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  • 51.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    Is organizing in projects sustainable? Exploring the long term-responsibility of project management2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite calls for taking the “organizing”-aspect of temporary organizations seriously, there is still a need for theory development in this area. By applying the concept of “trajectories” to an empirical story of a project, this paper aims at re-conceptualizing “the temporary organization” as changing across time and space between two empirically driven modes; “goal seeking” and “goal oriented”. This is done, we argue, through shifts of the trajectory of the particular “project” at hand.

    Keywords Projects, Trajectory, Goal seeking, Goal oriented, Process ontology, Temporary organizations, Temporary organizing

  • 52.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Managing Death: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tragedy2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the true story of the actions of a middle manager in a major industrial company after the unexpected death of one of his employees, while participating in one of the most important social rituals to humans and society - the creation of meaning of death - we take an analytical approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done by discussing the overlap between CSR and human resource management (HRM). The story induces us to question the upholding of CSR an HRM as separate theoretical fields, since the managerial practice seems to indicate that these have merged into one. Also, the story indicates that the borders between the 'private' and 'public' roles in managerial practice are blurred and that to be a middle manager today is quite complicated. The article finishes with a discussion on why the writing of policies may not be the answer to this problem.

  • 53.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Narratives as artifacts and artifacts as narratives: The touchable and the thinkable2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Organisational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICT´s for mobility2009Book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, TinaKungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Organizational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICTs for Mobility2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH.
    Project overflow and the projectification of society - taking a step back2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Projektledning2015 (ed. 2)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Projektledning2012Book (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH.
    The headache of what happens after projects – extending the ethical responsibility of project management2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH.
    Trajectories in temporary organizing: “goal seeking” and “goal oriented” projects”2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Kärrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Translating sustainability in city development projects: The case of Stockholm Royal Seaport2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Linnefell, William
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    The Performative Construction of stakeholders and vetoplayers - the trajectories of ‘Strategy Work2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH,Sweden.
    Lundevall, K.
    The City of Stockholm, Sweden.
    mCity: User focused development of mobile services within the city of Stockholm2008In: Evolutionary Concepts in End User Productivity and Performance: Applications for Organizational Progress, IGI Global , 2008, p. 268-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the mCity Project, a project owned by the City of Stockholm, aiming at creating user-friendly mobile services in collaboration with businesses. Starting from the end-users' perspective, mCity focuses on how to satisfy existing needs in the community, initiating test pilots within a wide range of areas, from health care and education, to tourism and business. The lesson learned is that user focus creates involvement among end users and leads to the development of sustainable systems that are actually used after they have been implemented. This is naturally vital input not only to municipalities and governments but also for the IT/telecom industry at large. Using the knowledge from mCity, the authors suggest a new, broader definition of "m-government" which focuses on mobile people rather than mobile technology.

  • 64.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Theorizing muddy practices in semi-temporary organizations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The projectification of organizations and the increased interest among researchers to developknowledge about temporary organizations has led to a lot of interesting work, most oftenfocusing on project-based organizations or firms. More scarce is research that focuses on howtemporary organizing takes place in permanent host-organizations that perform the larger partof their activities in processual, routine-based operations. Previous researchers have argued thatin such semi-temporary organizations, tensions emerge between the temporary and permanentdue to competing organizational logics. How these tensions are played out in daily workpractices is however not known. This paper addresses this gap, drawing on an in-depth casestudy of a waste management company. Using practice theory as an epistemological lens, weanalyze the practices involved the temporary organizing in the company in light of the fourbasic dimensions of a temporary organization, time, team, task and transition (Lundin &Söderholm, 1995). Doing so, we are able to theorize the “muddy” practices of temporaryorganizing in a permanent host-organization.

  • 65.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Mörndal, Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    De-mystifying the practices of social innovation work - the mundande work of muddling through.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the social practice through which a social innovation – a new organizing for inter-organizational collaboration – emerged through the work of two public sector strategists in a Swedish municipality. The social practice in this empirical case were constituted by five recurrent practices: planning, navigating, interacting, documenting and pacing. The pacing-practice may be understood as an practice superior to the others, used to coordinate and adapt to the rhythm of the other practices. Hence, pacing was central for driving the project forward and contributed to various activities being carried out not only in the "right" order and in the "right" time, but also in the “right” place. This practice is rather similar to other practices of public sector work, which implies that social innovation work is about common “muddling through”-type of public policy work. The paper thus de-mystifies the work of social innovation; something that may be seen as important in a time where social innovation is said to be the answer to challenges related to globalization, sustainability, demography, and when current forms of organizing, eg NPM, do not seem to work.

