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  • 51.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Global Industrial Development, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hansson, L.
    Scania CV AB, Global Industrial Development, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Method for Design of Human-industrial Robot Collaboration Workstations2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to fully utilise a 3D simulation software capable of evaluating hand-guided human-industrial robot collaborative (HIRC) work tasks, there is a need of a HIRC design process for early production development stages. This paper proposes a HIRC design method that uses the possibilities of the demonstrator software in the HIRC workstation design process. The method is based on Pahl and Beitz's engineering design method; it interprets all their phases and activities into HIRC design-specific ones.

  • 52.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jiménez Sánchez, Juan Luis
    Scania CV AB.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Skövde University, School of Engineering .
    Design Method of Human–Industrial Robot Collaborative Workstation with industrial ApplicationIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Reddy Vemula, Bhanoday
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human - Industrial Robot Collaboration: Application of Simulation Software for Workstation Optimisation2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Reddy Vemula, Bhanoday
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human Industrial Robot Collaboration – Optimisation of Handover Position2015In: 2015 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Hamburg, Germany, September 28 - October 02, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The simulation possibilities of Human Industrial Robot Collaboration (HIRC) are limited in commercial software and published research. In order to meet this a demonstrator software has been developed. This paper presents the combination of the quantitative output from the software (measuring operation time and biomechanical load) together with optimisation techniques used to design the optimal HIRC workstation. An industrial case is used as an example where the optimal geometric handover position between robot and human is found. From the simulation software metamodels were created in order to represent the investigated workstation. The model was used in a multi-objective optimisation problem and resulted in a trade-off chart between operation time and biomechanical load. The result shows one example of the possibilities to combine the quantitative results from the simulation with optimisation in order to get the best solution to a HIRC design problem.

  • 55.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Global Ind Dev, S-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Reddy Vemula, Bhanoday
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Global Ind Dev, S-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.;Univ Skovde, Sch Engn Sci, S-54128 Skovde, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fagerström, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Simulation methodology for performance and safety evaluation of human-industrial robot collaboration workstation design2019In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT ROBOTICS AND APPLICATIONS, ISSN 2366-5971, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 269-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong interest in the scope of human-industrial robot collaboration (HIRC) in manufacturing industry for greater flexibility and productivity. However, HIRC in manufacturing is still in its infancy; industrial practitioners have many apprehensions and uncertainties concerning the system's performance and human operators' safety. Therefore, there is a need for investigations into design processes and methods to make sure the designed HIRC workstations successfully meet design guidelines on system performance, human safety and ergonomics for practical industrial applications. This research proposes a HIRC workstation design process. The novelty of this design process is the methodology to evaluate the HIRC workstation design alternatives by considering both performance and safety characteristics through computer-based simulations. As a proof of concept, the proposed HIRC design process is applied on an industrial manufacturing case from a heavy-vehicle manufacturing company.

  • 56.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Industrial Path Solutions Sweden AB.
    Verification of manikin motions in human-industrial robot collaborative simulationsIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Rastegari, Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    CONDITION BASED MAINTENANCE IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES: INTRODUCING CURRENT INDUSTRIAL PRACTICE AND CHALLENGES2013In: 22nd International Conference on Production Research, ICPR 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an introductory review of CBM practice applied in manufacturing industry, focusing the technical constituents within condition monitoring. The empirical base for the study is a case study of two major manufacturing sites in Sweden, complemented with a brief benchmark of data from two reference manufacturing sites from France and Brazil. The data from the main studies were collected by interviews and document analysis. The result indicates that there is a wide range within current practice of applying CBM. The implementations are dependent on process type (machining, assembly or heat treatment) and product type. By analysing the empirical data, gaps and challenges for implementing CBM in industry are presented, primarily focusing condition monitoring within manufacturing industry. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future trends and research areas, needed to increase the industrial use of CBM.

