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  • 1.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, M.c
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The emergence of socio-material assemblages in a university, company, and municipality collaboration2018In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL, Academic Conferences Limited , 2018, p. 506-512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report on an attempt to let students, companies, and organisations themselves discover the kinds of technologies that could be useful when co-producing knowledge in a Master’s-level course in innovation and design. Traditionally, and for various good reasons such as security and stability, universities have had certain online tools and systems for collaboration, while companies and municipalities have had others. These systems support internal communication within organisations but do not necessarily enhance communication with external contacts. This use of different systems creates barriers to the iterative, recurring, convenient, non-hierarchical, and open online collaboration needed in an innovative design process involving multiple stakeholders. During a ten-week Master’s-level course in innovation and design in 2016 and 2017 the 38 students divided into five project groups established contact with five companies and organisations and could choose their own online tools in dialogue with them. This paper presents the students’ and organisations’ emerging practices during the process based on observations and reflective evaluations conducted during and after the course. The results are discussed in light of how socio-material assemblages formed in this special setting and how the results might be used to improve the teaching of online literacy in design collaboration. The result indicates that for co-production of knowledge in innovation and design projects, three new social media literacies would be useful: meta communication, peak performance, and design awareness.

  • 2.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical interfaces for managing international manufacturing networks – A literature review2019In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bertoni, M.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Johansson, C.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Social Technologies for Cross-Functional Product Development: SWOT Analysis and Implications2012In: 45th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences HICSS, 2012, p. 3918-3927Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In product development, innovation means bringing together people with different expertise to develop breakthrough product and service offers. In spite of their potential, cross-functional efforts are not yet adequately supported from a knowledge perspective, asking for a more open and bottom-up approach for knowledge management. The paper aims to investigate how social technologies can enhance collaboration and knowledge sharing in complex, cross-functional and cross-organizational product development projects, highlighting the role of weak ties as enablers for more innovative design processes. Emerging from data collected in two case studies within the European aeronautical industry, it applies the Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) framework to highlight how wikis, blogs, forum or microblogs can shorten lead-time and increase the quality of early design decisions. Furthermore, it elaborates on how the design team can enhance its perception of the needs to be addressed and leverage its capability to develop solutions for the task at hand.

  • 4.
    Bertoni, M.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, A.
    Lund University.
    Eriksson, Å.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, T.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, O.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Sweden.
    Randall, D.
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    The Rise of Social Product Development2012In: International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, ISSN 1470-9503, E-ISSN 1741-5225, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 188-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the rising potential of social software to increase the knowledge management capabilities of virtual product development teams. It presents six fundamental transitions, elaborated from the empirical findings, which justify the rise of a more bottom-up, social creation and sharing of engineering knowledge in the virtual organisation. The study suggests that traditional engineering knowledge management approaches alone are not sufficient to support development activities in the virtual organisation, and that such teams display an increasing demand for social, comparatively lightweight and remixable platforms for bottom-up, social creation and sharing of knowledge.

  • 5.
    Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Leveraging Web 2.0 in New Product Development: Lessons Learned from a Cross-company Study2011In: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 548-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the application of Web 2.0 technologies to support product development efforts in a global, virtual and cross-functional setting. It analyses the dichotomy between the prevailing hierarchical structure of CAD/PLM/PDM systems and the principles of the Social Web under the light of the emerging product development trends. Further it introduces the concept of Engineering 2.0, intended as a more bottom up and lightweight knowledge sharing approach to support early stage design decisions within virtual and cross- functional product development teams. The lessons learned collected from a cross-company study highlight how to further developblogs, wikis, forums and tags for the benefit of new product development teams, highlighting opportunities, challenges and no-go areas.

  • 6.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Analyzing Lessons Learned Practice in Complex Product Development: Identification of problems and recommendations2014In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL, KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING (ICICKM 2014), 2014, p. 108-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, product development is becoming increasingly complex. The ability to continuously learn from experience and improve existing business processes has become an important competitive strategy for many manufacturing companies. Many companies have established lessons learned practices as one of the key knowledge management efforts for the collection and dissemination of experiences in the form of lessons learned. However, according to the literature, many companies are still struggling not only to collect meaningful lessons learned, but also to reuse them in new situations. To address these challenges, a research study has conducted in the aerospace industry in collaboration with two manufacturing companies. The purpose of the study is to identify the potential barriers in the lessons learned practices in the context of a complex product development. The study identified several challenges in the lessons learned practice, which were mainly grouped into ten barriers. Finally, based on barriers, this paper outlined relevant recommendations for improving lessons learned practices in complex product development environments.