  • 66.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Nuur, C.
    Take me to the city. Where?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Schultz-Nybacka, Pamela
    Södertörns högskola.
    Santa Boss is coming to town: Vertical gift giving in an organizational context2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Schultz-Nybacka, Pamela
    Södertörns högskola.
    Stockholm reads: organizational identity through literary novels2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Sergi, Viviane
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Hot stuff: gendering the academic2010In: ASCOS, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Solli, RolfHandelshögskolan i Göteborg.
    First International Research Forum on Guided Tours: Proceedings2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Hoppe, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Guziana, Bozena
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Mörndal, Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Samverkan i det offentliga gränslandet: Utmaningar och möjligheter i samverkan mellan akademi, andra offentliga aktörer och invånare2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Arbetet som ligger till grund för den här rapporten har gjorts inom Samverkansprojektet vilket är ett forskningsprojekt som initierats som en del av Samhällskontraktet (SK) och dess delprocess Hållbar samhällsutveckling (HSU). Både SK och HSU är organisatoriska samverkansytor för Västerås stad, Eskilstuna kommun, Region Västmanland, Landstinget Sörmland och Mälardalens högskola.

    Samverkansprojektet har pågått i tre år, mellan 2015 och 2017, i det gränsland som etablerats mellan akademin, våra offentliga samarbetsparter och invånarna, vilket förklarar titeln på rapporten. Vårt konkreta mål med forskningsprojektet har varit att ”utveckla modeller/begrepp som gör det lättare för våra intressenter att förstå de organisatoriska problem de står inför vad gäller att lösa samhällsproblemen de ansvarar för”.

    För att nå målet har flera mindre studier men också andra aktiviteter genomförts. Våra resultat har successivt växt fram och de har också spritts, och fortsätter spridas, på kon­ferenser, seminarier och olika typer av möten likväl som i både akademiska och populära skrifter.

    Våra resultat och erfarenheter presenteras även i denna rapports åtta bidrag, där vi med hjälp av skiftande perspektiv, modeller och begrepp resonerar kring hur samverkan bättre kan förstås och förbättras. Varje kapitel avslutas med rubriken ”Läs mer” där den som vill fördjupa sig i det som tagits upp ges tips om vidare läsning. Rapporten sätter punkt för forskningsprojektet genom att formulera lättillgängliga texter som bygger på olika delar av vårt forskande och samverkande arbete.

    Formen har vi valt för att bidra till ett gemensamt reflekterande hos dig och dem som du vill prata om samverkan med. Istället för färdiga svar, som man ofta hittar som resultat eller slutsatser i mer traditionella rapporter, vill vi att rapporten ska fungera som ett stöd till ett gemensamt utforskande och konstruktionen av gemensamma svar. Att undra tillsammans över problem med hjälp av det vi tar upp i den här rapporten, innebär en jämställd process där var och en bidrar med sitt perspektiv. Rapporten kan på detta sätt ses som ett verktyg för dig som arbetar med samverkan, kanske främst i offentlig sektor.

  • 72.
    Jaakkola, Elina
    et al.
    Univ Turku, Turku Sch Econ, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Organizational Structures for New Service Development2018In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 280-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has demonstrated that many critical success factors for new service development (NSD) relate to how the NSD function is organized, few attempts have been made to examine the organizational arrangements for NSD in more detail. This study explores what kind of organization structures firms use for NSD, and what implications such structures have for NSD. To expand the previous research heavily focused on standardized services, a qualitative, in-depth study of NSD in knowledge-intensive business service firms was conducted. The study uses a multiple case comparative research strategy where empirical data was collected in nine companies. The study empirically identifies four key organizational arrangements for NSD: NSD in customer relationships, NSD in temporary project teams, NSD in business development units, and NSD in separate R&D units. These arrangements are conceptualized as organization structures characterized by their level and nature of specialization, standardization, formalization, and centralization. The study shows that these key NSD structures can coexist in organizations despite their different and even contradictory characteristics, and highlights the unique opportunities and challenges that each structure brings for NSD. Challenging extant research that has focused on examining particular structural characteristics as success factors for NSD, this study demonstrates that NSD performance may be driven by a configuration of several, simultaneously operating NSD structures rather than by one superior structure. Accordingly, firms should establish organizational approaches that support close connections between different NSD structures.

