https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
3456789 251 - 300 of 539
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 251.
    Hedström, Robin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
     Alfdex Manufacturing Footprint:  Future Expansion Strategy for Production 2014 - a Global Review 2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in offshore manufacturing have in a historical perspective been taken as a series of separate decisions with a strong focus on cost reduction. This kind of cost is typically narrowed to the cost of purchase or manufacture. The total supply chain costs are hardly ever considered. Investments need to be reviewed within the context of a company´s total market and manufacturing requirements. This will prevent unwanted issues such as extended lead times, greater buffer stocks and excess capacity, uncoordinated strategic responses, conflicts and the failure to be profitable.

    Alfdex, which is a joint venture owned by Alfa Laval and Haldex, provide the global truck and diesel engine market with its products and is for the moment market leader. The future demand will however exceed their current capacity within five years. To avoid that any decision will be made ad hoc this project will identify some essential factors that are significant for a future expansion of production. This will thereafter be adapted for Alfdex situation to recommend where they should expand their future production based on an objective perspective.

    In this project seven markets will be reviewed; North America, Europe, South America, Russia, China, India, and Asia. The manufacturing footprint refers to where a company geographically locates its production. It is based on a long-term perspective and required reasonable strategic thinking and analysis.

    Four essential factors have been identified which will determine Alfdex manufacturing footprint recommendations; the current situation; the market development and capacity need; the issue of costs; global and local conditions and differences together with the supply chain. In addition a scenario matrix and analysis matrix have been developed to support the analysis.

    This work has shown that the most feasible solution, based on what is known today, is to make an onsite expansion in Landskrona, Sweden. By keeping the production in Sweden Alfdex will meet the most qualifications identified in the manufacturing footprint. Additionally a sales person and technical support are required in North America as well as allocating resources to monitor the Chinese market.

    In this version of the report customers’ and suppliers’ names as well as some figures have been concealed. In some cases the information has been replaced by an X and in others it has been completely removed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 252.
    Hellstrand, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    On the value of land2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sustainable development is once again moving the production factor land into the focus of economic theory and practise. There are three production factors, capital, labour and land. Land is a synonym to ecosystems. During the major part of the 20th century land in economic theory has been handled as a peripheral issue. The sustainability context implies a challenge to take land in proper consideration. That means to in an adequate way consider system characteristics that result in complex systems, such as thresholds, resilience, irreversibilities, and interdependencies between systems and system levels.

     The thesis examines

    • how land can be understood and handled in the context of a sustainable development,
    • the relations between land and society on a conceptual level and in operative terms,
    • the relations between system levels and between the three sustainability dimensions ecological, economic and social,
    • the importance of agriculture and animal production in a sustainable development. 

    The major findings are that in contexts such as economically profitable and natural resource-efficient milk production; methods to measure sustainability performance of production systems generally; and societal strategies for management of natural resources that support economic and social development within ecological sustainability limits, three “laws” need to be handled appropriate: Liebig’s “Law” of the minimum, Shelford´s “Law” of tolerance, and the “Law” of diminishing return in biological-ecological productions systems.

    The thesis identifies examples within dairy sciences, systems ecology, and engineering sciences that affect or may affect policies in real world systems from local to global level that can be substantially improved. In order to suggest relevant measures a tool-kit supporting a sustainable development have been generated, integrating contributions from agricultural sciences, systems ecology, economic theory, economic geography, applied environmental sciences and theories of complex systems. The thesis summarises around 30 years of professional experiences mainly within advanced consultancy, during which this tool-kit has been developed and applied. Evaluation of some applications afterwards shows relevance. For some of the examples analysed in the thesis, found weaknesses are such that global food security literally is threatened within one to twenty years.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 253.
    Hägg, Anette
    et al.
    Volvo Construction Equipment Components AB Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment Components AB Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    The impact of outsourcing on logistics: Case study at Volvo2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The business today is dominated by change and uncertainty. It is getting more and more global and the increased expectations from the customers’ leads to higher demands on the businesses. The objective of this paper is to identify critical parameters that affect the efficiency of companies’ logistics. The aim is also to investigate which of the logistics parameters should be considered before taking sourcing decisions. The paper will review literature within related areas and present a case study performed at a company within the Volvo group. The conclusion is eleven parameters which are affecting the efficiency in the logistics system and nine should be considered before taking sourcing decisions and they are; delivery capacity, delivery dependability, capacity and technical equipment, total cost, quality, transportation cost, physical distance, flexibility and planning/ steering.

  • 254.
    Hägg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Andersson, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment Components AB Eskilstuna, Sweden .
    The impact of outsourcing on logistics: Case study at Volvo2004In: DS 34: Proceedings EDIProD 2004 / [ed] R. Rohatynski; J. Jakubowski, 2004, p. 173-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The business today is dominated by change and uncertainty. It is getting more and more global and the increased expectations from the customers’ leads to higher demands on the businesses. The objective of this paper is to identify critical parameters that affect the efficiency of companies’ logistics. The aim is also to investigate which of the logistics parameters should beconsidered before taking sourcing decisions.The paper will review literature within related areas and present a case study performed at acompany within the Volvo group. The conclusion is eleven parameters which are affecting the efficiency in the logistics system and nine should be considered before taking sourcing decisions and they are; delivery capacity, delivery dependability, capacity and technical equipment, total cost, quality, transportation cost, physical distance, flexibility and planning/ steering. 

  • 255.
    Hägg, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Granlund, Åsa
    Need for strategic rightsourcing decision model: Case studies at ABB and Volvo2004In: Proceedings of the TMCE 2004, 2004, p. 1033-1042Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies of today act on a global competitive market. This dynamic business environment requires operational efficiency and capabilities to produce and develop products and services required by the market at the necessary rate of change. To achieve this many companies focus on core competencies, moving the rest to external suppliers. The trend has therefore turned from producing internally to buying from external suppliers. The objective in this paper is to identify critical parameters, which affects (or are affected) by the make or buy decision, based on the two case studies. This paper is based upon a literature overview and two case studies conducted at Volvo and ABB in Sweden. Both companies have out-sourced different components. Some of the parameters found in the case studies are; competitive priorities, resources, the logistic cost, core competencies, the feed-back loop and long time survival. The case study shows that not all outsourcing cases were such a success as expected, indicating the need for a "Rightsourcing model".

  • 256.
    Isaksson, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kartläggning, analys och förbättringsförslag på verkstadsunderhåll av apparater till en gasturbin2021Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify, apply and verify scientific theories regarding how an organization may reduce wasteful activities and systematically work towards improved quality. The study is a descriptive case study that consists of qualitative data gathered through a literature study followed by observations and interviews conducted at a case company working with maintenance of gas turbines and their modules. 

    The research questions the study tries to answer are:

    -       What wastes can be identified in the maintenance process?

    -       How can the organization improve and streamline the maintenance process?

    -       How can the organization systematically work to continuously improve the maintenance of the gas turbine modules?

    During the study, wasteful activities as well as methods to improve the processes of organizations and methods for them to systematically work towards higher quality could be defined by the literature review. These theories were then the foundation to identify flaws in the case company’s processes and for the construction of solutions to how the case company could improve, streamline, and systematize their processes. 

    Through dialog with executives at the case company it was decided that the maintenance of fuel nozzle manifolds and bleed air valves were to be analyzed. During the observations and interviews, wasteful activities in the form of waiting, transporting, defects, over processing, inventory, motion, and unused skills could be detected. Through observations of the flow, a spaghetti diagram was created, and unnecessary movements and transports were visualized. A new layout was presented with a radically reduced amount of motion and transport. The interviews resulted in the identifying of flaws and wastes in the working environment, unreliable processes, the risk of waste through waiting, and a lacking structure. Through relocating certain processes and stations, implementing a material supply system, creating workstations constructed according to 5S, as well as implementing a systematic approach regarding the gathering of data related to deviations and spare parts and material consumption, the possibility to reduce the lead time and raise productivity and quality was demonstrated. 

  • 257.
    Ivars, Amelia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Sandvik, Caroline
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Change management within digital transformations: A study on how to manage a digital change project2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the issue of a high failure rate for digital transformations and the neglect of working with social aspects of technological changes by answering the question How can organizations work with change management within a digital transformation project to facilitate a change? The study follows a qualitative approach where a case study involving interviews was conducted at a globally leading manufacturing company within the automotive industry. The case study investigated a project which involved a new production concept with new technology and methods of working, which has inspired further projects and started a digital transformation journey at the case company. The topics highlighted in this study involve how people perceived resistance and readiness within the project, leadership, and how the digital change was designed. The study concluded: 1) the environment of the change does not necessarily affect the chosen approach 2) technology characteristics set scope and time frame, 3) analyzing people’s previous change experiences and ensuring voluntary participation may reduce resistance, 4) both task- and people oriented leaders are necessary, 5) digital projects may benefit from ensuring autonomy and a distance to hierarchical structures, 6) a digital strategy must be clearly formulated and communicated, and 7) both a project- and change management model should be adopted. Further research needs to be conducted on projects in different practical settings and conditions. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Change management within digital transformations, Ivars and Sandvik
  • 258. Ivory, Chris
    Critical Representation of Work and Organisation in Popular Culture2011In: Critical Perspectives on International Business, ISSN 1742-2043, E-ISSN 1758-6062, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 111-112Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Ivory, Chris
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Images of Projects2012In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 415-416Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Ivory, Chris
    et al.
    University of Newcastle, UK.
    Alderman, Neil
    University of Newcastle, UK.
    Can Project Management Learn Anything from Studies of Failure in Complex Systems?2005In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 5-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of failure in complex technology systems point to the role of non-linear interactions, “emergence,” conflicting objectives, overly centralized management and “multi-nodality” in precipitating this failure. At the same time, studies of technology failure and safety in high-reliability organizations point to the benefits of what might be termed an “interventionist” approach to managing. Drawing on the insights of these studies, we explore three case studies of complex projects to show the importance of ongoing management “interventions” in preventing project failure. We conclude that “interventionism,” as a balance to overreliance on centralized project management systems, may be a fruitful approach to project management in the context of complex projects.

  • 261.
    Ivory, Chris
    et al.
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Alderman, Neil
    Newcastle University, UK.
    The imagined user in projects: Articulating competing discourses of space and knowledge work2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 131-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper articulates the role of the imagined user in the design choices of a higher education client with respect to a project to provide new workspaces for one of its divisions. The case study centres on the disagreements that occurred between different factions within the client organisation regarding the type of office space that was appropriate for its workforce. The paper examines the ways in which competing images of academic knowledge work and knowledge workers were conjured up in differently imagined users and deployed as persuasive user-stories in the design process. The analysis of the case uses the narratives of key project actors to identify the underlying discourses that were articulated to support particular imaginings of the user. The case shows how the successful deployment of discourses was tied up with the power wielded by particular actors at different times during the project. The paper suggests that the articulation of an imagined user implies that project actualities may be presumed as well as real and that discourse analysis provides a useful mechanism for understanding these imagined actualities.

  • 262.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hellström, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Robot Automation in a Lean Manufacturing System2009In: Proceedings of CARV International Conference on Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 263.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Zaman, Abedullah
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Factory-In-a-Box – Mobile Production Capacity on Demand2007In: International Journal of Modern Engineering, ISSN 1930-6628, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 12-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Change and uncertainty dominate today’s business environment. Meeting customer demands require a high degree of flexibility, low-cost/low volume- manufacturing skills, and short delivery times. In this highly competitive environment there is a great need to identify and develop unique manufacturing capabilities within industry. This paper will present an ongoing research project in Sweden called Factory-in-a-Box with the objective to develop mobile production capacity on demand. The Factory-in-a-Box concept consists of standardized production modules that are installed in e.g. a container and transported by e.g. a truck or by train. The modules may rapidly be combined into production systems that can be reconfigured for a new product and/or scaled to handle new volumes. The key features of this futuristic production system concept are flexibility, mobility, and speed. In the research project five fully operative demonstrators have been developed and implemented in close cooperation between different academic and industrial partners in Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 264.
    Janius, Camilla
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Löfqvist, André
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Produktionsstyrning och utfallsanalys2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the Master of Science in product- and process development at Mälardalens University, this thesis is performed during the spring semester of 2015. The employer is Strängbetong AB winner of Lean-builders 2013 for their innovative production system in the traditional construction industry. The thesis is performed on Strängbetong factory in Kungsör and delimited to the reinforcing workshop, which is the first step of producing concrete pillars. These issues are the goals of which this thesis is to answer:

    Which are the most important factors that affect the production for the reinforcement work shop at Strängbetong AB in Kungsör the most and makes it possible for the waste to grow?

    How does a company achieve a better production management for a more predictable manufacturing?

    A description was made of the current state by mapping the manufacturing processes of reinforced cages with help of observations and literature studies. A value stream map was made to analyze the processes, which affects the productions outcome the most. The authors used an efficiency analysis of one of the main processes. To ensure that they had the right amount of input the process was observed for five days, in which they timed the process to get substantial data of unplanned stops and cycle times.

    It was discovered that one of the main elements that affected the production was the failure rate of the drawings used to produce reinforcement cages. With input from the factory audit department the authors could calculate 17 % of all drawings needed correction. When a drawing is incomplete it can keep the production waiting in an unpredictable amount of time, until the necessary changes have been made by the constructor to correct the errors. Some of the other elements that where discovered was unnecessary transport, capacity-constrained workstations and the workshops layout.

    The improvement proposals that were developed was to optimize processes through the development of a new assembly station, a new layout, strive to complete fewer orders rather than several.

    With these improvement suggestions and recommendation for Strängbetong to strive towards an optimized material flow throughout the factory, the company can achieve an improved flow and get better control over their production.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 265.
    Javadi, Siavash
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Product Introduction in Low-volume Manufacturing: from an Information Quality Perspective2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies must continually innovate and introduce new products to compete globally, relying on a well-executed product introduction process for success. This involves a successful transition from design to production, ensuring alignment between product and production systems. A successful product introduction process results in a shorter time-to-market and fewer production disruptions. Collaboration and information sharing between design and production are pivotal, with the content quality of shared information crucial to the product introduction process.

