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  • 51.
    Schröter, Thorsten
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Translating in and for higher education in Sweden: Some reflections from a practitioner2016In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English language plays an increasingly important role in Swedish higher education - and not just in English studies. More and more types of university-related documents are either written in English from the outset or translated into the language, for the benefit of students, employees and other interested parties not fluent in Swedish (and far from always native speakers of English either). This brings about an increased need for translation and review services, which are often provided in-house. The present contribution offers a few reflections regarding these types of services, covering some general issues as well as a number of concrete challenges for the translators.

  • 52.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe Univ, Egitim Fak, Beytepe, Turkey..
    ‘Epistemic status check’ as an interactional phenomenon in instructed learning settings2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 13-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the interactional unfolding of ‘epistemic status check’ (ESC) (e.g. ‘no idea?’, or ‘you don’t know?’), which is a frequently observed feature of teacher talk in language classrooms. The paper aims at contributing to the literature of institutional interaction and classroom discourse by introducing and defining ‘ESCs’, which also will indirectly be conducive to expanding the scope of the idea of epistemic engine (Heritage, 2012a,b). An ESC can be defined as a speaker’s interpretation of another interactant’s state of knowledge, which (in the case of classrooms) can be initiated in order to pursue certain pedagogical goals when a second-pair part of an adjacency pair is delayed. It is employed subsequent to inter-turn gaps (Schegloff, 2007) that are accompanied by non-verbal cues. The study draws on 16 h of video-recorded interactions in two English language classrooms in a public school in Luxembourg. The participants are adolescent multilingual students, aged between 15 and 18, and a local teacher. The analysis was carried out using conversation analysis, by also drawing on the use of multi-semiotic resources including gaze directions, gestures, and body orientations. The findings show that teachers treat these embodied actions as displays of insufficient knowledge in classroom talk-in-interaction, and initiate ESCs subsequent to certain student non-verbal cues including gaze withdrawals, long silences, and headshakes. These displays of insufficient knowledge were found to be visual resources that the teacher uses in order to move the classroom activity forward, by first initiating an ESC, and then by allocating the turn to another student. These findings have implications for the analysis of ‘claims of insufficient knowledge’ (e.g. ‘I don’t know’) in general and their management in instructed learning environments in particular. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 53.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Integrating digital video analysis software into language teacher education: insights from conversation analysis2013In: AKDENIZ LANGUAGE STUDIES CONFERENCE, 2013, Vol. 70, p. 231-238Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at contributing to the development of language teacher education programmes in Turkey by integrating Conversation Analysis into the current curriculum. This short paper will argue for the use of digital video analysis software, namely Transana,in order to improve teachers’ Classroom Interactional Competence. It will be suggested that by critically reflecting on video-recordings, teachers will develop a better understanding of the relationship between their language use and the learning opportunities they give to their students. It will also be argued that Transana, compared to audio-software, brings certain advantages to the training process, since it enables users to observe multimodal resources (e.g. body language) employed during classroom interaction. (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 54.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe University.
    Social Interaction and L2 Classroom Discourse2015 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    The Interplay between Collaborative Turn Sequences and Active Listenership: Implications for the Development of L2 Interactional Competence2019In: Teaching and testing L2 interactional competence: bridging theory and practice / [ed] Rafael Salaberry; Silvia Kunitz, Routledge, 2019, p. 110-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter shows that preliminary findings based on analyses of second language (L2) discussion task interactions involving learners who had previously had limited opportunities to practice oral communication. It focuses on participants’ deployment of responsive actions, and specifically focuses on turn completions in collaborative turn sequences. The chapter explains completions as ‘demonstrations of active listenership’ and argues that an interplay between collaborative turn sequences and demonstration of active listenership in relation to L2 interactional competence (IC). It provides a conversation analytic approach to data, followed by a post-analytic corpus linguistic annotation to present frequencies and a plot analysis using corpus software. Social interaction is a co-constructed accomplishment. The chapter presents a review of listenership, collaborative completions and L2 IC. It also presents a sequential analysis of representative extracts from the collection. The chapter outlines the quantitative findings from post-analytic observations.

