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  • 51.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sjödin, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Urquhart, Neil
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    From development to delivery in industrial service innovation2011In: Nordic Academy of Management Conference (NFF), August 22-24, Stockholm, 2011, Stockholm, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    McPhee, Chris
    et al.
    Carleton University, Ottawa Canada.
    Hoppe, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Editorial: Action Research2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through this special issue we sought to publish articles that will help us better understand how academia and practice can work together through new and contemporary accounts of “action research” and its close relative “participatory action research”, which stresses the mutuality of the approach.

  • 53.
    McPhee, Chris
    et al.
    Carleton Univ, Technol Innovat Management, Ottawa, ON, Canada.;Queens Univ, Biol, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Hoppe, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Editorial: Action Research2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54. McPhee, Chris
    et al.
    Hoppe, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Editorial: Action Research2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 3-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Nygren, Christer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    ICT enabled business model innovation to support servitization in global industrial companies2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Servitization in industrial companies to escape the “commodity trap” can be enhanced by business model innovation (BMI) in order to systemically focus on the firm ?s value proposition, its organization of (co-) production as well as capturing of value in revenue mechanisms (Amit & Zott, 2012; Chesborough, 2010). ICT oriented developments like cloud, big data, internet of thing, smart installed base here offer potentials to take advantage and develop the information base of products, processes, utilization and customer behavior and needs into new and more complex offerings (LaValle et al., 2011). The purpose of the paper is to analyze the enablers and barriers for innovation in ICT enabled business models to ease and accelerate the journey towards service business development in global industrial companies. The research is done through a literature review on research and BMI cases, and a process oriented case study of emerging developments in a global industrial company. The research result is identification and synthesis of enabling factors and barriers in servitization through ICT supported BMI. Enabling factors are related to information and information processing potentials and organizational capabilities to increase service content of offerings, while barriers are e.g. internal integration and competence as well as customer trust, information confidentiality as well as willingness to engage in more close, service oriented and co- creative business relationships. The result will be input to ongoing action research collaboration with industrial companies in terms of research agenda as well as practical insights for BMI efforts.

  • 56.
    Read, S.
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Urbanism, Delft, Netherlands.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Mashayekhi, A.
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Urbanism, Delft, Netherlands.
    The inefficiencies of energy efficiency: Reviewing the strategic role of energy efficiency and its effectiveness in alleviating climate change2016In: Journal of Settlements and Spatial Planning, ISSN 2069-3419, Vol. 2016, no Spec. Iss. 5, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our present economy is high-energy and demand-intensive, demand met through the use of high energy yield fossil fuels. Energy efficiency and renewable energy sources are proposed as the solution and named the ‘twin pillars’ of sustainable energy policy. Increasing energy efficiencies are expected to reduce energy demand and fossil fuel use and allow renewables to close the ‘replacement gap’. However, the simple fact is that fossil fuel use is still rising to meet increasing global demand and even when demand is stabilised, the substantial energy efficiencies achieved are not delivering the expected reductions in energy demand. The net effect is that efficiencies are gained and renewable energy use is increasing, even though the replacement of fossils is not an immediately plausible possibility. This points to the under-theorised problems in the ‘efficiency and replacement’ formula. We argue the need to pay closer attention to the ‘systemicity’ of the problem and to the technical and practical systems involved in energy demand. There are a number of detailed reasons why the ‘efficiency and replacement’ equation has become problematic (‘globality’, energy yield, ‘rebound’ and ‘momentum’ effects) and we include a short review of these and relate them to our ‘systemicity’ argument. We argue there is a need for better thinking, but also for a new primary instrument to drastically reduce energy demand and fossil fuel use. Attention should be urgently shifted from gains in energy efficiency to substantial year-over-year reductions in demand.

  • 57.
    Read, Stephen
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Delft, Netherlands..
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Technology and transition: 'progressive evolution of regimes and the consequences for energy regime change2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition of energy systems has been under-theorised. We have argued previously that energy efficiency as a strategy for fossil fuel replacement is inadequate as energy demand is not being reduced by efficiency alone. This paper is intended to elaborate further on the reasons. We require better answers to better questions about the nature of energy regimes and how they resist change. Our present-day socio-technical energy regime is a global integrated technical arrangement based on cheap high-yield energy sources (fossil fuels) with built-in 'progressive' social and economic directions. This 'progressive' change relies on cheap energy as a resource towards ever greater global integration and economic efficiency. Energy regime change will be not a tinkering at the edges but will require a dismantling of this 'progressive' tendency with radical retrogressive economic and social consequences. We conclude a change of our relationship with energy will require the reversal of a contingent 'progressive' tendency that is as old as mankind and the necessarily modest building of a new infrastructural apparatus designed to a new 'end', or the reversion to previous low or lower demand apparatus based on non-fossil energy sources. Both solutions would imply major social and economic changes which we will deal with in another paper. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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