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  • 301.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fagerström, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Thomas, Lechler
    Opportunity discovery in initiated and emergent change requestsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, we analyze practitioner practices and praxes associated with discovering and exploiting opportunities in project-based change requests. Change requests are the aggregation of engineering changes and are considered in a redesign process. Raising a change request initiates the formation of an ad hoc team to manage it. A single case study design was employed using change request records and practitioner interviews from an engineering project. Additionally, the collected data was used to analyze discovered and exploited opportunities from a projects-as-practice perspective. Prior research on change requests has shown that practitioners often view changes in a risk-averse manner. However, a risk-averse mindset does not encompass opportunities. Our findings emphasize the importance of the informal structure of ad hoc teams, as opposed to formal structures, to aid in opportunity discovery. The informal structure enables cross-hierarchal discussions among team members and draws on the proven experience of the team members. Finally, the dynamic, dual structure of ad hoc teams (engineering and on-site teams) is an essential part of opportunity discovery. Adding to the existing knowledge in the field of engineering change management, we present a framework that supports practitioners in identifying how to turn engineering changes into successful opportunities. 

  • 302.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Norouzilame, Farhad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Aspects In Engineering Change Management Of Engineering To Order Projects: A Review2016In: POMS EUROMA WORLD CONFERENCE POMS-EUROMA, Havanna, Cuba, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Sohaleh, Hamed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    RECONFIGURABLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEM:AN ENABLER FOR COMPETITIVENESS FOR TODAY’S INDUSTRY2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Tough market situation from one side and global competition from another side are persuading companies to search for new manufacturing concepts and try to stay competitive. But “how” to consider “new” manufacturing systems is still a big question mark.This thesis aims to analyze reconfigurability as an enabler for competitiveness in manufacturing systems. The frame of work in this study is “Reconfigurable Manufacturing System” or briefly RMS. In first chapter, some background about reconfigurability has been stated. Then it will continue with research questions, delimitations and expected results.Then the research methodology and challenges for applying RMS have been stated. This chapter explains researchers’ method for data reviewing and data collection. Another focus area in this thesis is SME (Small and Medium size Enterprises). So this report tries also to examine reconfigurability challenges in SMEs. There is a big gap between “ideal” production system and “designing” of this ideal production system. So this thesis tried to increase the knowledge about design of reconfigurable manufacturing systems.In empirical study chapter two case studies have been analysed and as a result a list of challenges for implementing reconfigurable system has been proposed. Then some solutions and methods are proposed in order to answer to challenges. This solutions and methods are then discussed and evaluated.Finally, in last chapter, challenges and prerequisites for implementing reconfigurable manufacturing system in general and for SMEs in specific have been stated. This chapter was ended by expressing future works.

  • 304.
    Stigels, Rickard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Layout över tvätt, målning och line-slutmontering av 1 till 6 cylinders C-huvud2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 305.
    Stålberg, Lina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Adapting to dynamic conditions through continuous innovation in manufacturing2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The speed of change increases due to the pace of technological change and globalisation, and many industries that usually have acted in more stable settings will in the future act in more dynamic marketplaces. In order to be able to manage dynamic conditions, the organisation needs to continue delivering effectively in existing business areas while developing new systems, products and processes to take advantage of new opportunities in the future. This means that the organisation must be able to use abilities for exploitation and exploration simultaneously or, in other words, strive for continuous innovation including ambidexterity.

    In the traditional manufacturing industry, many companies use some sort of improvement programme for achieving operational excellence. Hence, a trend among multinational manufacturing companies is also to deploy and integrate corporate improvement programmes (XPS). These are based on lean production and inspired by the Toyota Production System. Generally, improvement programmes such as XPS largely support the development of exploitation capabilities but not exploration capabilities, which instead may have to stand back. Previous research states that these are problematic and complex issues that need to be further understood and developed. Therefore, more knowledge and support needs to be developed regarding how manufacturing companies can adapt their production systems to remain resource-efficient while simultaneously adapting to more radical changes.

    The overall purpose of this research project is to contribute to an increased understanding of how XPS integrations can be developed towards continuous innovation to be able to manage more dynamic conditions. Accordingly, the research objective is to develop recommendations supporting continuous innovation in manufacturing. An overall longitudinal study has been carried out containing five case studies at a manufacturing company integrating an XPS during dynamic conditions, i.e., with large variations in volumes and mixes of products together with the introduction of new products and production concepts. The studies conducted and the results are presented in five appended papers.

    The research shows there is a risk that the XPS concept is abandoned due to a lack of understanding of how the XPS contributes to solve the turbulent situation that appears under dynamic conditions. At the same time, it is important to develop and support exploration skills in parallel, as these abilities are not particularly well developed in this context. Furthermore, the research shows that a strategy formulation process striving for high involvement can be used as a means of creating ambidextrous capabilities.

  • 306.
    Stålberg, Lina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lean production integration adaptable to dynamic conditions2018In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1358-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how a continuous improvement (CI) approach like lean production (LP) integration is affected by dynamic conditions and to propose how LP integration can be adaptable to dynamic conditions. Design/methodology/approach A longitudinal case study has been conducted in which data were collected through participative observations, observations, documents and an in-depth semi-structured interview. Findings The adaptability is related to the maturity level of the LP integration, where more mature organisations are better equipped to deal with the challenges occurring due to their learning and experimentation capabilities. The main problem is that the LP integration needs to be adapted, like compromising with just-in-time. This creates challenges to more immature organisations; they do not seem to be able to adapt the LP integration since the skills are lacking. Research limitations/implications The research limitations are associated with the research design and therefore might limit generalisation of the context studied. Practical implications The management needs to stay focused on the LP integration to continue building CI capability. There is a need to adapt the LP concept, which includes assessing how proposed changes and the LP concept interact in order to make them reinforce each other. This involves creating guidelines concerning adaptation and facilitating a transition from mainly single-loop learning to double-loop learning. Originality/value This paper contributes by describing challenges that have an impact on LP integration and related organisational adaptability under dynamic conditions.

  • 307.
    Svensson Harari, Natalia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Design Process of Flexible Assembly Systems2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible assembly systems have emerged in response to changing markets and increased variety in form of demands of new products and manufacturer’s need for differentiation. Assembly systems play a critical role in handling great variety and adapting to dynamic changes at the same time as securing product quality and productivity. Therefore, assembly systems should be designed to be able to handle changes. However, the design of flexible assembly systems is a challenge because it involves several subjects such as the configuration of the flow, the material handling and the flexibility to handle future changes and adjustment. In addition, time-to-market and time-to-volume are important which means that faster assembly systems designs are required.

    The design process of assembly systems concerns the procedures that guide the design work to achieve an assembly system proposal. The design process is divided into a number of stages/phases describing the activities that should be done and when they should be performed as well as the expected result after each phase supporting the decision-making process. Research argues that working in a systematic and structured way is important in order to achieve better assembly systems in shorter time.

    However, even though there is extensive research work in regard to flexibility, knowledge is limited concerning the design process of assembly systems. Therefore, the objective of this thesis has been to increase the knowledge about the design of flexible assembly systems by investigating the relation between the assembly system design process and flexibility. The characteristics of flexible assembly systems and how flexibility is considered during the design process have also been studied in this thesis.

    Literature reviews were conducted as well as three case studies and one exploratory survey in the manufacturing industry of heavy vehicles. Study I concerns the results of having studied an industrial international project of the design process of a flexible assembly system during two years. In study II, flexibility needs, enablers and challenges in assembly systems were identified. In study III, the mechanism used to achieve flexibility in the assembly systems of two companies were investigated. The exploratory survey study IV, was a pilot study to investigate the relationship between the design process of assembly systems and flexibility based on the association of different variables involved in the design process of flexible assembly systems.

    From the holistic perspective adopted in this thesis, the results showed that flexibility should be considered in a comprehensive way during all the design process. The design process of flexible assembly systems is iterative, circumscribed by different conditions, and requires support as well as the participation of different roles and functions to achieve a solution. The increased knowledge generated in the research is expected to lead to future development of working procedures that better can support the design process of flexible assembly systems.

  • 308.
    Svensson Harari, Natalia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Flexibility Needs and Enablers in Assembly Systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the research presented in this paper has been to analyze flexibility needs and enablers in assembly systems. The methodology used for the research has been a literature review and a case study at a Swedish manufacturing company. Flexibility as a competitive factor has been shown to be needed in order to satisfy the changing demands, at low cost and with delivery precision. The level of customization and changes in volume also increases the flexibility needs. The results from the case study indicate that there are four flexibility enablers in assembly systems: capacity and production planning, production development, material supply, and work organization. The needs of flexibility should be considered during the design process of the assembly system to respond to changes in product variants and production volumes in a cost-effective way.

  • 309.
    Svensson Harari, Natalia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Mixed-Product Assembly Lines: Characteristics and Design Challenges2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 310.
    Svensson Harari, Natalia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Components of the Design Process of Flexible and Reconfigurable Assembly Systems2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 549-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assembly systems need to manage changes in products and volume. During the design process, preconditions for the operation of assembly systems are generated. The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of the design process of flexible and reconfigurable assembly systems. Literature reviews were conducted and empirical data from six research studies were analyzed to report the results. The authors suggest that the findings can give a clearer overview of the components in these design processes and support studies about relations between components as well as practitioners with a holistic view during the design work.

  • 311.
    Söder, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Horneman, Louise
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Develop competitive production systems by including sustainability at conceptual modeling2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s market, sustainability has become an important competitive priority, affecting the way manufacturing companies need to develop their production systems. Increased external pressure from stakeholders, customers, law and regulations, as well as the undeniable consequences of the environmental crisis, causes a need for more sustainable production patterns. This affects manufacturing companies, since the social and environmental dimension of sustainability no longer can be ignored if companies want to retain their competitive position. Therefore, this thesis proposes a conceptual modeling framework that includes both sustainability and operational goals, with purpose to support manufacturers who want to develop sustainable production systems with the help of discrete event simulation.

    Empirical evidence from Swedish automotive industry indicates an unlocked potential in applying this framework to a discrete event simulation project, and findings in current research shows that alignment of sustainability and operational goals during production system development can help manufacturing companies achieve increased competitive advantage. However, there is two limitations to current knowledge; firstly, on how to align sustainability and operation goals in the early phases of a discrete event simulation project, namely at conceptual modeling; secondly, a lack of focus on conceptual modeling in discrete event simulation. In order to examine how to address this gap, a case study was conducted within the Swedish automotive industry, along with a literature study. As guidance in this work, four research questions were formulated and answered:

    RQ 1:    Why is the alignment between sustainability and operational goals important in development of production systems?

    RQ 2:    What sustainability goals may be included in a conceptual model in development of production systems?

    RQ 3:    What operational goals may be included in a conceptual model in development of production systems?

    RQ 4:    How can operational and sustainability goals be aligned in a conceptual model in development of production systems?

    As for the environmental dimension of sustainability, the goals that could be included at conceptual modeling are: pollution; emissions; and resource consumption. The most commonly involved operational goals at conceptual modeling are: quality and design; throughput; production layout and flow; automation levels; production volume; cycle times; lead times and change-over times; material handling; buildings and plant properties; storage and stock; capacity; price and costs.

  • 312.
    Söder, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Vardanyan, Emilia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rättvisande priser: En fallstudie på måleriavdelningen på Volvo Construciton Equipment2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Title Fair prices – A case study in Volvo Construction Equipment (CE)Keywords Cost allocation, product costing, fair cost allocation, activity allocation, valueaddedactivities.Purpose The purpose of this paper is to locate the value added activities, investigatewhich activity that differentiate the products best and see how the processtime/times for an activity can be used as an allocation key for allocating costs.The activities at the department of painting have been examined and the value-added activitiesof these have been identified. Two conclusions have been made by the work. The time that differentiate the products best are the manual time, the work performedby man. The more activities that the cost allocation includes the more correct and fair thecalculation will be. The sum of the time in the painting robot, the cleaning process andthe manual time result in good a basis for cost allocation. With the reservation that thework performed by man should be standardized.Product calculation is about allocation of the cost in a company, which is easier said than done.The problems related to cost allocation has been discussed back and forward the latest fiftyyears. How should companies allocate their costs, direct and indirect costs, on their productsand services to give their products and services a fair price? The direct costs are easy to deriveto their cost object, but the indirect costs are way harder to work with.This paper investigates which processes that are value-adding in the paint shop and from theseprocesses four scenarios are made. Every scenario is made of different value-added activitiesand their process times. The finance department at Volvo CE simulated a cost allocation withevery scenario as basis and the result of the simulation were analysed.The work has been done as a case study in the paint shop at Volvo CE. The authors are EmiliaVardanyan and Erik Söder. The supervisor at Mälardalens university are associated professorAntti Salonen and the supervisor at Volvo CE are manager production engineering assemblyJosef Lännerström.

  • 313.
    Sörensen, Kim
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Towards a manufacturing strategy supporting make or buy decisions and a global manufacturing structure2009In: Swedish Production Symposium 2009, Göteborg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Tajadod, Malek
    et al.
    Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman, Iran.
    Abedini, Mohammadali
    University of Science and Technology IUST, Tehran, Iran.
    Rastegari, Ali
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Mobin, Mohammadsadegh
    Western New England University, Springfield, MA, USA.
    A Comparison of Multi-Criteria Decision Making Approaches for Maintenance Strategy Selection (A Case Study)2016In: International Journal of Strategic Decision Sciences IJSDS, ISSN 1947-8569, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of world-class manufacturing companies and global competition caused significant changes in the way of manufacturing companies operation. These changes have affected maintenance and made its role even more crucial to stay ahead of the competition. Maintenance strategy selection is one of the strategic decision-making issues that manufacturing companies in the current competitive world are facing. In this paper, a comparison between different Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) approaches is conducted in a dairy manufacturing factory to rank the maintenance strategies. The aim is to suggest an appropriate approach for the best selection of the maintenance strategy. The decision-making elements including evaluation criteria/sub-criteria and problem alternatives, i.e., maintenance strategies are determined and a group of experts from the case-study factory are asked to make their pair-wise comparisons. The pair-wise comparison matrix is constructed by using the crisp and triangular fuzzy numbers, while the aggregation of individual priorities (AIP) approach is utilized to aggregate the decision-makers’ judgments. The priority vectors of decision elements are calculated by Mikhailov’s fuzzy preference programming (FPP) methods and the final weights of the decision elements are found. Results show that when the effectiveness of one element on the other elements is higher, it will have greater weights; and therefore, the results from the analytic network process (ANP) method is completely different from those of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The reason for these differences between the AHP and Fuzzy AHP (FAHP) with the ANP and Fuzzy ANP (FANP) is that the methods of AHP and FAHP evaluate the criteria only based on the level of importance and do not consider the interdependencies and interactions among the evaluation elements. In this research, a predictive maintenance is selected as the most appropriate strategy in the case company and the preventive strategies outperformed the corrective strategies. The results of this research are consistent with the results of previous studies found in the literature.

  • 315.
    Tomasic, Ivan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Erdem, Ilker
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rahman, Hamidur
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Andersson, Alf
    Volvo Car Corporation Manufacturing Engineering, Sweden.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sources of Variation Analysis in Fixtures for Sheet Metal Assembly Process2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assembly quality is affected by various factors within which fixture variations are the most important. For that reason significant research on fixture variations has already been done. In this work we propose a linear mixed models (LMMs) application for the purpose of analyzing sources of variation in the fixture Objective: To estimate the strength of influences of different sources of variation on the control and assembly fixtures. The variables considered are: time, operator, default pin positions, shifts from the default pin positions . Methods: The data was collected through assembly and measurement for repeatability and experimental corrective actions. We use LMMs to model the relation between features measured on the assembled parts and the input variables of interest. The LMMs allow taking into account the correlation of observations contained in the dataset. We also use graphical data presentation methods to explore the data. Results: The expected results are the strengths of influences of the individual variables considered, and the pairwise interactions of between the variables, on the assembled parts variations.

  • 316.
    Trolle, Julia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Gradin, Beata
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Förbättringsarbete för projektprocesser - Kommunicera, strukturera, standardisera.2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today it is required that industrial companies are continuously searching for new improvementopportunities to streamline processes so that they can be competitive on the market. One way to succeed is to standardize and map processes to structure the work and clarify possible weaknesses.The purpose of this study is to examine the problems and uncertainties in the project-process which can be reduced, dealing with new projects. Which project-models and standardizations should be established for the project-process to achieve a maximum flow through the project. The goal of the study is that these project-models and standardizations in turn will facilitate the management of projects by clarifying responsibilities, support communication, and reduce uncertainties. To reach an answer three questions has been raised:- How can implementing project-models improve the existing project-process, dealing with new projects?- How can standardized templates and checklists be used to reduce uncertainties and problems in a project-process?- What measures should take place to eliminate the loss of information between differentdepartment within an organization and between external parties?