    Low-volume manufacturing companies are integral to the European manufacturing sector but face unique challenges with regard to new product introduction due to their specific characteristics. Existing studies often overlook low-volume manufacturing, leading to a lack of comprehensive understanding, particularly regarding the role of information quality in the process.

    This research project aims to examine the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing by focusing on the role of information content quality. To fulfil this aim, seven case studies were conducted in two manufacturing companies to investigate the influences of the characteristics of products and production systems in low-volume manufacturing on the product introduction process, the role of information content quality in the process, and the management strategies that enhance information content quality.

    The findings of this thesis map the characteristics of products and production systems in low-volume manufacturing and their influences on the product introduction process. The characteristics, activities, and phases of the product introduction process for low-volume products are thus defined. Moreover, the types and sources of disturbances during product introduction in low-volume manufacturing are identified. Furthermore, the role of information content quality in the low-volume product introduction process and the identified disturbances are investigated. Information correctness, completeness, accuracy, clarity, consistency and timeliness are identified as dimensions of information content quality affected by the characteristics of product introduction in low-volume manufacturing. Additionally, adapting product introduction management strategies to suit the requirements and characteristics of low-volume manufacturing is investigated, with a focus on enhancing the quality of information in the design–production interface. In total, the study identifies four main product introduction management strategies that are well suited to companies in low-volume manufacturing. Finally, the study explores the integration of advanced digital technology practices – such as interactive digital design reviews, digital test assemblies, virtual builds and digital clinics – into various product introduction management strategies to improve information content quality.

    This research contributes to the product introduction research area by delving into aspects of the process in low-volume manufacturing. It specifically addresses the role of information content quality and management strategies for improving information quality. The findings will benefit practitioners in low-volume manufacturing by providing insights into process characteristics and challenges in their industry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 266.
    Javadi, Siavash
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards tailoring the product introduction process for low-volume manufacturing industries2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the closing phase of product development projects, the product introduction process significantly influences the time to market and product quality. The rapid launching of new products to market aids manufacturing companies in avoiding crucial consequences, such as a loss of market share and revenue and the early obsolescence of products in a globalized market. Therefore, the characteristics and influential factors of the product introduction process must be identified to facilitate the management of new product development projects and to maintain competitiveness for manufacturing companies.

    The management and support of product introduction processes in low-volume manufacturing industries require solutions that are tailored to the characteristics and requirements of these industries. However, studies on the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries and their influence on the product introduction process are limited. Therefore, the objective of the research presented in this thesis is to develop knowledge about product introduction process and its facilitators in low-volume manufacturing industries by focusing on characteristics of products and production systems in these industries. To fulfil this objective, the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries and their influence on the product introduction process were investigated via literature reviews and a multiple-case study. In addition, the facilitators of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were examined. A case study was performed, comprising two longitudinal real-time cases and two retrospective cases, all within one Swedish company.

    The characteristics of low-volume products and production systems are studied in this research. The identified influences of these characteristics on the product introduction process include few engineering prototypes, limited and uncertain numbers of pre-series productions and the infeasibility of conventional production ramp-up. Other identified influences include the modification of existing products instead of the development of entirely new products, the use of existing production systems with slight modifications for new products, a high frequency of introducing new products, and an extensive focus on the functionality of products instead of their manufacturability.

    Finally, the utilization of knowledge and experiences from the development and production of prior similar products was identified as a potential facilitator of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries. A process was suggested to support the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries in gathering, sharing and using knowledge and experiences from the production of prior similar products. This process can compensate for the lack of opportunities to test and refine products and production systems during the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 267.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Start of Production in Low-Volume Manufacturing Industries: Disturbances and Solutions2015In: Advances in Production Management Systems: Innovative Production Management Towards Sustainable Growth, 2015, Vol. 459, p. 475-483Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing disturbances during start of production of new products is of high importance to assure that products reach the market on-time with the intended quality and volume. Therefore, identification and elimination of sources of such disturbances is necessary. Since the literature about such disturbances in low-volume manufacturing industries are limited, this paper is aimed to identify the common sources of such disturbances and the possible solutions to mitigate them in low-volume manufacturing industries. A multiple-case study has been conducted to achieve this aim. The results show that main sources of disturbances are lack of opportunities to test and refine products, considering the production system “as is” and putting extensive focus on product functionality rather than its manufacturability. Moreover, using the knowledge and experiences from production of previous similar products is identified as a source of learning and compensation for lack of opportunities for test and refinement.

  • 268.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

    Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

    Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

    Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

    Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

  • 269.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Product development in low-volume manufacturing industries: Characteristics and influencing factors2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development process has a considerable effect on factors such as time to market and quality of product which are vital for manufacturing companies to remain competitive. Therefore, study of the factors which influence the product development process such as characteristics of products and production systems is necessary to support and improve the product development process. Since most of the studies have been conducted in the context of high-volume manufacturing industries, the influences of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems on the product development process in such industries have not been considered sufficiently. In this paper, characteristics of low-volume products and production systems, their inter-relations and their influences on the product development process have been studied through a multiple case study. A general map of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems and their inter-relations was presented in this paper. Moreover, the influences of these characteristics on product development process including the reduced complexity of the process and lack of opportunities for test and refinement were discussed.

  • 270.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Customizing management strategies for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing: Enhancing information content quality2024In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies characterized by high-mix and low-volume production exhibit distinct features that exert a significant influence on the product introduction process. The quality of information exchange between product design and production interfaces becomes paramount in low-volume manufacturing. Consequently, there exists a pressing need to explore various methods for adapting and customizing management strategies to align with the unique characteristics of low-volume manufacturing and its associated product introduction processes. While this knowledge is critical in low-volume manufacturing, most existing studies focus on the management aspects of high-volume manufacturing. Therefore, this study investigates the customization of management strategies for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing to enhance the quality of information content. Drawing upon a longitudinal analysis of new product introductions within a low-volume manufacturing company, this study identified four management strategies, namely securing a production test and verification plan, revising the role of product introduction management, formal design and production coordination plan, and lessons learned management plan. The paper explains how the examined company adapted and implemented product introduction management strategies to facilitate the enhancement of information content quality across three key stages: pre-implementation, post-implementation, and subsequent modification and refinement of strategies following the initial round of implementation. By shedding light on these strategies, this study offers a comprehensive understanding of management approaches for product introduction in low-volume manufacturing. The study makes a valuable contribution to the discourse on information quality management and design-production interface in low-volume manufacturing and low-volume product introduction literature.

