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  • 51. Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Delaktighet i skolmiljöer för barn och ungdomar med funktionshinder2002In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 538-545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Lee, A.
    Ståhl, Ylva
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Children in need of special support - a functional approach2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping university.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping university.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping university.
    Patterns of participation and support in preschool settings for children with and without need for additional support.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Lilly
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Luttropp, Agneta
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Delaktighet: Sammanfattning av ett forskningsprojekt2004Report (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Imms, Christine
    Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Research Institute, Torornto, Canada.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; CHILD, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brooks, Rob
    School of Clinical and Applied Sciences, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gothilander, Jennifer
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    CHILD, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Definitions and operationalization of mental health problems, wellbeing and participation constructs in children with ndd: Distinctions and clarifications2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1-19, article id 1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with impairments are known to experience more restricted participation than other children. It also appears that low levels of participation are related to a higher prevalence of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). The purpose of this conceptual paper is to describe and define the constructs mental health problems, mental health, and participation to ensure that future research investigating participation as a means to mental health in children and adolescents with NDD is founded on conceptual clarity. We first discuss the difference between two aspects of mental health problems, namely mental disorder and mental illness. This discussion serves to highlight three areas of conceptual difficulty and their consequences for understanding the mental health of children with NDD that we then consider in the article: (1) how to define mental health problems, (2) how to define and assess mental health problems and mental health, i.e., wellbeing as separate constructs, and (3) how to describe the relationship between participation and wellbeing. We then discuss the implications of our propositions for measurement and the use of participation interventions as a means to enhance mental health (defined as wellbeing). Conclusions: Mental disorders include both diagnoses related to impairments in the developmental period, i.e., NDD and diagnoses related to mental illness. These two types of mental disorders must be separated. Children with NDD, just like other people, may exhibit aspects of both mental health problems and wellbeing simultaneously. Measures of wellbeing defined as a continuum from flourishing to languishing for children with NDD need to be designed and evaluated. Wellbeing can lead to further participation and act to protect from mental health problems. 

  • 56.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Severe, Multiple Disabilities2013In: The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology and Disability / [ed] Michael Wehmeyer, Oxford University Press, 2013, p. Kap. 28-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Gustafsson, Berit M
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping university.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university.
    Proczkowska, Marie
    Linköping university.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Longitudinal pathways of engagement, social interaction skills,hyperactivity and conduct problems in preschool children2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 170-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool children’s engagement/social interaction skills can be seen as aspects of positive functioning, and also act as protective aspects of functioning.On the other hand, hyperactivity/conduct problems are risk aspects that negatively affect children’s everyday functioning. Few studies have investigatedsuch orchestrated effects on mental health in young children over time. The aims of the study are rst, to identify homogeneous groups of children havingsimilar pathways in mental health between three time points. Second, to examine how children move between time points in relation to risk and protectivefactors. Alongitudinal study over 3 years, including 197 Swedish preschool children was used. Questionnaire data collected from preschool teachers.Statistical analysis using person-oriented methods with repeated cluster analyses. Children high in engagement/social skills and low in conduct problemscontinue to function well. Children with low engagement/social skills exhibiting both hyperactivity and conduct problems continue to have problems.Children with mixed patterns of protective factors and risk factors showed mixed outcomes. The stability of children’s pathways was quite high if theyexhibited many positive protective factors but also if they exhibited many risk factors. Children exhibiting a mixed pattern of protective and risk factorsmoved between clusters in a less predictable way. That stability in mental health was related to the simultaneous occurrence of either many protectivefactors or many risk factors supports the notion of orchestrated effects. The results indicate that early interventions need to have a dual focus, includingboth interventions aimed at enhancing child engagement and interventions focused on decreasing behavior problem.

  • 58.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Klang, Nina
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Magnússon, Gunnlaugur
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Professionalism, governance and inclusive education: A total population study of Swedish special needs educators2019In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 559-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior research shows that special needs educators (SNEs) have had problems defining their occupational roles and jurisdiction, particularly regarding inclusive education. There are two occupational groups of SNEs in Sweden, namely special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) and special education teachers. In this paper, we use the collective name SNEs to refer to both groups. Here, results from a total population study of Swedish SNEs are presented (N = 3367, response rate 75%). The aim is to explore differences in SNEs’ interpretation of school difficulties and if these differences are influenced by SNEs’ employment in different parts of the school organisation. Statistical cluster-analysis was used to categorise SNEs into five distinct groups based on how they view the problems of pupils in school difficulties. Key concepts employed in the analysis are, primarily organisational vs occupational governance in relation to professional jurisdiction. Findings suggest that SNEs are less unanimous in their views of school problems, than prior research indicates. The variance is partly due to where they work in the school organisation, but we also find indications that different groups of SNEs experience different forms of governance with regard to their professionalism. The results are important due to the scope of the data and method of analysis as well as the illustrated variance of professional values and situations of SNEs and the potential consequences for the development of inclusive education.

