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  • 201.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    In-Vehicle Stress Monitoring Based on EEG Signal2017In: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, ISSN 2248-9622, E-ISSN 2248-9622, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, improved road safety by monitoring human factors i.e., stress, mental load, sleepiness, fatigue etc. of vehicle drivers has been addressed in a number of studies. Due to the individual variations and complex dynamic in-vehicle environment systems that can monitor such factors of a driver while driving is challenging. This paper presents a drivers’ stress monitoring system based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals enabling individual-focused computational approach that can generate automatic decision. Here, a combination of different signal processing i.e., discrete wavelet transform, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and modified covariance have been applied to extract key features from the EEG signals. Hybrid classification approach Fuzzy-CBR (case-based reasoning) is used for decision support. The study has focused on both long and short-term temporal assessment of EEG signals enabling monitoring in different time intervals. In short time interval, which requires complex computations, the classification accuracy using the proposed approach is 79% compare to a human expert. Accuracy of EEG in developing such system is also compared with other reference signals e.g., Electrocardiography (ECG), Finger temperature, Skin conductance, and Respiration. The results show that in decision making the system can handle individual variations and provides decision in each minute time interval.

  • 202.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Physiological sensor signals classification for healthcare using sensor data fusion and case-based reasoning2014In: Sensors (Switzerland), ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 11770-11785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, clinicians often do diagnosis and classification of diseases based on information collected from several physiological sensor signals. However, sensor signal could easily be vulnerable to uncertain noises or interferences and due to large individual variations sensitivity to different physiological sensors could also vary. Therefore, multiple sensor signal fusion is valuable to provide more robust and reliable decision. This paper demonstrates a physiological sensor signal classification approach using sensor signal fusion and case-based reasoning. The proposed approach has been evaluated to classify Stressed or Relaxed individuals using sensor data fusion. Physiological sensor signals i.e., Heart Rate (HR), Finger Temperature (FT), Respiration Rate (RR), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) are collected during the data collection phase. Here, sensor fusion has been done in two different ways: (i) decision-level fusion using features extracted through traditional approaches; and (ii) data-level fusion using features extracted by means of Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE). Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is applied for the classification of the signals. The experimental result shows that the proposed system could classify Stressed or Relaxed individual 87.5% accurately compare to an expert in the domain. So, it shows promising result in the psychophysiological domain and could be possible to adapt this approach to other relevant healthcare systems. 

  • 203.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Fusion Based System for Physiological Sensor Signal Classification2014In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2014 MTD10, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, usage of physiological sensor signals is essential in medical applications for diagnoses and classification of diseases. Clinicians often rely on information collected from several physiological sensor signals to diagnose a patient. However, sensor signals are mostly non-stationary and noisy, and single sensor signal could easily be contaminated by uncertain noises and interferences that could cause miscalculation of measurements and reduce clinical usefulness. Therefore, an apparent choice is to use multiple sensor signals that could provide more robust and reliable decision. Therefore, a physiological signal classification approach is presented based on sensor signal fusion and case-based reasoning. To classify Stressed and Relaxed individuals from physiological signals, data level and decision level fusion are performed and case-based reasoning is applied as classification algorithm. Five physiological sensor signals i.e., Heart Rate (HR), Finger Temperature (FT), Respiration Rate (RR), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) are collected during the data collection phase. Here, data level fusion is performed using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE) and extracted features are then used to build a case- library. Decision level fusion is performed on the features extracted using traditional time and frequency domain analysis. Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is applied for the classification of the signals. The experimental result shows that the proposed system could classify Stressed or Relaxed individual 87.5% accurately compare to an expert in the domain. So, it shows promising result in the psychophysiological domain and could be possible to adapt this approach to other relevant healthcare systems.

  • 204.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Filla, Reno
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Classification of physiological signals for wheel loader operators using Multi-scale Entropy analysis and case-based reasoning2014In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor signal fusion is becoming increasingly important in many areas including medical diagnosis and classification. Today, clinicians/experts often do the diagnosis of stress, sleepiness and tiredness on the basis of information collected from several physiological sensor signals. Since there are large individual variations when analyzing the sensor measurements and systems with single sensor, they could easily be vulnerable to uncertain noises/interferences in such domain; multiple sensors could provide more robust and reliable decision. Therefore, this paper presents a classification approach i.e. Multivariate Multiscale Entropy Analysis–Case-Based Reasoning (MMSE–CBR) that classifies physiological parameters of wheel loader operators by combining CBR approach with a data level fusion method named Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE). The MMSE algorithm supports complexity analysis of multivariate biological recordings by aggregating several sensor measurements e.g., Inter-beat-Interval (IBI) and Heart Rate (HR) from Electrocardiogram (ECG), Finger Temperature (FT), Skin Conductance (SC) and Respiration Rate (RR). Here, MMSE has been applied to extract features to formulate a case by fusing a number of physiological signals and the CBR approach is applied to classify the cases by retrieving most similar cases from the case library. Finally, the proposed approach i.e. MMSE–CBR has been evaluated with the data from professional drivers at Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden. The results demonstrate that the proposed system that fuses information at data level could classify ‘stressed’ and ‘healthy’ subjects 83.33% correctly compare to an expert’s classification. Furthermore, with another data set the achieved accuracy (83.3%) indicates that it could also classify two different conditions ‘adapt’ (training) and ‘sharp’ (real-life driving) for the wheel loader operators. Thus, the new approach of MMSE–CBR could support in classification of operators and may be of interest to researchers developing systems based on information collected from different sensor sources.

  • 205.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Behnam, Moris
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Larsson, Thomas B
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Nolte, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sandström, Kristian
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards a Compositional Service Architecture for Real-Time Cloud Robotics2016In: ACM SIGBED Review, E-ISSN 1551-3688, p. 63-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present our ongoing work towards a compositional service architecture that integrates cloud technology for computational capacity targeting real-time robotics applications. In particular we take a look at the challenges inherent within the data center where the services are executing. We outline characteristics of the services used in the real-time cloud robotics application, along with the service management and corresponding task model used to execute services. We identify several key central challenges that must be addressed towards integrating cloud technology in real-time robotics.

  • 206.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Westerlund, Hanna
    Camanio Care AB, Sweden.
    Hjortsberg, Cecilia
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    Food4You: A Personalized System for Adaptive Mealtime Situations for Elderly2017In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2017 MTD 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Behnam, Moris
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bruhn, Fredrik
    Bruhnspace AB, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Software architecture for next generation hyperparallel cyber-physical hardware platforms: challenges and opportunities2015In: ECSAW '15 Proceedings of the 2015 European Conference on Software Architecture Workshops, 2015, Vol. Article No. 19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present what is destined to become the de-facto standard for hardware platforms for next generation cyber-physical systems. Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) is an initiative to harmonize the industry around a common architecture which is easier to program and is an open standard defining the key interfaces for parallel computation. Since HSA is supported by virtually all major players in the silicon market we can conjecture that HSA, with its capabilities and quirks, will highly influence both the hardware and software for next generation cyber-physical systems. In this paper we describe HSA and discuss how its nature will influence architectures of system software and application software. Specifically, we believe that the system software needs to both leverage the hyperparallel nature of HSA while providing predictable and efficient resource allocation to different parallel activities. The application software, on the other hand, should be isolated from the complexity of the hardware architecture but yet be able to efficiently use the full potential of the hyperparallel nature of HSA.

  • 208.
    Belli, Fevzi
    et al.
    University of Paderborn, Germany.
    Seceleanu, Cristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Panel Description: 40 Years of Software Engineering2008In: Proceedings 32nd Annual IEEE International Computer Software and Applications Conference, COMPSAC2008, 2008, p. 7-7Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the fall of 1968, NATO hosted in Garmisch- Partenkirchen, close to Munich, a conference devoted to the problems of the computer industry that was having a great deal of trouble in producing large and complex programs. The term Software Engineering (SE) was not in general use at that time, its adoption for the title of this conference was deliberately provocative. As a result, the conference and its report have played a major role in gaining general acceptance of the term SE.

  • 209.
    Bello, L. L.
    et al.
    University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Åkerberg, J.
    ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gidlund, M.
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Uhlemann, Elisabeth
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Guest Editorial Special Section on New Perspectives on Wireless Communications in Automation: From Industrial Monitoring and Control to Cyber-Physical Systems2017In: IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics, ISSN 1551-3203, E-ISSN 1941-0050, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 1393-1396, article id 7938563Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Bello, Luciano
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedin, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sabelefeld, Andrei
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Value Sensitivity and Observable Abstract Values for Information Flow Control2015In: 20th International Conference on Logic for Programming, Artificial Intelligence and Reasoning LPAR'15, 2015, p. 63-78Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much progress has recently been made on information flow control, enabling the enforcement of increasingly rich policies for increasingly expressive programming languages. This has resulted in tools for mainstream programming languages as JavaScript, Java, Caml, and Ada that enforce versatile security policies. However, a roadblock on the way to wider adoption of these tools has been their limited permissiveness (high number of false positives). Flow-, context-, and object-sensitive techniques have been suggested to improve the precision of static information flow control and dynamic monitors have been explored to leverage the knowledge about the current run for precision. This paper explores value sensitivity to boost the permissiveness of information flow control. We show that both dynamic and hybrid information flow mechanisms benefit from value sensitivity. Further, we introduce the concept of observable abstract values to generalize and leverage the power of value sensitivity to richer programming languages. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by comparing it to known disciplines for dealing with information flow in dynamic and hybrid settings.

  • 211.
    Berg, Tobias
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Karlström, Lars
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    The construction of a Pan-Tilt unit with two digitalcameras and a PC interface2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 212.
    Bergman, Jan E. S.
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden.
    Bruhn, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Isham, Brett
    Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, Bayamón, Puerto Rico.
    Rincon-Charris, Amilcar
    Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, Bayamón, Puerto Rico.
    Capo-Lugo, Pedro
    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA.
    Åhlen, Lennart
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden.
    Exploiting Artificial Intelligence for Analysis and Data Selection on-board the Puerto Rico CubeSat2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Bergström, Henning
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Enoiu, Eduard Paul
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Using Timed Base-Choice Coverage Criterion for Testing Industrial Control Software2017In: Proceedings - 10th IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation Workshops, ICSTW 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 216-219Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The base-choice criterion was proposed as a suitable technique for testing software based on its nominal choice of input parameters. Test cases are created based on this strategy by varying the values of one input parameter at a time while keeping the values of the other parameters fixed on the base choice. However, this strategy might not be as effective when used on industrial control software for testing timed behavior. We propose to incorporate time as another parameter when generating and executing tests by defining the timed base-choice coverage criterion. We performed an empirical evaluation using 11 industrial programs written in the IEC 61131-3 programming language. We found that tests generated for timed base-choice criterion show better code coverage (7% improvement) and fault detection (27% improvement) in terms of mutation score than tests satisfying base-choice coverage criterion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of applying timed base-choice criterion for testing industrial control software.

  • 214. Blobel, Bernd
    et al.
    Lindén, MariaMälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.Ahmed, Mobyen UddinMälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Wearable Micro and Nano Technologies for Personalized Health: pHealth20152015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 215. Boman, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Ehn, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    Folke, Mia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hansson, Pär
    Sommerfeld, Disa
    Borg, Jörgen
    Users’ and health-care professionals’ contributions in developing a home-based stroke rehabilitation tool2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Cavrak, Igor
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Di Nitto, Elisabetta
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Zagar, Mario
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Hall of Fame nomination paper: Distributed Software Development course2017In: 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education & Training CSEE&T, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributed Software Development course is a joint project-based course involving three universities, from Croatia, Sweden and Italy, running each year since 2003. Distributed student teams work on all phases of a complex software engineering project, solving several challenges of working in a global environment, thus obtaining a valuable experience for their future careers. The course is very well received

  • 217.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cavrak, Igor
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Di Nitto, Elisabetta
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Feljan, Juraj
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Introducing SCRUM into a Distributed Software Development Course2015In: Workshop on Enhancing Software Engineering Education WESEE2015, Dubrovnik, Croatia, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing enactment of Global Software Engineering in industry has triggered educational institutions to perceive the importance of preparing students for distributed software development. During the last twelve years we have disclosed advantages and pitfalls of GSE to our students through our Distributed Software Development course. After running the projects according to the iterative process model for eleven years, we decided to shift to an agile development model, SCRUM. This decision was due to the growing industrial adoption of agile methods, but more importantly to increase proactiveness, sense of responsibility, and to balance the workload among the project team members. In this paper we describe the process and outcomes of our first attempt at introducing SCRUM in our distributed course.

  • 218.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cavrak, Igor
    University of Zagreb.
    Orlic, Marin
    FER, University Zagreb, Croatia.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Multi-dimensional Assessment of Risks in a Distributed Software Development Course2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organizational shift from local to global settings in many software development initiatives has triggered the need for entailing it when educating the future software engineers. Several educational institutions have embraced this need and started collaborating for the provision of global software engineering courses. The rather complex nature of such courses results in a wider range of risks, in comparison to standard software engineering courses, that arise in different dimensions, ranging from course- to result-related, and for different reasons. In this work we provide an assessment of such a variety of risks as well as their causes, and we give a hint on how they may affect each other based on our 10-year-long experience with a tightly integrated GSD course.

  • 219.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cavrak, Igor
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Di Nitto, Elisabetta
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Zagar, Mario
    FER, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Managing diversity in distributed software development education: a longitudinal case studyIn: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching Distributed Software Development with real distributed settings is a challenging and rewarding task. Distributed courses are idiosyncratically more challenging than standard local courses.We have experienced this during our distributed course, which has been run for 14 consecutive years. In this paper, we present and analyze the emerging diversities specific to distributed project-based courses. We base our arguments on our experience and we exploit a three-layered distributed course model, which we use to analyze several course elements throughout the 14-years lifetime of our distributed project-based course. In particular, we focus on the changes that the course underwent throughout the years, combining findings obtained from the analyzed data with our own teaching perceptions. Additionally, we propose insights on how to manage the various diversity aspects.

  • 220.
    Brahneborg, D.
    et al.
    Infoflex Connect AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Causevic, Adnan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Björkman, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards a more reliable store-and-forward protocol for mobile text messages2018In: Proceedings of the Annual ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, p. 13-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Businesses often use mobile text messages (SMS) as a cost effective and universal way of communicating concise information to their customers. Today, these messages are usually sent via SMS brokers, which forward them further to the next stakeholder, typically the various mobile operators, and then the messages eventually reach the intended recipients. Infoflex Connect AB delivers an SMS gateway application to the brokers with the main responsibility of reliable message delivery within set quality thresholds. However, the protocols used for SMS communication are not designed for reliability and thus messages may be lost. In this position paper we deduce requirements for a new protocol for routing messages through the SMS gateway application running at a set of broker nodes, in order to increase the reliability. The requirements cover important topics for the required communication protocol such as event ordering, message handling and system membership. The specification of such requirements sets the foundation for the forthcoming design and implementation of such a protocol and its evaluation.

  • 221.
    Brahneborg, Daniel
    et al.
    Infoflex Connect AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Causevic, Adnan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Black-Box Approach to Latency and Throughput Analysis2017In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE International Conference on Software Quality, Reliability and Security Companion, QRS-C 2017, 2017, p. 603-604, article id 8004393Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable fast and reliable delivery of mobile text messages (SMS), special bidirectional protocols are often used. Measuring the achieved throughput and involved latency is however non-trivial, due to the complexity of these protocols. Modifying an existing system would incur too much of a risk, so instead a new tool was created to analyse the log files containing information about this traffic in a black-box fashion. When the produced raw data was converted into graphs, they gave new insights into the behaviour of both the protocols and the remote systems involved.

