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  • 51.
    Baumgart, Stephan
    et al.
    E&E System Architecture Department, Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Joakim
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Functional Safety in Product Lines - A Systematic Mapping Study2016In: 42nd Euromicro Conference series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications SEAA 2016, 2016, p. 313-322Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software product line engineering is a widely used approach to plan and manage reuse of software. When safety critical products are developed, achieving functional safety standard compliance must be shown. The requirements stated in the functional safety standards also apply when safety critical products are developed in product lines. Managing functional safety in industrial product lines is challenging and work around solutions are applied in practice. The objective of this research is to collect and review reported research publications focusing on achieving safety in product lines and to identify gaps in todays research. We conduct a systematic mapping study of research publications reported until January 2016.We identify 39 research articles to be included in a list of primary studies and analyze how product lines are documented, which safety-related topics are covered and which evaluation method the studies apply. Generally, we find that the area of how to achieve functional safety in product lines needs more attention. Our study provides an overview on which topics have been discussed until now and which safety-related topics need more attention.

  • 52.
    Baumgart, Stephan
    et al.
    Volvo Construct Equipment, E&E Syst Architecture Dept, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Joakim
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Punnekkat, Sasikumar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Industrial Challenges to Achieve Functional Safety Compliance in Product Lines2014In: 2014 40TH EUROMICRO CONFERENCE SERIES ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND ADVANCED APPLICATIONS (SEAA 2014), 2014, p. 356-360Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing safety critical products demands a clear safety argumentation for each product in spite of whether it has been derived from a product line or not. The functional safety standards do not explain how to develop safety critical products in product lines, and the product line concept is lacking specific approaches to develop safety critical products. Nonetheless, product lines are well-established concepts even in companies developing safety critical products. In this paper we present the results of an exploratory study interviewing 15 practitioners from 6 different companies. We identify typical challenges and approaches from industry and discuss their suitability. The challenges and approaches brought out by this study help us to identify and enhance applicable methods from the product line engineering domain that can meet the challenges in the safety critical domain as well.

  • 53.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A corporate perspective on global management and development of lean production systems: A case study2014In: Handbook of Research on Design and Management of Lean Production Systems, IGI Global, 2014, p. 270-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge for every multinational manufacturing company with the ambition to implement the lean production concept is how to implement it worldwide within its global manufacturing footprint. There are many decisions that need to be taken from a company group perspective when planning and implementing a lean program. These concern the level of standardization on principles and tools, how to structure and organize additional resources, how to share experiences within the organization, and how to sustain the effort. These factors are elaborated in this chapter from a factory perspective based on the presentation of the lean journey of Gyproc AB, a process industry company within the Gypsum part of the large Saint Gobain group. The company has worked for about ten years with implementing world-class manufacturing and has extensive experience of the issues of starting-up and sustaining the lean-based concept. 

  • 54.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 55.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Användandet av tillståndsbaserat underhåll i svensk industri - en enkätundersökning genomförd på Underhållsmässan 20042004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Som ett led i forskningsprojektet ”Tillståndsbaserat underhåll i tekniska system2 ” genomfördes en enkät för att ta reda på i vilken utsträckning olika företag och industrier/branscher använder sig av tillståndsbaserat underhåll. Enkäten bestod av 10 stycken frågor med olika svarskategorier (se Metod och Bilaga). Syftet med enkäten var att snabbt få en bild av hur svensk industri utför sina underhållsaktiviteter. Total samlades 28 ifyllda enkäter in. För att underlätta sammanställning delades enkätsvaren in i fyra kategorier av industrier: process-, verkstads-, läkemedels/livsmedels- och energiindustrin. Resultatet ur en sådan här liten undersökning behöver naturligtvis inte vara representativt för hela den svenska industrin, dock kan vissa slutsatser dras.

  • 56.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Classification of Machine Equipment2011In: Published in Proceedings of 1st Conference on Maintenance Performance Measurement & Management, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden, Editor(s):Galar, D., Parida, A., Schunnesson, H., and Kumar, U., Luleå, Sweden: Luleå tekniska universitet , 2011, p. 99-103Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to present the process, results, and range of usability of a machine classification in a company that is producing discrete items. The classifications were built on the four factors of: (1) if the machines had any redundancy, (2) the utilization factor of the machines, (3) the quality impact of the machines, and finally, (4) the age of the machines. Through different levels and an assessment process the machines were classified in AAA-, AA-, A-, B-, or C-classes, AAA being the most critical. The classifications were performed in teams consisting of representatives from maintenance- and production engineering as well as production managers and operators, this, in order to achieve a consensus regarding the classification results. The result not only gave a deepened view on the factory layout, it also gave a good foundation to prioritize many improvement initiatives. Several ranges of use will be illustrated in the paper, as well as how the process and results has been received by the employees.

  • 57.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Condition based maintenance systems: An Investigation of Technical Constituets and Organizational Aspects2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 58.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Using a game-based learning approach in teaching overall equipment effectivenessIn: Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, ISSN 1355-2511, E-ISSN 1758-7832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel training material for the performance indicator overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) in the form of a game-based learning (GBL) approach to be used in Industry and University context. The paper will present the development of the game as well as results from tests of the game with Industry employees and University students. Design/methodology/approach – The data that are used in the game have been acquired from real OEE data logs of a reference company. The game has been refined iteratively using feedback from the participants of the tests. Findings – The paper presents the game with its components and learning objectives. A comparison of various theoretical factors on GBL and the novel trainingmaterial is performed and future improvements are suggested. Research limitations/implications – The game has been developed based on OEE data logs from only one reference company. Practical implications – The training material and specifically the game can be used to train Industrial workers and University students to better envision OEE as a performance indicator. Originality/value – Serious games on lean manufacturing have been developed and played for a long time. While some of these games include OEE as an important result parameter, none really demonstrates how it is measured and analyzed.

  • 59.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Jackson, Mats
    Important Aspects to take into Consideration when Deciding to Implement Condition Based Maintenance2004In: COMADEM 2004 Proceedings, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Machining Equipment Life Cycle Costing Model with Dynamic Maintenance Cost2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 48, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how a Life cycle cost or Total cost of ownership analysis has been performed on machining equipment in a Swedish company. Life cycle cost models used in case studies are compared to an empirical model, used at the company, where dynamic energy, fluid, and maintenance cost are included. Linear and variable factors in the models are analyzed and discussed regarding data availability and estimation, especially with emphasis on maintenance. The life cycle cost aspect of the equipment give guidelines to consider operation, maintenance, tools, energy, and fluid cost in addition to acquisition cost, when designing/specifying the equipment.

  • 61.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Lundström, Gunnar
    Volvo Construction Equipment Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    On the importance of combining "the new" with "the old" - One important prerequisite for maintenance in industry 4.02018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 118-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development and technological advancement within Industry 4.0 is on top of agendas worldwide. The prediction that cost of technology will decrease while computational power will increase may lead to a maintenance community putting too much trust in technological advancement, leaving basic maintenance concepts and management underdeveloped or even unimplemented in the future. This paper will, through a case study, exemplify the importance of combining basic maintenance concepts and management, e.g., early equipment management, predetermined preventive maintenance, and root-cause failure analysis and elimination, with technological advancement, e.g., predictive maintenance, cyber-physical systems, internet of things, and big data, in order to increase total maintenance effectiveness.

  • 62.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Olsson, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Technical Design of Condition Based Maintenance Systems - A Case Study Using Sound Analysis and Case-Based Reasoning2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Productivity is a key weapon for manufacturing companies to stay competitive in a continuous growing global market. Increased productivity can be achieved through increased availability. This has directed focus on different maintenance types and maintenance strategies. Increased availability through efficient maintenance can be achieved through less corrective maintenance actions and more accurate preventive maintenance intervals. Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) is a technology that strives to identify incipient faults before they become critical which enables more accurate planning of the preventive maintenance. CBM can be achieved by utilizing complex technical systems or by humans manually monitoring the condition by using their experience, normally a mixture of both is used. Although CBM holds a lot of benefits compared to other maintenance types it is not yet commonly utilized in industry. One reason for this might be that the maturity level in complex technical CBM system is too low. This paper will acknowledge this possible reason, although not trying to resolve it, but focusing on system technology with component strategy and an open approach to condition parameters as the objective is fulfilled. This paper will theoretically discuss the technical components of a complete CBM system approach and by a case study illustrate how a CBM system for industrial robot fault detection/diagnosis can be designed using the Artificial Intelligence method Case-Based Reasoning and sound analysis.

  • 63.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Olsson, Erik
    Mälardalen University, Department of Computer Science and Electronics.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Department of Computer Science and Electronics.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Technical Design of Condition Based Maintenance Systems: A Case Study using Sound Analysis and Case-Based Reasoning2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construct Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Requirements and Needs-A Foundation for Reducing Maintenance-Related Waste2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10TH WORLD CONGRESS ON ENGINEERING ASSET MANAGEMENT (WCEAM 2015), 2016, p. 105-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to discuss and elaborate on requirements of maintenance and the resulting maintenance needs in order to maintain said requirements without introducing waste while doing so, taking into account both external and internal wastes. The paper will present, and elaborate on, conceptual models that can be utilized in maintenance operations in order to increase awareness of the importance of well-founded customer/stakeholder requirements in order to articulate appropriate maintenance needs in order to balance effectiveness and efficiency as well as to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste.

  • 65.
    Berglund, Gustav
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lind, Emma
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Framtagning av produktionstavlor: Visuell styrning av taktad produktion2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis was written on the behalf of Bombardier Transportation in Västerås and constitutes the final part of the master program in engineering – Innovation, production and logistics, at Mälardalens University in Eskilstuna.

    Bombardier Transportation produces converters for trains at their factory in Västerås. One of the company’s current problems is the lack of visual management of their production. There are a lot of people involved in the production and it is important to visualize the production status in order to give everyone involved a clear view of the present production state. Therefore, the aim of this thesis was to develop a proposal of how the production status could be visualized by means of electronic production status boards.

    To be able to form a base for the thesis, information was collected in various ways. A theoretical study of Lean production, visual management and takted production was conducted as well as benchmarking at other companies who use visual management. In addition, information was collected internally by interviews at Bombardier Transportation. The purpose of the interviews was to highlight the employees’ thoughts and opinions on visual management. Finally, a mapping of the two production lines which the thesis is directed towards was performed.

    After collecting and analyzing the information the most useful data was selected to create a solid foundation to build the rest of the thesis on. This information also formed the base of a workshop with the aim of involving people within the company and benefit from their knowledge. The workshop resulted in four different proposals of electronic production status boards which were then optimized into one final proposal.

    The final proposal consists of a technical specification for electronic production status boards. It is divided into six different implementation stages, to fit the company’s needs, and contains a layout suggestion and as well as a thorough description of all functions of the electronic productions status boards.

  • 66.
    Berglund, Rachael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Critical Psychosocial Risk Treatment for Engineers and Technicians2019In: ICRAM 2019 ICRAM, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Bredberg, Sofia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Den stora produktionen i den lilla fabriken: En fallstudie om Leans påverkan på platsbrist2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I en plåtbearbetande verkstad norr om Stockholm, upplevs en platsbrist så akut att företaget överväga att bygga ut lokalerna. Då utbyggnad dröjer vill de utvärdera alternativa lösningar för platsbristen. Syftet är med denna studie är att studera situationen och utvärdera hur en implementering av Leanprinciperna slöseri elimnering, 5S och JIT skulle kunna påverka platsbristen samt hur det skulle kunna införas. Arbetet utförs för att visa på en alternativ lösning samt motivera personalen på företaget att förbättras.

    En fallstudie genomförs på företaget ovan beskrivet, där empiriska data samlats in genom observationer och intervjuer och sedan analyserades tematiskt mot den teoretiska referensramen.

    Den empiriska datan kategoriserades tematiskt och stort fokus lades på ordning, lager och flöde, men även utbildning, kvalitet och kommunikation.

    Studien kom fram till att höga nivåer av produkter i arbete och stora volymer av verktyg är grundorsakerna till platsbristen på företaget. Genom att applicera en slöserieliminerande strategi kan fallföretaget minska mängden lager, både produkter i arbete och färdigvarulager, samt minska behovet för lagringsplatser som uppkommer på grund av flödets väg genom verkstaden, vilket i sin tur minskar platsbristen. Applicering av 5S skulle minska volymerna av verktyg och färdigvarulager, och JIT implementering skulle minska mängden produkter i arbete.

    Företaget rekommenderas börjar arbeta för att införa Leanprinciperna, samt skapa en kultur där alla på företaget tillsammans arbetar för att förbättra företaget.

  • 68.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The critical role of design information for improved equipment supplier integration during production system design2011In: Proceedings of the 44th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of production equipment is one step of the production system design process. When design and building of production equipment is handed over to an equipment supplier, higher requirements are placed on the design information exchange to secure that the equipment corresponds to technical and financial requirements of the buying company. The paper presents results on characteristics of design information exchanged and success factors for effective collaboration between equipment suppliers and manufacturing companies. Results are based on an in-depth case study at a Swedish manufacturing company and a survey of 25 equipment suppliers.

  • 69.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Exploring requirement specification of the production system – a position paper2009In: Paper presented at the 3rd SwedishProduction Symposium, Gothenburg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s turbulent environment, manufacturing companies are forced to efficiently change or develop production systems that are robust and dynamic enough to handle changing production situations during its entire life-cycle. To achieve such a production system requires a structured development process that should be carried out simultaneously to the product development process and considers the company’s product portfolio. Within a structured development process, the requirements specification of the proposed system is vital since it will guide the design process and the evaluation of the system on a conceptual as well as a detailed level. The aim of this paper is to address the requirement specification process that covers all aspects of the production system to be designed. This paper argues for the need of a holistic view in the requirement specification process of production systems. A holistic view of the overall process will facilitate to manage the various demands and categories important to deal with in the specification of requirements. Based on the holistic view it will be possible to identify the gates and stakeholders of the process itself, but also the substantial content of this process map.

  • 70.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Core plant capabilities for competitive production development - a literature review2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although plant role issues have been discussed in a number of studies, there is limited insights in literature on the capabilities that are required for the core plant to be excellent. Drawing on a capability based perspective, the purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding of core plant capabilities for competitive production development by analysing the multidisciplinary literature on the core plant concept. We synthesis our findings into a conceptual model that distinguishing capabilities required to be (come) and act as an excellent core plant and thus widen the core plant concept and offer several contributions.

  • 71.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier collaboration in production equipment development – a lifecycle perspective2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to refine existing theories on collaboration between users and suppliers in joint production equipment development projects by exploring critical collaboration activities throughout the lifecycle stages of the production equipment. By means of a literature review and a multiple case study of two equipment suppliers and two users, a lifecycle perspective on production equipment development is adopted. Our results show that collaboration intensity depends on the specific lifecycle stage of the production equipment. The contributions of this paper are illustrated in a developed lifecycle model in order to facilitate practitioners in organising critical collaboration activities.

  • 72.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Development of Robust Production Equipment: A guide to strong collaboration between users and suppliers2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of today’s global and increasingly tough competition is narrow market windows and a demand for quick volume increases in production. This in turn means increased demands for a rapid and effective development of production equipment that ensures high performance right at the start of production. Robust production equipment with a high level of production efficiency and reduced costs for operation and maintenance therefore make up one of the most important factors for strong competitiveness and high profitability for Swedish industrial enterprises. Strong collaboration between users and suppliers is the key to success in this type of investment project. This handbook therefore presents a model that can be used by manufacturing companies who want to develop robust production equipment. The model and the other recommendations of the handbook focus on projects that are to be carried out in strong collaboration and are targeted at both users and suppliers. The model has been deve-loped through “EQUIP – User-supplier integration in production equipment design”, which has received funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013–2016. The model consists of seven development phases based on the production equipment life cycle: Phase 1 – Preliminary study Phase 2 – Concept study Phase 3 – Procurement Phase 4 – Detailed design Phase 5 – Construction Phase 6 – Installation and commissioning Phase 7 – Production In each phase, critical activity steps and recommendations are presented for how to distribute responsibility within and between the parties involved. The model adopts a life cycle perspective for development projects in order to facilitate collaboration and to more clearly visualise the link between activities and their impact on the project success. Within the scope of an investment project, there is a great potential for developing sustainable production solutions. For this reason, this handbook also presents seven guidelines that may provide you with support in developing production equipment that remains secure, lean and sustainable throughout the equipment life cycle. The main purpose of the handbook is to facilitate collaboration through the whole investment project in a way that benefits both parties and which contributes to lasting relationships. The results of the research project show that there is a great interest in improved collaboration from both users and suppliers. For this reason, support, tools and preparedness from both parties are required to venture into investing time and resources in collaboration from the beginning, in the early phases of a new development project. This is then the potential to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration and for designing the best possible production equipment in the shortest time possible.

  • 73.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Utveckling av Robust Produktionsutrustning: En guide för god samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Av dagens globala och allt hårdare konkurrens följer korta marknadsfönster och krav på snabb volym- uppgång i produktion. Det innebär i sin tur ökade krav på snabb och effektiv utveckling av produktions- utrustning som säkerställer hög prestanda direkt vid produktionsstart. Robust produktionsutrustning med hög produktionseffektivitet och minskade kostnader för drift och underhåll är därför en av de viktigaste faktorerna för stark konkurrenskraft och hög lönsamhet för svenska industriföretag. God samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör är nyckeln till framgång i denna typ av investerings- projekt. Denna handbok presenterar därför en modell som kan användas av tillverkande företag som vill utveckla robust produktionsutrustning. Modellen och övriga rekommendationer i handboken fokuserar på projekt som ska genomföras i stark samverkan och riktar sig till både beställaren och leverantören. Den har utvecklats i forskningsprojektet ”EQUIP – kund- och leverantörsintegration i utformning av produktionsutrustning” som finansierats av KK-stiftelsen under 2013-2016. Modellen består av sju utvecklingsfaser som är baser- ade på produktionsutrustnings livscykel: Fas 1 – Förstudie Fas 2 – Konceptstudie Fas 3 – Upphandling Fas 4 – Detaljerad utformning Fas 5 – Uppbyggnad Fas 6 – Installation och driftsättning Fas 7 – Produktion I varje fas presenteras kritiska aktivitetssteg och rekommendationer för hur ansvaret för dessa bör fördelas inom och emellan deltagande parter. Modellen använder ett livscykelperspektiv för utvecklingsprojekt för att underlätta samverkan samt tydligare visualisera sambandet mellan aktiviteter och deras påverkan på projektets framgång. Inom ramen för ett investeringsprojekt finns stor potential att utveckla hållbara produktionslösningar. Därför presenterar denna handbok även sju guider som kan stödja er i att ta fram produktionsutrustning som är säker, lean och hållbar under hela utrustningens livscykel. Huvudsyftet med handboken är att underlätta samverkan under hela investeringsprojektet på ett sätt som gagnar båda parter och bidrar till varaktiga relationer. Forskningsprojektets resultat visar att det finns ett stort intresse för främjad samverkan från både beställ- are och leverantör. Därför behövs stöd, verktyg och beredskap från båda parter för att våga investera tid och resurser på samverkan redan från början, i de tidiga faserna av ett nytt utvecklingsprojekt. Det är då potentialen att lägga grunden till långsiktig samverkan och utforma bästa möjliga produktionsutrustning på kortast möjliga tid är som störst.

  • 74.
    Byary, Hamza
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Framtagning av ett fästelementssystem2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on providing innovative solutions to assist workers lacking technical knowledge at Husmuttern AB to assemble its products. The Swedish company produces standardized building-sections that can be assembled to build model-houses, and other forms of buildings in mobile factories. The company’s vision is to provide opportunities for inexperienced labors and newcomers to Sweden, and so playing a positive role in integrating immigrants into the Swedish market and society. To actualize this ambition, this paper aims specifically at developing tools/products that assist unskilled workers to reduce the margin of errors in determining where and how the screws will be placed when combining the wooden beams and plywood boards, which form the building sections.

     

    Semis-structured interviews with workers at Husmuttern AB were conducted to identify problems associated with the working process. Ullman’s product-developing method was employed to develop the facilitative tools. Several concepts were developed and compared in an attempt to find the best solution for the given problem(s), and eventually two proposed products were presented: the first is a template where holes are located to mark where the screws should be placed. The other product is basically an inclined plane with a drill-guide to direct the screw in the correct gradient and prevent the screw from moving through the process.

  • 75.
    Cadavid Cadavid, Juan Manuel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Discrete-Event Simulation: Development of a simulation project for Cell 14 at Volvo CE Components2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the company-wide CS09 project being carried out at Volvo CE Components, Cell 14 will have changes in terms of distribution of machines and parts routing to meet the lean manufacturing goals established.  These changes are of course dependant on future production volumes, as well as lot sizing and material handling considerations.

    In this context, an important emphasis is given to the awareness of the performance measures that support decision making in these production development projects.  By using simulation as a confirmation tool, it is possible to re-assess these measures by testing the impact of changes in complex situations, in line with the lean manufacturing principles.

    The aim of the project is to develop a discrete event simulation model following the methodology proposed by Banks et al (1999).  A model of Cell 14 will be built using the software Technomatix Plant Simulation ® which is used by the Company and the results from the simulation study will be analyzed.

  • 76.
    Carnbo, Linda
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Suonperä, Nadja
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Projektering av robotcell2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med examensarbetet var att projektera en fysisk robotcell till Haldex i Landskrona, tillverkare av bromshävarmar, då det finns ett behov hos dem att effektivisera sin produktion för att kunna bibehålla konkurrenskraften och tillverkningen i Sverige. Bromshävarmen är en mogen produkt vilket medför att det inte skulle bli lönsamt att omforma den utan istället fokusera på tillverkningen. Därför vore lösningen att automatisera den del av monteringslinan som inte tillför något värde till slutprodukten. Robotcellen kommer att placeras på bromshävarmarnas monteringslina som en automatiserad station vilken ska utföra kvalitetskontroll av bromshävarmarna. Examensarbetet ingår i ett pågående forskningsprojekt på Mälardalens högskola inom Lean Automation, med Robotdalen och Haldex. Lean Automation handlar om att vid användandet av Lean Produktion utgå från ett automationsperspektiv.Slutprodukten av examensarbetet skulle innefatta projektering av en robotcell. Den skulle bestå av konceptuell design av robotcell samt konstruktion av robotstativ och gripfingrar. Utifrån den slutliga cell-layouten skulle en testcell på Mälardalens högskola tas fram vilken skulle motsvara den cell som kommer att implementeras på Haldex i Landskrona. Arbetet skulle även innefatta framtagning av ritning till robotstativ med tillhörande hållfasthetsberäkningar och gripfingrar till given chuck. Dessa skulle tas fram och levereras till Haldex.Genom konceptgenerering arbetades cell-layouten fram. Detta utfördes genom att först besöka fabriken för att samla information, därefter togs skisser fram och arbetet med att skapa visualiseringar i 3DCreate påbörjades. Detta gav alla involverade en gemensam bild av koncepten. De koncept som inte blev godkända av uppdragsgivaren ratades och arbetet med kvarvarande koncept fortsatte. Tillslut togs ett koncept fram som gemensamt med Haldex bedömdes att bli den slutliga cell-layouten. Till den nya robotcellen på Haldex behövdes ett stativ till roboten att stå på, som placerade den på en lämplig arbetsnivå i cellen, vilket var i höjd med inbanan på 1220 mm eftersom roboten hade bäst räckvidd inom detta arbetsområde. Stativet konstruerades i SolidWorks där även beräkningar i SolidWorks simulation genomfördes, för att påvisa att stativet skulle klara av tilltänkta externa laster. Efter godkända beräkningar skickades ritningar till Haldex för tillverkning. Då arbetet på stationen i nuläget sker manuellt, fanns inga gripfingrar som är lämpade för den uppgiften som roboten ska genomföra. Därför skulle nya tas fram, lämpade för uppgiften. Gripfingrarna togs fram genom att utgå från befintliga gripfingrar som följde med den chuck Haldex skickade till MDH. Dessa granskades och de nya gripfingrarna blev en variant av de gamla men de kunde nu greppa bromshävarmen. Gripfingrarna konstruerades i SolidWorks och frästes fram i en CNC-maskin på MDH. De seghärdades för ökad hållfasthet innan de skickades till Haldex.Rekommendationerna till Haldex var att testa gripfingrarna då det inte gjordes i samband med framställningen. MDH bör påbörja programmering och provkörning av testcellen.

  • 77.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    A Conceptual Evaluation Framework for Performance Measurements within Industrial Product Development2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to deliver streams of new products to the market is more important than ever before. Still, no generally accepted performance measurement framework for product development exists. This paper outlines a performance measurement evaluation matrix, based on extensive qualitative research within large organizations developing industrial products in Sweden, that enable managers to assess what is and what is not measured in the product development process. This is important in order to continuously keep the measurement system updated according to the current needs of the organization.

  • 78.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Performance Evaluation in an Industrial Product Development Context2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s turbulent and competitive environment the need for deploying product development investments more efficiently and effectively is stronger than ever. To assist managers in this context, two conceptual tools to support the performance evaluation process in a product development context have been developed, based on extensive exploratory case studies. Results indicate that it is common to associate performance measures with time, cost and quality; missing is the monitoring of the value created. It is argued that there needs to be a change in the perception of performance, before there can be any changes in the performance evaluation system.

  • 79.
    Cedervall, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kartläggning och effektivisering av ett komplext montage. En fallstudie utförd på ABB Machines slutmontage2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 80.
    Chawapatnakul, Jatuphol
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Redesign of Control Center Concept for Supporting Operators’ Efficiency: Discussion on Control Centers for Future Concept Improvement2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the varieties in knowledge advancements nowadays, the concepts of control room have been created in different directions. These concepts have been implemented in various fields of business to increase advantages over competitors. Meanwhile, an individual company has its own experiences and strategies, the results in the actual implementation are different to the conceptual plan. Most of them were not qualified to the actual specification and expectation. These exposures lead this research to find out and discuss about the proper criteria to improve the control centers’ performance. The viewpoints used in this study are discussed based on the perspectives of control system designers, operators, and researchers to create validity for the analysis and conclusion. The final result of this research can be used to generate realization in the necessities of improving control centers to support the operators’ performances to create competitive advantages for business sectors. In conclusion, this research aspires to be used as a guideline for the control centers design and improvement strategies to increase their performance and productivities.

  • 81.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Challenges in managing new product introduction projects: An explorative case study2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED Volume 2, 2017, Vol. 2, p. 259-268, article id DS87-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s market conditions, manufacturing companies are under pressure to constantly launch new products or product variants to the market in short intervals. The introduction of new products poses managerial implications on the existing production systems and their processes. Hence, the production organisations are increasingly involving in the new product development since the beginning of the project as they are responsible for the product introduction. The project management of new product introduction therefore play a significant role in the success of new product development. The existing literature covers a wide range of issues and disturbances in the product introduction process in different industries. However, little research exists on the management of new product introduction projects from a project management perspective especially from the viewpoint of production. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company, this paper examines the challenges in managing new product introduction projects in the production organisation. The study identified nine key challenges in the management of new product introduction projects which are associated to the resources, time-readiness and schedule, gated administration, ways of working, communication and time-sharing, learning, business case, co-ordination and alignment, and competences.

  • 82.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Experience Feedback Loops in the New Product Introduction Process2017In: 24TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PRODUCTION RESEARCH (ICPR), 2017, p. 44-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior research has identified the reuse of past experiences as a remarkable driver for achieving high levels of maturity for both product and production systems. Many companies put effort into capitalizing their own experiences through nurturing feedback loops and learning mechanisms at different phases in the new product introduction process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops on the performance of new product development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the new product introduction process. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the new product introduction process. This study was performed in close collaboration with a global manufacturing company that is responsible for the introduction of new products. The paper presents the identified feedback loops and 

  • 83.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Managing product introduction projects in operations key challenges in heavy-duty vehicle industry2018In: Journal of Modern Project Management, ISSN 2317-3963, E-ISSN 1747-0862, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 108-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s market conditions, manufacturing companies are under pressure to constantly launch new products or product variants to the market in short intervals. Introduction of new products poses managerial implications on the existing production systems and their processes. Hence, the production and operations organisations are increasingly involved in the early phases of new product development since they are responsible for the product introduction and delivery. The project management of product introduction therefore play a significant role in the success of new product development. The existing literature covers a wide range of issues and disturbances in the product introduction process in different industries. However, little research exists on the management of product introduction from a project management perspective especially from the viewpoint of operations. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company in heavy-duty vehicle industry, this paper examines key challenges in managing product introduction projects in the production and operations organisation. The study identified seven types of projects in relation to the product introduction. Further, nine key challenges are identified in the management of product introduction projects which are associated to the resources, time-readiness and schedule, gated administration, ways of working, communication and time-sharing, learning, business cases, co-ordination and alignment, and competences. The study contributes new insights into project management in operations by deepening the understanding on the issues associated to the product introduction projects.

  • 84.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing Lessons Learned For Product-Service Innovation: A proposal for a new method2016In: 6th Global Innovation and Knowledge Academy Annual Conference GIKA'16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing lessons learned practice for product-service innovation2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 11, p. 4986-4991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies adopt lessons-learned practices to transform gained experiences into useful knowledge for future benefit. Researchers have examined lessons-learned practices in project-based organizations that primarily develop pure products or services in various disciplines and industrial sectors. However, little research exists on the lessons-learned practices in manufacturing companies offering integrated product-service combinations. Therefore, this study performs three case studies in two large manufacturing companies undergoing a servitization journey to becoming product-service providers. The study identifies ten requirements under three main categories-content, process, and technology-for better organized lessons-learned practice. Drawing from the requirements analysis, this study develops a method for representing lessons learned in product-service innovation contexts. 

  • 86.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Pelle
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Dalarna Univ, Dalarna, Sweden.
    The Influence of Different Media Instructions on Solving a Procedural Task2015In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Volume 11, Issue DS 80-11, 2015, p. 173-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of different forms of media instructions on the process and outcomes of completing a specific procedural task. The experiment was conducted with four student groups having an education in the area of Information Design. In the experiment four media instructions – text only, text plus drawings, a series of pictures and video with narration – were considered. The findings show that the type of media has an influence on the ability to solve a procedural task and on group interaction and the way groups solve a task. Compared with the other instructions, video instruction triggered a different interaction and behavioural pattern during assembly. Participants considered both video and picture instructions as more usable in terms of facilitating the ability to understand, select and apply possible solutions to a given task. However, the video medium showed little influence on dialogue in the group during assembly. The instructions, such as text plus drawings, pictures and video had a similar influence on task performance times, whereas text instructions took three times longer to implement than other instructions.

  • 87.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Social media engagement strategy: Investigation of marketing and R & D interfaces in manufacturing industry2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 138-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that effective marketing and R&D interface is pivotal in a company's new product development performance and future competitiveness. The increased popularity of social media promised to enhance interaction, collaboration, and networking between the two functions. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the key activities, infrastructure requirements, and potential benefits of social media in the marketing and R&D interface. This study aims to advance the current understanding of social media engagement strategies, which facilitates improved marketing and R&D interfaces and ultimately NPD performance for manufacturing companies. Based on a multiple-case study in two manufacturing companies, this study first presents the role of social media in facilitating improved marketing and R&D interface within a B2B context. Second, it presents the adoption process of the social media engagement strategy for an evolving marketing and R&D interface. The adoption process is divided into three phases, namely coordination, cooperation, and coproduction, to provide detailed insights regarding full-scale social media engagement. Taken together, the study provides novel insights into industrial marketing management literature by exemplifying the role of social media and proposing a systematic social engagement strategy for improved marketing and R&D interface in the manufacturing industry.

  • 88.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Parida, Aditya
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Understanding Knowledge Reuse Process: A case study in a production maintenance organizationIn: 4th International Conference on Business Intelligence, Analytics and Knowledge Management BIAKMConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many firms constantly strive for reusing existing knowledge to be better at learning from their mistakes and successes. Despite its importance, firms are yet to see the benefits from such initiatives, especially at the individual level. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to investigate and discuss the individual knowledge reuse process in a large manufacturing company. Based on a case study in a production maintenance organization, the paper describes different steps of knowledge reuse process. Further, several issues related to different stages of knowledge reuse process are discussed. Finally, the paper summarizes the contributions and concludes with the future research directions.

  • 89.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schedin, Joel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Development projects, stage-gate models, and degree of newness: Examining the correlation from a production perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies have adopted stage-gate models to manage different types of development projects, which can vary in degree of newness. Currently, there is limited research on how the development projects, stage-gate models and degree of newness are correlated in practice from a production perspective. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company, this paper examines correlations from a production perspective. The results show that the company runs nine types of development projects in production, and uses two forms of stage-gate models. The degree of newness is not addressed in a structured way in production compared to the product development process.

  • 90.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    COMBINATION OF STATISTICAL AND PHYSICAL MODELS FOR MODEL BASED CONTROL AND DECISION SUPPORT IN PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY2007Other (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Experience from on-line applications of process simulation in P&P industry.2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Combined Solar Power, Hydrogen, TPV and Cyanobacter Production2010In: Proceedings of the International Conference of Applied Energy / [ed] Jinyue Yan, 2010, p. 179-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss design for a combined TPV and solar power system with production of biomass. During the passage through the solar collector cyanobacters or algae are getting sunshine to drive the photo synthesis. An algae suspension is circulated through a solar panel to drive photo synthesis. The flow rate is varying with solar intensity to balance the temperature increase. This is to avoid inhibition of the cyanobacters/algae growth rate due to too high temperature. PV cells are producing electricity when there is light, while TPV cells are used when it is dark. The biomass produced then is utilized for production of photons for the TPV system. As an alternative a system producing Hydrogen and electricity produced in a fuel cell system is discussed. Design criteria for the systems are discussed in this paper for a house that is principally self sufficient on energy. Both theoretical and practical obstacles are discussed, as there are a number of issues to solve before the technique can be used in ”real life”

  • 93.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Dhak, Janice
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Experiences of on-line and off-line simulation in Pulp and Paper industry2004In: Proceedings of the PTS-symposium, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 94.
    Daraei, Maryam
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Warehouse Redesign Process: A case study at Enics Sweden AB2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays warehousing became one of the most important and critical part in supply chain systems due to the fact that it consumes a considerable part of logistic cost. Designing phase of warehousing system is the most important part in warehousing since most of the strategic and tactical decisions should be taken in this phase.

    Majority of academic papers are primarily analysis oriented and does not give a systematic method and techniques as a basis for warehouse redesign. So there is a need to develop a structured procedure that can be applied for different type of warehouses.

    Therefore the purpose of this thesis is to develop a process for redesigning production warehouses, and analyzing major problems during redesign steps.

    The thesis is designed as a case study, and a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods were used for data collection and data analysis. The methodology focuses around the warehousing process and redesign steps as described in the literature. Results of the thesis develop a seven steps procedure for redesigning of the production warehouse, also different problems and challenges are faced during redesign steps.

    It was tried to choose the best redesigning method which fit with the characteristics of the warehouse, in order to cover the space reduction of the warehouse with the consideration of existing facilities and reducing of cost. In addition, the performance of the current warehouse system was evaluated based on current design of the warehouse in order to avoid repeating of same mistake in redesign process.

    Storage assignment policy as one of the redesign steps was discussed and a framework for storage system of the components were suggested.

    The findings of the thesis to some extent can be applicable to other production warehouses. Further research is suggested for more specific results and new developed redesign methods for all types of warehouses.

  • 95.
    Darvish Shahrbabaki, Shahab Aldin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green and Lean Production Visualization Tools; A Case Study exploring EVSM2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great need for an environmental, economic and social sustainable society, meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations. Focusing on environmental sustainability, legislation and industrially accepted emission targets have emerged, on an overall level represented by e g the Kyoto protocol. Green as well as Lean production has thus become a more and more important topic in recent years. Based on the gigantic need for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO2 emissions globally, as well as customer demands for cost efficient and environmental friendly goods and processes, companies are starting to change their principles towards Green and Lean philosophies. In Green and/or Lean development, like other systematic approaches towards improved processes, there is a need for visualization tools to be used to analyze the supply chain and the manufacturing system. One possible visualization tool for this purpose is Environmental Value Stream Mapping, which has all the characteristics of its parent, VSM (Value Stream Mapping) and additional kaizen elements. In the EVSM, the environmental issues and the usage of material or energy have been added to the established VSM tool. However it has been almost four years since United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has introduced EVSM and there is no reliable evaluation how this tool really works and can be implemented. Therefore there is a need to evaluate and possibly improve this tool, based on practice and the applicability in industry. A case study has been performed testing the EVSM tool in industry and is presented in this paper. The aim of the case study is to analyze how the EVSM tool can be used as well as implementing suggested changes, summarized into, an Environmental Flow Process Chart. The EVSM tool seems suitable for showing the parts of the process in the supply chain which has more waste of energy or material. Still, it lacks information about where and how this waste are generated and which element of the process that is making the most waste, indicating a need for improvement

  • 96.
    Delkhosh, Ali
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lean Automation: Combining Lean with Industrial Robotics in Real Examples2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this report is to analyze whether we can have a better automation manufacturing using lean solutions. First, this report is started with the background and problem description. After that the research questions are mentioned and the delimitations and expected results are discussed.

    The theoretical part of this thesis is describing the research methodology and the literatures review of automation and related challenges. A theoretical review of lean and lean automation concepts has been conducted.

    In the empirical part of the thesis some challenges of automation are listed based on interviews and case studies. Some observed lean automation solutions are discussed and evaluated. In the discussion and analysis part, a concept of lean automation is presented based on the results from the case studies and interviews.

    Finally, in the conclusion chapter, the research questions are answered and future research is proposed for further studies.

  • 97.
    Detjens, Sönke
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Flores, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Evaluating Lean Manufacturing Proposals through Discrete Event Simulation – A Case Study at Alfa Laval2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In their strive for success in competitive markets companies often turn to Lean philosophy. However, for many companies Lean benefits are hard to substantialize especially when their ventures have met success through traditional manufacturing approaches. Traditional Lean tools analyze current situations or help Lean implementation. Therefore productions facilities require tools that enhance the evaluation of Lean proposals in such a way that decisions are supported by quantitative data and not only on a gut feeling.

    This thesis proposes how Discrete Event Simulation may be used as an evaluation tool in production process improvement to decide which proposal best suits Lean requirements. Theoretical and empirical studies were carried out. Literature review helped define the problem. A case study was performed at Alfa Laval to investigate through a holistic approach how and why did this tool provide a solution to the research questions. Case study analysis was substantiated with Discrete Event Simulation models for the evaluation of current and future state Lean proposals.

    Results of this study show that Discrete Event Simulation was not designed and does not function as a Lean specific tool. The use of Discrete Event Simulation in Lean assessment applications requires the organization to understand the principles of Lean and its desired effects. However, the use of traditional static Lean tools such as Value Stream Mapping and dynamic Discrete Event Simulation complement each other in a variety of ways. Discrete Event Simulation provides a unique condition to account for process variability and randomness. Both measurement of and reduction in variability through simulation provide insight to Lean implementation strategies.

  • 98.
    Edoff, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Between outsourcing and Open Innovation: An intercultural case study in the Telecom industry2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the competition is increasing both nationally and globally, the companies are looking for new ways to decrease costs and gain innovation. The latest hot topic is Open innovation (OI), which can be seen as the ultimate limit in terms of accessible expertise, since it makes no difference in valuing an idea in terms of its origin. The trend is that companies are increasingly acknowledging the relevance of external resources, engaging in OI rather than relying exclusively on internal research and development (Chesborough, 2006). There are many types of supplier relations and innovation networks that the companies can take part in, but OI can be seen more as an approach and mindset that should determine how the companies act, whether it’s a question of being more open for ideas from another department, or even towards a competitor company. The companies are often using different types of collaborations and strategy and, potentially, trying to move up “the scale” towards OI.  With this thesis work I propose that there are many different aspects that the companies have to be aware of when moving up the scale from in-house development towards global OI. In reality, not many companies are taking the full advantage of OI, nonetheless knows the perquisites for doing so. OI may be the trend for development of companies, but today the nature of this is complex as companies are using different layers of the supplier and collaboration types in different parts of the organization. The success stories which Chesborough uses to exemplify the concept of OI do not address the grey area, or place on a scale, where many companies are situated in. This study will therefore explore the complexity in managing these collaborations that is not so present in the literature. How do you manage a collaboration that includes supplier relation, partnership and a want for OI at the same time? This means that there has to be a selection on which projects to collaborate with, as well as strategies for collaborating in a more innovative way and the steps that needs to be taken to get there.  In this thesis I am going to use this broad definition of innovation:

    Innovation is the total set of activities leading to the introduction of something new, resulting in strengthening the defendable competitive advantage of a company. (van der Meer, 1996)

    My partner company in this study is a global Telecom company (DU Technology) who would like to learn more about this and improve their collaboration with an Indian Service provider (ITC). These companies will be used as a case study to provide an example on how complex the movement towards OI can be, and what it demands from the companies to succeed. As the companies are working in a global context, I will also highlight the importance of an understanding for the cultural differences that affects collaboration and how to manage these when they are not a part of your own company.

  • 99.
    Edoff, Petra
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Norström, Christer
    Boivie, Ylva
    Managing Offshore Development- an Intercultural Perspective2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offshore Outsourcing, by utilizing the suppliers´ economy of scale and lower wages, is one of the solutions that companies use to reduce costs. However, as the outsourced tasks are getting more complex and require innovative practices, cultural differences get exposed. Cultural aspects are important to consider in securing efficiency and innovation in offshore outsourcing. Nevertheless, the cultural influence has only been studied to a limited extent in literature. With this in mind, we have performed a case study exploring the cultural differences between a Swedish high tech company and its Indian service provider. The study is based on 40 in-depth interviews, observations and business review documentation. The phenomenon of culture is framed by a literature review on organizational culture, national culture and contextual factors. Our results show that by understanding, relating to and managing cultural differences in a systematic manner, companies can gain competitive advantages.

  • 100.
    Edoff, Petra
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Norström, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Boivie, Ylva
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Managing offshore development- an intercultural perspective2009Conference paper (Refereed)
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