  • 73.
    Jonasson, Mikael
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Centrum för samhällsanalys (CESAM).
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Stockholm University.
    Smith, Phil
    Plymouth University.
    Performing Guided Tours: Editorial2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 85-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Rethinking dichotomization: A critical perspective on the use of “hard” and “soft” in project management research2014In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on the categorization – dichotomization – between “hard” and “soft” in project management research. This categorization is becoming more increasingly used in project management research for example by stating that some projects are “hard”, while other projects are “soft”, that some project skills are “hard”, while other project skills are “soft” etc. The aim is to discuss this dichotomization as an example of hierarchization – a power struggle between opposites – within project management research and literature and acknowledge the effects for project management research and practice of unreflective upholding of this dichotomy. We provide a critical review and discussion of stage-gate models as an example of “hard” project management approaches, and agile methods as an example of “soft” approaches to project management and acknowledge that in project management practice, it seems as if “hard” and “soft” approaches are most often combined. Hence, this dichotomy seems to be upheld by the research community while practitioners show a more holistic perspective to project management.

  • 75.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Rethinking the dichotomy of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ in projects: Comparing stage-­gate-­models and agile methods2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Guiding in the imaginary city of the future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Shaping the (sustainable) citizens of tomorrow: An act of CRS or HRM?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Who are shaping the sustainable cities of tomorrow and how do they do it?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Kovala, Tommy
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Factors influencing industrial excess heat collaborations2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, p. 595-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there is a potential to double the amount of industrial excess heat from todays 5 TWh that is delivered into district heating networks. This paper investigates factors that are influencing industrial excess heat collaborations. The paper presents result from qualitative interviews as well as answers through a more quantitative web based survey which has been sent out to stakeholders in existing Swedish industrial excess heat collaborations. This work provides new evidence on that economic motivations are the most common driver for starting up a collaboration, but well in place factors like transparency as well as investment sharing between the partners becomes important for a long-term successful collaboration.

  • 80. Kärrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Guiding in the City of Tomorrow: Materializing the Future Through Future and Present Components2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 2 SI, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores an intrinsic case of a guided tour of a future city: Stockholm Royal Seaport. Whereas guided city tours usually aim at educating and enlightening those guided about the past and present of the place visited – building the truth claim by relating what is said in the tour to the physical environment of the tour – the case described in this paper offers the opportunity to explore how the urban future is made material to those guided. The study shows that the guide’s actions materialized the urban future in two ways: by using future components of the future and by using present components of the future. Based on this analysis, we conclude that both these ways function as ways of confirming the present.

  • 81.
    Linnefell, W.
    et al.
    The Municipality of Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lagergren, M.
    The Municipality of Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Implementing e-Government policy - politics and resistance2014In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Government, ECEG, Volume 2014, 2014, p. 163-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its promise of increasing public authorities' effectiveness, improving decision making and service delivery, e-Government initiatives often fail. So far, reasons have largely been sought in technological aspects of e-Government. However, e-Government implementation processes should be seen as more complex than that; also encompassing various social aspects, implying the need for a broader perspective when developing the understanding of e-Government implementation. Based on an in-depth case study of the attempted implementation of new policy documents on e-Government in the municipality of Vasteras, Sweden, this paper sets out to develop the understanding of e-Government by elucidating how individuals' actions, behaviors and decision affect e-Government policy implementation processes. Applying theoretical concepts from political science and organizational change management, the paper describes how the change driver aimed at steering the implementation as a political process through involving as many stakeholders as possible. Hence, a new advocacy coalition emerged, which agreed upon a new definition of "e-Government", which was necessary for the policy implementation to be successful. However, as time went by, it became apparent that there existed several veto players, which the change driver failed to engage, who actively blocked the implementation process. As a consequence, the policy implementation process failed, despite that Vasteras have the best starting points possible, with general agreement regarding the usefulness and necessity of ICTs and hence with a long history of ICT-use in its daily operations. The case study illustrates the importance of acknowledging basic change management aspects when steering implementation of e-Government processes in order for these to be successful. The case also highlights the need for e-Government-research to look beyond theoretical areas of technological science, and it illustrates the usefulness of theories from political science and organization studies when furthering the knowledge of e-Government. 

  • 82.
    Linnefell, William
    et al.
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lagergren, Mikael
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    E-government Policy Formation - Understanding the roles of change drivers, veto players and advocacy coalitions2014In: Electronic Journal of eGovernment, ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its promise of increasing public authorities’ effectiveness, improving decision making and service delivery, e-government initiatives too often fail. So far, reasons for this have largely been sought in technological aspects of e-government. However, e-government is much more complex than that; e-government also encompasses aspects related to the “inner workings” of organizations, policy formation processes and change management. Based on an in-depth case study of an e-government policy formation process in the municipality of Vasteras, Sweden, this paper sets out to develop the understanding of e-government policy failure by elucidating how individuals’ actions, behaviors and decision affect endeavors to improve e-government policy agendas. Applying theoretical concepts from political science and the change management literature, this paper describes how a change driver attempted to accomplish fundamental changes in the policy area of e-government, through involving as many stakeholders as possible in the policy formation process, and how this enabled for the emergence of a new advocacy coalition. This advocacy coalition consisted of the actors involved in the policy formation process, and these actors espoused the policy belief advocated by the change driver. However, as time went by, it became apparent that there also existed several veto players, which the change driver failed to engage, and who actively blocked the attempt to get the new policy documents on e-government adopted. As a consequence, the policy formation process failed, despite that the municipality of Vasteras had exceptionally good conditions for improving the e-government policy agenda. This case study highlights the need for e-government-research to look beyond theoretical areas of technological science, and it illustrates the usefulness of theories from political science and change management when furthering the knowledge of e-government. It also points to the need for more processual studies on policy formation processes.

  • 83.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Avd.).
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Standardization and Innovation: The Janus-face of Service Innovation2011In: NFF 2011 - Nordic Academy of Management: A practice about practice, Stockholm University, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the back-office function of service innovation, in which much service innovation work is executed. The paper shows that standardization is an important and interrelated part in service innovation.

    Standardization is utilized by management at several levels of the development process as a way of organizing the courses of action. The approach utilized for the collection of empirical data is qualitative interviews as a basis for a comparative case study.

  • 84.
    Lucarelli, A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Brand transformation: a performative approach to brand regeneration2015In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 31, p. 84-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Traditional brand management literature largely implies that the brand regeneration process is linear, atomistic and rather harmonic, thus reducing the complexity of the process to individual parts that can be managed rationally and logically in sequence. By ontologically as well as epistemologically adopting a performative approach where brands are seen as loose performative assemblages, the present article suggests instead that the brand regeneration process is truly processual, multiple and political. A specific brand regeneration process should be seen as relationally spatial and as only one of several possible ‘realities’. The argument is based on an analysis of a 5-year-long case study of the branding of Stockholm, inspired by a Latourian hybrid fieldwork approach. Based on the analysis, the novel concept ‘brand transformation’ is suggested to frame the characteristics and complexities of the brand regeneration process.

  • 85. Lundevall, K.
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lagergren, M.
    Wretlund, M.
    eGovernment in a swedish municipality-change management in the planning process2012In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Government, ECEG, 2012, p. 408-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGovernment continues to be an interesting area of study, especially since it is not simply about the implementation of ICTs, but rather, as this paper will show, about a larger change management process. When trying to understand the factors behind successful examples of eGovernment in the context of change management, most research so far focuses on the implementation phase in a literal sense and not on the planning phase, that precedes the implementation phase, or theevaluation phase that follows. This paper aims at remedying this by focusing on the planning phase; the development of an eGovernment strategy and vision, which is the departing point for a future implementation process. Through an in-depthcase study of the work done at a Swedish municipality, the city of Vasteras, this paper aims at answering the question: "Which are the key change management aspects of an eGovernment planning process?" By focusing on the planning phase of eGovernment in a Swedish municipality, this paper develops the knowledge and understanding of this kind of endeavour. Even if ICTs can be seen as a means to modernize government, technology alone cannot break down organizational and culturalbarriers - something that is necessary in order for the full benefits of eGovernment to be realized. The paper is hence primarily empirical in contribution. However, this paper also provides useful insights on the planning process for eGovernment and necessary aspects when creating an eGovernment strategy.

  • 86.
    Mörndal, Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Finding the Pace of the Learning Practice of Purposeful Organising.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this paper is to understand how the creation of a new purposeful organising within the public sector developed by exploring the nature of the learning practice that was deployed in an empirical case. Five patterns of actions were found in the empirical material that served different purposes in relation to the rhythm of the learning practice. The patterns of actions are in this paper called navigating, planning, communicatinganddocumenting.These four were recurring and synchronized in time through a fifth, overarching pattern of actions called pacing. The paper contributes to the understanding of learning in organising by expanding our knowledge of how patterns of actions are synchronized temporally in a learning practice.

  • 87.
    Mörndal, Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Privat.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Pacing - the facilitation of boundary management for organizational collaboration.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that organisational collaboration requires coordinating work across formal and informal organizational boundaries. Previous research has also shown how such boundary-spanning across organizations come about through boundary spanners, boundary objects and boundary activities. This means that the spatial dimensions of boundary-spanning have been in focus, rather than the temporal dimensions. As time and space are connected, only focusing on the spatial dimensions provides a limited understanding of boundary management in organizational collaboration. The purpose with this paper is to develop the understanding of the spatiotemporal dimensions of boundary-spanning. We argue that attention needs to be given to the linking of individuals and artefacts, by focusing on the rhythmof activities. This we call takta. We explore the concept of takta in an empirical case, by analysing how boundary spanners, boundary objects and boundary activities were linked to each other in a rhythm involving pace, order and tempo, through takta

  • 88.
    Sergi, Vivianne
    et al.
    Department of Management, HEC Montréal, Montréal.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thick performances, not just thick descriptions: the processual nature of doing qualitative research2011In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 191-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the consequences of doing research that uses qualitative approaches. Anchored in a process ontology, this paper starts from the idea that doing research implies a performance in which the researcher is fully immersed, and explores the implications of the processual nature of doing research.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes use of vignettes; short stories of research in action, told by different researchers that are analyzed to reveal the richness of the situation in question. These vignettes illustrate how performing qualitative research is an emotional, embodied and deeply personal experience.

    Findings – The authors show that when grounding qualitative research in a process ontology, research is the fruit of the researcher's performance: doing research is performing it, and performing it cannot happen without feeling a wide range of emotions, without appealing to who we are or without questioning what we are doing. Thus, this exploration reveals that doing research is a rich, complex and multi-level experience that mobilizes the whole person conducting this inquiry – that is, that doing research takes the form of a thick performance.

    Originality/value – The value of the paper lies in its roots in a process ontology to understand the doing of qualitative research, which makes it possible to fully acknowledge the importance of subjectivity in all the steps that make up the research endeavor, from the fieldwork to writing – thus offering not only a richer image of what research is about, but an image that is also closer to the experience of doing it.

  • 89.
    Sergi, Vivianne
    et al.
    Department of Management, HEC Montréal, Montre´al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thick performances, Not Just Thick Descriptions: The Processual Nature of Qualitative Research2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Sundström, Angelina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Industrial PhD students and their projects2016In: Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 100, p. 739-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the usual case a PhD student is enrolled and supervised at an academic faculty, in Sweden also most often employed at a department of the university. The whole doctoral education takes part in one single environment. There is an opportunity to enroll “classes” of industrial PhD students in industrial graduate schools. The PhD student is in these cases most often employed by an industry. Each PhD student has at least one academic supervisor, but also an industrial mentor. Sometimes the industrial mentor also holds a PhD and can formally also be an industrial co-supervisor. Even if the funding of the PhD student is a research project, the doctoral work is often not performed as a project. There are often severe delays of the dissertation. The public defense often happens a year after the funding has ended. This represents a large cost for the university or for the industry. The progression of the student lies outside the control of the university management and also the funding industry. We have conducted a case study to explore the organizing of PhD work with the purpose to describe whether project methodology could support industrial PhD students in their progression towards a PhD.

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