  • 59.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Educ Studies, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Educ, Uppsala, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Soc, Falun, Sweden..
    Mollas, Gunvie
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Educ & Commun, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Educ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ideas about occupational roles and inclusive practices among special needs educators and support teachers in Sweden2017In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 490-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special needs educators (SNEs) and their counterparts are expected to play a significant role in schools' work towards inclusive practices. Studies do, however, indicate a rather diversified picture regarding the occupational groups assigned to work with special support and their workroles, within and between different countries. In Sweden, one can differentiate between two such occupational groups, SNEs with qualifications in special educational needs at advanced level and support teachers (SuTs) with varying teacher education and education in special educational needs. The aims of this article are to investigate the occurrence of SNEs and SuTs within the compulsory school system in 10 municipalities in Sweden and the occupational roles of those SNEs and SuTs in relation to the inclusion agenda. A questionnaire was sent out in 2012 to all SNEs and SuTs in 10 municipalities (n = 511, response rate 61.6%). Main results indicate that: (a) there is wide variation between municipalities regarding the extent to which SNEs or SuTs are assigned to work with special support; (b) the characteristics of the occupational role of SNEs are more in line with inclusive practices than those of the role of SuTs; (c) there is consensus between the two occupational groups regarding what they think should characterize the occupational role of SNEs; (d) SNEs consider, more than do the SuTs themselves, that the role of SuTs should be more in line with that of a traditional special-education teacher. Results are discussed in relation to Thomas Skrtic's theoretical accounts of inclusive education and Andrew Abbott's notion of jurisdictional control.

  • 60.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linköping, Sweden..
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Jönköping Univ, CHILD, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Jönköping Univ, CHILD, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Self-rating via video communication in children with disability - a feasibility study2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1130675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Different barriers may hinder children with developmental disabilities (DD) from having a voice in research and clinical interventions concerning fundamentally subjective phenomena, such as participation. It is not well-investigated if video communication tools have the potential to reduce these barriers. AimThis study investigated the feasibility of administering a self-rating instrument measuring participation, Picture My Participation (PmP), via a video communication tool (Zoom), to children with DD. Materials and methodsPmP was administered to 17 children with DD (mean age 13 years). The pictorial representations of activities and response options in PmP were displayed in a shared PowerPoint presentation, enabling nonverbal responses with the annotate function in Zoom. Child and interviewer perceptions of the interview were measured through questionnaires developed for the purpose. ResultsAll the children completed the interview. Most PmP questions were answered, and no adverse events were registered. Technical issues could generally be solved. No special training or expensive equipment was needed for the interviews. ConclusionInterviewer-guided self-ratings of participation and related constructs through video communication may be a feasible procedure to use with children with DD from age 11. SignificanceOffering video communication may increase children's chances to contribute subjective experiences in research and clinical practice.

  • 61.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet.
    Granlund, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Jönköping University.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Patterns of time processing ability in children with and without developmental disabilities2010In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 250-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Keywords:

    • child development;
    • cluster analysis;
    • time management;
    • time orientation;
    • time perception

    Background  Children with developmental disabilities, e.g. intellectual disability or autism, are reported to have problems in time perception, time orientation or time management, i.e. in time-processing ability (TPA). The aim was to investigate whether the problems described are diagnosis specific or reflect differences in age or in level of TPA.

    Methods  Using a cross-sectional design, this study investigated if there were different patterns of TPA in 5- to 10-year-old children with (n = 77) and without disabilities (n = 89). The results indicated that the patterns of TPA mainly follow the chronological age of children without disabilities, all clusters differing as regards levels of TPA. Daily time management (as estimated by the parents) and children’s self-rated autonomy differed between clusters and was related to TPA.

    Conclusions  The level of TPA seems to be a more valid overall base than the type of diagnosis for the planning of interventions in daily time management.

  • 62.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Computer-based assistive technology device for use by children with physical disabilities: a cross sectional study2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate the prevalence of children with physical disabilities who used a computer-based ATD, and to examine characteristics differences in children and youths who do or do not use computer-based ATDs, as well as, investigate differences that might influence the satisfaction of those two groups of children and youths when computers are being used for in-school and outside school activities.