  • 56.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Foreign Languages Educ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Transcribing Talk and Interaction: by Christopher Joseph Jenks2013In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 353-355Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Sert, Olcay
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Balaman, Ufuk
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Orientations to Negotiated Language and Task Rules in Online L2 Interaction2018In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 355-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research shows that negotiation of meaning in online task-oriented interactions can be a catalyst for L2 (second/foreign/additional language) development. However, how learners undertake such negotiation work and what kind of an impact it has on interactional development in an L2 are still largely unknown mainly due to a lack of focus on task engagement processes. A conversation analytic investigation into negotiation of meaning (NoM) in task-oriented interactions can bring evidence to such development, as conversation analysis (CA), given its analytic tools, allows us to see how participant orientations in interaction evolve over time. Based on an examination of screen-recorded multiparty online task-oriented interactions, this study aimed to describe how users (n=8) of an L2 (1) negotiate and co-construct language and task rules and (2) later show orientations to these rules both in the short term (50 minutes) and in the long term (8 weeks). The findings showed that in addition to negotiating existing rules, the learners co-constructed new rules around an action called policing, which occurred when the learners attended to the breach of language and task rules. Furthermore, even after the negotiation work was completed, they oriented to negotiated rules through policing their own utterances (i.e. self-policing). Overall, this interactional continuum (from other-repairs to self-repairs) brought longitudinal evidence to bear on the role of NoM in the development of L2 interactional competence. These findings bring new insights into NoM, technology-mediated task-based language teaching (TBLT), and CA for second language acquisition (SLA).

  • 58.
    Sert, Olcay
    et al.
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Jacknick, Christine M.
    The City University of New York.
    Student smiles and the negotiation of epistemics in L2 classrooms2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 77, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the interactional unfolding of student smiles in instructed language learning settings drawing on data from both English as a Second Language and as a Foreign Language classrooms. Conversational actions performed by participants through ‘smiles’ is an under-researched area, especially in classroom settings where teachers’ and students’ smiles may serve different functions due to the institutional nature of ongoing interactions. To address this research gap, we aim at investigating the interactional unfolding of student smiles in English language classrooms based on 16 h of video-recordings in Luxembourg and 45 h of video-recordings in the US. Taking a conversation-analytic approach, we show how participants use smiles to index and resolve interactional trouble. Our analysis shows that smiles and epistemic issues in the classroom are intricately connected, and in the case of interactional trouble related to epistemic access, student smiles serve to maintain affiliation and to promote the progressivity of talk. The findings of the paper have implications for understanding the interactional unfolding of smiles in institutional interaction in general, and in classroom interaction in particular.

  • 59.
    Sert, Olcay
    et al.
    Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Walsh, Steve
    Newcastle University, UK.
    The interactional management of claims of insufficient knowledge in English language classrooms2013In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 542-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper primarily investigates the interactional unfolding and management of claims of insufficient knowledge’ (Beach and Metzger 1997) in two English language classrooms from a multi-modal, conversation-analytic perspective. The analyses draw on a close, micro-analytic account of sequential organisation of talk as well as on various multi-semiotic resources the participants enact including gaze, gestures, body movements and orientations to classroom artefacts. The research utilises transcriptions of 16 (classroom) hours of video recordings, which were collected over a six-week period in 2010 in a public school in Luxembourg. The findings show that establishing recipiency through mutual gaze and turn allocation practices have interactional and pedagogical consequences that may lead to claims of insufficient knowledge. Furthermore, the findings illustrate various multi-modal resources the students use (e.g. gaze movements, facial gestures and headshakes) to initiate embodied claims of no knowledge and to show specific exchange structures. Finally, we suggest that certain interactional resources, including embodied vocabulary explanations and Designedly Incomplete Utterances (Koshik 2002), deployed by the teacher after a student’s claim of insufficient knowledge may lead to student engagement, which is a desirable pedagogical goal. Our findings have implications for the analysis of insufficient knowledge, for teaching, teacher education and in particular for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence (Walsh 2006).