  • 7.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Challenges in managing new product introduction projects: An explorative case study2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED Volume 2, 2017, Vol. 2, p. 259-268, article id DS87-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s market conditions, manufacturing companies are under pressure to constantly launch new products or product variants to the market in short intervals. The introduction of new products poses managerial implications on the existing production systems and their processes. Hence, the production organisations are increasingly involving in the new product development since the beginning of the project as they are responsible for the product introduction. The project management of new product introduction therefore play a significant role in the success of new product development. The existing literature covers a wide range of issues and disturbances in the product introduction process in different industries. However, little research exists on the management of new product introduction projects from a project management perspective especially from the viewpoint of production. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company, this paper examines the challenges in managing new product introduction projects in the production organisation. The study identified nine key challenges in the management of new product introduction projects which are associated to the resources, time-readiness and schedule, gated administration, ways of working, communication and time-sharing, learning, business case, co-ordination and alignment, and competences.

  • 8.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Clarifying Feedback Loops Concept for Innovation Capability: A Literature Review2017In: XXVIII ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Experience Feedback Loops in the New Product Introduction Process2017In: 24TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PRODUCTION RESEARCH (ICPR), 2017, p. 44-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior research has identified the reuse of past experiences as a remarkable driver for achieving high levels of maturity for both product and production systems. Many companies put effort into capitalizing their own experiences through nurturing feedback loops and learning mechanisms at different phases in the new product introduction process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops on the performance of new product development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the new product introduction process. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the new product introduction process. This study was performed in close collaboration with a global manufacturing company that is responsible for the introduction of new products. The paper presents the identified feedback loops and 

  • 10.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lessons Learned Practice in a Complex Production Environment2017In: Book Innovative Quality Improvement in Operations / [ed] Tomas Backström, Anders Fundin, Peter E. Johansson, Springer, 2017, p. 113-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lessons learned practice is a well-known method embraced by many companies to enhance continuous learning in their organizational routines and day-to-day work. The extant literature presents a mix of several lessons learned approaches from different disciplines. However, the approaches fail to address the distinct, complex settings that arise in production and operation phases. Thus, there is a need for rethinking of lessons learned practice in a complex production environments. Based on case studies in the aerospace industry, this chapter presents a new method for lessons learned practice, which includes a standard, seven-step representation format, together with guidelines, using videos as an enabling media. The seven-steps are: lesson learned statement, working context, task description, what went wrong or what went well, lesson learned, lesson learned measures, and applicability and delimitations. The method intends to capture a single learning point with specific recommendations, promoting process-based rather than a project-based learning. The chapter presents results from the validation of this new method in industrial setting. The validation shows that the method is beneficial in capturing lessons from skill-oriented activities in narrative form by visually showing and telling defects, problems, or improvements in complex products and associated actions in production or product support phases. The method supports exploration processes at the individual level with the creation of new knowledge with a richer context and so support exploitation processes and activities at the organizational level.

  • 11.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Managing Knowledge for Product-Service System Innovation: The Role of Web 2.0 Technologies2013In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the emerging service economy, many traditional product manufacturing companies are seeking innovative ways to do business, focusing on product-service combinations. Development of these offerings requires the integration of a wider span of expertise from several companies, which poses new challenges in the way knowledge is captured and managed. On the basis of a case study from an aerospace supply chain, this paper first identifies the limitations of current knowledge-management systems in such a setting and then discusses the role of Web 2.0 technologies in managing knowl-edge across the knowledge life cycle. Web 2.0 technologies have potential to lower barriers to leveraging informal and unstructured knowledge, contextualized information, networks of connections, and collective creation and maintenance of knowledge assets, which could complement current knowledge-management systems in multicompany product development efforts.

  • 12.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Managing product introduction projects in operations key challenges in heavy-duty vehicle industry2018In: Journal of Modern Project Management, ISSN 2317-3963, E-ISSN 1747-0862, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 108-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s market conditions, manufacturing companies are under pressure to constantly launch new products or product variants to the market in short intervals. Introduction of new products poses managerial implications on the existing production systems and their processes. Hence, the production and operations organisations are increasingly involved in the early phases of new product development since they are responsible for the product introduction and delivery. The project management of product introduction therefore play a significant role in the success of new product development. The existing literature covers a wide range of issues and disturbances in the product introduction process in different industries. However, little research exists on the management of product introduction from a project management perspective especially from the viewpoint of operations. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company in heavy-duty vehicle industry, this paper examines key challenges in managing product introduction projects in the production and operations organisation. The study identified seven types of projects in relation to the product introduction. Further, nine key challenges are identified in the management of product introduction projects which are associated to the resources, time-readiness and schedule, gated administration, ways of working, communication and time-sharing, learning, business cases, co-ordination and alignment, and competences. The study contributes new insights into project management in operations by deepening the understanding on the issues associated to the product introduction projects.

  • 13.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing Lessons Learned For Product-Service Innovation: A proposal for a new method2016In: 6th Global Innovation and Knowledge Academy Annual Conference GIKA'16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards a Methodology for Lessons Learned Practice in Complex Product Development2014In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 15TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (ECKM 2014), VOLS 1-3, 2014, p. 205-213Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations are becoming increasingly aware that learning from experience can be a source of competitive advantage. Many manufacturing companies are not immune to this realisation and have established lessons learned practices as one of the key knowledge management efforts for the collection and dissemination of experiences in the form of lessons learned. However, identifying relevant lessons learned from past product development projects and reusing them in new situations is still an enormous task for many companies. The paper uses qualitative data collected in three case studies in the aerospace industry to investigate the potential barriers in the current lessons learned practice in a complex product development setting, and to identify the end-user’s requirements for improving this practice. A new methodology for capturing lessons learned in complex product development is then presented and discussed. The methodology represents a lesson learned in a standardized format together with guidelines, using videos as enabling media. The format comprises a seven-step representation of lesson learned, consisting of: (1) lesson learned statement, (2) working context, (3) task description, (4) what went wrong or what went well, (5) lessons learned, (6) lessons learned measures, and (7) applicability and delimitations.

  • 15.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using Videos to Record Lessons Learned from Production and Aftermarket Phases: Preliminary results2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning from experience has turn out to be the basis of every manufacturing company in creating and sustaining competitive differentiation. Many companies put effort in capitalizing these experiences through continuous improvement initiatives such as lessons learned practices. However, these practices are failed to address the distinct, complex settings available in manufacturing, serial production, use, and maintenance phases, where much of the learning is still tacit nature and difficult to articulate. In this context, based on three case studies in the aerospace industry, the author previously proposed a lesson learned methodology using videos as an enabling media. This paper presents some preliminary results based on the validation activities performed in the aero-engine component manufacturing company.

  • 16.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Söderlund, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Experience Reuse in Production Maintenance: Practices and Challenges2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reuse of experiences gained in maintenance activities is important issue in maintenance management. Efficient experience reuse would improve next interventions, reduce the mistakes and potentially contribute to time and cost savings. However, few studies focus on how maintenance workforce reuses past experiences in the problem- solving phases of the maintenance work. The purpose of this study is therefore to examine the experience reuse process in production maintenance in order to identify reuse practices and its challenges. Based on a case study, this paper presents the observed work practices and its challenges for collecting and reusing experiences in production maintenance. Further, potential improvement suggestions are proposed to overcome these challenges.

  • 17.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ericson, Å.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Isaksson, O.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Knowledge-Sharing Network for Product-Service System Development: Is it atypical?2012In: The Philosopher's Stone for Sustainability: Proceedings of the 4th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Tokyo, Japan, November 8th - 9th, 2012, Tokyo, Japan: Springer , 2012, p. 109-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The move towards offering Product-Service Systems (PSS) requires the involvement of stakeholders from different companies, possessing knowledge about the different product lifecycle phases. This setting poses unique challenges for traditional product manufacturers, which need to rearrange transaction-based relationships into long-term relationships of co-development. Knowledge sharing across organizational boundaries is, therefore, considered as a key enabler for the development of profitable PSS. The paper is based on a social network tie perspective, and its purpose is to describe and exemplify knowledge-sharing network for PSS development—in order to describe the impact of the shift toward PSS development on companies’ relationships and responsibilities. Based on the findings from two research projects involving various partners from the aerospace industry, the paper concludes that the development of profitable PSS relies on the development of strong and weak ties across the supply network. Finally, a five stages model of the evolution of tie strength is proposed for classifying relationships within the PSS knowledge-sharing network.