    METHOD:

    A cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in and outside school (n = 287) and group comparisons.Results: The prevalence of using computer-based ATDs was about 44 % (n = 127) of the children in this sample. These children were less satisfied with their computer use in education and outside school activities than the children who did not use an ATD.

    CONCLUSION:

    Improved coordination of the usage of computer-based ATDs in school and in the home, including service and support, could increase the opportunities for children with physical disabilities who use computer-based ATDs to perform the computer activities they want, need and are expected to do in school and outside school.

  • 63.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Wetso, Gun-Marie
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Different agendas?: The views of different occupational groups on special needs education2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 143-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how different occupational groups explain why children have problems in school, how they believe schools should help these children and the role they believe that special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) should have in such work. A questionnaire was distributed to all teaching and support staff in a Swedish municipality (N=1297). As a result, 938 persons (72.5%) answered the questionnaire. The answers given by (a) preschool teachers (b) teacher assistants (c) SENCOs (d) special teachers (e) class teachers and (f) subject teachers were compared. Several interesting patterns emerged from the data indicating that the occupational groups to a large extent have different ideas concerning how the school should work with children in need of special support. The SENCOs were, for example, the only group that believed that they should be involved in school development. The outcome of the study is discussed in relation to the notion of inclusive education.

  • 64.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2019In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions. Methods: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions. Conclusion: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 65.
    Niia, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Student participation and parental involvement in relation to academic achievement2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 297-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study show that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students’ participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students’ participation as more closely related to activity and academic performance. Despite these differences, teachers and students are in closer agreement regarding activities of a social nature. Teachers’ and parents’ ratings of parents’ involvement in school have a higher agreement, but also correlate negatively with the academic achievement of the student. This is likely because communication is more frequent with parents of underachieving students than students with high academic performance. The partly inconsistent results in previous research regarding the relation between participation and academic achievement can here be explained by the choice of raters, as this connection only exists in ratings done by teachers.

  • 66.
    Niia, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Granlund, Mats
    Utvärdering av IDA-projektet: Slutrapport november 20102010Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 67.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle, Malmö högskola, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Is it Possible to Get Away from Disability-Based Classifications in Education?: An Empirical Investigation of the Swedish System2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 379-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disability classifications is given a minor role in the Swedish national policy onspecial needs in schools. In the present study questionnaires are used toinvestigate the actual importance of medical diagnosis in obtaining specialsupport as well as attitudes towards such practices. The study involves differentlevels of the educational system as well as different occupational groups withincompulsory schooling and preschool. The results show that: 1) disability-basedcategories are seen as less needed in practice by chief education officers than byprincipals; 2) disability-based classifications have stronger support among schoolstaff than in the guiding documents and among principals and chief educationofficers; 3) a disability-based approach has stronger support at the compulsoryschool level than at the preschool level; 4) the group most in favour of disabilitybasedclassifications is teachers and those most against are chief educationofficers, principals and SENCOs.

  • 68.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle, Malmö högskola.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation; Jönköpings högskola.
    What is the problem? Explanations of School Difficulties by Eight Occupational Groups2013In: International Journal of Special Education, ISSN 0827-3383, E-ISSN 1917-7844, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 161-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from four different questionnaires are analyzed.  Explanations of school problems are compared for chief education officers, principals (in municipal and independent schools), subject teachers, class teachers, special teachers, special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs), and  assistants. Explanations involving deficits tied to the individual child were by far most common. Teachers and principals were the groups least likely to view teachers as a cause of school problems. Principals were even less likely to do so than the teachers themselves, and this was also the group that was least likely to consider the functioning of classes as an explanation of school difficulties. A school-leadership paradox is identified, meaning that principals discern causes of school problems that are not within their influence.

  • 69.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Borås University, Sweden.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Donohue, Dana
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hvit, Sara
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child’s perspective based on the problem being investigated.

    Methods: Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

    Results: The child’s perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child’s perspective in conjunction with the need to know children’s opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult’s view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children’s capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children’s opinions.

    Conclusion: The examples provided indicate that children’s opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

    Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17518423.2013.801529

  • 70.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Children’s Voices in Early Childhood Education 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s voices in early childhood education

    Recently, there has been a developing interest concerning children’s voices in e.g. decision-making and planning of children within different educational contexts. In Sweden the preschool is viewed as an integral part of the national education policy and emphasize equal learning opportunities as well as children’s right to express their own opinion and be listened to. Although children’s rights are emphasized it is not clear how these rights are expressed in children’s everyday life. Methods focusing on highlighting children’s voices in educational contexts are needed. This presentation will discuss the methods of two research projects stressing children’s voices and perspectives. The first study, involving 30 children, aimed to describe how children view their participation in plans and decisions at preschool. Children were interviewed in two steps: a focus group interview using a puppet interview technique, playing different scenarios with the children as co-actors, and a photo walk in where children took photos of their preschool context and used these as stimulated recall in individual interviews to let the children express their participation in the preschool context.  An objective in the second study was to longitudinally explore the language environment in preschool to promote children’s abilities to think and express themselves. The teachers play a significant role in promoting this and thus an observational procedure involving 188 teachers was used to explore children’s interaction with adults. One teacher at a time was observed interacting with one child or a group of children and the interaction was classified according to the relational climate as well as to the degree of language development. The methods will be discussed in terms of the significance of bringing children’s voices to the front in educational contexts as well as in research aiming to promote children’s participation in issues that concerns their own everyday life. 

  • 71.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Qualitative Aspects of Emergent Literacy Skills and Children´s Engagement in Swedich Preschools2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Norling, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Engagement and emergent literacy practices in Swedish preschools2015In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 619-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's ability to express thoughts, ideas, and needs is vital to their full participation in a democratic society. In the preschool environment, multiple opportunities to engage in emergent literacy practices may stimulate this ability. The study used an ecological development approach to investigate the language environment in Swedish preschools, focusing on the relationships among seven classroom quality dimensions. Children's engagement was measured by observing their active participation in emergent literacy practices. The results showed that positive climate, instructional learning formats and language modeling were the most significant contributors to engagement in emergent literacy practices. To conclude, children's engagement in emergent literacy practices seems to benefit from a positive climate and needs and uses instructional discussions and activities in the everyday situations in preschool.

  • 73.
    Ritosa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Assessing school engagement -Adaptation and validation of 'Engagement Versus Disaffection with Learning: Teacher Report' in the Swedish educational context2020In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 5, article id 521972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To follow the trajectories of children’s engagement in learning, validated measures ofengagement appropriate for different ages and educational contexts are needed. Thepurpose of this study was to adapt and validate the school engagement questionnaire(Engagement Versus Disaffection with Learning: Teacher Report, EDL) in the Swedisheducational context, and to investigate if it assesses the same construct as a measureof engagement used for children of preschool age. After translating the questionnaireto Swedish, cognitive interviews were conducted with six teachers to check forinterpretability and relevance of the items. For psychometric validation, teachers of110 6 to 7-year-old children filled out EDL on two occasions two weeks apart.On the first occasion, they also filled out the Child Engagement Questionnaire, ameasure of global engagement intended for children of preschool age. Dimensionalstructure, convergent validity, test-retest reliability, and internal consistency of EDL wereinvestigated. Factor analysis provided support for differentiating between behavioraland emotional components of school engagement. Measures of school and preschoolengagement used in this study correlated highly, which provides support for usingthem to study the engagement of children as they develop, and their educationalcontexts change. The subscales of behavioral and emotional engagement showed goodtest-retest reliability and internal consistency.

  • 74.
    Ritoša, A.
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Danielsson, H.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden .
    Granlund, M.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Profiles of State and Trait Engagement of Preschool Children2023In: Early Education and Development, ISSN 1040-9289, E-ISSN 1556-6935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research Findings: This study examined the engagement of 494 preschool children in Sweden (M = 53.44 months, SD = 10.64) using both teacher questionnaires to measure global engagement (trait) and observations to measure momentary engagement (state). Using a person-oriented approach with cluster analysis, we identified five distinct profiles of global and momentary engagement, with four of them showing discrepancies between global and observed engagement levels. We found that age, hyperactivity, and second language learner (SLL) status were related to a specific engagement profile. Specifically, children high in hyperactivity tended to be in clusters with higher momentary engagement than global engagement, whereas second language learners were overrepresented in clusters with lower momentary engagement. Practice or Policy: The findings suggest that global and observed measures of engagement capture different aspects of children’s engagement and should not be used interchangeably. Children with low engagement ratings on both measures of engagement are more likely to have an extreme score on the global engagement measure, indicating that difficulties they experience will be more noticeable in their global engagement. On the other hand, displays of high levels of momentary engagement could signal children’s inherent potential, prompting tailored encouragement and support within Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) settings and promoting their overall engagement levels. 

  • 75.
    Samuels, Alecia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. University of Pretoria, CAAC, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university.
    Adair, Brooke
    Australian Catholic university, Australia.
    Raghavendra, Pammi
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Dada, Shakila
    University of Pretoria, CAAC, South Africa.
    Longitudinal studies on change in activities and participation: A systematic review2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Sandberg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Uys, K.
    Interrelatedness of participation, engagement and enjoyment2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Engagement both as a means and an end, a transactional analysis2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Interaction processes as a mediating factor between children's externalized behaviour difficulties and engagement in preschool2016In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 186, no 10, p. 1649-1663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined social interaction as a mediator between externalized behaviour difficulties and children's engagement in preschool. Data from 663 children (340 boys), aged 18-71 months, were collected at 81 Swedish preschool units in six municipalities to test a path model that included child, teacher, and child groups. The results indicated that behaviour difficulties and engagement may occur simultaneously. Hyperactivity had a direct negative influence on engagement, which was not the case with conduct problems. Teachers' responsiveness as well as positive interactions with peers had an indirect influence on the relationship between hyperactivity and engagement. Responsive staff and positive interactions within the child group seem to contribute to children's engagement despite hyperactivity. Children's engagement, as well as special support to stimulate engagement in preschool, is discussed.

  • 79.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Teachers and childrens interaction in Swedish preschool settings as a mediating factor between engagement and childrens externalizing behavior.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Anna-Karin
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Social interaction and gender as factors affecting the trajectories of children’s engagement and hyperactive behaviour in preschool2021In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 617-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social interactions in preschool and a child’s gender are, incross-sectional studies, related to the child’s overall levels of hyperactive behaviour andengagement in preschool activities. However, whether social interaction and gender canpredict children’s engagement and hyperactivity is not thoroughly investigated. This studyaims to investigate the longitudinal influence of gender, child-to-child interaction, andteacher responsiveness on the association between trajectories of children’s levels ofcore engagement and hyperactive behaviour. It was hypothesized that peer-to-childinteraction and teacher responsiveness in preschool settings are related to positivechange in engagement among children with hyperactive behaviour, especially for boys.Sample and methods. Swedish preschool staff completed questionnaires assessingthe variables of interest for children aged 1–5(N = 203). Data were collected on threeoccasions over a two-year period. Latent growth curve (LGC) models were used toexplore whether teacher responsiveness, peer-to-child interaction, and gender predicttrajectories of engagement and hyperactivity.Results. The results revealed that high levels of hyperactivity were associated withlower levels of engagement on the first occasion. Positive peer-to-child interactions andresponsive teachers were significant predictors of an increased level of engagement anddecreased level of hyperactive behaviour, especially for boys.Conclusions. The findings underscore the need to improve social interactions,especially peer-to-child interactions, to improve engagement in children with hyperactivebehaviour, especially boys. Implications for practices and research are discussed.

  • 81.
    Sjöquist, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Åsenlöf, Pernilla
    Uppsala University.
    Lampa, Jon
    Uppsala University.
    Opava, Christina H.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical-activity coaching and health status in rhematoid arthritis: a person-oriented approach2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 816-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No interventions to promote physical activity can succeed for all participants. Insights into the specific characteristics of those who do succeed are needed. One aim was to investigate whether a selection of correlates of general health perception creates cluster typologies in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Another was to evaluate whether magnitude of change in health status differs between clusters after a 1-year coaching intervention targeting health-enhancing physical activity.

    METHOD:

    Two hundred and twenty-eight patients (74% women, mean age 56 years, disease duration 1 year) with RA, from 10 rheumatology clinics in Sweden, participated. The patients were assigned at random to intervention or control. The intervention group underwent 1 year of coaching to adopt health-enhancing physical activity (moderately intensive, 30 min/day, > 4 days/week). The cluster analysis included five correlates of general health perception: disease activity; pain; timed standing; activity limitation; and self-reported physical activity. The primary outcome of the coaching intervention was self-reported health status.

    RESULTS:

    One-hundred and forty-six patients were eligible for inclusion in the cluster analysis. The eight clusters identified both at baseline and post interventions were operationalized according to the number of cluster variables affected: less (LE) affected or more (MO) affected, respectively. Clusters with LE affected variables had significantly better general health perception at baseline than those with MO affected variables. Further, coached individuals in MO affected clusters significantly improved self-reported health status compared both to those coached in LE affected clusters and to those in MO affected clusters in the control group.

    CONCLUSION:

    This person-based approach contributed more than did the results in a previous randomized controlled trial to the understanding of which patients benefit most from the present physical-activity coaching intervention. The intervention may thus be most beneficial for individuals more severely affected by their disease at baseline.

  • 82.
    Stalberg, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Emergency Dept, Stockholm, Sweden.;Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, ChiP Res Grp, Västerås, Sweden..
    Söderbäck, Maja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, ChiP Res Grp, Västerås, Sweden.;Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Dept Caring Sci, Västerås, Sweden..
    Widarsson, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Children's Right to Health through the Principles of Protection, Promotion, and Participation, from the Perspectives for Children, Parents, and Professionals: A Systematic Review2024In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This systematic review aimed to identify how children's right to health, connected to the principles of protection, promotion, and participation, and from the perspectives of children, parents, and professionals in preschool, school, and healthcare has been empirically demonstrated by international scholars between 1989 and 2021. Following the standards of PRISMA-P, two searches, in 2018 and 2020, were conducted in seven databases. In total, 561 studies were found and after the screening process, which entails reviewing titles, abstracts, and full text-versions, 49 studies were finally included. A deductive qualitative content analysis, proposed by Elo and Kyngas, was performed. According to the findings, protection was demonstrated as Being protected from harmful acts and practices and being entitled to special care and assistance. Promotion was demonstrated as Possessing of resources and Receiving of services, and participation as Being heard and listened to and Being involved in matters of concern. Conforming to the findings, although presented separately, protection, promotion, and participation could be understood as interrelated concepts. In summary, children's right to health was demonstrated within two major fields: as the use of their own resources, and trust and as aspects provided by adults as support and safety. This is the first review of studies, published 1989-2021, identifying children's right to health through the perspectives of protection, promotion, and participation. During this period, children's right to health has mainly been demonstrated in studies from a healthcare context. All researchers, policymakers, health workers, and politicians should include children in all decisions that concern them, to increase their participation. As children's health is closely linked to their physical, social, and cognitive development there is a need for more studies exploring children's right to health in preschool and school contexts in which children spend their everyday life.

  • 83.
    Sterlingova, T.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Nylander, E.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Møller Christensen, B.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Factors affecting women's participation in mammography screening in Nordic countries: A systematic review2023In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 878-885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Mammography screening programs have been implemented in European countries as prevention tools aimed at reducing breast cancer mortality through early detection in asymptomatic women. Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland) demonstrated high participation rates; however, breast cancer mortality could be limited by further optimizing screening. This review aimed to explore factors that affect women's participation in mammography screening in Nordic countries. Method: A systematic review of segregated mixed research synthesis using a deductive approach was conducted. The following databases and platforms were searched to identify relevant studies: CINAHL with Full Text (EBSCOHost), MEDLINE (EBSCOHost), PsycInfo (ProQuest), Scopus (Elsevier) and Web of Science Core Collection (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, and ESCI). The Critical Appraisal Skills Program was used for quality assessment. The Health Promotion Model was applied to integrate findings from qualitative and qualitative research. All methodological steps followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: The final selection (16 articles) included studies from three Nordic countries: Denmark (four quantitative studies), Norway (one qualitative and four quantitative studies), and Sweden (three qualitative and seven quantitative studies). Sixty-three factors were identified as barriers, facilitators, or factors with no influence. Conclusion: A substantial number of obtained factors, spread across a wide spectrum, describe (non-)participation in mammography screening as a versatile phenomenon. Implications for practice: The findings of this review could benefit the mammography staff and providers regarding possible interventions aimed at improving screening participation rates.

  • 84.
    Täljedal, T.
    et al.
    Region Västmanland - Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Västmanland Hospital Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, M.
    CHILD Research Environment, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. CHILD Research Environment, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Osman, F.
    School of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Norén Selinus, E.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fängström, K.
    CHAP, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Patterns of mental health problems and well-being in children with disabilities in Sweden: A cross-sectional survey and cluster analysis2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children with disabilities have an increased risk of mental health problems. Patterns of mental health problems and well-being may vary. AIMS: To identify patterns of mental health problems and well-being in children with disabilities in Sweden, and investigate the influence of parental background (migration, education), and child cognitive level. METHOD: In this cross-sectional study, cluster analysis was used to analyse parents' ratings of conduct problems, emotional symptoms, and prosocial behaviour on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in children with disabilities (n = 136). The influence of parental background (migration, education) and child cognitive level on cluster membership was explored through multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: Five clusters of mental health patterns emerged. Three clusters had mean ratings near or past clinical cut-off for one each of the SDQ-subscales. One cluster had difficulties on all three subscales. Greater child cognitive difficulties increased the likelihood of low prosocial behaviour (OR 2.501, p < .001) and of difficulties on all three subscales (OR 2.155, p = .006). Parental background did not influence cluster membership. CONCLUSION: Children with disabilities display varying mental health patterns. Awareness of the complexity of mental health patterns among children with disabilities is important. Screening and support for emotional symptoms and prosocial behaviour deficits should be considered for children with conduct problems.

  • 85.
    Ullenhag, A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Granlund, M.
    Jönköping University.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Differences in patterns of participation in leisure activities in Swedish children with and without disabilities2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare participation in leisure activities between Swedish children with and without disabilities and to examine whether age, gender, presence of disabilities, and mother's educational level influence participation. Method: A Swedish version of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment was used to study the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of participation in leisure activities of children aged 6 to 17 years. Fifty-five of the children had disabilities and 337 of the children did not have disabilities. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to explore the impact of age, gender, mother's level of education, and disability on the diversity, intensity, and enjoyment of leisure activities. A t-test for independent samples was used to compare the diversity and intensity of participation between children with and without disabilities. Results: The multiple regression analysis explained 4-36% of the variance of diversity, intensity, and enjoyment. Children with disabilities participated with higher diversity, but with less intensity, than children without disabilities. Younger children had higher levels of enjoyment. Conclusions: Children with disabilities participated in several different activities, but the presence of a disability was associated with lower intensity of participation. The low explanatory value of the investigated variables indicates that the combined effect of several variables needs to be taken into consideration when designing participation interventions.Implications for RehabilitationChildren with disabilities participated in a high number of activities but with a low intensity compared to children without disabilities. Analysis of the children's personal and environmental barriers and facilitators is critical to providing the therapist with ideas about which strategies should be implemented to increase participation. Assessment and intervention may need to focus on methods for supporting the children's autonomy and on creating goals for intervention that focus on activities that are determined by the child based on their interests and desires.Age and gender influenced the variance in the diversity and enjoyment outcome and the presence of disability was associated with the intensity outcome.Age, gender, parental educational level, and disability only explain a small proportion of the variance in leisure participation patterns. Thus, client-centred and individually tailored interventions are needed that are based on the individual's unique situation. © 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

  • 86.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University.
    Krumlinde Sundholm, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Cultural validity of the children's assessment of participation and enjoyment/preferences for activities of children: CAPE/PAC2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 428-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate whether the activity items of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC) were relevant for Swedish children. Subjects: A total of 337 typically developed children aged 6–17 years old. Methods: The CAPE/PAC was translated into Swedish in accordance with accepted translation procedures. By means of 14 group interviews with children with and without disabilities aged 6–15 years old and parents, available leisure activities were listed. These were matched to the items in the CAPE/PAC. Sixteen new potential activities were added and tested on 337 typical developed children from different regions of Sweden. A cutoff level of activities performed by >10% was set to identify relevant activities. Differences between the original and a proposed Swedish version were analysed using paired-samples t-tests of standardized mean scores. Results: Three new activity items were included, for 10 items new activity examples were added, and three not relevant items were excluded. In the Swedish version the outcome of standardized mean diversity score was significantly higher compared with the outcome of the original version. Conclusions:When using instruments in new contexts, it is not enough simply to translate; validation of the item relevance to the new context is essential.

  • 87.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bult, M.K.
    University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Nyquist, A
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Ketelaar, M
    University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Jahnsen, R
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, L
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping Univ, Sweden.
    An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands2012In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 369-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance. Methods: In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6-17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation. Results: Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender. Conclusion: Differences in school-and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most

  • 88.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, CHILD, SIDR, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A Strength-Based Intervention to Increase Participation in Leisure Activities in Children with Neuropsychiatric Disabilities: A Pilot Study2020In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 2020, p. 1-11, article id 1358707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to evaluate the feasibility of an intervention model with a client-centered goal-directed approach with the aim to enhance the child's participation in leisure activities, self-efficacy, and activity performance. A pilot intervention using a client-centered goal-directed approach and a single-subject design was performed. Two Swedish boys with neuropsychiatric diagnosis aged 12 and 14 years old were included, and 3 leisure activity goals were identified. The intervention was carried out over 8 weeks and took place in the adolescent's everyday environment and at the pediatric rehabilitation center. The goal attainment of participation goals (GAS), the perceived performance ability according to the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), the self-efficacy, and the participants' satisfaction were used to study the effect. The participants succeeded in attaining their leisure goals as specified by the GAS by achieving +2 on one goal and +1 on the other two goals. They estimated higher performance ability and self-efficacy in their goal performance. Participants, parents, and therapists were overall satisfied and found the intervention to be applicable and helpful in optimizing leisure participation. The intervention model with a client-centered goal-directed approach in which participants define their own leisure activity goals appears to be effective in increasing participation in leisure activities.

  • 89.
    Wallin Ahlström, Sara
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Falun Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna Uppsala University Falun Sweden;School of Health and Welfare Dalarna University Falun Sweden;Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Harder, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV) Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    The experiences and the meaning of using MyTime in the preschool context from the perspective of children in need of special support, 5–6 years of age2023In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Children in need of special support often display delays in time processing ability, affecting everyday functioning. MyTime is an intervention programme for systematic training of time processing ability. To support preschool children's development of time processing ability and everyday functioning, it is necessary to include their perspectives of the MyTime intervention programme. A previous study shows that MyTime is feasible with children in the preschool setting and shows positive effects on time processing ability for older children in special schools. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how preschool children experience the intervention programme and how they understand its meaning. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and the meaning of using MyTime from the perspective of children with informal needs of special support (INS) 5–6 years of age in the preschool context.

    Methods

    To explore the children's perspectives, video-recorded interviews with 21 children were analysed hermeneutically. To facilitate the interview situation with the children in need of special support, the Talking Mats© was used. Both body and spoken languages were analysed.

    Results

    The results reveal children as active participants, willing to share their experiences of using the MyTime intervention in the preschool context. The conceptualization of the children's experiences and expressions uncovers their meaning of using the MyTime intervention as to know and to understand time by doing.

    Conclusions

    When children are given the opportunity to use concrete tools to understand and measure time, they experience themselves as active participants involved and engaged in the intervention. They reveal meaningful experiences to be able to manage time that facilitate their everyday functioning and participation in the preschool context.

  • 90.
    Wallin Ahlström, Sara
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV), Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden;Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden;Habilitation Services in Dalarna, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden;Habilitation Services in Dalarna, Sweden;Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare (HVV), Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Feasibility of an intervention to facilitate time and everyday functioning in preschoolers2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 337-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children in need of special support (INS) often display delays in time-processing ability (TPA) affecting everyday functioning. Typically developing (TD) children are not yet mature to use the information of a clock.Aim To investigate the feasibility of an intervention program, MyTime, to facilitate TPA and everyday functioning in pre-school children, including the subjective experiences of pre-school staff and the children.Materials and Methods The intervention sample consisted of 20 children: 4 INS and 16 TD. Intervention was given daily in 8 weeks with MyTime in the pre-school environment. Data collection procedures were evaluated and children were assessed for TPA pre- and post intervention. Everyday functioning were assessed by teachers, parents and children. Experiences of the intervention were assessed by a group interview with teachers and a Talking Mats© evaluation with children.Results MyTime worked well in pre-school and indicated an increase in the children’s TPA and everyday functioning. The program was perceived simple to use by teachers and children highlighted the importance to understand the duration of time.Conclusion The program MyTime was found to be feasible in the pre-school environment. Significance: The assessment and program design can be used to investigate intervention effectiveness in a randomised study.

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  • 91.
    Wennberg, B.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Ctr Social & Affect Neurosci, Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Kjellberg, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, P. A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Ctr Social & Affect Neurosci, Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Janeslatt, G.
    Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, Falun, Sweden..
    DAILY TIME MANAGEMENT AND AUTONOMY IN SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN WITH IDD AND TYPICALLY DEVELOPING CHILDREN2019In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 884-885Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Åström, Frida
    et al.
    Mälardalen University. CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Patterns of observed child participation and proximity to a small group including teachers in Swedish preschool free play2022In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of all children in preschool activities is the main outcome of inclusive Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC). The current study used the Child Observation in Preschool (COP) to explore the observed participation patterns in the free play of a sample of 3–5-year-old Swedish preschool children (N = 453), and to examine the characteristics of the resulting clusters in terms of child and preschool unit characteristics. Based on a series of hierarchical and K-means cluster analyses, we identified eight distinct and meaningful clusters that could be ranked from very high to very low observed participation. Four of the clusters indicated average-to-very high observed participation. Two clusters indicated low-to-very low observed participation. The cluster displaying low observed participation had high proximity to a small group including teachers. On average, children in this cluster came from preschool units with significantly more second language learners. The cluster displaying a very low observed participation had low proximity to a small group including teachers. On average, children in this cluster were significantly more often second language learners, and the children came from units with a significantly higher number of resource staff. No significant differences appeared in the number of children with special educational needs across the clusters, although tendencies emerged. The results imply that the children in this sample had a varied degree of observed participation. Two clusters of children appeared to have difficulties in participating in free play activities where second language learners and children from preschool units with more second language learners were more common. Preschool teachers need to identify children who participate less in preschool activities and who might benefit from more teacher proximity. Teachers also need to reflect on how their proximity impacts the participation of children differently and on the type of support they provide when being close to the children.

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