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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Johansson, Anders W
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Walking a tightrope between artistry and entrepreneurship - the stories of Hotel Woodpecker, Otter Inn and Luna Resort,2006In: Proceedings from the AGSE conference in Auckland, New Zeeland, 2006, New Zeeland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Conceptualizing Everyday Entrepreneurship: A Theoretical Contribution to Entrepreneuring2010In: Entreprenörskapets olika dräkter, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Conceptualizing everyday entrepreneurship: The case of college students at the risk of dropping out2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Björkman, Hans
    et al.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Öberg, Christina
    Angels and demons – The religion of Innovation?2013In: The Proceedings of The XXIV ISPIM Conference - Innovating in Global Markets: Challenges for Sustainable Growth Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    History anticipates a link between religion and innovation, and religious aspects could be expected to impact also current innovation activities, positive or negative. This paper describes and discusses the relations between innovation and religion by means of a systematic literature review. The review points to six different causal claims between religion and innovation: (i) the Church as a platform for innovation and entrepreneurship; (ii) religion enabling or inhibiting innovation adaptation and diffusion; (iii) spirituality and ethics, and their relation to innovation, organisational development and human relation management; (iv) creation and utilisation of innovations in religious settings; (v) doctrinal innovation; and (vi) religion as scientific underpinning. This evokes an initiative for further studies on religion and innovation, and contributes to current understanding through providing a first-of-its kind literature review.

  • 5.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Organizing Experience Feedback Loops for Continuous Innovation2015In: 16th International Continuous Innovation Network Conference CINet 15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Florin, Ulrika
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Norms and Ethics: Prerequisites for Excellence in Co-production2015In: Högskola och Samhälle i Samverkan HSS´15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Knowledge production is increasingly made in broader Mode 2 (Gibbons, 1994) network of stakeholders and contributing actors, e.g. in the form of participatory, interactive and action research. Historically this has always been an important part of scientific and academic activity, particularly important in certain scientific fields of research, e.g. engineering, business administration, organization and working life research, pedagogics and social work studies, as well in methodological traditions like action research and participatory research (Reason & Bradbury, 2008). When roles in knowledge production are more interconnected traditional research ethics focused on ethical treatments of research objects when they also are subjects (e.g. information, consent, and confidentiality) need to be significantly supplemented. When knowledge is seen as co-produced in interaction between equal parties with different contribution to the process and knowledge interest, this creates the need for recognition and guidance of special norms and ethical codes as prerequisites for excellent practice. This paper is aiming to explore and discuss norms of excellence and ethical concerns in co-production between academia and enterprises and how collaboration could be organized to increase both validity and utility of the knowledge created in such settings. All parties in such collaborative setting have the responsibility to generate practical agreements as to form the ground for a beneficial co-production, however this includes rules for securing non-violation of rights, like confidentiality and intellectual property. The parties share responsibility in review and control of quality of processes and results in relation to these agreements, although it differs in what matters considered important to address in academic traditions and enterprises cultures. The purpose of this paper is to develop an extended set of norms and ethical principles for co-production oriented research. The main focus is relational dimension between involved parties instead of how one party (the researcher) treats other affected parties. We have therefore developed a list of norms with clarification and argument as basis for their use. Examples are: acknowledgement and respect should be given to different forms of knowledge, theoretical and practical, explicit and formal as well as implicit and tacit; care should be taken to provide space for expression of different perspectives of involved parties in order to secure validation and useful results, open discussion on equal terms; democratic dialogue, is a core medium for good co-productive relations, different knowledge needs and interests of involved and concerned parties, practical as well as scientific; to the co-production should be considered in the aims and procedures, and that the parties have a mutual responsibility to develop sufficient understanding of the needs and interests of others. The proposed norms developed in this paper can be considered as a tool or a guideline for the development of ethical and excellence co-produced research.

  • 7.
    Grinbergs, Johan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Partnerskap – en arena for entreprenörskap?2008In: Arenor for entreprenörskap, Örebro: Forum för småföretagsforskning , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Guziana, Bozena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Environmental leadership: The Environmental Technology Sector in Sweden from an Ecopreneurship Perspective2012In: Sustainable Development: Theory, Practice, Education / [ed] Pienkowski, Darek, Makarewich-Marcinkowska, Agnieszka, Wiland-Szymańska, Justyna, Poznan: Poznan , 2012, p. 187-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic actors and entrepreneurs are the central agents of change in the process of transformation needed to solve environmental challenges. The growing recognition of environmental issues has provided entrepreneurs with new opportunities, resulting in the emergence of ecopreneurs. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the character of ecopreneurship in the environmental technology sector, with focus on environmental responsibility and environmental leadership at both the company and sector level. The survey of companies and representatives of branch organisations in four environmental technology subsectors: Waste Management & Recycling, Bioenergy Fuels, Wind Energy Technology and Solar Energy Technology is based on telephone and personal interviews as well as on environmentally related information and statements on the websites. The literature review shows that there are different approaches to categorizing ecopreneurs and sustainability entrepreneurs. A key dimension is the value and motives of entrepreneurs, with dichotomy between opportunistic ecopreneurs, and those driven more by nonprofit value. Environmental technology and cleantech are commonly accepted as being green businesses as these sectors deliver environmental preferable products and services.  According to the results there is a strong awareness about this environmental friendly profile within subsectors of environmental technology industry, both within branch organizations and within companies. However, this awareness does not always lead to a broader, green-green view of the environmental leadership. In many cases the branch organizations and the companies within environmental technology sector represent a more opportunistic approach towards environmental issues. Only one of branch organizations addresses environmental impacts of members.

  • 9.
    Hafting, Tore
    et al.
    Högskolan i Hedmark, Norge.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Developing collaborative power in working life: linking American pragmatism and action research2013In: American Pragmatism and Organisation: Issues and Controversies / [ed] Kelemen, M. & Rumens, N, Gower Publishing Ltd., 2013, p. 205-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Johansson, Anders W
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Emancipation or Workability? Critical versus pragmatic scientific orientation in action research2008In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 95-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article a distinction between a pragmatic and a critical orientation of action research is made. These orientations can be considered, implicitly or explicitly, to be the main alternatives in AR today. What are the assumptions behind, and practical implications for, AR projects with different orientations? A number of themes are introduced where a tension between the two are identified and illustrated in the form of a dialogue and friendly quarrel between proponents from each side. It is argued that the two orientations suit different research contexts and cannot easily be combined. The pragmatic orientation is well suited for contexts where concerted and immediate action is needed, whereas the critical is preferable where transformative action needs to be preceded by critical thinking and reflection. In the former, power to act is a desired outcome, and in the latter, unequal and invisible power relations need to be unveiled before they can be transformed. The responsibility of the researcher, as well as the form of knowledge developed, differs between the two orientations.

  • 11.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Action research as praxis oriented inquiry: Towards a praxis turn in the orientation of science2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Are Partnerships Innovative?2008In: Partnership - As a Strategy for Social Innovation and Sustainable Change, Santérus förlag , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Att bedöma och uppnå kvalitet i interaktiv forskning2008In: Gemensamt kunskapande – den interaktiva forskningen praktik, Växjö: Växjö University Press , 2008, p. 333-349Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Democratizing Innovation - Theoretical considerations2012In: The Proceedings of The XXIII ISPIM Conference 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are today trends towards democratizing innovation (von Hippel, 2005) in line with the vision of creative democracy earlier recognized by thinkers like Dewey (1939) and Follett (1998). User involvement and the internet as a medium for interaction is broadening the participation in innovation processes. What is lacking in innovation research is conceptual and theoretical understanding of democratizing dimensions of innovation management grounded in theories of participatory democracy. The purpose of the paper is to contribute with understanding of the character of democratic innovation management based on four variants of theory of participatory democracy. The study is performed through synthesis of liberal, communitarian, discursive and interactive theories of participatory democracy, and investigating how these theories contribute with understanding of participation and the mobilization of creative capacities of people as well as how to integrate them freely into collaborative, innovative and efficient innovation processes.

  • 15.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Development of Total Innovation Management Approach for Service Innovation2012In: 2012 International Symposium on Management of Technology, ISMOT 2012, 2012, p. 28-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stronger global completion provides an impetus for servitization in global industrial companies, that is, to shift from selling products to selling integrated products and services. To increase efficiency in service innovation there is a need to reorganize innovation system and build suitable capabilities, something which require significant organizational transformation. The purpose of the paper is to describe a Scandinavian effort to develop a Total Innovation Management (TIM) approach to service innovation. Firstly, a theoretical framework for innovation system for service is developed. Secondly, through a case illustration it is shown that servitization in practice imply complex dynamics of many factors, forces and agency which both works towards and restricts servitization. To deal with this dynamic there is a need for a TIM approach.

  • 16.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Development Partnership as Societal Entrepreneurship2009In: Entrepreneurship in the Name of Society, Stockholm: Knowledge Foundation , 2009, p. 67-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Emergent innovation - towards a new paradigm for innovation research and management2013In: INFORMS Annual Meeting 2013 INFORMS2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Entrepreneurship as driver of market and institutional change for sustainability2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Från vetenskaplig orientering till kvalitetspraxis. Att bedöma och uppnå kvalitet i aktionsforskning/interaktiv forskning2007In: Högskolor och samhälle i samverkan (HSS 07), Jönköping, 8-11 maj, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Interactive project strategy in development partnerships2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lindhult, Erik
    KTH, Sweden.
    Management by Freedom: Essays in moving from Machiavellian to Rousseauian approaches to innovation and inquiry2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Management of power in action research and participatory research2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Scientific Excellence in Participatory and Action Research: Part I. Rethinking Research Quality2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 6-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A core impetus of participatory and action research is making science relevant and useful for solving pressing problems and improving social conditions, and enabling stakeholders to participate in research and development processes. There are claims in the community of participatory and action research of the potential for heightened scientific excellence, but at the same time, there are critiques in the mainstream community that more engaged, even activist, stances threaten scientific norms or that position these type of research approaches outside the field of science, for example, as issues of application. In the search of clarification of the scientific identity and the specific qualities of participatory and action research, scholars have been moving away from and sometimes have rejected traditional conceptions of quality. This leads to confusion about how to relate to the discourse on research quality and scientific excellence in mainstream science. Integration in this discourse is important in order to attain academic legitimation in prevailing institutions of science, for example, in applications for funding, in seeking to publish research, and in the acceptance of dissertations based on participatory and action research. The purpose of this article is to contribute to this integration by reconstructing the way traditional quality concepts - validity, reliability, and objectivity - can be fruitfully used in expanded frameworks for quality where scientific excellence of participatory and action approaches are visible and where mainstream science approaches also can be harboured. In this conceptual article, reconstruction of understanding of scientific inquiry is first made based on a praxis-oriented epistemology inspired by pragmatism. Through rethinking truth as trustworthiness, new proposals for the conceptualization and frames for research quality and scientific excellence are introduced. Second, a framework for understanding purpose in science and its basis in validity, reliability, and the core characteristics of participatory and action research is developed. Third, the turn to action, practice, and participation enables plural ways of knowing and ways that knowledge claims can be validated and made trustworthy. The article concludes that participatory and action research offers a broader landscape of purpose and validation than more traditional approaches to science. In a subsequent article, reliability and objectivity, and their use in participatory and action research, will be clarified.

  • 24.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Scientific Excellence in Participatory and Action Research: Part II. Rethinking Objectivity and Reliability2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to deal with the following question: Can the concepts of reliability and objectivity be reconceptualized and reappropriated to enable understanding of scientific excellence in participatory and action research? The article shows that it is fruitful to consider the "subjective" and active role of researchers as vital in enabling scientific objectivity and reliability. As an expansion from a replication logic, reliability can be conceptualized as adaptive, goal-seeking, dynamically regulated processes enabled by effective organization of interactive and participatory learning processes where all participants can contribute to learning and correction in inquiry. Instead of erasing subjectivity, objectivity can be enabled by critical subjectivity, intersubjectivity, practical wisdom, impartial norms of inquiry, and open democratic dialogue. Reliability and objectivity in this understanding can be enabled by participatory and action research through skilful performance of research practices such as reflective conversations between parties, dialogue conferences, experimentation, and experiential learning as part of action-research cycles, etc., which are common in participatory and action research initiatives and projects. By rethinking validity, reliability, and objectivity, recognizing the substantially more active and participatory stances enables scientific excellence, it can expand the repertoire of strategies for promoting research quality, and it helps to mainstream this type of approach in the scientific community.

  • 25.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Service innovation capabilities in large industrial organizations2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Servitization through innovation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Societal entrepreneurship – fruitful concept or oxymoron?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Societal entrepreneurship as identity and strategy orientation of incubators and science parks2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Societal Entrepreneurship for sustainable development of society2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Societal Entrepreneurship in the development of Incubators and Science Parks2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Space for emergent innovation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sustainable entrepreneurship and cleantech. A Swedish perspective2009In: 2009 UNESCO-WTA International Training Workshop: Green Growth based on the Science Park Initiatives, 2009, p. 85-101Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sustainable entrepreneurship as driver in cleantech development towards industrial eco-renewal2011In: Studies in Industrial Renewal - Coping with Changing Contexts, Västerås: Mälardalen University , 2011, p. 421-436Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Towards democratic scientific inquiry? Participatory democracy as theory of science point of departure in action research2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards democratic scientific inquiry?: Participatory democracy, philosophy of science and the future of action research2015In: Action Research for Democracy: New Ideas and Perspectives from Scandinavia, Taylor and Francis , 2015, p. 199-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One common feature of different variants of Action Research and Interactive Research is the rejection of technocratic, undemocratic streaks in science and inquiry, particularly those emanating from different aspects of the still quite strong positivist and contemplative academic heritage (Toulmin 2001). Action Research was, from the Lewinian start, already seen as a form of research to further the democratic process. A basic impetus in Participatory Action Research and Interactive Research is bringing practitioners into the scientific research process (Fals-Borda & Rahman 1991; Nielsen & Svensson 2006). This chapter will focus on the explicit or implicit democratising ambitions and tendencies in many of these types of approaches. I believe most of us value democracy and would see science as in service to it. The point here is to take the argument a step further in line with a position of a leading researcher in the field of Acton Research, who wrote, “Democracy does not only function as ‘something that is good’, but also as a theory of science point of departure-as the system of thought underlying the construction of the concept and-at a later stage-the survey of ‘facts’ and shaping of praxis” (Gustavsen 1990, p. 98). Democratising science raises the question of whether science will become more or less scientific? How can participatory democracy contribute to the scientific quality of inquiry? Or does it stifle it? Will the democratising researcher lose scientific perspective and become a political activist or a consultant-be it of a managerial or emancipatory kind? How can the academic researcher be engaged, useful and democratic-as well as scientific-at the same time? The purpose of the chapter is to develop a number of different arguments for taking participatory democracy not only as an extra-scientific value that, however commendable, should not disturb the scientific process, but as a comparatively advantageous philosophy of science orientation for Action and Interactive Research (see, e.g. Novotny, Scott & Gibbons 2001; Toulmin & Gustavsen 1996). I develop five types of arguments-empirical, epistemological, moral, institutional and political-which commend participatory democracy as a philosophy of science point of departure.

  • 36.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Utvecklingspartnerskap som samhällsentreprenörskap2009In: Samhällets entreprenörer: En forskarantologi om samhällsentreprenörskap, Stockholm: KK-Stiftelsen , 2009, p. 214-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Variety of entrepreneurship as requirement for sustainable development .2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Complexity and democracy as points of departure in Total Innovation Management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Moving towards Total Innovation Management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Berglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Conceptualizing Everyday Entrepreneurship: The case of college students at the risk of dropping out2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Berglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Anders W
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Partnerskap som socialt entreprenörskap2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Campillo, Javier
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Read, S.
    TU Delft, Delft, Netherlands.
    Innovation capabilities and challenges for energy smart development in medium sized European cities2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, no 88, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition towards becoming Energy smart city integrating different areas of energy production, distribution and use in a community requires a spectrum of capabilities. The paper reports on findings from the EU planning project PLEEC, involving six medium sized European cities. The purpose of the paper is to describe innovation capabilities and challenges in the complex, systemic innovation journey of cities in the transition to sustainability. A case of implementing an innovative project for electrical vehicles in Eskilstuna is presented illustrating both technological potentials and innovation challenges.

  • 43.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Grinbergs, Johan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Nietzschean transcendence as core entrepreneurial challange2011In: Paper to Nordic Academy of Management Conference NFF 2011, Stockholm, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By appropriating learning from the social and cultural sciences, entrepreneurship and innovation as research fields can be enriched and deepened. Nietzsche can make a contribution to the understanding of entrepreneurship as a matter of transcending the established order, through the creative work of actors. E.g. in order to be able to handle “radical” forms innovation and entrepreneurship, Nietzchean conceptual resources and perspectives can be helpful. He is a philosopher of the unconventional par excellence. An important aspect of transcendence is the overcoming and self-transcendence of the self. The concept of ubermensch by Nietzsche is here intriguing and ambivalent in the reception of his work - seemingly an analogy to the ambivalence of the entrepreneur-hero in the entrepreneurship literature. Closer reading indicate a more complex understanding of men through creative work overcoming themselves, and breaking loose of established customs and norms.

  • 44.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Value logics for service innovation: practice-driven implications for service-dominant logic2018In: Service Business: An International Journal, ISSN 1862-8516, E-ISSN 1862-8508, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 457-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service-dominant logic (SDL) provides a conceptual understanding of and widens the view on value creation in service innovation for product-centric companies. However, empirical research linking SDL and service innovation is still limited albeit expanding. This study provides insights beyond existing discussions on product and service dimensions using the theoretical lens of the value logic perspective. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to examine how value can be understood, targeted, and created in the pursuit of service innovation by product-centric manufacturing companies. Building on a previous investigation of two multinational product-centric manufacturing companies, this paper identifies and develops a theoretical model to describe the space shift in service innovation with four different kinds of value logics, namely, product-based value logic, service-based value logic, virtual-based value logic, and systemic-based value logic. Using a digitalization-driven new service innovation, namely the My Control System, which is a web-based service delivery platform, this paper describes space shifts to enhance value through four value logics as efforts. Further, challenges associated with different value logics are described in terms of complexity traps and service gaps. The study also contributes to bridging the gap between SDL theory and practice by developing a midrange theoretical model for value creation as a specification and amendment to SDL that supports SDL-guided service innovation and servitization in practice.

  • 45.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Coghlan, David
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Trinity Business Sch, Dublin, Ireland..
    The Status and Future of Action Research: An Interview with Professor David Coghlan2019In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 42-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hafting, Tore
    American Pragmatism, Action Research and Power2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hazy, James K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Complexity approach to joint value discovery in service innovation management2014In: The Proceedings of The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 Dublin, Ireland - 8-11 June 2014, Dublin, Ireland, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes how complexity notions can be useful to model Servitization dynamics in industrial companies moving from product based to service oriented configuration. It is a movement towards joint value discovery in industrial service innovation management increasing potentials for radical or architectural innovation. Based on process oriented research on global industrial companies identifying transition phases of Servitization, a complexity model is developed to understand, predict and guide the process, mechanisms, and outcomes of increased capacity for joint value discovery. The model synthesizes and extends to service innovation management a complexity approach originally introduced by Goldstein, Hazy and Lichtenstein (2010) and called the Cusp of Change Model. The theoretical developments are particularly useful in guiding leadership of innovation in broader organizational and networked settings, contributing to development of service innovation strategies as well as systemic leadership of innovation activity in services in global industrial companies.

  • 48.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hazy, James K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Midgley, Gerald
    Center for Systems Studies, University of Hull, UK.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Value driven innovation in industrial companies: A complexity approach2015In: The XXVI ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM'15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to contribute to the development of an interactive, systemic and ecosystem view of innovation and its management. This emerging interactive and systematic view of innovation labeled as Value Driven Innovation in this research, where enhanced symbiotic value is continuously discovered and realized in interactive processes among stakeholders such as customers, providers, suppliers and related partners. The main outcome of the research is a complexity conceptualization of value driven innovation, which synthesizes and extends to value-driven innovation management recent developments in complexity science. In addition, the findings may provide useful tools to clarify and enhance the manageability of innovation in the face of complexity, uncertainty and unpredictability.

  • 49.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Höglund, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Does advice to innovators contribute to innovation?2009In: The XX ISPIM Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Höglund, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hamrefors, Sven
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rådmark, J
    Municipality of Nacka, Sweden.
    Ståldal, B
    Municipality of Nacka, Sweden.
    Societal entrepreneurship education as driver in community transformation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 57
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