  • 60.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Edinburgh University, UK.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mežek, Špela
    Pecorari, Diane
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Conditions for vocabulary acquisition in multimodal and multilingual environments2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Sheikhi, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Förstaspråkstalarens roll i vägledningssamtal med andraspråkstalare: Förhandling och förenkling som stöd för delad förståelse.2014In: Svenskans beskrivning 33: Förhandlingar vid Trettiotredje sammankomstenför svenskans beskrivningHelsingfors den 15–17 maj 2013, 2014, p. 437-448Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Sheikhi, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Leppänen, Annaliina
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Sociala karriärer, språklig kompetens och identitet: En förstudie bland sverigefinnar och kaldéer i Eskilstuna2006In: Utbildningsval, karriärer, språkliga kompetenser och identiteter. (U-SOKKI): Del II – pilotstudiefasen / [ed] Jarmo Lainio, Eskilstuna: Institutionen för humaniora, Mälardalens högskola , 2006, p. 7-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Sundell, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    ”Sök hjälp, det är inte normalt eller ens ok”: En studie av språkliga konstruktioner av föreställningar om sexuella praktiker2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna diskurspsykologiska studie är att undersöka hur språkliga konstruktioner av föreställningar om sexuella praktiker ser ut på två diskussionsforum på internet: Familjeliv och Darkside. Studien undersöker kritiskt effekterna av utsagor i diskussionstrådar som behandlar sexuella praktiker och skisserar utifrån det en version av förekomsten av diskurer och diskursordningar på nämnda forum. Temat för studien är språk, makt och sexuella praktiker. Resultatet visar på både likheter och skillnader i sätt att tala om och förstå sexuella praktiker på respektive forum. Slutsatsen är att det finns en fundamental skillnad mellan föreställningarna om sexuella praktiker forumen emellan; sex förstås som en relationsaktivitet på Familjeliv medan Darksideanvändarna förstår sexuella praktiker utifrån ett individuellt perspektiv. Därefter finns en medvetenhet kring den ”allmänna” föreställningen om sexuella praktiker och dess villkor närvarande på båda forumen, men dominerar på Familjeliv, samtidigt som användarna på Darkside konstruerar en diskursordning som präglas av en ”avvikande” syn på sexuella praktiker. I det allmänna talet reproduceras i högre grad vårt historiska arv i syn på sexualitet och sexuella praktiker medan ett större motstånd och lösgörande från gamla normer sker i det avvikande.

  • 64.
    Sundgren, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Diskursmarkörer över tid. Individuell variation och förändring2014In: Fint språk/Good Language: Festskrift till Lars-Gunnar Andersson, Göteborg: Meijerbergs institut för svensk etymologisk forskning, Göteborgs universitet , 2014, p. 163-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Svensson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    The Way of the Word: Vocabulary learning strategies in an upper secondary school in Sweden2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the hardest challenges that learners may face during the process of acquiring a second language is learning vocabulary. Knowledge of vocabulary is an important factor when achieving the competence to communicate in a foreign language. There are multiple strategies available when it comes to learning new words, depending on factors such as the learner, the environment, and the context. Essentially, as Nation (2001) maintains, there are two ways of learning vocabulary: "incidental learning" and "direct intentional learning". Although there is a growing body of research on vocabulary learning strategies employed by students, studies in the Swedish context that take into consideration both students’ and teachers’ perspectives are scarce. Against this background, this mixed methods study examines on the one hand which strategies to learn and remember new words are preferable from the students' perspective and on the other hand it also investigates what strategies the teachers are actually using and encouraging in the English subject in a Swedish upper secondary school.    The reported preferences of the students indicate that they do not explicitly use vocabulary learning strategies (VLSs) to any great extent at all, while their teachers' view is that the students should largely be responsible enough to care for their own vocabulary acquisition. However, the students suggest one VLS to be of great advantage to themselves: to use their teacher as help rather than for example dictionaries or textbooks. This is, however, something that the teachers do not encourage in their classrooms, although previous research has shown the benefits of using source language translations in second language learning.   

  • 66.
    Svensson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Yes.
    "Vi ställer aldrig ens frågan": Hur pedagoger och skolledare identifierar och vägleder särskilt begåvade elever i svenska på gymnasiet2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att dels studera om och hur gymnasielärare identifierar och arbetar med särbegåvade elever i svenska och dels hur skolledare stödjer både lärare och elever i frågan. I studien har tre svensklärare och tre skolledare intervjuats och och 26 svensklärare har svarat på enkätfrågor. Studien visar att både lärare och skolledare ser att skolans uppdrag i dag mer fokuserar på elever som inte uppnår godkänt betyg i svenskämnet, även om lärarna ser den individanpassade undervisningen i allmänhet som ett sätt att nå ut till så många som möjligt. Någon specifik planering för att identifiera och utmana särskilt begåvade elever är inte vedertagen på de undersökta skolorna, utan ansvaret hamnar här på den enskilde läraren och dennes egna intresse för den elevgruppen. Intervjuade lärare och skolledare är överens om att skolan i dag inte passar samtliga elever vilket i förlängningen kan drabba de särbegåvade eleverna, då dessa inte upptäcks och stimuleras i sin utveckling. Samtidigt finns även en konsensus om att större resurser än i dag också borde läggas på elever som anses vara särbegåvade.

  • 67.
    Svensson, Åsa
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Tillgodoses nyanlända elevers behov av andraspråksinlärning för att klara undervisningen i ordinarie klasser?: En kvalitativ undersökning av de internationella klasserna.2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med undersökningen är att undersöka de nyanländas situation i de internationella

    klasserna. Jag har använt intervjuer för att få fram de berördas erfarenheter av de

    internationella klasserna, samt utgått från de lokala och de nationella styrdokumenten. De som

    jag har intervjuat är; elever som går i internationell klass, elever som har gått i sådan klass,

    lärare i sådana klasser, lärare i ordinarie klass samt skolans rektor. Av resultatet av

    intervjuerna har jag gjort en jämförande analys för att se skillnader och likheter i

    informanternas svar.

    Slutsatserna visar att eleverna ställer sig positiva till den undervisning de fått. Lärarna och

    rektor känner sig mer tveksamma och anser att undervisningen och organisationen alltid kan

    förbättras. Det är heller inte helt klarlagt vilken undervisningsmodell som är den bästa för de

    nyanlända eleverna. Man kan i alla fall konstatera att modersmålet har betydelse för elevens

    identitet och för andraspråksinlärningen.

  • 68.
    Thorell Popa, Elena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Hur undervisningsspråket påverkar språkutvecklingen: Ett utvecklingsarbete i engelska i skolår 12011Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta examensarbete undersöker jag huruvida undervisningsspråket påverkar resultatet när man lär sig ett nytt språk. Studien genomfördes i en klass i år ett där två grupper fått engelskundervisning på olika språk, ena gruppen via instruktioner på svenska och den andra enbart på engelska, vilket utgjorde min metod.

    Resultatet av tester med eleverna visade att de som endast fått undervisning på engelska kunde svara på fler frågor än de som fått det på svenska.  Då eleverna även kan ha tränat olika mycket inför detta test, måste jag också se till övrig undervisning för att kunna dra slutsatser.

    Elever som får höra ett nytt språk oftare har också fler chanser att lyssna till hur det låter och hur man använder det, och kan på så sätt samla information som hjälper dem att själva använda språket. Min slutsats att undervisningsspråket har viss betydelse när man lär sig ett nytt språk.

  • 69.
    Tuna Berglin, Ieva
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    "Really? You're gonna say 'tunes'?": The functions of register clashes in the television drama series Gilmore Girls2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Register clashes are a linguistic phenomenon that occurs in both real and fictional interaction. This study, based on the theory of register as developed by Halliday, examines the functions of register clashes in the television drama series Gilmore Girls. It was hypothesized that the function of register clashes is to create humor, to characterize some characters on the show as sophisticated and witty and some others as lacking in communicative competence, or what is popularly referred to as geeky or nerdy, as well as to characterize the show. A total of 1,306 cases of register clashes were identified, of which 761 cases (58.3 percent) were clear cases and 545 cases (41.7 percent) were somewhat more doubtful. Nearly all cases of register clashes found were considered to have been used to create humor. Eight out of the ten most productive characters with respect to the utterance of register clashes were found to be characterized as witty; the other two characters produced register clashes in a way that characterized them as geeky. Each of the six episodes examined in this study was found to contain many instances of register clashes, regardless of the fact that each was written by a different author. The results thus suggest that the function of register clashes in Gilmore Girls is indeed to create humor, to characterize the characters, and to characterize the show.

  • 70.
    Vinter, Vanja Elizabeth Liv
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    You Call me a Bitch Like It's a Bad Thing: A Study into the Current Use and Semantic Properties of the Noun Bitch2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses and discusses the present-day use of the noun bitch, as the term in contemporary usage seems to have started to deviate from the lexical definition. Traditionally considered an insult when applied to a woman, bitch has recently started being used as a self-imposed label rather than an applied one. Such a phenomenon indicates reappropriation, a negotiation of the meaning and semantics of a word. The purpose of this study is to investigate the origin and semantics of the term, as well as its historical usage and developments. Of particular interest and significance regarding the semantic development of bitch are social and extra-linguistic factors such as political movements, as will be evident from the results presented. Additionally, the present-day use of the term is analysed using lexical semantics and corpus linguistics, with the adjective collocates of the term retrieved from two corpora. Further, contemporary music lyrics are quoted and analysed to lend further support to the corpus findings regarding the present-day use, as well as the indicated semantic change and reappropriation. The results indicate that the term bitch is undergoing a reappropriation and is currently used both as a derogatory and self-empowering term. It is hoped that this paper will give insight to the phenomenon of reappropriation and the connection between social and linguistic change, as well as the importance of context in determining the meaning of a term.

  • 71.
    Westerholm, Jim
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    "Damn good coffee": Swear words and advertising2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Swear words and their role in advertising have been debated for a long time. There has been a general sentiment that the use of swear words should be avoided in ads so they would not appear crass or offensive. Does this sentiment still reflect reality or could swear words be used to good effect in advertising? The aim of the present study is to find out how a number of informants react to the presence of swear words in advertisements, and what their general attitude toward swearing is. An online survey with 54 respondents provided quantitative data, and two group interviews supplemented it with more qualitative information. The study shows that respondents reacted favourably towards adverts with swear words as long as they were not too offensive.

  • 72.
    Ziegler, Gudrun
    et al.
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Durus, Natalia
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Hacettepe University, Ankara Turkey.
    Plurilingual Repertoires in the ESL Classroom: The Case of the European School2013In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 47, no 3, SI, p. 643-650Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Ziegler, Gudrun
    et al.
    University of Luxembourg.
    Durus, Natalia
    University of Luxembourg.
    Sert, Olcay
    Hacettepe University, Turkey .
    Family, Neiloufar
    University of Luxembourg.
    Analyzing ELT in the European Arena: Multilingual Practices2015In: International Perspectives on ELT Classroom Interaction / [ed] Christopher Joseph Jenks and Paul Seedhouse, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 1, p. 188-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
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