  • 18.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Parida, A.
    Luleå University of Technology,.
    Johansson, C.
    Bertoni, M.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Performance Measurement Framework for Product–Service Systems Development: A Balanced Scorecard Approach2013In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 146-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper proposes a framework for analysing the performances of product-service systems (PSSs) development processes using a balanced scorecard (BSC) as an instrument to guide the implementation and the evaluation of new methods and tools. Emerging from a case study in the aerospace industry, the paper discusses the main challenges in PSS development and proposes a performance measurement framework for PSS development based on multi-criteria indicators. Finally, the benefits of a framework for PSS development performance measurement are discussed.

  • 19.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Engineering 2.0: leveraging a bottom-up and lightweight knowledge sharing approach in cross-functional product development teams2010In: Proceedings of I-KNOW 2010: 10th International Conference on Knowledge Management and Knowledge Technologies, Graz, Austria, 2010, p. 105-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the application of Web 2.0 technologies in the engineering product development domain. Growing on data collected from a number of industrial development projects, related to several different products in various industry segments, the paper analyses the dichotomy between the prevailing hierarchical structure of CAD/PLM/PDM systems and the emerging principles of the Social Web, e.g. the self-organization of its users. It introduces the concept of Engineering 2.0, intended as a more bottom up and lightweight knowledge sharing approach supporting early stage design decisions within cross-functional product development teams. A set of scenarios related, for instance, to the application of blogs, wikis, forums and tags in the engineering domain are eventually presented, highlighting opportunities, challenges and no-go areas.

  • 20.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Johansson, C.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Experience Feedback Using Social Media: From the Product Lifecycle Phases to the Design Practices2013In: Product-Service Integration for Sustainable Solutions: Proceedings of the 5th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Bochum, Germany, March 14th - 15th, 2013 / [ed] Horst Meier, Bochum, Germany: Lecture Notes in Production Engineering. Springer, Berlin. , 2013, p. 459-471Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies have been using lessons learned practices as one of their key knowledge management initiatives to capitalize on past experiences. For product development companies, learning from product lifecycle phases gives a true competitive advantage to improve the next generation of products. However, companies are still struggling in capturing and sharing lessons learned and applying them in new situations. Based on this consideration, the paper proposes a video-based approach–using social media technologies–as a way to leverage continuous capturing and sharing lessons learned from product lifecycle phases to design practices. The paper presents the findings of a case study within the aerospace industry, which investigates the current industrial practices with regard to experience feedback, and illustrates the implementation of a video-based approach. Further, the conceptual mock-up of video-based lessons learned sharing portal and its social platform that are aimed to support the design practices are illustrated.

  • 21.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Exploring Lightweight Knowledge Sharing Technologies for Functional Product Development2010In: 2nd CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product Service Systems IPS2'10, Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010, p. 347-355Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moving away from offering just physical artifacts to becoming providers of functional products, or Product-Service Systems (PSS), implies inevitable changes in the way engineering knowledge is identified and shared in a cross company environment. Capturing downstream knowledge assets and making them available to cross-functional teams becomes crucial to approach ill-defined problems in PSS design. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Web 2.0-based knowledge sharing technologies may be used to support the design of functional products. The article, drawing on data from several industrial development projects in various segments, introduces the concept of “lightweight technologies” as a means to lower the threshold related to the sharing of downstream engineering knowledge assets. The paper points out potential benefits and challenges related to the adoption of a lightweight approach and provides examples of how tools like wikis, blogs or social bookmarking may be used to support functional product engineers.

