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  • 101.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Brown, J.
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Democracy, sustainability and positional analysis2017In: Positional Analysis for Sustainable Development: Reconsidering Policy, Economics and Accountin, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2017, p. 127-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Brown, Judy
    Victoria Univ Wellington.
    Democratizing economics Pluralism as a path toward sustainability2010In: ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS REVIEWS, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 179-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate scientists point to a number of unsustainable trends concerning the environment and natural resources. There is also ongoing concern about poverty reduction, labor rights, and other social aspects of sustainable development. Growing numbers argue that change is required, but still at issue is the extent of change and how to facilitate it. In this paper, the focus is on the dominant interpretive schema of influential actors with respect to ideas about science in society, paradigms in economics, and ideological orientations. The authors argue that the monopolistic position of neoclassical economics at university departments of economics in different parts of the world, and the spread of its associated technocratic logic within broader policy arenas, should be abandoned in favor of a more ideologically open attitude that facilitates discussion and debate within academia, public policy, and in civil society more generally. In a sense, economics requires "democratization" with implications for approaches to sustainability monitoring, accounting, and the assessment of projects and policies. The paper provides suggestions for developing sustainability assessment technologies and practices that take pluralism seriously.

  • 103.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Brown, Judy
    University of Wellington,New Zealand.
    Making actors, paradigms and ideologies visible in global governance for sustainability2012In: Sustainability Analysis. An Interdisciplinary Approach / [ed] Stanislav Shmelev and Irina Shmeleva, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, p. 11-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambition of this chapter is to present a sustainability economics largely compatible with normal ideas of democracy. Rather than rely on expertise and technocracy as in neoclassical enonomics, different actors in the economy are made visible with their ideological orientation. How do they understand sustainable development for example? Institutional inertia as well as institutional change is discussed. It is argued that the dominance of neoclassical economics with connected ideology is one of the main explanations of the current ecological crisis.

  • 104.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Brown, Judy
    Pluralism and democracy in political economics2011In: International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, ISSN 1757-5656, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 240-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Until about 1870 economics was referred to as 'political economics' and it is here argued that it was a mistake to abandon this terminology. Mainstream neoclassical economics is specific in scientific and conceptual terms but also in ideological terms. Similarly, other theoretical perspectives like feminist economics or ecological economics can be described in scientific as well as ideological terms. The fact that politics and ideology is involved suggests that only pluralism in economics is a reasonble position in a democratic society. This ideological element may also explain that there are different groups and schools of thought in economics who support pluralism.

  • 105.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dereniowska, M.
    Aix-Marseille University (Aix Marseille School of Economics), CNRS, EHESS, France.
    Philosophy, ethics and positional analysis2017In: Positional Analysis for Sustainable Development: Reconsidering Policy, Economics and Accountin, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2017, p. 137-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Hedlund, Anders
    MKB-Centrum, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Kan MKB stärka demokratin och bidra till hållbar utveckling?2007In: MKB: Perspektiv på miljökonsekvensbeskrivning, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, p. 155-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi lever i ett demokratiskt samhälle. Demokratiska strävanden kan därför tas som utgångspunkt för hur beslutsprocesser organiseras och beslutsunderlag utformas. Omställning till en hållbar utveckling ställer också krav på beslutsprocesserna, inte minst på grund av att mål och medel för en sådan utveckling är svåra att identifiera. Etiska och ideologiska utgångspunkter är viktiga i sammanhanget och bör lyftas fram.

  • 107.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Kledal, Paul Rye
    Kjeldsen, Chris
    Refsgard, Karen
    Ecological economics and organic farming2006In: Global Developments and Organic Agriculture: Challenges and Prospects, Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing , 2006, p. 113-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological economics (EE) is proposed as an approach to decision-making and planning in organic farming. It is argued that EE is better suited for this task than the conventional neoclassical economics approach. The contribution that EE can make to the organic farming movement is apparent on the ontological level, through its focus on socio-economic systems as nested subsystems of the ecosystem. In addition EE´s stance on the issue of allocation, distribution and scale seems to constitute a more appropriate conceptualization about the interaction between socio-economic systems and the environment, which is more closely aligned to the principle aims of the organic farming movement. The concepts of time and scale are used as examples of how EE, with input from political economics, can help highlight problematic issues regarding the interaction between farming systems and their biophysical environment, which are not addressed in the neoclassical approach. Material flow Accounting and Analysis (MFA) and Multicriteria Analysis (MCA) are discussed as practical examples of the framework that EE can provide for decision-making.

  • 108.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Norman, Hans
    historia, Uppsala universitet.
    Johansson, Susanne
    Centrum uthålligt lantbruk, SLU, Uppsala.
    Messing, Ingmar
    Markvetenskap, SLU, Uppsala.
    Bygg inte på kultur- och åkermark2009In: Upsala Nya Tidning, no 2 maj, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 109.
    Söderbaum, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Tortajada, Cecilia
    International Centre for Water and Environment, Zaragoza.
    Perspectives for water management within the context of sustainable development2011In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 812-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most challenging issues in the multidimensional field of water resources has been the implementation of "sustainable development", especially using it to improve management practices and processes. This paper analyzes the complexity of the involvement of the growing number of actors in the water sector guided, unavoidably, by their individual and collective values and ideological orientations.

123 101 - 109 of 109
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