  • 58.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Risk Analysis in Manufacturing Footprint Decisions2013In: International Conference on Manufacturing Research: International Conference on Manufacturing Research 2013, Cranfield University Press , 2013, p. 495-500Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key aspect in the manufacturing footprint analysis is the risk and sensitivity analysis of critical parameters. In order to contribute to efficient industrial methods and tools for making well-founded strategic decisions regarding manufacturing footprint this paper aims to describe the main risks that need to be considered while locating manufacturing activities, and what risk mitigation techniques and strategies that are proper in order to deal with these risks. It is also proposed how the risk analysis should be included in the manufacturing location decision process.

  • 59.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Realising dynamic abilities in a measurement system: A participatory case study2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally accepted by academics and practitioners alike that production performancemeasures ought to be derived from the strategy of a company. However, unlike the context that measurement systems operate in, they appear to be static. Hence, companies often fail to continuously reflect the dynamic business environment and their new priorities in their performance measurement systems. In the rapidly changing environment of today the development, implementation and use of adequate performance measurement frameworks are some of the major challenges confronting organisations and are also significant success factors. The purpose of this paper is to present key contributing factors in creating dynamic abilities in a production performance measurement system. The factors are derived by a literature study, a case and by contrasting the case to the literature. The case presented is a participatory study that stretches over 10 months and follows a project leader with the task of re-designing and implementing a support structure for a production performance measurement system. Following the introduction, the paper is divided into three sections: the literature review, the case study presentation and finally a discussion regarding what factors amplify and inhibit the dynamics in the support structure of a performance measurement system. The conclusion derived is that four additional factors have emerged as enablers for a dynamic

  • 60.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Performance measure review practice in heavy automotive industry – a dual perspective case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of performance measurement and management (PMM) it is well-established that more research is needed into understanding how change is managed in performance measures (PM) (Eccles, 1991; Ghalayini and Noble, 1996; Neely, 1999; Kennerley and Neely, 2002; Kennerley and Neely, 2003; Melnyk et al., 2004; Neely 2005; Bourne, 2008). Even though academics have risen to the challenge by proposing several performance measurement frameworks (Bititci et al., 2000; Bourne et al., 2000; Najmi et al., 2005; Kennerley et al., 2003) two shortcomings prevail in the contemporary thereotical base. Firstly, little research has focused on the applied practices of organisations in the industry for managing change. Secondly, the research available today takes on a management perspective rather than an organisation-wide equivalent. This has been acknowledged by Bourne (2008) that underlines the need for more collaborative research into understanding how organisations manage change in PM in practice. With these deficiencies in mind, the purpose of this paper is firstly to outline the PM review practice of an organisation within the heavy automotive industry from two perspectives, top-management and operational, and secondly to contrast the practice to theory. In order to do this, two case studies at one case company have been executed, one from each perspective. The heavy automotive industry, defined in this paper as the industry for buses, trucks, and construction equipment, is both interesting and appropriate to study in relation to the outlined phenomenon.

  • 61.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Performance measurement review practices: a dual perspective case study2013In: Conference on performance measurement and management control, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Dynamic abilities in performance measurement system: a case study on practice and strategies2011In: Book of abstracts, 18th International Annual EurOMA Conference, Exploring interfaces, 2011, p. 133-133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyse the key factors for creating a dynamic ability in the performance measurement system, in order to manage the operations/strategy interface. A case study was conducted at a heavy vehicle manufacturing site with three data collection components: analysis of archival data, direct observations and an interview study. The study details five factors that need to be fulfilled in order to realise dynamic abilities in a PMS: review process, IT system, management, culture and employee involvement. Moreover, in order to realise the factors in practice the PMS design and context need to be considered.

  • 63.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    From Metrics to Process: Towards a Dynamic and Flexible Performance Measurement System for Manufacturing Systems2009In: Proceedings of third swedish production symposium / [ed] B-G Rosén, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance measurement systems are challenged by today’s rapidly changing and highly competitive markets. Measures and management of these systems often fail to continuously reflect the dynamic business environment. This purpose of this paper is to discuss how to achieve a dynamic and flexible performance measurement system applicable for manufacturing sites. The analysis is based on a literature review on major performance measurement schemes, as well as a problem identified in industry. The paper introduces an industrial case where the current measurement at Operations is briefly evaluated and put in relation to the findings made in the literature study. The industrial challenges and possibilities are set as one basis for a proposed future structure. Important aspects on unctionalities/abilities for future research as well as development at the case company when choosing indicators and their implementation are discussed.

  • 64.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Aligning Dynamic Performance Measures2010In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 6TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE, Wroclaw, Poland, 2010, p. 339-349Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few existing performance measurement systems emphasis the need for a performance management process, instead management is perceived as a once-off initial occurrence. Therefore performance measures and management of these measurement systems often fail to continuously reflect the current dynamic business environment. This creates a paradox with organisations using performance metrics that are obsolete or redundant due to the unfamiliarity of changing them. Few researchers have tried to answer the question how performance measures evolve and act in their milieus after the implementation phase. The need for a dynamic approach to performance measurement is not widely addressed and viable processes which can be used by management teams in a consistent manner are inquired. Corporations need tools to integrate and update performance measurement systems rationally and systematically as context and opportunities change. Without a nurturing infrastructure a performance measurement system can not stay viable. Without a process keeping the performance measurement system viable measuring becomes valueless and even destructive. As it is generally accepted both in academia and practice that business strategy is dynamic and ever changing in nature a consensus is growing that performance measurement systems must be accounted for when direction changes. The purpose of this paper is twofold, firstly to primary single out and present theoretically crucial characteristics for dynamic and flexible performance measurement systems. Secondly, to investigate to what extent the theoretical parameters are applied in practice. The article is divided into three parts; firstly, the literature within the field of performance measurement systems is filtrated to identify theoretically crucial factors for a dynamic performance measurement system. Secondly, the theoretical factors are observed in practice through two case studies and a cross-case analysis. Finally, the article is rounded up with a discussion over why organisations should focus on alignment of measures and objectives as a first step in their pursuit of dynamic measurement systems.

  • 65.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The effect of environmental and economic perception on industrial waste management2014In: 1st International EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum EurOMA.Sus, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essence of industrial waste management is evaluated in term of economy and resource efficiency. With optimal waste management system companies are able to make a correct assessment when balancing the economic benefits and environmental risks. However, the economic and environmental benefits need to be known and understood to allow individuals making correct waste management decisions. In this study the ability of individuals to assess the economic and environmental impact of ten common waste fractions in manufacturing was examined. These results can be used to direct educational efforts to increase industrial waste management efficiency and enhance recyclability.

  • 66.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency measurement: Swedish case studies2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

  • 67.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Industrial waste management within manufacturing: a comparative study of tools, policies, visions and concepts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial waste is a key factor when assessing the sustainability of a manufacturing process or company. A multitude of visions, concepts, tools, and policies are used both academically and industrially to improve the environmental effect of manufacturing; a majority of these approaches have a direct bearing on industrial waste. The identified approaches have in this paper been categorised according to application area, goals, organisational entity, life cycle phase, and waste hierarchy stage; the approaches have also been assessed according to academic prevalence, semantic aspects, and overlaps. In many cases the waste management approaches have similar goals and approaches, which cause confusion and disorientation for companies aiming to synthesise their management systems to fit their waste management strategy. Thus, a study was performed on how waste management approaches can be integrated to reach the vision of zero waste in manufacturing.

  • 68.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material Efficiency Measurement: Empirical Investigation of Manufacturing Industry2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 8, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving material efficiency contributes to reduce the volume of industrial waste as well as resource consumption. However, less has been published addressing on what to measure for material efficiency in a manufacturing company. This paper presents the current practice of material efficiency performance indicators in a manufacturing context through a bottom-up approach. In addition to literature review, the empirical data was collected via a multiple case study at seven global manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The results show that existing material efficiency indicators are limited and are mainly measured as a cost or quality parameter rather than environment. The limited number of measurements relates to the fact that material efficiency is not considered as a central business in manufacturing companies and is managed by environmental department with limited correlation to operation. Additionally, these measurements do not aim to reduce waste volume or improve homogeneity of generated waste.

  • 69.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sjödin, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A foresight study on future trends influencing material consumption and waste generation in production2014In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation / [ed] F. Frank Chen, San Antonio, Texas, United States: DEStech Publications, Inc. , 2014, p. 249-257Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are boundless upcoming factors that influence future of material waste in production. This broad range of factors needs to be scanned, categorized and analyzed in a structured way. This paper by a foresight study, aims to give an insight and increase awareness about external macro-level future trends concerning raw material consumption and waste generation in production. A limited pilot study indicated that technological forecasting and some reaction upon obvious trends are being taken, although in an ad hoc manner and without structured tools. However, political influences, economic visions and social-cultural shifts were seldom or never discussed. External macro trends and tendencies were examined through PEST analysis to identify potentials and opportunities influencing strategic decisions and innovation initiatives. It is vital to understand the whole picture of possible changes and not only considering the technological trends, but also other relevant development areas that might affect production in different ways.

  • 70.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Supply chain risks: an automotive case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using the Green Performance Map: towards the next step in material efficiency measurement2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using the Green Performance Map: towards material efficiency measurementIn: Sustainable Operations Management / [ed] Luitzen De Boer and Poul Houman Andersen, UK: Palgrave MacmillanChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Importance of higher waste segregation for improving material efficiency.• Presentation of barriers towards improved material efficiency in a new categorization.• Material efficiency barriers are mainly internal.• Lack of material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies.

  • 74.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategies2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 127, p. 438-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved material efficiency is a key to improve the circular economy and capturing value in industry. Material efficiency reduces the generation of industrial waste, the extraction and consumption of resources, and energy demands and carbon emissions. However, material efficiency in the manufacturing sector, as a means of improving the recyclability, reusability, reduction and prevention of industrial waste, is little understood. This study aims to investigate, on a micro-level, further material efficiency improvement opportunities, barriers and strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Sweden, focusing on increasing waste segregation into high quality circulated raw material. Improvement opportunities at large global manufacturing companies are investigated; barriers hindering material efficiency improvement are identified and categorized at two levels; and strategies that have been deployed at manufacturing companies are reviewed. Empirical findings reveal (1) further potential for improving material efficiency through higher segregation of residual material from mixed and low quality fractions (on average, 26% of the content of combustible waste, in weight, was plastics; 8% and 6% were paper and cardboard, respectively); (2) the most influential barriers are within budgetary, information, management, employee, engineering, and communication clusters; (3) a lack of actual material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies. According to our analysis, the majority of barriers are internal and originate within the manufacturing companies, therefore they can be managed (and eradicated if possible) with sufficient resources in terms of man hours, education and investment, better operational and environmental (waste) management, better internal communication and information sharing, and deployment of material efficiency strategies.

  • 75.
    Sörensen, Kim
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Towards a manufacturing strategy supporting make or buy decisions and a global manufacturing structure2009In: Swedish Production Symposium 2009, Göteborg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    A Method for Modelling and Evaluation of Assembly Systems: a Way to Concurrent Engineering1998In: ISATA’98, International Symposium on Automotive Technology and Automation, Dusseldorf , 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Assembly System Design – an immature field of practice?2000In: Delft Workshop on Assembly Automation, Delft University of Technology, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Drivers for life cycle perspectives in Product Realization2012In: Acta Technica Corviniensis : Bulletin of Engineering, ISSN 2067-3809, Vol. 5, p. 81-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Early Performance Assessment in Design of Car Assembly Systems2000In: 33rd CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems, Stockholm, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Modelling and Evaluation of Large Assembly Systems: An Approach to a Support Tool for Conceptual Design1998In: CESA’98, IMACS/IEEE international multiconference on Computational Engineering in Systems Applications, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The impact of legacy in production system design2012In: Annals of Faculty Engineering Hunedoara : International Journal of Engineering, ISSN 1584-2665, Vol. 10, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, T.
    Volvo Car Corporation, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Broman, M.
    Swedish Institute of Prod. Eng. Res., Stockholm, Sweden .
    A note on the specification of assembly systems2000In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, Vol. 38, no 16, p. 3997-4002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the characteristics and cost of any technical system are highly influenced by the early design phases, little focus has been on thestructure and use of the specification in manufacturing system design, in this paper exemplified by assembly systems for large, high-volume products. This paper proposes a framework for elaborating such specifications. The framework is based on a division in qualifying and winning criteria, and is structured into four classes: functional requirements; internal design constraints; external design constraints; and winning criteria. Defining the specification by these terms is justified and explained by comparing standard mathematical formulation for this kind of problem to theframework. Future research efforts are pointed out where the framework is used throughout the development project for goal-focus, as thespecification is used and refined in an iterative manner.

  • 83.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sustainable Manufacturing - Challenges and Possibilities for Research and Industry from a Swedish perspective2008In: The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Reducing environmental impact from manufacturing – an industrial case study2011In: Journal of Production Research & Management, ISSN 2249-4766, Vol. 1, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for technologies and strategies that will reduce environmental impact from manufacturing globally. This paper presents an industrial case study with three objects of study where manufacturing of ‘green’ products are analysed and solutions are presented on reducing environmental impact from manufacturing. The objects represent a conceptual product, a manufacturing ready product and an update of an existing product. The case study also builds the base for presenting a draft analysis scheme for designing a more environmentally sustainable production system. The examples and the proposed analysis scheme are discussed in the context of designing a socially, economically and environmentally sustainable production system.

  • 85.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Reducing Environmental Impact from Manufacturing: Three Industrial Cases for the Manufacturing of ‘Green’ Products2009In: 42nd CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Grenoble, France, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a gigantic need for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO2 emissions globally. This paper presents three industrial cases in Sweden where manufacturing of ‘green’ products are analysed and solutions are presented where environmental impact from manufacturing is reduced. The cases represent a conceptual product, a manufacturing ready product and an update of an existing product. The cases also build the base for presenting a draft analysis scheme for designing a more environmentally sustainable production system. The cases and the proposed analysis scheme are discussed in the context of designing a socially, economically and environmentally sustainable production system.

  • 86.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lundin, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Södergren, B.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Automation and flexibility: An apparent or real dilemma?2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, vol. 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 35-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are trade-offs between cost and capabilities throughout specification, implementation and operation of automated solutions in manufacturing companies. This chapter describes four identified dilemmas or contradictions while balancing flexibility to automation, based on an empirical study with interviews and workshop in five internationally competitive manufacturing companies. The study generated insights on experienced challenges while implementing automated solutions in manufacturing, and these apparent conflicts between automated solutions and maintaining a high operational flexibility need to be managed as manufacturing automation will continue to increase on all levels. 

  • 87.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lundin, Mats
    Swerea IVF Mölndal, Sweden .
    Södergren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Automation and Flexibility: Exploring Contradictions in Manufacturing Operations2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Groth, Margareta
    Conditions for Innovation: Insights from a multi-case study2011In: Journal of Technology Management & Innovation, ISSN 0718-2724, E-ISSN 0718-2724, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 203-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is based on a multiple-case study of conditions for product-based innovations. Key actors from 18 cases were interviewed concerning the specific character of the innovation process, its parts and phases, with a focus on the realization phase. The cases are analyzed and discussed on the basis of an experience-based framework with seven specific components. In addition, the data are illustrated and discussed by more general themes of successful and unsuccessful innovation processes. It is concluded that the components of the used framework are necessary but individually not sufficient to maintain a continuous friction-free innovation process. The dynamics of the innovation processes are well illustrated by the framework.

  • 89.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Romvall, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Competitiveness by integrating the green perspective in production: A review presenting challenges for research and industry2010In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM 2010), 2010, p. 318-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concern has risen as an important topic in management research as well as within the manufacturing industry. The realization that environmental sustainability should be viewed from a value-adding perspective and not only from a regulatory or cost perspective has implied a dramatic change of focus when creating competitive strategies. In production system research, some argue that green is the next great leap after lean, and many publications on the synergies and contradictions of lean and green have been published. This paper aims at high-lighting relevant topics related to environmental sustainability within a production system from the view of academia as well as industry. A review of related research has been performed together with an orienting empirical study of three companies in Sweden. The result reveals that the holistic view is often lost due to trade-offs and uncertainty, implying that incorporating environmental sustainability in an organization becomes difficult. This indicates that there is a growing need for methodology and decision support tools for integrating the green perspective at all levels of the production system. The concepts of continuous improvements and “lean and green” are identified as favorable options to succeed with this integration, implying important areas for future research.

  • 90.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, Industriell Produktion.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, Industriell Produktion.
    Life Cycle Approaches on Product Realization: meeting the challenges of future production research2010In: Proceedings of 43rd CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, 2010, p. 204-212Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global increase of manufacturing activities and the need for sustainability, calls for manufacturing strategies and technologies with reduced environmental impact. This paper presents a part of a strategic research initiative in Sweden, established by an ambitious industry-academic collaboration. A cross-organizational and cross-disciplinary focus area has been formulated to develop leading-edge production research for the future: Life cycle approaches on product realization. The research considers the total life cycle of the product and production system on three levels: (1) On a process level, with manufacturing technologies supporting products with high energy efficiency and low materials usage. (2) On a system level, with an extended production system design for the total life cycle of the production and product portfolio. (3) On an information level, with methods and tools covering the life cycles of products and production.

  • 91.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Södergren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Asplund, Ola
    IF Metall, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Exploring Site roles in Global Corporations: Balancing Local identity to Global responsibility2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how the lead plant role within an international manufacturing network (IMN) is expressed from a site perspective, in relation to key competitive factors. A participative observational study of a workshop series with five Swedish manufacturing sites, all working within international companies, showed how the sites’ interests challenges and supports the interests of the IMNs. The lead plants are to lead the development and dissemination of new knowledge, but still being competitive in efficiency and delivery. Strong positions within the six analysed competitive factors were generally expressed as positive abilities for being a lead plant within an IMN.

  • 92.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Varanasi, S.
    University of Florida, US.
    Bai, S.X.
    University of Florida, US.
    An optimal production flow control problem with impulsive demand1997In: Mathematical and Computer Modelling, ISSN 0895-7177, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 53-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a system consisting of a single machine cell and producing one part type. The machine cell has a finite capacity and is reliable. We consider a finite planning horizon containing N impulsive demands. The demand occurs instantaneously. Each such demand is known by its size and when it occurs in the planning horizon. In order to keep the production as close to the demand as possible there is a trade off between building up inventory and letting customers wait. An optimal control problem is formulated to determine the optimal production strategy. Solution technique is developed via Pontryagin's Minimum Principle.

  • 93.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wikström, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ekman, Sten
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Developing idPeo –- A Multidiciplinary Approach to Product Realization2009In: ICED 09 - THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, VOL 6: DESIGN METHODS AND TOOLS, 2009, p. 67-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the background of a changing industrial landscape and key elements of the realization of complex integrated products, this paper discuss and explore an "innovative" approach towards product concept development methodologies by focusing on creativity, multidisciplinary teams, and decision-making. Throughout 2006-2009 a product realization methodology, the idPeo methodology, has been developed in a university/industry collaboration milieu. Based on a briefly reported literature review, the paper presents the methodology, briefly the three generations of conducted cases and the evolution of the methodology over the years. It is argued that the approach for innovative product realization in concept development, if implemented correctly also into companies' product development process, could contribute to increased flexibility, creativity and tolerance for change. It could also decrease lead time, increase product performance, and decrease uncertainty. 

  • 94.
    Zackrisson, M.
    et al.
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Winroth, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Landström, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Windmark, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, A.E.
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Myrelid, A.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Sweden.
    Sustainability Performance Indicators at Shop Floor Level in Large Manufacturing Companies2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, p. 457-462Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates sustainability in the performance measurement systems of Swedish manufacturing companies. It builds on a previous study that documents relatively few direct environmental indicators at shop floor level, which raises questions about possible indirect links between existing indicators and the environment that could be used to improve the environmental aspect of company's sustainability ambitions. A method for identifying and categorizing indirect links to sustainability issues was defined and used. The results suggest that at shop floor level 90% of the indicators have at least an indirect relation to one or more of the sustainability dimensions economy, environment and social, of which 26% are at least indirectly related to the environmental dimension. Despite the many indirect connections, participating companies perceive a need to improve sustainability indicators and some ideas are suggested. 

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