  • 222.
    Brahneborg, Daniel
    et al.
    Infoflex Connect AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Causevic, Adnan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Pragmatic Perspective on Regression Testing Challenges2017In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE International Conference on Software Quality, Reliability and Security Companion, QRS-C 2017, Prague, Czech Republic, 2017, p. 618-619, article id 8004401Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regression testing research has received significant focus during the past decades, acknowledging the benefits it can provide to organisations in terms of reduced development and maintenance costs, as well as sustained end-user satisfaction. There are several challenges left to overcome before the industry can fully take advantage of the available research results in this area. To get a better overview of how current regression testing research fits in with today’s industrial practices, we read a selection of papers in the field and based on our experience, critically examined their content. As a result, we present and discuss a taxonomy of regression testing challenges, from the perspectives of both methods and organisations, that we believe will foster the industrial uptake of regression testing.

  • 223.
    Breivold, Hongyu
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cloud Computing education strategies2014In: 2014 IEEE 27th Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2014 - Proceedings, 2014, p. 29-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud Computing is changing the services consumption and delivery platform as well as the way businesses and users interact with IT resources. It represents a major conceptual shift that introduces new elements in programming models and development environments that are not present in traditional technologies. The evolution of Cloud Computing motivates teaching Cloud Computing to computer science senior students and graduate students so that they can gain broad exposure to the main body of knowledge of Cloud Computing and get prepared for occupations in industry. There is thus a strong need for having a Cloud Computing education course that (i) has a broad coverage of different roles interacting with a cloud; and (ii) leverages Cloud Computing concepts, technology and architecture topics at both introductory and advanced level. In this paper, we describe the demand for understanding the impact of Cloud Computing in computer science higher education. We propose education strategies for teaching Cloud Computing, including key knowledge areas for an enduring Cloud Computing course. © 2014 IEEE.

  • 224.
    Breivold, Hongyu Pei
    et al.
    ABB Corp Res, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cloud Computing Education Strategies2014In: 2014 IEEE 27TH CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND TRAINING (CSEE&T) / [ed] Bollin, A Hochmuller, E Mittermeir, RT Cowling, T LeBlanc, R, IEEE , 2014, p. 29-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud Computing is changing the services consumption and delivery platform as well as the way businesses and users interact with IT resources. It represents a major conceptual shift that introduces new elements in programming models and development environments that are not present in traditional technologies. The evolution of Cloud Computing motivates teaching Cloud Computing to computer science senior students and graduate students so that they can gain broad exposure to the main body of knowledge of Cloud Computing and get prepared for occupations in industry. There is thus a strong need for having a Cloud Computing education course that (i) has a broad coverage of different roles interacting with a cloud; and (ii) leverages Cloud Computing concepts, technology and architecture topics at both introductory and advanced level. In this paper, we describe the demand for understanding the impact of Cloud Computing in computer science higher education. We propose education strategies for teaching Cloud Computing, including key knowledge areas for an enduring Cloud Computing course.

  • 225.
    Breivold, Hongyu Pei
    et al.
    ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden .
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Radosevic, Iva
    Balatinac, Ivan
    Architecting for the cloud: A systematic review2015In: Proceedings - 17th IEEE International Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, CSE 2014, Jointly with 13th IEEE International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing and Communications, IUCC 2014, 13th International Symposium on Pervasive Systems, Algorithms, and Networks, I-SPAN 2014 and 8th International Conference on Frontier of Computer Science and Technology, FCST 2014, 2015, p. 312-318Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud Computing has emerged as a new paradigm in the field of network-based services within many industrial and application domains. The major benefits that it provides in terms of IT efficiency and business agility represent a huge competitive advantage for an organization. However, building new services in the cloud or designing cloud-based solutions into existing business context in general is a complex decision process involving many factors. In this paper, we undertake a systematic review to obtain an overview of the existing studies in designing cloud-based solutions. In particular, we investigate the main challenges and concerns when building cloud-based architectures and different architectural approaches and design considerations that are proposed in literatures to meet these specific concerns. The search strategy identified 72 studies that were catalogued as primary studies for this review after using multi-step selection process. The main challenges and concerns are classified into four main categories: security and trustworthiness, elasticity, portability and interoperability, and cloud resilience. We have also categorized studies that describe architectural approaches and design considerations when architecting for the cloud. Implications for research and practice are presented as well.

  • 226.
    Bril, Reinder J.
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TU/e), Netherlands.
    Altmeyer, Sebastian
    University of Amsterdam (UvA), The Netherlands.
    van den Heuvel, Martijn
    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TU/e), Netherlands.
    Davis, Rob
    University of York, UK.
    Behnam, Moris
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Integrating Cache-Related Pre-emption Delays into Analysis of Fixed Priority Scheduling with Pre-emption Thresholds2014In: Proceedings - Real-Time Systems Symposium, 2014, Vol. January, p. 161-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cache-related pre-emption delays (CRPD) have been integrated into the schedulability analysis of sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines for fixed-priority pre-emptive scheduling (FPPS). This paper generalizes that work by integrating CRPD into the schedulability analysis of tasks with arbitrary deadlines for fixed-priority pre-emption threshold scheduling (FPTS). The analysis is complemented by an optimal threshold assignment algorithm that minimizes CRPD. The paper includes a comparative evaluation of the schedulability ratios of FPPS and FPTS, for constrained-deadline tasks, taking CRPD into account.

  • 227.
    Bruhn, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Brunberg, Kjell
    BAP, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hines, John
    Independent Consultant.
    Asplund, Lars
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. BAP, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Introducing Radiation Tolerant Heterogeneous Computers for Small Satellites2015In: IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, vol. 2015, 2015, Vol. 2015, p. Article number 7119158-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results and conclusions from design, manufacturing, and benchmarking of a heterogeneous computing low power fault tolerant computer, realized on an industrial Qseven® small form factor (SFF) platform. A heterogeneous computer in this context features multi-core processors (CPU), a graphical processing unit (GPU), and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The x86 compatible CPU enables the use of vast amounts of commonly available software and operating systems, which can be used for space and harsh environments. The developed heterogeneous computer shares the same core architecture as game consoles such as Microsoft Xbox One and Sony Playstation 4 and has an aggregated computational performance in the TFLOP range. The processing power can be used for on-board intelligent data processing and higher degrees of autonomy in general. The module feature quad core 1.5 GHz 64 bit CPU (24 GFLOPs), 160 GPU shader cores (127 GFLOPs), and a 12 Mgate equivalent FPGA fabric with a safety critical ARM® Cortex-M3 MCU.

  • 228.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Model-based Approach for Vehicular Systems2017Report (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Model-driven Development Approach with Temporal Awareness for Vehicular Embedded Systems2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering the ubiquitousness of software in modern vehicles, its increased value and development cost, an efficient software development became of paramount importance for the vehicular domain. It has been identified that early verification of non functional properties of  vehicular embedded software such as, timing, reliability and safety, is crucial to efficiency. However, early verification of non functional properties is hard to achieve with traditional software development approaches due to the abstraction and the lack of automation of these methodologies.

     

    This doctoral thesis aims at improving efficiency in vehicular embedded software development by minimising the need for late, expensive and time consuming software modifications with early design changes, identified through timing verification, which usually are cheaper and faster. To this end, we introduce a novel model-driven approach which exploits the interplay of two automotive-specific modelling languages for the representation of functional and execution models and defines a suite of model transformations for their automatic integration.

     

    Starting from a functional model (expressed by means of EAST-ADL), all the execution models (expressed by means of the Rubus Component Model) entailing unique timing configurations are derived. Schedulability analysis selects the set of the feasible execution models with respect to specified timing requirements. Eventually, a reference to the selected execution models along with their analysis results is automatically created in the related functional model to allow the engineer to investigate them.

     

    The main scientific contributions of this doctoral thesis are i) a metamodel definition for the Rubus Component Model, ii) an automatic mechanism for the generation of Rubus models from EAST-ADL, iii) an automatic mechanism for the selection and back-propagation of the analysis results and related Rubus models to design level and iv) a compact notation for visualising the selected Rubus models by means of a single execution model.

  • 230.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Early Timing Analysis of Vehicular Systems: The Road from Single-core to Multi-core2016In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Volume 1735, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the software development for vehicular embedded systems, timing predictability is paramount for the development of the vehicles' safety features and for reaching a satisfactory customer value. Modern vehicles' features require new level of computational power. On the one hand, multi-core platforms can provide e cient support for these features. On the other hand, multi-core platforms complicate the software development of vehicular embedded systems as timing predictability is still an open issues for these platforms. In this paper we present a PhD work de ning a model-based software development methodology which supports early timing analysis for vehicular embedded systems on multi-core.

  • 231.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Raising Abstraction in Timing Analysis for Vehicular Embedded Systems through Model-Driven Engineering2015In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2015, Vol. 1499, p. 11-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of vehicular embedded systems is continuously increasing and this can negatively a ect their development cost and time to market. One way to alleviate these issues is to anticipate analysis of system properties at design time for early architectural re- nements. In this paper, we present a licentiate work which aims at contributing to this e ort. In particular, considering the importance of timing constraints typical of vehicular embedded systems, we leverage Model-Driven Engineering for realizing an automatic approach which allows the developer to perform timing analysis on design models, without having to manually specify timing elements. The proposed approach, starting from a high-level model of the vehicular embedded application, generates a set of candidate models enriched with timing elements in a semi-automatic manner. Timing analysis is run on the generated models and, based on its results, the approach supports the selection of the best candidate model for a speci c, non-empty, set of timing constraints

  • 232.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB .
    Raising Abstraction of Timing Analysis through Model-Driven Engineering2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     The complexity of software running on vehicular embedded systems is constantly

    increasing and this negatively affects its development costs and time to

    market. One way to deal with these issues is to boost abstraction in the form

    of models to (i) ease the reasoning about the system architecture, (ii) automate

    certain stages of the development, (iii) early detect flaws in the system architecture

    through fundamental analysis and (iv) take appropriate countermeasures

    before the system is implemented.

    Considering the importance of timing requirements in the design of software

    for vehicular embedded systems, in this licentiate thesis we leverage

    Model-Driven Engineering for realizing a semi-automatic approach which allows

    the developer to perform end-to-end delay timing analysis on design models,

    without having to manually model timing elements and set their values.

    The proposed approach, starting from a design model of an automotive

    software functionality, automatically generates a set of models enriched with

    timing elements whose values are set at generation time. End-to-end delay timing

    analysis is run on the generated models and, based on the analysis results,

    the approach automatically selects the generated models which better meet a

    specific set of timing requirements.

  • 233.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Addazi, Lorenzo
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Eramo, Romina
    University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy..
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Nolin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    MoVES: a Model-driven methodology for Vehicular Embedded Systems2018In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, p. 6424-6445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a novel model-driven methodology for the software development of real-time distributed vehicular embedded systems on single- and multi-core platforms. The proposed methodology discloses the opportunity of improving the cost-efficiency of the development process by providing automated support to identify viable design solutions with respect to selected non-functional requirements. To this end, it leverages the interplay of modelling languages for the vehicular domain whose integration is achieved by a suite of model transformations. An instantiation of the methodology is discussed for timing requirements, which are among the most critical ones for vehicular systems. To support the design of temporally correct systems, a cooperation between EAST-ADL and the Rubus Component Model is opportunely built-up by means of model transformations, enabling timing-aware design and model-based timing analysis of the system. The applicability of the methodology is demonstrated as proof of concepts on industrial use cases performed in cooperation with our industrial partners.

  • 234.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Addazi, Lorenzo
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Eramo, Romina
    University of LAquila, Italy.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Model-based Approach for Vehicular Systems2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a novel model-based approach for the software development of vehicular embedded systems. The proposed approach discloses the opportunity of improving efficiency of the development process by providing support to identify viable design solutions with respect to selected non functional requirements. To this end, it leverages the interplay of two modelling languages for the vehicular domain whose integration is achieved by a suite of model transformations. An instantiation of the methodology is discussed for timing requirements, which are among the most critical ones for the development of vehicular systems. The applicability of the methodology is demonstrated as proof of concepts on industrial use cases performed in cooperation with our industrial partners.

  • 235.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. 0000-0002-0401-1036.
    Eramo, Romina
    University of L'Aquila, Italy.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Anticipating Implementation-Level Timing Analysis for Driving Design-Level Decisions in EAST-ADL2015In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Vol. 1487, 2015, p. 63-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of model-driven engineering in the automotive domain resulted in the standardization of a layered architectural description language, namely EAST-ADL, which provides means for enforcing abstraction and separation of concerns, but no support for automation among its abstraction levels. This support is particularly helpful when manual transitions among levels are tedious and error-prone. This is the case of design and implementation levels. Certain fundamental analyses (e.g., timing), which have a significant impact on design decisions, give precise results only if performed on implementation level models, which are currently created manually by the developer. Dealing with complex systems, this task becomes soon overwhelming leading to the creation of a subset of models based on the developers experience; relevant implementation level models may therefore be missed. In this work, we describe means for automation between EAST-ADL design and implementation levels to anticipate end-to-end delay analysis at design level for driving design decisions.

  • 236.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Kodali, M.
    Westermo, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Alignment of Requirements and Testing in Agile: An Industrial Experience2018In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365, Vol. 738, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile development aims at switching the focus from processes to interactions between stakeholders, from heavy to minimalistic documentation, from contract negotiation and detailed plans to customer collaboration and prompt reaction to changes. With these premises, requirements traceability may appear to be an overly exigent activity, with little or no return-of-investment. However, since testing remains crucial even when going agile, the developers need to identify at a glance what to test and how to test it. That is why, even though requirements traceability has historically faced a firm resistance from the agile community, it can provide several benefits when promoting precise alignment of requirements with testing. This paper reports on our experience in promoting traceability of requirements and testing in the data communications for mission-critical systems in an industrial Scrum project. We define a semi-automated requirements tracing mechanism which coordinates four traceability techniques. We evaluate the solution by applying it to an industrial project aiming at enhancing the existing Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol by adding Simple Network Management Protocol support. 

  • 237.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Pierantonio, Alfonso
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards Design-Space Exploration of Component Chains in Vehicle Software2016In: 42nd Euromicro Conference series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, Work In Progress (WiP) SEAA 2016 WiP, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The size, complexity and heterogeneity of vehicular software systems has been constantly increasing. As a result, there is a growing consensus on the need to leverage modelbased techniques for automating, thus taming, error-proneness of tedious engineering tasks. Our methodology employs a one-tomany model transformation for generating a set of implementation models from a single design model. Then, it evaluates the appropriateness of each generated model by means of modelbased timing analysis. In this ongoing work, we discuss an enhancement of our methodology where model-based timing analysis is extended for running on a single model with uncertainty.

  • 238.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Syst, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Pierantonio, Alfonso
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Univ Aquila, DISIM, Laquila, Italy.
    Handling Uncertainty in Automatically Generated Implementation Models in the Automotive Domain2016In: 42nd Euromicro Conference series on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications SEAA 2016, 2016, p. 173-180Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models and model transformations, the two core constituents of Model-Driven Engineering, aid in software development by automating, thus taming, error-proneness of tedious engineering activities. In most cases, the result of these automated activities is an overwhelming amount of information. This is the case of one-to-many model transformations that, e.g. in designspace exploration, can potentially generate a massive amount of candidate models (i.e., solution space) from one single model. In our scenario, from one design model we generate a set of possible implementation models on which timing analysis is run. The aim is to find the best model from a timing perspective. However, multiple implementation models can have equally good analysis results. Therefore, the engineer is expected to investigate the solution space for making a final decision, using criteria which fall outside the analysis’ criteria themselves. Since candidate models can be many and very similar to each other, manually finding differences and commonalities is an impractical and errorprone task. In order to provide the engineer with an expressive representation of models’ commonalities and differences, we propose the use of modelling with uncertainty. We achieve this by elevating the solution space to a first-class status, adopting a compact notation capable of representing the solution space by means of a single model with uncertainty. Commonalities and differences are thus represented by means of uncertainty points for the engineer to easily grasp them and consistently make her decision without manually inspecting each model individually.

  • 239.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards a metamodel for the Rubus Component Model2014In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, vol 1281, 2014, p. 46-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Component-Based Software Engineering has been recognized as an effective practice for dealing with the increasing complexity of the software for vehicular embedded systems. Despite the advantages it has introduced in terms of reasoning, design and reusability, the software development for vehicular embedded systems is still hampered by constel- lations of different processes, file formats and tools, which often require manual ad hoc translations. By exploiting the crossplay of Component- Based Software Engineering and Model-Driven Engineering, we take ini- tial steps towards the definition of a seamless chain for the structural, functional and execution modeling of software for vehicular embedded systems. To this end, one of the entry requirements is the metamodels definition of all the technologies used along the software development. In this work, we define a metamodel for an industrial component model, Rubus Component Model, used for the software development of vehicular real-time embedded systems by several international companies. We focus on the definition of metamodeling elements representing the software architecture.

  • 240.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Jarfalla, Sweden.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Jarfalla, Sweden.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Exploring Timing Model Extractions at EAST-ADL Design-level Using Model Transformations2015In: Proceedings - 12th International Conference on Information Technology: New Generations, ITNG 2015, 2015, Vol. Article number 7113538, p. 596-600Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the problem of extracting control and data flows from vehicular distributed embedded systems at higher abstraction levels during their development. Unambiguous extraction of control and data flows is vital part of the end-to-end timing model which is used as input by the end-to end timinganalysis engines. The goal is to support end-to-end timing analysis at higher abstraction levels. In order to address the problem, we propose a two-phase methodology that exploits the principles of ModelDriven Engineering and Component Based Software Engineering. Using this methodology, the software architecture at a higher level is automatically transformed to all legal implementation-level models. The end-to-end timing analysis is performed on each generated implementation-level model and the analysis results are fed back to the design-level model. This activity supports design space exploration, modelrefinement and/or remodeling at higher abstraction levels for tuning the timing behavior of the system.

  • 241.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Metamodel for the Rubus Component Model: Extensions for Timing and Model Transformation from EAST-ADL2017In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, ISSN 2169-3536, p. 9005-9020Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Model-Driven Engineering paradigm, one of the entry requirements when realising a seamless tool chain for the development of software is the definition of metamodels, to regulate the specification of models, and model transformations, for automating manipulations of models. In this context, we present a metamodel definition for the Rubus Component Model, an industrial solution used for the development of vehicular embedded systems. The metamodel includes the definition of structural elements as well as elements for describing timing information. In order to show how, using Model-Driven Engineering, the integration between different modelling levels can be automated, we present a model-to-model transformation between models conforming to EAST-ADL and models described by means of the Rubus Component Model. To validate our solution, we exploit a set of industrial automotive applications to show the applicability of both the Rubus Component Model metamodel and the model transformation.

  • 242.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Comparative Evaluation of Timing Model Extraction Methodologies at EAST-ADL Design Level2015In: Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 17th International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications, 2015 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Cyberspace Safety and Security and 2015 IEEE 12th International Conference on Embedded Software and Systems, HPCC-CSS-ICESS 2015, 2015, p. 1110-1115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are various methodologies that support the extraction of timing models from EAST-ADL design-level models during the development of vehicular embedded software systems. These timing models are used to predict timing behavior of the systems by performing end-to-end timing analysis. This paper presents, for the first time, a comparative evaluation of three methodologies. We present an evaluation framework that consists of several evaluation features. Using the framework, we compare and evaluate the methodologies against each feature. Eventually, the evaluation results can be used as guidelines for the selection of the most suitable methodology with respect to the end-to-end timing behavior of a given vehicular embedded application.

  • 243.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Arcticus Systems AB, Järfälla, Sweden.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Technology-preserving transition from single-core to multi-core in modelling vehicular systems2017In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 10376, Springer Verlag , 2017, p. 285-299Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vehicular industry has exploited model-based engineering for design, analysis, and development of single-core vehicular systems. Next generation of autonomous vehicles will require higher computational power, which can only be provided by parallel computing platforms such as multi-core electronic control units. Current model-based software development solutions and related modelling languages, originally conceived for single-core, cannot effectively deal with multi-core specific challenges, such as core-interdependency and allocation of software to hardware. In this paper, we propose an extension to the Rubus Component Model, central to the Rubus model-based approach, for the modelling, analysis, and development of vehicular systems on multi-core. Our goal is to provide a lightweight transition of a model-based software development approach from single-core to multi-core, without disrupting the current technological assets in the vehicular domain.

  • 244.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lundbäck, John
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Kurt-Lennart
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Mäki-Turja, Jukka
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Demonstrator for modeling and development of component-based distributed real-time systems with Rubus-ICE2013In: Open Demo Session of Real-Time Systems: Open Demo Session of Real-Time Systems located at Real Time Systems Symposium (RTSS), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a demonstrator for modeling and development of component-based vehicular distributed real-time systems using the industrial model Rubus Component Model (RCM) and its development environment Rubus-ICE (Integrated Component development Environment). It demonstrates various stages during the development process of these systems such as modeling of software architecture, performing timing analysis, automatic synthesis of code from the software architecture, simulation, testing, and deployment.

  • 245.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lundbäck, John
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Kurt-Lennart
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Mäki-Turja, Jukka
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjödin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    From Modeling to Deployment of Component-Based Vehicular Distributed Real-Time Systems2014In: Proceedings, International Conference on Information Technology: ITNG 2014, IEEE , 2014, p. 649-654Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present complete model-and component based approach for the development of vehiculardistributed real-time systems. Within this context, we model and timing analyze these systems using one of the state-of-the-practice modeling and timing analysis techniques that is implemented in the existing industrial model the Rubus Component Model and accompanying tool suite. As a proof of concept, we conduct a case study by developing an intelligent parking assist system which is adistributed real-time application from the vehicular domain. The case study shows various stages during the development such as modeling of software architecture, performing timing analysis, simulation, testing, automatic synthesis of code from the software architecture, deployment, and execution.

  • 246.
    Bucaioni, Alessio
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Nolin, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lundbäck, John
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Gålnander, Mattias
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, Kurt-Lennart
    Arcticus Systems AB, Sweden.
    Demonstrating Model- and Component-based Development of Vehicular Real-time Systems2017In: Open Demo Session of Real-Time Systems located at Real Time Systems Symposium (RTSS) RTSS@Work'17, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Bucchiarone, A.
    et al.
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, Italy.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sanctis, M. D.
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, Italy.
    Towards a domain specific language for engineering collective adaptive systems2017In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 2nd International Workshops on Foundations and Applications of Self* Systems, FAS*W 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017, p. 19-26Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterogeneous agents that cooperate to accomplish collective tasks constitute Collective Adaptive Systems (CAS). Engineering a CAS not only involves the definition of the individual agents, but also their roles in achieving a collective task and adaptation strategies to counteract to environmental changes. Current solutions for specifying CAS typically tackle the problem at a low level of abstraction (e.g., writing XML files), making this task time-consuming and error-prone. Moreover, such a low level of abstraction hinders the understandability of the specification. Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) proposes to reduce the complexity of development by adopting models as first class artifacts in the process. In this respect, this work proposes a MDE approach to enhance CAS specification. In particular, we introduce a domain-specific language (DSL) made-up of three main views: one devoted to adaptive systems design; one addressing ensembles definition; and one tackling the collective adaptation. These three separate aspects are woven seamlessly by the DSL to constitute a complete CAS design. While the different views allow us to exploit separation-of-concerns to reduce complexity and focus on a specific aspect of the system, facing CAS specification at a higher-level of abstraction permits to use concepts closer to the experts of the involved domains. Moreover, the precise definition of modeling concepts through corresponding meta-models enables correctness-by-construction of the system specification. 

  • 248.
    Bucchiarone, Antonio
    et al.
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, Italy.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    De Sanctis, Martina
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento, Italy.
    CAStlE: A Tool for Collective Adaptive Systems Engineering2017In: Poster FAS*W, 2017, p. 385-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose CAStlE, a MDE approach to enhance Collective Adaptive System (CAS) specification. In particular, we introduce a domain-specific language (DSL) made-up of three main views: one devoted to adaptive systems design; one addressing ensembles definition; and one tackling the collective adaptation. These three separate aspects are woven seamlessly by the DSL to constitute a complete CAS design. Moreover, each of the defined views conveys the creation of a corresponding model editor, which allows for the three aspects of a CAS to be independently designed by CAStlE.

  • 249.
    Burgin, Mark
    et al.
    Faculty of Philosophy, Pontifical Lateran University, Vatican City.
    Dodig Crnkovic, Gordana
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    From the Closed Classical Algorithmic Universe to an Open World of Algorithmic Constellations2013In: Computing Nature: Turing Centenary Perspective, Springer, 2013, p. 241-253Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze methodological and philosophical implications of algorithmic aspects of unconventional computation. At first, we describe how the classical algorithmic universe developed and analyze why it became closed in the conventional approach to computation. Then we explain how new models of algorithms turned the classical closed algorithmic universe into the open world of algorithmic constellations, allowing higher flexibility and expressive power, supporting constructivism and creativity in mathematical modeling. As Gödel’s undecidability theorems demonstrate, the closed algorithmic universe restricts essential forms of mathematical cognition. In contrast, the open algorithmic universe, and even more the open world of algorithmic constellations, remove such restrictions and enable new, richer understanding of computation.

  • 250.
    Burgin, Mark
    et al.
    UCLA - University of California, Los Angeles .
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Gordana
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    The Nature of Computation and The Development of Computational Models2013Conference paper (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 1404
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