    This study has been executed according to Six Sigma’s systematic methology DMAIC that facilitated and clarified the studys structure and planning. Through this method the study has been divided into five natural stages. The study is bases on both primary and secondary-data.

    In the study result it showed that there are several factors which are limiting the project-process flow. One factor that turned out to be a very considerable for a well-functioning project processwas communication between all parties. This covers both internally and externally. Defective communication leads to uncertainties in the responsibilities, work duties and increased lack ofessential information/data. Through the implementation of standardized project-models such as Flowchart and a Kanban-board could work duties, responsibilities and information become clarified and uncertainties be reduced. 

  • 317.
    Uggla, Karolina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Visualization of Production Planning2019In: Information Visualization: Biomedical Visualization and Geometric Modelling & Imaging, 2019, p. 312-317Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of production planning tools is primarily based on conventions which can be found in research on visual perception and how data is traditionally represented. Standardized forms have become everyday tools and are an essential part of our visual culture. In the first part of the 20th century, the Gantt chart was introduced and was primarily used for charting workplace efficiency. It has been used in various forms ever since, in parallel with other Stage-Gate models. Visual management has been developed in companies that work with lean production systems. For governance and control of daily activities, a so-called lean board is used, which consists of a white board. In this paper we discuss how—despite rapid technological development and digitalization in many fields—our perceptions, visual representations, and organization of time seem to remain rooted in the past.

  • 318.
    Vafadarnikjoo, A.
    et al.
    Allameh Tabataba'i University, Tehran, Iran .
    Mobin, M.
    Western New England University, MA, United States .
    Allahi, S.
    Allameh Tabataba'i University, Tehran, Iran .
    Rastegari, Ali
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A hybrid approach of intuitionistic fuzzy set theory and dematel method to prioritize selection Criteria of bank branches locations2015In: International Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2015, ASEM 2015, 2015, p. 595-604Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimally locating new bank branches is a strategic decision in banking industry in order to stay competitive. The importance of this issue is primarily due to the fact that locating branches in appropriate sites is one of the main factors in absorbing and satisfying bank customers. This results in a core benefit for banks, particularly in a vibrant competition. In addition, without a set of well-chosen selection criteria and their prominence, the goal of locating suitable sites for bank branches would not be efficiently achieved. In this research, six most widely used criteria for bank branch location consideration are obtained from the literature review. These criteria include demographic attributes, access to public facilities, transportation, competition, cost and flexibility. In order to prioritize these criteria, an integrated methodology of the intuitionistic fuzzy set theory as well as Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory Model (DEMATEL) technique (i.e. IFDEMATEL) are utilized. The DEMATEL technique considers interrelationships between criteria. Furthermore, the intuitionistic fuzzy set theory, which has some advantages over fuzzy set theory, to include the vagueness and imprecision of subjective judgments of specialists is applied. As a case study, a well-known Iranian public bank in the city of Rasht, Iran is considered. Consequently, the obtained ranks from the integrated method provide useful information for bank managers in determining efficient locations of their new branches.

  • 319.
    Vishaj, Fidan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hylshantering samt flödesanalys2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Trioplanex International AB is a part of the group Trioplast Industrier AB, which produces packaging materials for the film and hygiene industry. The group is active throughout Europe, where most of the production is located in Sweden, with head office in Smålandsstenar. Operations in Landskrona consist of Trioplanex International AB and Trioplast Landskrona.

    Semi-finished articles consisting of paper cores, so called bobbins, give rise to a high amount of core waste in any form of core cutting. The objective of the report is to map out all core waste and illustrate the material flow with regard to present layout and equipment.

    In the beginning of the project an analysis of the current process was carried out with focus on the cutting equipment. A case study in the form of an improvement work took place in order to reduce the causes which had the biggest impact on existing machinery.

    Improvement proposals were discussed by the author together with supervisor, assigner and other parties involved. One of the solutions involved a relocation of industrial equipment with a modified material flow as a result. The introduction of continuous improvements is also one of the proposals outlined in the report.

  • 320.
    Wangenborn, Theresé
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design process enhancement2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The need and demands within the automotive industry on quality systems and processes are high. The most widely spread document for quality control is the standard ISO/TS 16949. The aim with the APQP-process is to build the quality of the product and process for new designs or re-designs. The aim of this project is to find a customized, when it comes to the design process, APQP-process for Fuji Autotech with focus on the two first phases where most of the design activities are performed. This is done by studying the existing APQP-process at Fuji Autotech and comparing it with mainly the standard ISO/TS 16949, interviewing personnel at the company, and empirical studies of the process. The focus areas are therefore to find a process that suites the company and contribute to the academia by sharing experience to the University. Three issues where considered being of importance for the outcome of the project.

    Question 1: Which factors are necessary to follow-up when assuring the quality of a project?

    Question 2: How does the process for quality assuring a project look like today?

    Question 3: How may the process for quality assurance of a project be optimized?

    The result from this research project is two new process maps and a new APQP process flow for Fuji Autotech has been created. The studies performed, within this research project have identified the following key factors for obtaining a good quality.

    • Existence of a management systems for quality
    • Management responsibility
    • Management of resources
    • Product design
    • Measure, Analyze and Improvement
    • Fulfilment of customer needs
    • Fulfilment of requirements
  • 321.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, T.
    Volvo Car Corporation, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Broman, M.
    Swedish Institute of Prod. Eng. Res., Stockholm, Sweden .
    A note on the specification of assembly systems2000In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, Vol. 38, no 16, p. 3997-4002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the characteristics and cost of any technical system are highly influenced by the early design phases, little focus has been on thestructure and use of the specification in manufacturing system design, in this paper exemplified by assembly systems for large, high-volume products. This paper proposes a framework for elaborating such specifications. The framework is based on a division in qualifying and winning criteria, and is structured into four classes: functional requirements; internal design constraints; external design constraints; and winning criteria. Defining the specification by these terms is justified and explained by comparing standard mathematical formulation for this kind of problem to theframework. Future research efforts are pointed out where the framework is used throughout the development project for goal-focus, as thespecification is used and refined in an iterative manner.

  • 322.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sustainable Manufacturing - Challenges and Possibilities for Research and Industry from a Swedish perspective2008In: The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Reducing environmental impact from manufacturing – an industrial case study2011In: Journal of Production Research & Management, ISSN 2249-4766, Vol. 1, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for technologies and strategies that will reduce environmental impact from manufacturing globally. This paper presents an industrial case study with three objects of study where manufacturing of ‘green’ products are analysed and solutions are presented on reducing environmental impact from manufacturing. The objects represent a conceptual product, a manufacturing ready product and an update of an existing product. The case study also builds the base for presenting a draft analysis scheme for designing a more environmentally sustainable production system. The examples and the proposed analysis scheme are discussed in the context of designing a socially, economically and environmentally sustainable production system.

  • 324.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Reducing Environmental Impact from Manufacturing: Three Industrial Cases for the Manufacturing of ‘Green’ Products2009In: 42nd CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Grenoble, France, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a gigantic need for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO2 emissions globally. This paper presents three industrial cases in Sweden where manufacturing of ‘green’ products are analysed and solutions are presented where environmental impact from manufacturing is reduced. The cases represent a conceptual product, a manufacturing ready product and an update of an existing product. The cases also build the base for presenting a draft analysis scheme for designing a more environmentally sustainable production system. The cases and the proposed analysis scheme are discussed in the context of designing a socially, economically and environmentally sustainable production system.

  • 325.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lundin, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Södergren, B.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Automation and flexibility: An apparent or real dilemma?2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, vol. 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 35-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are trade-offs between cost and capabilities throughout specification, implementation and operation of automated solutions in manufacturing companies. This chapter describes four identified dilemmas or contradictions while balancing flexibility to automation, based on an empirical study with interviews and workshop in five internationally competitive manufacturing companies. The study generated insights on experienced challenges while implementing automated solutions in manufacturing, and these apparent conflicts between automated solutions and maintaining a high operational flexibility need to be managed as manufacturing automation will continue to increase on all levels. 

  • 326.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, Industriell Produktion.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, Industriell Produktion.
    Life Cycle Approaches on Product Realization: meeting the challenges of future production research2010In: Proceedings of 43rd CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, 2010, p. 204-212Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global increase of manufacturing activities and the need for sustainability, calls for manufacturing strategies and technologies with reduced environmental impact. This paper presents a part of a strategic research initiative in Sweden, established by an ambitious industry-academic collaboration. A cross-organizational and cross-disciplinary focus area has been formulated to develop leading-edge production research for the future: Life cycle approaches on product realization. The research considers the total life cycle of the product and production system on three levels: (1) On a process level, with manufacturing technologies supporting products with high energy efficiency and low materials usage. (2) On a system level, with an extended production system design for the total life cycle of the production and product portfolio. (3) On an information level, with methods and tools covering the life cycles of products and production.

  • 327.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Varanasi, S.
    University of Florida, US.
    Bai, S.X.
    University of Florida, US.
    An optimal production flow control problem with impulsive demand1997In: Mathematical and Computer Modelling, ISSN 0895-7177, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 53-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a system consisting of a single machine cell and producing one part type. The machine cell has a finite capacity and is reliable. We consider a finite planning horizon containing N impulsive demands. The demand occurs instantaneously. Each such demand is known by its size and when it occurs in the planning horizon. In order to keep the production as close to the demand as possible there is a trade off between building up inventory and letting customers wait. An optimal control problem is formulated to determine the optimal production strategy. Solution technique is developed via Pontryagin's Minimum Principle.

  • 328.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Peter, Ahlin
    Husqvarna AB, Sweden.
    Visual representations for communication in geographicallydistributed new product development projects2019In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, ISSN 0954-4828, Vol. 30, no 8/9, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the role of visual representations in supporting communication between an R&D team and geographically distributed suppliers for a new product development (NPD) project. Itspecifically focuses on the design and use of visual representationsas a feasible way for communication between the distributed actorswhen they face communication challenges originating from differences in skills in the English language, but also from differences inwork experiences. Relying on empirical materials from a Swedishmanufacturing company in the mechanical engineering industry,this paper makes the following contributions to the literature. First,it shows that visual representations are effective boundary objectsable to support process-oriented and product-oriented communication in distributed NPD projects. Second, it illustrates that visualrepresentations do not necessarily have to follow graphic designprinciples, but can still be effective if distributed actors share thesame project context. Finally, it highlights the need for a dynamic andcontext-dependent perspective on communication in NPD projects.

  • 329.
    Wlazlak, Paraskeva
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Prod Dev Prod & Design, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Prod Dev Prod & Design, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Supply Chain & Operat Management, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Gavle, Sweden..
    Original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-supplier integration to prepare for production ramp-up2019In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Although prior research provides evidence that production ramp-up is often disrupted by supplier-related problems, it fails to discuss how the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and various types of suppliers integrate their functions and operations to secure preparations for production ramp-up. The purpose of this paper is to investigate OEM-supplier integration in a new product development (NPD) project to prepare for production ramp-up. Design/methodology/approach The results presented in this paper are based on a real-time, longitudinal study of a single collaborative NPD project in the mechanical engineering industry. The NPD project involves seven suppliers and it is carried out in a large Swedish company (the OEM) and fits the theory-elaborating approach of this research. Findings This study argues that the aspect of timing in OEM-supplier integration, the OEM's research and development (R&D) attitude toward collaboration and the OEM's (R&D) operating procedure are challenges affecting the preparation for production ramp-up. The following three mechanisms to facilitate OEM-supplier integration in order to prepare for production ramp-up are also discussed: the mediator's role, the OEM's face-to-face meeting at the project level and suppliers' formal face-to-face meetings with the OEM and internally. Originality/value This paper elaborates on and extends prior research on production ramp-up by conducting an empirical analysis that incorporates supplier integration in NPD. It bridges the gap between the literature on production ramp-up and on supplier integration in NPD and clearly indicates that supplier integration is an important prerequisite for successful production ramp-up.

  • 330.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kaikaku in production2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s fast-changing and dynamic business environment, the pressures on manufacturing companies to compete on the global arena have been intensified. Production is challenged to handle and benefit from ever increasing competitions in terms of cost, delivery capability, and flexibility. In order to gain and sustain the competitive advantage under such circumstances, strong and constant development of production must be ensured not only with continuous improvements but also with radical improvements.

    Continuous improvement or called Kaizen has been an established approach of production improvement. The concept of Kaizen is well described and many tools and methods that support Kaizen have been developed and widely applied in industry. However, for radical improvement or “Kaikaku” in Japanese, the need and the importance of Kaikaku are still limitedly recognized at companies. Moreover, the knowledge of structured support that facilitates an effective and efficient execution of Kaikaku has been insufficiently developed.

    The purpose of the research presented in this thesis is to develop models and methods that address the need and the importance of Kaikaku in production and facilitate the realization of it.

    The research consists of a literature study and three case studies. The literature study was conducted in order to structure the concept of Kaikaku. As a result of the study, a conceptual framework of Kaikaku was developed. The three case studies were conducted to identify influential factors to the realization of Kaikaku. Both Swedish and Japanese companies were studied and analyzed. These case studies led to identify a way of realizing a certain type of Kaikaku. Some characteristics of organization setting were also found influential to the realization of Kaikaku.

    To conclude, the research has contributed to creating a foundation of the research area related to Kaikaku. This has opened up opportunities for further research in this field.

  • 331.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kaikaku in production in Japan: An analysis of Kaikaku in terms of ambidexterity2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, vol. 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 67-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Japanese manufacturing companies have been active both in Kaizen—continuous improvement—and Kaikaku—radical improvement. However, compared to Kaizen, Kaikaku is less known and also less discussed in articles and books. Some questions may arise about Kaikaku: What is it? How is it undertaken in practice? How can an organization be proficient in both Kaikaku and Kaizen? In this chapter, these questions will be discussed. 

  • 332.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kaikaku in production toward creating unique production systems2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the business environment characterized by the severe global competition and the fast-paced changes, production functions of manufacturing companies must have a capacity of undertaking not only incremental improvement, Kaizen, but also large-scale improvement that is of a radial and innovative nature here called “Kaikaku” (Kaikaku is a Japanese word meaning change or reformation).

    Moreover, production functions especially those located in high-wage countries must be proficient in radical innovation in production to maintain their competitive advantages. They must to be capable of creating new knowledge and constantly developing and implementing radically new production technologies, processes, and equipment which make their production systems more “unique”. Here, a unique production system means a production system that is valuable for the company’s competition, rare in the industry, difficult for competitors to imitate, and difficult for them to substitute.

    Kaikaku is not a new phenomenon in the industry, and much research has been done on how to manage large-scale changes in Kaikaku. However, the previous research has rarely focused on the relation of Kaikaku and creating unique production systems. Kaikaku can be an effective means to create such systems. The objective of the research presented in the doctoral thesis is to propose how to plan and implement Kaikaku so that it contributes to creating unique production systems. To fulfil the objective, five empirical studies were conducted. In the empirical studies, data were collected through literature review, interviews, participant-observation, and action research. Japanese and Swedish manufacturing companies were studied.

    General conclusions of the research are summarized as follows. In order to achieve Kaikaku so that it contributes to realizing unique production systems, the intent and commitment to realize such systems must be present at the strategic level of the organization. Organization structures and resources need to be prepared to support the mentioned kind of Kaikaku. A process of Kaikaku can be a less linear and systematic but more cyclic and emergent process which can be seen as a series of unfolding smaller improvement or development projects that are undertaken during Kaikaku to achieve overall objectives. In each projects exploration and organizational learning are facilitated. The research has also found a specific direction of how to develop a production system in order to make the system more unique. Finally, in the research, a design method that is helpful to create unique production lines, cells, and equipment has been found and studied

  • 333.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Need of understanding how to enhance innovation at early phases of production system development2018In: Participatory Innovation Conference 2018 PIN-C 2018, Eskilstuna, Sweden, 2018, p. 44-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose this paper is to discuss a research potential in the area of understanding how a company can enhance innovation at the early phases of production system development. Due to this purpose, the structure of this paper deviates from the conventional ones that include methods, findings, and contributions. The chain of logic in this paper is structured as follows. Firstly, the importance of the early phases in terms of constantly developing new production systems is mentioned. Then, the early phases are defined and described in theoretical frameworks. Later, two industrial cases are introduced to emphases the aforementioned importance. Finally, the research potential is discussed based on the theories and practices introduced in the earlier parts of the paper.

  • 334.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Fundamental mindset that drives improvements towards lean production2010In: Assembly Automation, ISSN 0144-5154, E-ISSN 1758-4078, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 124-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, Kristian
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Karakuri IoT - the concept and the result of pre-study2018In: Proceedings Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXIII ICMR2018, 2018, p. 311-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although scholars and practitioners are actively discussing the potential benefits of introducing Internet of Thing (IoT) in production, IoT is still as an expensive solution in terms of investment and high technological threshold. Manufacturing companies seek a simpler and lower-cost approach to adopting IoT technologies in production, allowing companies to take advantage of the knowledge and innovation capabilities of people close to shop floor operations. This paper introduces the concept of “Karakuri IoT” – simple and low-cost IoT-aided improvements driven by the people close to shop floor operations. A pre-study is conducted to examine the feasibility of the concept. This paper presents the results of the pre-study.

  • 336.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, Kristian
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. RISE SICS, Västerås, Sweden.
    Aranda Munoz, Alvaro
    RISE SICS, Västerås, Sweden.
    Development of methods that support exploration of simple and low-cost IoT-aided improvement solutions at manufacturing plants2018In: The 2018 Annual Autumn Meeting of Japan Industrial Management Association JIMA, Tokyo, Japan, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Yella, Gilbert Ncheh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Atem, Tongwa Ivo
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Continuous Quality Improvement: Implementation and Sustainability2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the philosophy of doing business shift from sell what you can produce to produce what you can sell so do the customers’ specification continuously become a vital tool during product development process, hence increasing the volatility of the business environment. The objective of this thesis is to thoroughly review literature to be supported by cases why most companies fail in sustaining improvement programs then map out a pathway that will leads to successful implementation.

    A series of reasons were found which impedes the successful implementation of improvement programs which includes; management is unable to define the problem to be solve and the method of measurement, implementers choose wrong parameters for improvement, implementers sub-optimize or may not involve everyone that will be affected by the program, top management gives little or no attention to improvement programs and at times they may even loose focus, so many concurrent improvement programs are executed which will result to resource overloading, teams members most often lack data integrity, and teams members are often scared to try new ideas hence prohibiting the chances of innovation. To minimize this cankerworm, a number of steps has been mentioned. The steps were divided into two phases, the selection phase and the implementation. The selection process includes; defining the program, focus program on improving shareholders’ value and choose program base on a holistic perspective. The implementation phase includes; commitment of top management, prioritize projects, use critical chain project management to plan and execute project, lay emphasis on quality data, minimize the number of concurrent projects, encourage risk taking, and spend time and resources on value adding activities.

  • 338.
    Yesilgul, Mustafa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Nasser, Firas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Discrete event modelling and Simulation of an Assembly Line at GKN Driveline Köping AB2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s economic conditions force companies and organizations to work more effectively in their processes due to different reasons.  Especially; after the Second World War, owing to the changing business perception and strong competition between companies, new terms such as productivity, flexible systems, efficiency, and lean came into industrial engineering discipline. However, these kinds of terms also brought a new question. How are they reached?  At that point, discrete event simulation has been used as an effective method to give an answer to this question.

    From this perspective; this project focuses on discrete event simulation and its role in real industrial processes. The main interest of this paper is discrete event simulation, but in this study we also tried to give some detailed information about other types of simulations such as continuous and discrete rate.

    Basically, we can say that this paper consists of several parts.

    In the beginning of this paper, the reader can find some theoretical information about simulation itself and the requirements for implementing it on real processes.

    Secondly, we tried to explain different types of simulations and the reason why we used discrete event simulation instead of continuous or discrete rate in our case study.

    Furthermore, one of the main areas of this research is to inform the reader about how computer support is used as a simulation tool by today’s companies. To do this, a powerful software, Extendsim8, is described in detail.  The reader is able to find all the information about how to create discrete event models in this software.

    In case study part, we are able to find the results of the five months work that we did between February and June at GKNDriveline Köping AB in Sweden. In these five months, we had been busy with analyzing an assembly line, collecting data, creating a simulation model, discussion with workers and engineers and doing some tests such as validation & verification. In this part, the reader can find all the information about the production line and the simulation model.

    In conclusion, reader can find the results of the project at the end with the visualization of future state. As it will be discussed repeatedly in the paper, validation is one of the important steps in a simulation project. Therefore, in order to see the reliability of our simulation model, different calculations and tests were made. Last of all, some of results will be shown by graphs and tables in order to give better insight to reader. 

  • 339.
    Yuji, Yamamoto
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Proposal of a deliberate discovery-learning approach to building exploration capabilities in a manufacturing organization2013In: Advances in Sustainable and Competitive Manufacturing Systems: 23rd International Conference on Flexible Automation & Intelligent Manufacturing, Springer, 2013, p. 1249-1262Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing organizations in developed countries need to be proficient in not only incremental improvements but also radical innovations. Radical innovations largely depend on exploration capabilities, in other words capabilities of searching, discovering, and developing radically new systems, processes, and operational practices. Since many manufacturing organizations are proficient in incremental improvements, an important challenge for them is to develop the exploration capabilities across the organizations. However, little knowledge has been accumulated as to how to develop such capabilities in practice. The main purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to building organization’s exploration capabilities. In the approach, the capabilities are built through leaders iteratively and deliberately creating situations where groups in an organization have to or can be more explorative. The approach is made by analogy from how organizational changes toward lean manufacturing were driven by an experienced lean consultant. In addition, this paper presents a model of how to practically apply the approach at companies. The model is developed firstly based on existing theories then modified through employing the model at a manufacturing company.

  • 340.
    Yuji, Yamamoto
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Monica, Bellgran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Four types of manufacturing process innovation and their managerial concerns2013In: Procedia CIRP, vol. 7, 2013, 2013, p. 479-484Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing process innovation (MPI), an organization-wide effort involving radical redesign of manufacturing related processes and systems to achieve dramatic improvements in critical manufacturing performance measures, encompasses various kinds of activities. Some MPI initiatives focus on technological innovation and others may intend to change work processes and organizations’ behavioral routines. Some organizations adopt new technological solutions or work methods that are externally available, while others may develop and adopt novel technologies or organizational routines which are new to the state of the art. Different focus in MPI initiatives requires different approaches and preconditions for achieving desired outcomes. However, MPI has been mostly treated as one type of innovation in literature and further classifications of MPI have not been made. This paper presents four types of MPI and discusses what managers can expect and prepare for each type of MPI. Basic strategic directions in terms of what type of MPI can be conducted at a specific organization is also discussed. The four types of MPI is developed through a literature review of various research fields, for instance manufacturing strategy, process innovation, organizational innovation, typology of innovation, and new product development.

  • 341.
    Yuji, Yamamoto
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Monica, Bellgran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing process improvements using value adding process point approach2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing functions need to be capable of constantly developing new manufacturing lines, cells, and pieces of equipment in order to maintain their operational competitiveness. This paper explores a unique approach to analyzing and designing manufacturing processes referred to as the Value Adding Process Point (VAPP) approach. This approach particularly focuses on the points where value is added to materials in manufacturing processes. The approach is mostly used at Japanese companies and it has contributed to developing unique manufacturing lines, cells, and pieces of equipment that tend to be simple, slim, and compact, and require low investment cost. The approach has also contributed to achieving major improvements in different performance measures in manufacturing. However, the approach is rarely known internationally. Moreover, the amount of practical information on how to apply the approach at companies has been limited in the scarce literature on the approach. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the VAPP approach to a broader audience and also to provide practical information on how to apply the approach by describing a case study in which the approach was applied at a Swedish manufacturing company. At the company, the application was made in a manner of experiential learning. In this paper, it is described how the VAPP approach was applied, what outcomes were generated by the application, and how participants in the case study experienced the application of the approach. Discussions are made as to usefulness of the approach and effective use of the approach.

  • 342.
    Yuji, Yamamoto
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Monica, Bellgran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing process innovation initiatives at Japanese manufacturing companiesIn: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Zafarzadeh, Masoud
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    A Guideline for Efficient Implementation of Automation in Lean Manufacturing Environment2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The competitive climate of production and high labour cost, motivate western companies to use technologies like automation as a mean to increase manufacturing competitiveness. On the other hand companies are aware about cost reductive policies like lean production which has shown noticeable achievement; consequently some manufacturers tend to follow such system. In this situation, in order to have lean enterprise, it is vital to find a clear picture of challenges and potentials of implementing automation within a lean environment. If the process of developing automation is not efficient and companies’ strategy and mission is not considered in time of project development, the result may not be lean at the end. So finding an appropriate guideline that can be used in time of developing automated projects is very important.This thesis aims to develop a guideline that can be used in developing automation solutions to have lean result at the end of the projects. The guidelines can be used in both assembly and manufacturing development projects.VOLVO GTO has chosen as the case study for this thesis. In order to find the answer of research questions two main areas in manufacturing and assembly are marked.

  • 344.
    Zhang, Zhedong
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Automatisering av slutförpackning: En förstudie vid Hilton Food Group, Sverige AB2007Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Examensarbetet har genomförts på Hilton Food Group, Sverige AB (HFG Sverige) i västerås. Uppgiften var att göra en förstudie som utreder möjligheten att automatisera slutförpackningsprocessen av komsummentförpackat kött (kpk) på företaget och är en del av projektet Robot till tusen. Projektet drivs av Robotdalen i syfte att öka tillväxten hos små- och medelstora företag i Mälardalen med hjälp av robotisering. Målet med examensarbetet var att ta fram förbättringsförslag och ett genomtänkt beslutsunderlag med framtagna koncept för automatiseringen av slutförpackningsprocessen. De prioriterade koncepten skall möjliggöra en besparing av personalresursen. Några avgränsningar som gjorts var att inte ta hänsyn till materialhantering före eller efter slutförpackningsprocessen.

    HFG bearbetar och packar över 150 olika sorters köttprodukter i deras 17 produktionslinjer. Dessa packas i standardlåda från Svenska Retursystem (SRS) och levereras till ICA. Detta görs i dagsläget manuellt. För att nå en fungerande automatiserad lösning behövde antal praktiska materialhanteringsproblem lösas:

    - Kvalitetskrav på trågen

    - SRS-låda försörjning

    - Bygelpositionering och kontroll innan lådfyllning och stapling

    - Trågförpackning från transportband till SRS-låda

    - Hantering av ”avvikelse” t.ex. tråg som måste packas om

    - Hantering av störningar

    I rapporten presenteras tänkbara lösningar till de nämnda problemen. Dessa lösningar, robotar och andra utrustningar som behövs för att realisera det automatiska systemet på en packlinje beräknas för HFG Sverige få en investeringskostnad upp till 2,5 miljoner kr. Minst en person per linje per skift sparas vid slutpackningsprocessen. Detta skulle resultera i en återbetalningstid på cirka två år.

    Författaren presenterar även andra förslag bland annat en automatiserad lösning för flera packlinjer samt att spelvända närmande packlinje för att effektivisera processen. Dessa är dock övergripande koncept varför ingen investeringskostnad kalkylerats.

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