  • 22.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Emmanuel-Ebikake, O.
    Edge Hill University, United Kingdom.
    Leoni, L.
    Tor Vergata University of Rome, Italy.
    Servati, M.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Intra-firm and inter-firm challenges in servitization ecosystem: Experiences from five product-centric firms in different industries2019In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Cambridge University Press , 2019, p. 3071-3080Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the challenges in the servitization journey of product-centric firms from an ecosystem perspective, considering both intra-firm and inter-firm levels. Prior research addresses the challenges of servitization in many sectors from different perspectives. However, the majority of studies primarily focus on the provider of an offering. There is a lack of in-depth studies on analysing servitization challenges from the broader set of network actors including customers, suppliers, and sub-suppliers at the intra-firm and inter-firm levels. A multiple case study method was used to analyse five product-centric firms from different industries that were engaged in servitization. At intra-firm level, our analysis shows that 'coordination' is a major challenge for the provider, supplier, and sub-suppliers, and that 'uncertainty' and 'risk' is a major challenge for the provider, customer, and supplier. At inter-firm level, 'partnership management' found to be a most significant challenge for provider, customer, supplier, and sub-suppliers. The study contributes to the discussion of the relational view approach for servitization research.

  • 23.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Pelle
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Dalarna Univ, Dalarna, Sweden.
    The Influence of Different Media Instructions on Solving a Procedural Task2015In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Volume 11, Issue DS 80-11, 2015, p. 173-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of different forms of media instructions on the process and outcomes of completing a specific procedural task. The experiment was conducted with four student groups having an education in the area of Information Design. In the experiment four media instructions – text only, text plus drawings, a series of pictures and video with narration – were considered. The findings show that the type of media has an influence on the ability to solve a procedural task and on group interaction and the way groups solve a task. Compared with the other instructions, video instruction triggered a different interaction and behavioural pattern during assembly. Participants considered both video and picture instructions as more usable in terms of facilitating the ability to understand, select and apply possible solutions to a given task. However, the video medium showed little influence on dialogue in the group during assembly. The instructions, such as text plus drawings, pictures and video had a similar influence on task performance times, whereas text instructions took three times longer to implement than other instructions.

  • 24.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, M.
    Jönköping University.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson, N.
    Bombardier Transportation, Västerås, Sweden.
    Löv, R.
    Volvo CE Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 169-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the industrialization process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops for both product and production systems development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the industrialization process. Based on a case study at a railway component manufacturing company, the paper presents the identified feedback loops and mechanisms that are working well and not working well within the industrialization process. Further, it explains a practical method to improve the current or establish new feedback loops. The paper contributes to the discussion on the application of lean and agile approaches to the industrialization process where feedback loops act as enablers.

  • 25.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, C.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Isaaksson, O.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Sweden.
    Capturing and Sharing Lessons Learned across Boundaries: A Video-based Approach2012In: ECIS 2012 - Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Information Systems, Barcelona, Spain: AIS Electronic Library (AISeL) , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of emerging product development trends, such as Product-Service Systems, manufacturing organizations are obliged to collaborate across functional and organizational borders. Hence, companies are increasingly investigating how to leverage knowledge management practices to enhance their dynamic learning capabilities to achieve continuous process improvements. Many researchers assert that lessons learned practices are possible ways for organizational learning, which allows for continuous capturing and sharing of experiential knowledge across boundaries in order to learn both from mistakes and successes. However, many organizations fall short in capturing and sharing lessons from projects and applying them in new situations. The purpose of this paper is to propose a video-based approach and related guidelines for capturing and sharing lessons learned in a dynamic manner across functional and organizational boundaries. Based on laboratory experiments as well as validation activities conducted in collaboration with an aerospace manufacturer, this paper compares the video-based approach with a more traditional text-based approach of documenting lessons learned from projects. The paper describes the results of testing activities conducted with a video-based lessons learned prototype and the authors reflect on its implications for design practice management in the aerospace industry.

  • 26.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, L.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Larsson, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Knowledge Sharing Across Boundaries: Web 2.0 and Product-Service System Development2011In: 3rd International Conference on Research into Design ICoRD'11, Bangalore, India, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest among product development organizations to capitalize on engineering knowledge as their core competitive advantage for innovation. Capturing, storing, retrieval, sharing and reusing of engineering knowledge from a wide range of enterprise memory systems have become crucial activities of knowledge management practice in competitive organizations. In light of a changing and dynamic enterprise definition, including a move towards Product-Service System (PSS) development, this paper discusses some of the limitations of current enterprise systems in reusing engineering knowledge across functional and corporate boundaries. Further, the paper illustrates how Web 2.0-based collaborative technologies can leverage cross-functional knowledge for new PSS development projects through an open, bottom-up, and collective sense-making approach to knowledge management.

  • 27.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing Experience Feedback Loops for Continuous Innovation2015In: 16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R & D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 29.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Parida, Aditya
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Understanding Knowledge Reuse Process: A case study in a production maintenance organizationIn: 4th International Conference on Business Intelligence, Analytics and Knowledge Management BIAKMConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many firms constantly strive for reusing existing knowledge to be better at learning from their mistakes and successes. Despite its importance, firms are yet to see the benefits from such initiatives, especially at the individual level. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to investigate and discuss the individual knowledge reuse process in a large manufacturing company. Based on a case study in a production maintenance organization, the paper describes different steps of knowledge reuse process. Further, several issues related to different stages of knowledge reuse process are discussed. Finally, the paper summarizes the contributions and concludes with the future research directions.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Teachers' Role in Blended Learning: The Emperor's new Clothes?2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 16TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON E-LEARNING (ECEL 2017) / [ed] Mesquita, A Peres, P, ACAD CONFERENCES LTD , 2017, p. 163-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a theoretical perspective, this paper problematizes the future role of teachers in higher education, especially in the Swedish context, placing opportunities and raised challenges by blended learning in a historical context of distance education. Distance education was introduced in the late 19th century and has been offered by two main actors in Sweden: the correspondence school Hermods and universities. It has been viewed as a part of life-long learning, a concept introduced in the 1960s. The correspondence schools offered elementary education courses, and in-service training for various professions, while universities largely focused on higher education but also provided education or training commissioned by other organizations. Recently, the teaching requirements and role of the teacher in distance education have changed dramatically, from formulating exercises and commenting on students' work to giving videotaped lectures in English for an open audience. However, there is still a lack of appropriate guidance for teachers on effective pedagogical practice in the new settings. Specifically, there is an increasing need to support teachers in designing and creating effective videotaped lectures that are accessible for a dispersed audience. The TED talks seem to provide a role model for performance as a lecturer, but the average teacher hardly has time to both prepare regular face-to-face lectures and distance lectures, e.g. extensively rehearse before recording. The paper discusses how the challenges of future roles of teachers can be met when lecturing in front of a camera.

  • 31.
    Johansson, C.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Frostevarg, J.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Kaplan, A.F.H
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Bertoni, M.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Enhancing intra-cognitive communication between engineering designers and operators: A case study in the laser welding industry2012In: 3rd IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Infocommunications CogInfo, 2012, p. 493-497Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In manufacturing, metal parts can be joined using a laser as a welding tool, i.e. laser welding. Despite huge amount of research over the years, the process is neither sufficiently understood nor mathematically predictable. This study aims to holistically analyze the knowledge management issues occurring in laser welding. Emerging from observations and semi-structured interviews from industry and academy, the complexity and the criticalities of the process as well as the current knowledge transfers is explained and analyzed, using a knowledge lifecycle framework as a reference. Besides enhanced awareness of the limiting issues, information and knowledge visualization, e.g. knowledge maps, is identified as a key for progress in the community. The Matrix Flow Chart is suggested as an alternative descaled map of process changes.

  • 32.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Value logics for service innovation: practice-driven implications for service-dominant logic2018In: Service Business: An International Journal, ISSN 1862-8516, E-ISSN 1862-8508, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 457-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service-dominant logic (SDL) provides a conceptual understanding of and widens the view on value creation in service innovation for product-centric companies. However, empirical research linking SDL and service innovation is still limited albeit expanding. This study provides insights beyond existing discussions on product and service dimensions using the theoretical lens of the value logic perspective. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to examine how value can be understood, targeted, and created in the pursuit of service innovation by product-centric manufacturing companies. Building on a previous investigation of two multinational product-centric manufacturing companies, this paper identifies and develops a theoretical model to describe the space shift in service innovation with four different kinds of value logics, namely, product-based value logic, service-based value logic, virtual-based value logic, and systemic-based value logic. Using a digitalization-driven new service innovation, namely the My Control System, which is a web-based service delivery platform, this paper describes space shifts to enhance value through four value logics as efforts. Further, challenges associated with different value logics are described in terms of complexity traps and service gaps. The study also contributes to bridging the gap between SDL theory and practice by developing a midrange theoretical model for value creation as a specification and amendment to SDL that supports SDL-guided service innovation and servitization in practice.

  • 33.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hazy, James K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Midgley, Gerald
    Center for Systems Studies, University of Hull, UK.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Value driven innovation in industrial companies: A complexity approach2015In: The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to contribute to the development of an interactive, systemic and ecosystem view of innovation and its management. This emerging interactive and systematic view of innovation labeled as Value Driven Innovation in this research, where enhanced symbiotic value is continuously discovered and realized in interactive processes among stakeholders such as customers, providers, suppliers and related partners. The main outcome of the research is a complexity conceptualization of value driven innovation, which synthesizes and extends to value-driven innovation management recent developments in complexity science. In addition, the findings may provide useful tools to clarify and enhance the manageability of innovation in the face of complexity, uncertainty and unpredictability.

  • 34.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    et al.
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Social Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schultheiss, Rakel
    Linnaeus Univ, Växjö, Sweden..
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kalmer, Nicolas Philipp
    Linnaeus Univ, Växjö, Sweden..
    Rad, Fakhreddin F.
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Social Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    User self-disclosure on social network sites: A cross-cultural study on Facebook's privacy concepts2020In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 112, p. 531-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates a cross-cultural comparison between Germany and Norway regarding users' self-disclosure of personal information on social network sites (SNSs). More specifically, the study considers three antecedents of privacy, namely concerns, attitudes, and intentions, and evaluates their potential effects on self-disclosure, considering Facebook as the SNS of choice. The study employs a deductive research approach and develops a conceptual model based on the theoretical analysis. Data is collected via an online survey of users in Germany and Norway. The results show that privacy intention is the only antecedent that has a significant direct influence on users' self-disclosure of information. By contrast, neither privacy concerns nor privacy attitude have a statistically significant influence on self-disclosure. Additionally, there are statistically significant differences between the German and Norwegian samples in privacy concepts and reported self-disclosure. The results support the creation of more transparent privacy policies by SNS providers to improve targeted marketing.

  • 35.
    Wallin, Johann
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Thompson, Anthony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Developing PSS concepts from traditional product sales situation: The use of business model canvas2013In: Product-Service Integration for Sustainable Solutions: Proceedings of the 5th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Bochum, Germany, March 14th - 15th, 2013, Bochum, Germany: Lecture Notes in Production Engineering. Springer, Berlin. , 2013, p. 263-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been growing interest in utilizing a product service system (PSS) approach when developing products and services in order to arrive at a business model focused on selling function or availability instead of physical products. However, the complex nature of PSS development has left many manufacturers still struggling to arrive at PSS concepts out of their traditional product sales situation in early design phases. The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach using the Business Model Canvas which could help manufacturers in the transition towards PSS development by articulating key business elements in developing and analyzing PSS concepts evolving from their traditional product sales situation. The paper presents preliminary findings from the aerospace industry and discusses the evolution of key business elements for PSS concepts from traditional product sales situation using the Business Model Canvas. Finally, the potential benefits of using the Business Model Canvas in a PSS context are discussed.

  • 36.
    Wallin, Johanna
    et al.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Sweden.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Enabling Organizational Changes for Development of Product-Service System Offers2013In: International Conference on Engineering Design 2013 ICED13, Seoul, Korea, Dem. Republic of, 2013, p. 11-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry is going through a transition from developing of products to the provision of product-service systems (PSS). Earlier research has identified different types of PSS offers, from product offers that include services as “add-on”, to the sale of services that include tangible goods as “add-on”. This paper addresses what consequences this has on manufacturing organizations undergoing PSS transition. The purpose of the paper is to clarify key success factors for organizational changes needed in the transition process of developing different types of PSS offers. The results are based on a case study of a manufacturer in the aerospace domain; the analysis approached organizational changes from organizational theory perspective. The study identified four key areas that need to be considered in the organizational transformation to PSS development: Business strategy and decision-making, Internal organizational structure, Team composition, and External networks and customer relationship. Based on the analysis of empirical data from these four areas, the paper discusses the successful organizational changes that are required in the transition towards PSS development.

1 - 36 of 36
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