  • 271.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Scania AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Leveraging Advanced Digital Technology Practices to Enhance Information Quality in Low-Volume Product Introduction and Manufacturing2023In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, p. 401-416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to examine the potential of advanced digital technology practices to enhance information quality during low-volume product introduction and manufacturing. The successful introduction of products is vital for the competitiveness and prosperity of manufacturing companies. However, low-volume products have distinct characteristics that affect the introduction process, and one significant challenge is the presence of poor information quality. This adversely impacts the introduction process and can lead to disruptions in new product production. Consequently, it is crucial to identify alternative approaches that align with the specific characteristics of such industries to enhance information quality. This research conducted a longitudinal study within a large manufacturing company specializing in heavy commercial vehicles. Two product introduction projects were examined to investigate how the adoption of advanced digital technology practices, including interactive digital design reviews, digital test assemblies, virtual builds, and digital clinics, has influenced the quality of information exchanged between the research and development (R&D) department and the production team throughout the product introduction process. The study begins by highlighting the primary challenges associated with the product introduction process within the case company. Subsequently, it explores the impacts of implementing digital technology practices on various criteria related to information content quality, such as completeness, accuracy, clarity, consistency, correctness, and timeliness. These criteria are discussed in detail, and their impact is supported by examples from the two studied product introduction projects.

  • 272.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Leveraging Advanced Digital Technology Practices to Enhance Information Quality in Low-Volume Product Introduction and Manufacturing2023In: Advances in Production Management Systems.: Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures, Springer, 2023, Vol. 689, p. 401-416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his study aims to examine the potential of advanced digital technology practices to enhance information quality during low-volume product introduction and manufacturing. The successful introduction of products is vital for the competitiveness and prosperity of manufacturing companies. However, low-volume products have distinct characteristics that affect the introduction process, and one significant challenge is the presence of poor information quality. This adversely impacts the introduction process and can lead to disruptions in new product production. Consequently, it is crucial to identify alternative approaches that align with the specific characteristics of such industries to enhance information quality. This research conducted a longitudinal study within a large manufacturing company specializing in heavy commercial vehicles. Two product introduction projects were examined to investigate how the adoption of advanced digital technology practices, including interactive digital design reviews, digital test assemblies, virtual builds, and digital clinics, has influenced the quality of information exchanged between the research and development (R&D) department and the production team throughout the product introduction process. The study begins by highlighting the primary challenges associated with the product introduction process within the case company. Subsequently, it explores the impacts of implementing digital technology practices on various criteria related to information content quality, such as completeness, accuracy, clarity, consistency, correctness, and timeliness. These criteria are discussed in detail, and their impact is supported by examples from the two studied product introduction projects.

  • 273. Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Information quality in the product introduction process: Examination of the influences of low-volume manufacturing characteristics2016In: Journal of manufacturing research, ISSN 1741-038X, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficiently transitioning from product design to production is crucial in ensuring thesuccessful introduction of new products. This paper delves into the often-understudiedrealm of information content quality within the interface between product design andproduction, particularly in the context of low-volume manufacturing industries. It seeksto bridge the knowledge gap by exploring how the distinctive characteristics of lowvolumemanufacturing affect the quality of shared information, encompassing criteriasuch as completeness, accuracy, clarity, and correctness. Drawing from a comprehensivecase study conducted at a low-volume manufacturing firm specializing in earthmovingand construction equipment, this research sheds light on the intricate relationship betweeninformation content quality and the specific attributes of low-volume manufacturing. Ithighlights the profound impact of these characteristics on information content quality andelucidates how subpar information content quality can disrupt the product introductionprocess, potentially leading to cost overruns, production delays, and quality issues. Thisstudy contributes to the existing body of knowledge on information quality within theproduct design and production interface and extends its focus to the often-neglected lowvolumemanufacturing sector. By emphasizing completeness, accuracy, clarity, andcorrectness as pivotal information content quality criteria and their implications for theproduct introduction process, this paper advances the understanding of informationquality management in low-volume manufacturing companies.

  • 274.
    Johanson, Ulf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Koga, Chitoshi
    Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.
    Skoog, Matti
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Henningsson, Johan
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    The Japanese Government's intellectual capital reporting guideline: What are the challenges for firms and capital market agents?2006In: Journal of Intellectual Capital, ISSN 1469-1930, E-ISSN 1758-7468, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 474-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Purpose – The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the Guideline for Intellectual Property Information Disclosure (GIPID) in relation to the ambitious aspirations behind the guideline and in that way develop a future research agenda aiming at addressing the main challenges regarding the construction of guidelines for future IC reporting. Design/methodology/approach – The purpose will be achieved by comparing the GIPID with two other IC guideline proposals, namely MERITUM and the Danish Guideline for Intellectual Capital Statements, respectively, from a capital market communication perspective and from a management control perspective. References are made to 12 Japanese companies that have published IP reports. The sample companies operate in a wide range of nine industries covering, for example, security, manufacturing, transportation, and chemistry, and comprise large as well as small firms.

    Findings – The study identifies four major challenges for intellectual capital guidelines and reporting. These challenges regard market communication, management control, uniqueness versus comparability, and confidentiality versus accountability. The paper concludes with a number of questions of vital importance for future research within the research area.

    Originality/value – This is one of the first papers that discuss the Japanese Guideline for Intellectual Property Information Disclosure as well as to compare it with similar European guidelines. 

  • 275.
    Johansson, A.
    et al.
    Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Process mapping in industry - the self-centred phenomenon and how it effects continuous improvements2020In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2020, p. 718-723Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the manufacturing system development process to deliver the expected value, it is important that the management of the process works. However, the competence of building adequate process models is often missing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that with some training, it is possible to achieve much better process models. This is studied through a workshop, where the participants map their “breakfast process”. The result shows that without guidance, the process becomes self-centred. A self-centred resource-oriented process model gives focus on time and resource utilisation, while a value objective oriented process model focuses more on process quality.

  • 276.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Malardalen Univ, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Safsten, Kristina
    Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Adolfsson, Ann-Cathrine
    Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    IMPLEMENTATION OF R&D MANAGEMENT MODELS IN GLOBAL ORGANISATIONS2015In: DS 80-3 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 3: ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses implementation of R&D management models in global product development organisations. The study rests upon empirical material originating from five industrial companies that was collected via workshops and interviews. A number of enablers for and barriers to implementation of R&D management models have been identified. The study adds to the current theory on how companies with global organisations can ensure that the R&D management model is implemented throughout the entire organisation. In addition, the practical value refers to that the identified enablers and barriers support companies in their strive towards better adherence to the R&D management models in product development projects.

  • 277.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kellokumpu, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Klamningskoncept för kablage på motor: Examensarbete, produktutveckling - konstruktion2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete har utförts på initiativ av Scania CV AB. Scania är en världsledande tillverkare av tunga lastbilar, bussar och industri- och marinmotorer. Konstruktionsgruppen inom Scania som detta examensarbete utfördes vid är benämnd NMKA och är en del av avdelningen NM – Engine development som bedriver forskning & utveckling av Scania motorer.

    Denna avhandling inom produktutveckling tjänar syftet som slutgiltigt examinationsmoment för civilingenjörsprogrammet Innovation och produktdesign på Mälardalens högskola. Arbetet har utgått ifrån en metod för produktutveckling som lärs ut i samband med utbildningen.

    Uppdraget har baserats på frågeställningen att utveckla ett robust klamningskoncept för kablage på motor, som uppfyller de ergonomiska och konstruktionsmässiga krav som Scania ställer på sina artiklar. Klamningskonceptet ska därmed möjliggöra säker infästning av lättare kabel, rör och slang i flera olika dimensioner. Samt även kunna upprätthålla denna funktion under de stränga förhållanden som råder i miljön kring motor. Vilket ställer höga krav på brukstemperatur, kemikaliebeständighet, egenfrekvens och livslängd.

    Det befintliga infästningselement som används idag i aktuella applikationsområden uppfyller inte Scanias ergonomiska krav och måste därför fasas ut och ersättas. En begränsning som medföljer är att det nya klamningskonceptets artikelpris måste ligga inom samma prisspektrum som sin föregångare.

    En stor del av Scanias verksamhet är belägen i Södertälje, däribland produktionslinan för montering av raka motorer till lastbil, buss och marina applikationer. Monteringen av motorkomponenter sker i hög grad manuellt, vilket medför repetitiva och ibland ergonomiskt påfrestande moment för montörerna. Scania värnar om sina anställda och prioriterar deras hälsa högt så att dem kan känna sig trygga i sin arbetsmiljö och fullfölja ett långt arbetsliv. Att ta fram och utveckla nya produktlösningar som minimerar eller motverkar riskerna för skador är därför en naturlig del av förbättringsarbetet. Samt en bidragande faktor till initiativet bakom formuleringen till detta examensarbete.

    Detta examensarbete har resulterat i ett förslag på ett klamningskoncept som har lägre artikelkostnad, är mer ergonomisk att montera och har kortare monteringstid. Klamningskonceptet är avsett enbart för applikationsområden med lättare rör och kablage, med infästning för M6-skruvförband. På det testade applikationsområdet avluftningsnätet innebär gruppens klamningskoncept en årlig kostnadsreducering på 50 % relativt det nuvarande infästningselementet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 278.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kompetens och förutsättningar för praktikbaserad innovation. Från självreglerat till expertstött förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete2017In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 22, no 1-2, p. 124-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete drivs inom tillverkande industri i många fall med en ambition att involvera medarbetare på alla nivåer i en organisation. I artikeln adresseras hur förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete kan organiseras inom industriell produktion och hur det inverkar på förutsättningarna för ett kompetent utförande av förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete. Två fallstudier från tillverkande industri utgör det empiriska underlaget. I resultatet identifieras två spänningsfält för förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete: självorganiserat-avsiktligt organiserat, samt självreglerande-expertstött arbete. I spänningsfälten identifieras fyra positioner: Den intuitivt drivna, den gruppdrivna, den coachdrivna och den vägledningsdrivna. En slutsats är att en begränsad distribuerad kompetens är en allt för svag katalysator för att bedriva förbättrings- och utvecklingsarbete i de självreglerande positionerna. Expertstöd i form av en kompetent andre kan genom facilitering eller handledning möjliggöra mer av utforskande aktiviteter och kan då bidra till att bryta med invanda handlingsmönster i sökandet efter nya lösningar. Det möjliggör mer av ett arbetsintegrerat lärande samt utgör en viktig grund för framväxt av praktikbaserad innovation.

  • 279.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing viable development work in operations2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 49-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to give an account of and discuss how viable development work can be organized and engage employees on all levels of an organization, which, depending on the specific needs, enables the emergence of both exploitation and exploration. A further aim is to describe the relationship between how development work is carried out and the opportunities afforded by such work for continuous learning of development work competence. The empirical material contains several examples of how employees are committed to improving their own operations, which in itself is an important prerequisite for a continuous work-integrated learning. However, the empirical findings presented in this chapter indicate that this is not a sufficient condition for the long-term development of skills relevant to pursuing structured development work. One conclusion to draw is that development work needs to be treated as a domain-specific competence in itself, which in turn needs to be distributed throughout the organization. 

  • 280.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Transcending the dichotomy of exploitative and explorative work orientations2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring the integration process of new practices for knowledge sharing2019In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide new perspectives on the implementation of new operations management practices by applying three different but interrelated frameworks: Human Interaction Dynamics, Normalization Process Theory, and Professional competence as ways of being. The empirical material in this paper is based on a case study within a global manufacturing company, and more specific the development and implementation of a new OM practice for knowledge sharing at one of the sites in Sweden. A mixed-method approach is used, and the empirical material is collected through analysis of a database, two group interviews, and a survey.

  • 282.
    Johansson, Peter E
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Solving the bottlenecks. The craftsmanship of collaborative research2018In: Participatory Innovation Conference 2018 PIN-C 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Johansson, Peter E.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Stefan, Ioana
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Söderberg, Tobias
    Utvecklingsenheten, Region Sörmland, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Katarina
    Utvecklingsenheten, Region Sörmland, Sweden.
    Creating balancing spaces for digital ambidexterity in healthcare2022In: Event Proceedings: LUT Scientific and Expertise Publications, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Johansson, Peter E
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology, Sweden.
    Exploring the work and competence of interactive researchers2020In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741-038X, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1539-1559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the competence in use when working with interactive research, which is a continuation and elaboration of action research.

    Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research approach was adopted for the study. The main body of empirical material in this paper is based on two sources of data – a survey comprising open-ended questions, followed by a series of focus group interviews. The respondents were researchers with varying degrees of experience in using interactive research.

    Findings: The findings provide illustrations of what characterises interactive research as work and identify an additional set of activities that go beyond traditional research activities. Some activities are relatively easy to describe, while others exist in the gaps between other activities – e.g. boundary spanning – and are harder to explicitly define in terms of implications for the involved researchers’ competence. The work activities reaching beyond the traditional research boundaries are implicit and are not a common shared practice. From a competence point of view, this implies that the competence in use for these implicit tasks of interactive research becomes individually carried. Based on these findings, a number of individual aspects of what constitutes competence in use are suggested.

    Research limitations/implications: In future studies, it would be valuable to use a mixed-method approach that also includes longitudinal observations of the actual work of conducting interactive research.

    Practical implications: The findings and suggestions for how to understand the competence of interactive researchers can be used as guidance for training in research education.

    Originality/value: This study contributes to previous research by describing important requirements and critical elements of competence in use when conducting interactive research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 285.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Osterman, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Conceptions and operational use of value and waste in lean manufacturing - an interpretivist approach2017In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 55, no 23, p. 6903-6915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how the key concepts of lean manufacturing, value, value adding and waste are conceived and operationally used by Lean trainers in operational work processes. A comparative case study with a mixed method approach, using an explanatory sequential design, was conducted. This means that a set of quantitative data were collected, which was followed by the collection of qualitative data with the purpose of explaining and understanding the quantitative measures. An interpretivist approach is used as a framework, which implies a perspective on contemporary operations management paradigms, such as lean manufacturing, as a continuous construction of inter-subjective experiences. What becomes evident in the empirical findings is that there are both similarities and differences in the Lean trainers conceptions and use of value adding and waste. The similarities and differences can be explained by variations in two dimensions: (a) the character of the work process, which ranges between mechanical and craftsmanship, and (b) Lean trainers approach to key concepts, which ranges between being rule-based and reflective. By using a research design where the concepts of value adding and waste were used simultaneously, and adopting an interpretivist approach on lean manufacturing, we were able to reveal conditions that in other cases remain hidden.

  • 286.
    Johansson, Robin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ekstedt, David
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Effektivisering av en produktion präglad av många produktvarianter2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Change is taking place all the time and it has happened as much for the last 50 years as in the entire human history. Hence changes are taking place at an ever higher rate, it is a must for companies to keep up with the development and streamline themselves to not be outdone by other companies. Companies compete with each other by offering high quality products at attractive prices with short lead times. Lean philosophy has become a widespread tool for companies to work with in this necessary streamlining work.

    The purpose of the work in this report is to streamline the manufacturing of elementary products at the case company. The reason has been to chart how the production process works today by performing a value-flow analysis. Our project is based on the value-flow analysis to find what deficiencies there is in the production and create an improved future position.

    Value-flow analysis, shortened VSM in literature, is a Lean production tool for mapping the flow of a product or service. It is a visual tool that helps identify value-enhancing and non-value enhancing parts and clearly illuminate wastes.

    The case company has a large product mix where many of the products undergo different processes, making it difficult to perform a proper value-flow analysis. We constrained our work to the 80/20 products and within these products found a suitable product family for our value-flow analysis, which symbolizes a large part of the case company's production. The improvements we propose mean a significant reduction of lead time within the production, which means more efficient production with lower costs and shorter delivery times.

    The production strategy we present that in theory leads to a significant reduction in lead time, requires further investigations and needs to be adapted to the case company's production with a high product mix before implementation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 287.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ekman, Sten
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Innovation Advising in practice: Four cases where the RAFT model has been used in environmental innovations, and how twenty-one STPs offers Innovation Advising.2010In: XXVII IASP World Conference on Science and Technology Parks, 2010, Daejeon Convention Center, Korea, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science and Technology Park's (STP) often offers business incubators to Idea owners where they can develop ideas into companies. The scope of this paper is a study in how the RAFT-model, a “How to”-model based innovation process, affected four Idea owners with environmental innovations in different business areas. This paper also shows how twenty-one Swedish STPs offer Innovation Advice (IA) to Idea owners and think of IA as a competitive offer. All Idea owners found the RAFT-model useful and consider using the RAFT-model again. Two ideas were still in a developing progress and the other two were shut down. Five of the STPs thought IA as a competitive offer to Idea owners, the others found IA proper to be offered by other organizations. Conclusions from this study are that the RAFT-model was appropriate to environmental innovations and STPs found IA valuable for Idea owners but not as a competitive motive.

  • 288.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    External Innovation Driver (EID) - a Developing and Organization Learning Service in Innovation Management. Three cases where an EID develop and learn SMEs innovation management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative companies are more successful than non-innovative ones, but there seems to be a lack of knowledge in innovation-management. Can an EID (External Innovation Driver) develop and learn a SME (Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises) about innovation management? If so, should the EID be supported by a STP (Science and Technology Park)? The scope of this study includes three cases where SME:s in Sweden got education and idea-developing-support through one idea-generating phase and one idea-developing phase. Out of 55 identified ideas in Phase One, 12 ideas were developed in Phase Two. The SME:s got education from “Learning by watching” combined with “Learning by doing” according to the RAFT-model, which resulted in 6 ideas reaching the market, 1 idea became a research project and 5 ideas were terminated. The SME:s felt it secure to know that the EID was a neutral and trusted person, supported by a STP, not claiming for partnerships.

  • 289.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Klintberg, Mikael
    Almi Företagspartner Mälardalen ABB 26, Port-Anders Gata 9, 722 12 Västerås, Sweden.
    Oldebring, Jan
    Almi Företagspartner Mälardalen ABB 26, Port-Anders Gata 9, 722 12 Västerås, Sweden.
    Sundström, Angelina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Developing a programme for educating managers in systematic innovation practices: a case study2023In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore how an educational programme can be designed to support managers in learning systematic innovation practices, contributing to the Innovation Management community. Using the community of practice (CoP) concept, we developed a programme to educate managers in systematic innovation practices, including systematic innovation work, innovation climate, and the creation of innovation teams. Our contribution builds on prior studies on the CoP construct. Using a case study with a mixed-methods design, we have explored the educational experiences of ten managers and the practical outcome of their organisations’ participation in the programme. Based on mixed data, we conclude that the educational programme “Management Education on Systematic Innovation Practices” (MEoSIP) supports managers’ understanding of systematic innovation practices in theory and in practice. It also contributes to practitioners who can support clients in improving innovation-related abilities. Agencies can develop training programmes using CoP for other educational purposes. Further research is proposed.

  • 290.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Stefan, Ioana
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ilg, Jakpb
    CyberForum e.V., Haid-und-Neu-Strasse 18, 761 31 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Lepa, Reesi
    Civitta Eesti, Riia 24a, 51010 Tartu, Estonia.
    Problems and Answers When OrganisingInternational Innovation Contests in Cross-border Collaboration2023In: Proceedings of XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference / [ed] Iain Bitran, Leandro Bitetti, Steffen Conn, Jessica Fishburn, Paavo Ritala, Marko Torkkeli & Jialei Yang, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we build on prior research to explore problems arising and answers attempted when an international innovation contest (IC) is organised by multiple organisations in cross-border collaboration. A Consortium involving ten science parks and one university developed a multistage IC, consisting of four phases: exploration, ideation, implementation and international market launch. This study focuses on the first two phases. The Consortium attractedparticipation from 300 challenge owners from twelve countries, generating 559 proposals by 318 SMEs from 36 countries. The empirical setting is explored in great detail. Data were collected through open-ended written questionnaires and field notes. Identified problems were related to four themes: collaboration, coordination, communication, and commitment. These could be further divided into internal and external problems. Practical implications and future research avenues are suggested.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 291.
    Josefsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Trollsfjord, Pia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Effektiv intern materialförsörjning i en volym- och produktmässigt varierad tillverkning: En fallstudie på ABB IEC LV Motors2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to investigate how the material flow, of a high-frequent component family, to an assembly line with volume and product mix variations, can be streamlined.

    In order to examine this, the aim has been divided into two defined queries.

    1. Which factors affect the efficiency of the material flow, for a high-frequent component family, to an assembly line?   
    2. How can an effective material flow, for a high-frequent component family, be designed?

    Methodology: Both a case study and a literature study has been performed, in order to answer the queries. Literature in the areas of material and inventory control, transportation and material handling has been studied. The case study, which was carried out at a company, was based on process mapping combined with interviews and observations. Collected data from the case study have been analysed with support of literature.

    Findings: Different factors that are restricting the efficiency of the material flow for an assembly line has been identified. Unnecessary operations and inefficient material handling resulted in high cycle times for the material flow. Furthermore, the layout and control of the inventory resulted in long lead time and unnecessary inefficient transportations. Inadequate design and integration of the logistic subsystems has shown to be a significant cause, resulting in limited effectiveness of the studied material flow. On this basis, a new design of the material flow has been proposed, where the holistic perspective and integration are central. A new inventory design and a tugger-train transportation solution along a timed route, reduce the material handling and the number of deliveries. In addition, a pull flow system where consumption controls material replenishment, reduces both inventory levels and the number of inventory buffers.

    Implications: The purpose of the study has been achieved by solving the defined queries. By identifying factors that reduce the effectiveness of the material flow, a more efficient solution can be designed. The study shows that there are several possible improvement opportunities for the studied material flow. However, only one case study was performed, therefore its ability to create scientific value, can be regarded as limited.

    Recommendations: For further studies, it may be of interest to study several companies with similar problems to be able to draw general conclusions with scientific depth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 292.
    Joseph Christian, Haranya
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Implementeringsplan För Effektivt Produktionsflöde Inom Spoltillverkningen Hos ABB AB Electrification Västerås: - En fallstudie kring flaskhalsarna inom produktionen2020Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Ständiga förändringar tillhör vardagen i dagens globaliserade marknad. Tillverkningsindustrierna måste hålla takten med de förändringarna som äger rum för att behålla sin plats på marknaden och framstå som konkurrenskraftiga bland andra företag. För att kunna vara ledande bör företagen ha grunden stadigt uppbyggd, så att basen står stadigt genom de förändringarna som kommer ta plats i framtiden. För en stadig uppbyggnad och för att uppnå konkurrenskraft eftersträvar många företag att gå över till ett dragande produktionssystem från det befintliga tryckande produktionssystemet. De söker därför vägar till en förändring. För att undersöka detta vidare så har ett fallföretag studerats, där studien skall bidra till att identifiera de flaskhalsarna som kan vara i vägen för att uppnå det önskade tillståndet som är ett dragande produktionssystem. 

    Studien fokuserar på produktionssystemet inom fallföretaget, där djupare undersökningar görs kring vilka orsaker som håller produktionen tryckande i dagsläget. Genom Värdeflödesanalys skapas en visuell bild över flaskhalsarna som finns och genom observationer hos produktionsavdelningen anknyts orsakerna till de identifierade hindren. Målet med studien är att besvara frågeställningen,

    ”Vilka processer inom tillverkningen definierar produktionen till att vara ett tryckande produktionssystem? Vad behövs implementeras för att transformera de processerna till ett dragande produktionssystem?”

    Empirin till studien är insamlad hos fallföretaget på plats med egna observationer och datainsamling. Analys av empirin identifierar att det bland annat råder överproduktion hos fallföretaget. För att bekräfta det gjordes analys över produkternas förbrukning och lagerhållning för år 2018. Genom ledtiden från VSM kunde man ta fram vad den egentliga medellagern borde vara. Den framtagna medellagernivån påvisar bland annat att den nuvarande storleken på orderkvantitet behöver uppdateras för vissa produkter, då det visar sig att medelagernivån är allt för hög för vissa produkter i jämförelse med förbrukningen. Efterfrågan förändras alltså ständigt och därför är det viktigt att företaget uppdaterar det kontinuerligt. Ett idealt framtida tillstånd presenteras med VSM och resterande förbättringsförslag anges med utförd analys och lagerberäkningar som bakgrund. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 293.
    Jwala, Parth
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Inventory Management: A case study at Volvo Construction Equipment2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    • Introduction

    In today’s world, manufacturing companies are keen to adopt lean methodologies to sustain an everchanging market. One way companies grow their business is by increasing customer satisfaction, customization and running the business in the optimal scenario. Inventories forma significant amount in applicable businesses, estimating around 30%, a number that has the potential to be decreased that would turn direct profits. The following two research questions were therefore answered.

    Q1. What are the potential factors which affect the inventory size in the lean production facility?

    Q2. What should be the inventory management approach in a lean manufacturing environment?

    • Methodology

    The literature review was performed to get an understanding of the current study on this topic. Further a site was visited, and the case study approach was adopted. While gatheringdata, semi-structured interviews were conducted with engineering, line management and operations. Observation technique was also used to collect empirical data.

    • Theoretical framework

    Theoretical study based on literature review helps authors to understand the complete system deeply from a lean perspective as manufacturing takes place in the lean environment. The theoretical framework helps in finding the right approach to the problem and showcases the potentially problematic areas to be focused on.

    • Empirical data

    Empirical data shows the actual image of the problem in the case company. It also shows the possible factors that are responsible for the present condition. These factors are represented with the help of the fishbone diagram.

    • Analysis and results

    Quantitative analysis was done based on data collected. Two approaches were proposed in which approach 2 answers the problem for sufficient buffer size. Cross-check analysis was also performed on the actual production plan from week 10 and 11 this cross-check analysis strengths the reliability of the research work.

    • Conclusions and recommendations

    The conclusion is drawn based on the analysis performed with the foundation of data collected. Although significant challenges are answered with the help of research questions, human involvement and absence of monitoring policy limit the reliability of the proposed results. The future recommendation is to perform the proposed solution on simulation and check the validity of different scenarios.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 294.
    Kabroo, Carl Gustaf
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Willenius, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Produktionsoptimering av elektromagnetiska omrörare - "ORD 43P" och "EM Stabilizer"2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis in product development – design was carried out between February and June 2013 and includes 15 credits (C-level), and is the final course of the Bachelor Program in Engineering, Innovation and Product Design. 

    The thesis dealt with the problem of adaptation to production and cost optimization of two pieces of electromagnetic stirrers at the company ABB, Process Automation, Metallurgy in Västerås. After contact with the supervisor from ABB, Jan-Erik Eriksson, the project work commenced to adapt the manufacturing design of the product ORD 43P and EM Stabilizer.

    To achieve cost-optimized production and production adapted design, the authors applied the following product development tools: Design for Cost, Design for Manufacture and Design for Assembly. To verify that the design was optimal, but also that it did not break during stress, the authors used the computer based module finite element method of the CAD program SolidWorks. 

    The selection of components was based on the component’s price per kilo. 

    To select the optimum material, that is high strength and affordable, the authors used the material database software CES EduPack. The materials selected from CES EduPack could not be found by the authors as standard material at the market. Therefore, the authors changed strategy to compare and select materials based on market research of standard materials with suppliers.

    The components of ORD 43P were optimized in terms of design in comparison with existing components coil bracket and insulation boards. They were also cost reduced significantly. The component frame base was examined briefly. 

    Through product development the components coil bracket, insulating boards and frame base the total cost of ORD 43P was reduced by 2,47 %. 

    The authors found that the total cost of ORD 43P could be reduced between 10-25 % as many of its components are oversized and made ​​of more expensive materials than needed. 

    The components of EM Stabilizer, cover and pneumatic hose, were designed with optimum design and was cost reduced.Through product development the components cover and pneumatic hose the costs of EM stabilizer were reduced by 1,3 %. 

    The authors assume that the costs of the EM Stabilizer can be reduced, because it is relatively new at the market. ABB want to ensure that the product reach its guaranteed life by over-sizing many of the components of the product and use more expensive material than necessary.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Produktionsoptimering av elektromagnetiska omrörare
  • 295.
    Karim, Aria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schnelzer, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Differences in Lengths of Life of Production Equipment & Production Systems and their implications on Acquisition & Replacement Processes2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays usage of advanced production equipment becomes more common among production industries, future challenges in the market require flexibility in production industries due to growing competition and demand responses. Decisions regarding acquisition and replacement of production equipment have a major role in future profitability and competitiveness of production industries. Production equipment life cycle is dependent on technical, economical and conceptual lengths of life. Technical and economical lengths of life are connected to production equipment and the conceptual length of life is connected to production systems.

    Acquisition and replacement assessment processes of production equipment within production industries require involvement from different responsible departments. Varieties of perspectives differ from different departments in their prioritization regarding economical, technical and conceptual lengths of life. Lack of collaboration and evaluation of critical factors create quality and capacity issues in production industries. This project is directed to investigate issues concerning establishment of a sustainable long term thinking in consideration of economical, technical lengths of life of production equipment and also conceptual length of life of production systems in an earlier stage of acquisition and replacement assessment processes.

    Investigated research questions in this project are the following; What is the correlation between lengths of life of production equipment & production systems and how they influence each other? What is the basis for acquisition and replacement assessment of production equipment? How does buyer-supplier relationship influence length of life of production equipment? This thesis work is based on both theoretical and empirical findings. A case study was performed with a survey and interviews to gather data for the analysis.

    Technical and conceptual lengths of life are both based on economical profitability and have to be adapted to product generations. Expensive investments in production equipment are critical and can be risky for production industries if marketing experts are excluded or if future product generation forecast are not considered in production equipment acquisition processes. Information and knowledge inputs from production equipment suppliers have to be considered in an earlier stage of concept development in production systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 296.
    Karlberg, Christian
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology. Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Energi- och bullerlösningar för fastigheter i tågtrafiken2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 297.
    Karlqvist, Vanessa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Future Assembly Layout Design for assembly of large robots: A state-of-the-art literature review and a Fuzzy AHP analysis for ABB values2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Global competition is growing for companies everywhere and the demand for new and improved products are rising for each day that passes. The globalization brings new opportunities as well as new challenges since companies need to stay up to date and implement new technologies to stay competitive. Not only do customers want up to date products, they also want high quality, low price and individualized products, customized for their needs. This puts high demand on manufacturing companies to adapt their businesses, increase product diversity and to being able to introduce new variations and new products quickly.  Since the drastic evolution of technology has increased the competitiveness of industrial companies, and the mass customization demands have increased, the necessity to investigate potential system alternatives towards improving production processes, with the help from the new technology, is required. One way of doing this is to revaluate one's assembly layouts since the layout design decision is highly connected to the product portfolio and the production volumes.

    The specific objective of this thesis is to broaden the case company’s, ABB, knowledge on ways their assembly of large robots can be improved with the focus on potential future assembly solutions. The overall aim of this thesis work is to identify state-of-the-art possible layout design alternatives, evaluate their performances and finding a method of choosing the final layout approach. This is answered by research questions connected to plant layout selection methodology, plant layout options and finally recommendations for the case company.

    The methodology chosen for deciding the recommended layout is the fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process which is a multi-criteria decision-making tool suitable for decision problems with a hierarchical structure, having main attributes and sub attributes connected to each main attribute. Twenty-four attributes were created and ten layouts based on company observations and a literature study. The layout with the highest score was a layout based on a modernized version of the common fixed position layout. The overall recommendation for the case company was to focus on having a layout in the future with focus on a high technology level as well as high flexibility, for also receiving high performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 298.
    Karlsson, David
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Produktanpassning vid insourcing av bearbetning: Tillverkningsanpassad konstruktion och insourcing i produktutvecklingsprocessen2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    High product quality together with low manufacturing cost are vital aspects of the economic success of a product. To achieve such success the method Design for Manufacturing (DFM) is used. DFM is a highly integrative method and demands a cross-functional team consisting of experts such as production engineers, pre-process engineers and manufacturing personnel (Ulrich & Eppinger, 2014).

    Volvo CE has a continuous work with DFM and it is done through many iterations and direct contact between the manufacturing- and design department. Although the overall work with DFM is continuous the department Driveline Systems Product Improvement is requesting a method for this work, due to the lack of any methods used today. It is discovered that there are many different methods for DFM described by many authors, and in this thesis methods by Ulrich & Eppinger (2014), Dalton et al. (2016) and O’Driscoll (2002) are investigated. A standardized way may increase the quality of the DFM work and may help create a more holistic view. A holistic view over the work with DFM can help create better conditions for re-use of previous knowledge related to manufacturing of the parts.

    In addition of the requested method for DFM the current product development process used, DMAIC, is investigated. The process is today mainly used and adapted for the development and improvement of existing products. The reason of the current case studies is to increase the utilization level at the current manufacturing department, and thus no improvement or development is initially present. Therefore, the current insourcing case studies are compared to the Volvo process DMAIC. To connect the current case to established product development processes the case studies are also compared to a theoretical product development process.

     

    Methods used within this thesis are field work, with interviews and case studies, and a complementary literature study to investigate methods and to increase the understanding of DFM and insourcing. In the field work two parts for insourcing are investigated as two case studies. The parts are initially selected through a project selection, where a total of six parts are included. To perform the selection and further development of the current case studies Ullmans (2010) design process were applied, with use of relevant methods and tools for this work. Also, some elements of the product development process according to Ulrich & Eppinger (2014) were applied. Based on the requested method for DFM and the current case studies the following research questions were raised:

     

    How does an insourcing process correlate with theoretical design processes and with Volvo’s product development process?

    Where in the insourcing process is it relevant to include DFM?

     

    Aspects of DFM are aspects that affect the manufacturing cost. When insourcing processing of parts and labour shift rate are the most relevant and important aspects and should be addressed when selecting and evaluating project. Both processing of parts and labour shift rate are aspects that affect the manufacturing cost. When insourcing it is also important to include aspects connected to outsourcing, and this fact cannot be identified in the DMAIC process nor the design process of Ullman (2010). Compared to the current insourcing case studies there are some differences between both the design process of Ullman (2010) and the Volvo process DMAIC, even if there also are some similarities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 299.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Direct and Indirect Innovation Integration in Swedish SMEs Business Strategy2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is a central strategic issue for companies who wants to repeatedlyinnovative and build long-term competitiveness. Research stresses the importance of strong linkages between innovation and the strategic orientation of a company. Despite that does both research and experience show that SME:s often have a short-term focus on results and are low-risk oriented towards incremental innovations or show a reactive, non-strategic approach towardsinnovation. This case study survey to what extent innovation is an, direct or indirect, integrated part of a SME:s overall business strategy. The case study was conducted at one Swedish SME in three stages with 10 participants with broad representation of management and employees from the entire company. Innovation was found to be strongly centred to the persons of top management, have strong informal linkages to top levels of formal business strategy but with weak integration at practical action oriented levels of strategy.

  • 300.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The importance of skill and experience in innovation auditing2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation auditing is by both academia and practitioners considered to be important for differentpurposes such as increased innovativeness and a multitude of auditing tools and methods exist. Majority of these doto some extent use best practice and most provides explicate judgment criteria why their dependence of theauditors’ skill and experience is relatively low. A literature review was conducted to deepen the understanding ofhow the auditors’ skill and experience is considered in current innovation audit literature. Only a few were found toaddress the issue explicitly but a majority contained examples of situations where skill or experience of the auditoraffected the audit process. Innovation auditing doesn’t only seem to provide a base for increased innovativenessand maturation but also requires auditing maturity.

3456789 251 - 300 of 539
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf