https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 101 - 122 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Rethinking the dichotomy of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ in projects: Comparing stage-­gate-­models and agile methods2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Guiding in the imaginary city of the future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Shaping the (sustainable) citizens of tomorrow: An act of CRS or HRM?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, Projektkommunikation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Who are shaping the sustainable cities of tomorrow and how do they do it?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Kovala, Tommy
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Factors influencing industrial excess heat collaborations2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, p. 595-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there is a potential to double the amount of industrial excess heat from todays 5 TWh that is delivered into district heating networks. This paper investigates factors that are influencing industrial excess heat collaborations. The paper presents result from qualitative interviews as well as answers through a more quantitative web based survey which has been sent out to stakeholders in existing Swedish industrial excess heat collaborations. This work provides new evidence on that economic motivations are the most common driver for starting up a collaboration, but well in place factors like transparency as well as investment sharing between the partners becomes important for a long-term successful collaboration.

  • 106. Kärrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Guiding in the City of Tomorrow: Materializing the Future Through Future and Present Components2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 2 SI, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores an intrinsic case of a guided tour of a future city: Stockholm Royal Seaport. Whereas guided city tours usually aim at educating and enlightening those guided about the past and present of the place visited – building the truth claim by relating what is said in the tour to the physical environment of the tour – the case described in this paper offers the opportunity to explore how the urban future is made material to those guided. The study shows that the guide’s actions materialized the urban future in two ways: by using future components of the future and by using present components of the future. Based on this analysis, we conclude that both these ways function as ways of confirming the present.

  • 107.
    Lammi, Inti José
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Making Do with Limited Transparency of Sensitive Information in Secretive Organizations: Collective Information Literacy Through Hinting2023In: Information Literacy and The Digitalisation of the Workplace / [ed] Gunilla Widén & Jose Teixeira, Facet Publishing, 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we build on the concept of information literacy when exploring sensitive information in workplaces. Drawing on an empirical study of project work in a high-security organization, we find that when information is sensitive and not readily available to everyone, information literacy is only made possible because of how organizational members work collectively to make do with the sings and cues they are able and allowed to disclose to each other. In these cases, the group can only achieve information literacy together through what we call hinting

  • 108.
    Lammi, Inti José
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Making Do with Limited Transparency of Sensitive Information in Secretive Organizations: Collective Information Literacy Through Hinting2023In: Making Do with Limited Transparency of Sensitive Information in Secretive Organizations: Collective Information Literacy Through Hinting / [ed] Gunilla Widen, Jose Teixeira, Facet Publishing, 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Lammi, Inti José
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    On responses to crisis and subsequent (non)-significant change in high hazard organizing2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High hazard organizations are often praised for their ability to remain stable and reliable. In this paper, we draw on a longitudinal case study from 2019 to 2023 from a high hazard organization and its project work to examine how such an organization reacted to the COVID 19 pandemic. As we show, an organization prone to avoid the use of new technologies and to favor on-site work can experience a seemingly significant change while its actors do not perceive such change as significantly different. We argue that an important consideration is not whether change has happened but whether it is significantly different in light of core aspects of organizational practices, such as their teleological structure and core concerns. Indeed, a high hazard organization might thus change meeting and communicative practices while remaining the same in aspects that matter more – leading to paradoxical narratives of change and non-change to manifest simultaneously. 

  • 110.
    Lammi, Inti José
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ivory, Chris
    Anglia Ruskin University, UK.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Affect and imagination – exploring the intensities of gaining research access2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the experiences of a detailed security check that the first author of this paper had do subject himself to in order to gain research access to a high-security facility where he is to perform an ethnographic study. In doing so, the paper accounts for a stressful experience, the intensities, i.e. the affective dimensions, of gaining research access. These are tied to wider discussions concerning the role of imagination -and how imagination exists in relation to a reseach group.

  • 111.
    Linnefell, W.
    et al.
    The Municipality of Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lagergren, M.
    The Municipality of Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Implementing e-Government policy - politics and resistance2014In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Government, ECEG, Volume 2014, 2014, p. 163-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its promise of increasing public authorities' effectiveness, improving decision making and service delivery, e-Government initiatives often fail. So far, reasons have largely been sought in technological aspects of e-Government. However, e-Government implementation processes should be seen as more complex than that; also encompassing various social aspects, implying the need for a broader perspective when developing the understanding of e-Government implementation. Based on an in-depth case study of the attempted implementation of new policy documents on e-Government in the municipality of Vasteras, Sweden, this paper sets out to develop the understanding of e-Government by elucidating how individuals' actions, behaviors and decision affect e-Government policy implementation processes. Applying theoretical concepts from political science and organizational change management, the paper describes how the change driver aimed at steering the implementation as a political process through involving as many stakeholders as possible. Hence, a new advocacy coalition emerged, which agreed upon a new definition of "e-Government", which was necessary for the policy implementation to be successful. However, as time went by, it became apparent that there existed several veto players, which the change driver failed to engage, who actively blocked the implementation process. As a consequence, the policy implementation process failed, despite that Vasteras have the best starting points possible, with general agreement regarding the usefulness and necessity of ICTs and hence with a long history of ICT-use in its daily operations. The case study illustrates the importance of acknowledging basic change management aspects when steering implementation of e-Government processes in order for these to be successful. The case also highlights the need for e-Government-research to look beyond theoretical areas of technological science, and it illustrates the usefulness of theories from political science and organization studies when furthering the knowledge of e-Government. 

  • 112.
    Linnefell, William
    et al.
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lagergren, Mikael
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    E-government Policy Formation - Understanding the roles of change drivers, veto players and advocacy coalitions2014In: Electronic Journal of eGovernment, ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its promise of increasing public authorities’ effectiveness, improving decision making and service delivery, e-government initiatives too often fail. So far, reasons for this have largely been sought in technological aspects of e-government. However, e-government is much more complex than that; e-government also encompasses aspects related to the “inner workings” of organizations, policy formation processes and change management. Based on an in-depth case study of an e-government policy formation process in the municipality of Vasteras, Sweden, this paper sets out to develop the understanding of e-government policy failure by elucidating how individuals’ actions, behaviors and decision affect endeavors to improve e-government policy agendas. Applying theoretical concepts from political science and the change management literature, this paper describes how a change driver attempted to accomplish fundamental changes in the policy area of e-government, through involving as many stakeholders as possible in the policy formation process, and how this enabled for the emergence of a new advocacy coalition. This advocacy coalition consisted of the actors involved in the policy formation process, and these actors espoused the policy belief advocated by the change driver. However, as time went by, it became apparent that there also existed several veto players, which the change driver failed to engage, and who actively blocked the attempt to get the new policy documents on e-government adopted. As a consequence, the policy formation process failed, despite that the municipality of Vasteras had exceptionally good conditions for improving the e-government policy agenda. This case study highlights the need for e-government-research to look beyond theoretical areas of technological science, and it illustrates the usefulness of theories from political science and change management when furthering the knowledge of e-government. It also points to the need for more processual studies on policy formation processes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 113.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Avd.).
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Standardization and Innovation: The Janus-face of Service Innovation2011In: NFF 2011 - Nordic Academy of Management: A practice about practice, Stockholm University, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the back-office function of service innovation, in which much service innovation work is executed. The paper shows that standardization is an important and interrelated part in service innovation.

    Standardization is utilized by management at several levels of the development process as a way of organizing the courses of action. The approach utilized for the collection of empirical data is qualitative interviews as a basis for a comparative case study.

  • 114.
    Lucarelli, A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Brand transformation: a performative approach to brand regeneration2015In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 31, p. 84-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Traditional brand management literature largely implies that the brand regeneration process is linear, atomistic and rather harmonic, thus reducing the complexity of the process to individual parts that can be managed rationally and logically in sequence. By ontologically as well as epistemologically adopting a performative approach where brands are seen as loose performative assemblages, the present article suggests instead that the brand regeneration process is truly processual, multiple and political. A specific brand regeneration process should be seen as relationally spatial and as only one of several possible ‘realities’. The argument is based on an analysis of a 5-year-long case study of the branding of Stockholm, inspired by a Latourian hybrid fieldwork approach. Based on the analysis, the novel concept ‘brand transformation’ is suggested to frame the characteristics and complexities of the brand regeneration process.

  • 115. Lundevall, K.
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lagergren, M.
    Wretlund, M.
    eGovernment in a swedish municipality-change management in the planning process2012In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Government, ECEG, 2012, p. 408-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGovernment continues to be an interesting area of study, especially since it is not simply about the implementation of ICTs, but rather, as this paper will show, about a larger change management process. When trying to understand the factors behind successful examples of eGovernment in the context of change management, most research so far focuses on the implementation phase in a literal sense and not on the planning phase, that precedes the implementation phase, or theevaluation phase that follows. This paper aims at remedying this by focusing on the planning phase; the development of an eGovernment strategy and vision, which is the departing point for a future implementation process. Through an in-depthcase study of the work done at a Swedish municipality, the city of Vasteras, this paper aims at answering the question: "Which are the key change management aspects of an eGovernment planning process?" By focusing on the planning phase of eGovernment in a Swedish municipality, this paper develops the knowledge and understanding of this kind of endeavour. Even if ICTs can be seen as a means to modernize government, technology alone cannot break down organizational and culturalbarriers - something that is necessary in order for the full benefits of eGovernment to be realized. The paper is hence primarily empirical in contribution. However, this paper also provides useful insights on the planning process for eGovernment and necessary aspects when creating an eGovernment strategy.

  • 116.
    Mård, Mika
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Hallin, Anette
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland .
    Digital Literacy in a Post-Digital Era: Rethinking 'Literacy' as Sociomaterial Practice2023In: Information Literacy and the Digitalization of the Workplace / [ed] Gunilla Widen, Jose Teixeira, Facet Publishing, 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Mörndal, Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Finding the Pace of the Learning Practice of Purposeful Organising.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this paper is to understand how the creation of a new purposeful organising within the public sector developed by exploring the nature of the learning practice that was deployed in an empirical case. Five patterns of actions were found in the empirical material that served different purposes in relation to the rhythm of the learning practice. The patterns of actions are in this paper called navigating, planning, communicatinganddocumenting.These four were recurring and synchronized in time through a fifth, overarching pattern of actions called pacing. The paper contributes to the understanding of learning in organising by expanding our knowledge of how patterns of actions are synchronized temporally in a learning practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 118.
    Mörndal, Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Privat.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Pacing - the facilitation of boundary management for organizational collaboration.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that organisational collaboration requires coordinating work across formal and informal organizational boundaries. Previous research has also shown how such boundary-spanning across organizations come about through boundary spanners, boundary objects and boundary activities. This means that the spatial dimensions of boundary-spanning have been in focus, rather than the temporal dimensions. As time and space are connected, only focusing on the spatial dimensions provides a limited understanding of boundary management in organizational collaboration. The purpose with this paper is to develop the understanding of the spatiotemporal dimensions of boundary-spanning. We argue that attention needs to be given to the linking of individuals and artefacts, by focusing on the rhythmof activities. This we call takta. We explore the concept of takta in an empirical case, by analysing how boundary spanners, boundary objects and boundary activities were linked to each other in a rhythm involving pace, order and tempo, through takta

  • 119.
    Popova, I.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Ivory, Chris
    Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Living with monsters: Introducing experience to the theorizing of sociomaterial entanglement2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we propose experience as a way to further unpack the relationship between the social and the material and as a means to conceptualize our entanglement with the sociotechnical ‘monsters’ of everyday life. Experience, we argue, integrates the cognitive and the emotional as well as the social and the material and as such brings together disparate areas of sociomaterial the-orizing. We argue that the precise qualities of the relationship between the social and the material can be understood by using McCarthy and Wright's [11] inter-pretation of Dewey [4-6] and their development of his different elements of ex-perience for application to technology use. This article takes the first steps in developing a research approach that operationalizes these ideas within a socio-material sensibility.

  • 120.
    Sergi, Vivianne
    et al.
    Department of Management, HEC Montréal, Montréal.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thick performances, not just thick descriptions: the processual nature of doing qualitative research2011In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 191-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the consequences of doing research that uses qualitative approaches. Anchored in a process ontology, this paper starts from the idea that doing research implies a performance in which the researcher is fully immersed, and explores the implications of the processual nature of doing research.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes use of vignettes; short stories of research in action, told by different researchers that are analyzed to reveal the richness of the situation in question. These vignettes illustrate how performing qualitative research is an emotional, embodied and deeply personal experience.

    Findings – The authors show that when grounding qualitative research in a process ontology, research is the fruit of the researcher's performance: doing research is performing it, and performing it cannot happen without feeling a wide range of emotions, without appealing to who we are or without questioning what we are doing. Thus, this exploration reveals that doing research is a rich, complex and multi-level experience that mobilizes the whole person conducting this inquiry – that is, that doing research takes the form of a thick performance.

    Originality/value – The value of the paper lies in its roots in a process ontology to understand the doing of qualitative research, which makes it possible to fully acknowledge the importance of subjectivity in all the steps that make up the research endeavor, from the fieldwork to writing – thus offering not only a richer image of what research is about, but an image that is also closer to the experience of doing it.

  • 121.
    Sergi, Vivianne
    et al.
    Department of Management, HEC Montréal, Montre´al.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thick performances, Not Just Thick Descriptions: The Processual Nature of Qualitative Research2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Sundström, Angelina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Industrial PhD students and their projects2016In: Procedia Computer Science, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 100, p. 739-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the usual case a PhD student is enrolled and supervised at an academic faculty, in Sweden also most often employed at a department of the university. The whole doctoral education takes part in one single environment. There is an opportunity to enroll “classes” of industrial PhD students in industrial graduate schools. The PhD student is in these cases most often employed by an industry. Each PhD student has at least one academic supervisor, but also an industrial mentor. Sometimes the industrial mentor also holds a PhD and can formally also be an industrial co-supervisor. Even if the funding of the PhD student is a research project, the doctoral work is often not performed as a project. There are often severe delays of the dissertation. The public defense often happens a year after the funding has ended. This represents a large cost for the university or for the industry. The progression of the student lies outside the control of the university management and also the funding industry. We have conducted a case study to explore the organizing of PhD work with the purpose to describe whether project methodology could support industrial PhD students in their progression towards a PhD.

123 101 - 122 of 122
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf