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  • 1.
    Abbas, Anwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Faruk Acar, Ömer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Simulation as an Enabler for ProductionSystem Development within the Indoor Vertical Farming Industry2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the increase in food consumption, new ideas, and technologies began to be developed. Inaddition, the developments generated by Industry 4.0 technologies have started to be applied tothe entire manufacturing sector and the indoor farming industry, which is currently trending.Many studies and articles have been prepared on this subject, and the main goal of each study isto produce quality products and to ensure continuity in production to cover the nonendingincrease in demand.

    This paper discusses how simulation technology, which is one of the industry 4.0 technologies,can be used in the production system development of the indoor farming industry. According tomany researchers, the biggest obstacle for the vertical farming industry is start-up cost, andsimulation technologies can be the solution for this since it allows future production systems tobe analyzed without any investment. To have a clear vision of how these technologies can beadapted in the indoor farming industry, this paper will find the answers to these questions, RQ1:How can simulation facilitate production system development and Industry 4.0 projects withinthe indoor farming industry? RQ2: What are the benefits and challenges when using simulationas a tool for production system development within the indoor farming industry? To reach thegoal of this paper, the case study method was used, and an indoor farming company was selectedto get more realistic data about the vertical farming system. BlueRedGold AB is a start-upcompany in the indoor farming industry, and it has a huge growth potential since they aim totransform its current production lines to be fully automated. Many articles and studies were usedto approach the solution of the research questions from a more technical and academic point ofview, and the analysis of these articles was carried out with the structured literature review method.

    After conducting this research, answers have been obtained for the research questions. Theauthors' solution to the layout issue, one of the case company's main challenges as indicated inthis study, was developed after extensive simulation model testing. As highlighted in this paper,it has been stated by many researchers, there are several simulation approaches to follow.However, the authors have developed a simulation modeling approach to be followed in theindoor vertical farming industry to overcome the complexity of these systems as well as thesimulation program complexity. In addition, several challenges and benefits have beenhighlighted in this paper such as the lack of ready models of the equipment used in indoorfarming which requires a knowledge of a programing language to overcome. Finally, despitechallenges, simulation technology can provide an applicable solution for production systemproblems of vertical farming companies/organizations to obtain continuous improvementphilosophy which is the main principle of Lean thinking. The generated simulation model in thisthesis project was successfully implemented, demonstrating how this technology might be aneffective solution for complex production systems as in the indoor farming sector. 

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  • 2.
    Abdelkarim, Sofia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hasan Hawre, Hazhwan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kartläggning av ergonomin i en produktionscell: Med utformningsförslag för en ergonomisk arbetsplats2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Purpose: The aim of the work is to map the ergonomics in a production cell and propose and compare the solutions to identified problems. In order to identify the problem and come up with some solutions, these questions have been answered.• What factors lead to operations that are harmful to the body?• How can a production cell be designed to be more ergonomic for employees?• What are the advantages / disadvantages of ergonomics in a production company?

     

    Method: To perform the study and achieve the purpose of the work, the authors used a case study company where observations were made in parallel with a literature review mainly on ergonomics variety of analysis and quality. The case study company has been used as the basis for the case study where ergonomics are mapped by means of observations, interviews and data that were analyzed by means of literature study done in parallel.

    Study results: The study resulted in a survey of ergonomics in a production cell at the case study company and 5 different suggestions for improvement. The production cell on the case study company is a red cell today, which means that the production cell is in a non-accepted position and in need for urgent changes in ergonomics. Factors leading to bad ergonomics and a non-accepted position as Volvo's requirements have been identified. Many heavy lifting and many torque is what has the highest negative impact on the working environment and ergonomics. Lack of adequate lifting tools have led to those not used in the production cell today. This leads to repetitive work and encumbrance at the case study company. Further, also the working height of the paths contributed to an increased workload as operators are in an unnatural posture. All of these factors are the basis of the 5 suggestions for improvement as the study also resulted in. New custom lifting tools, job rotation, reverse the order of the court, new packaging and pallet to the gears and the robot turn. All these proposed solutions lead to reduced stress and improved ergonomics in the production cell as manual lifting and twists are reduced. The solutions also leads to the production cell shifting from a non-accepted position with demands of urgent change to a yellow production cell that requires an action plan for the future.

     

    Implications: The aim of this study was to map the ergonomics in a production cell. With the study in hand, a conclusion is drawn that the aim has been achieved when all three of the questions have been addressed. Factors leading to poor ergonomics are identified. As well the advantages and disadvantages of investing in ergonomics identified and how production cells should be formed. With this information in mind, a number of proposed solutions have been developed.

     

    Recommendations: Further studies on the subject are recommended to increase knowledge and interest. It may be appropriate to carry out more case studies at more industries to strengthen the study’s results and generalizability. Furthermore, studies are recommended where the entire work environment is studied and not only physical ergonomics. By studying the whole working environment and the many factors that interact it can lead to a greater force being created for higher efficiency and quality in production.

     

    Keywords: Ergonomics, Ergonomics, Work, Volvo CE, Load, Lifting Tools, Body Injury, Advantages, Improvements, Quality

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  • 3.
    Achi, Raghukulesh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring value proposition of service offerings in telematics system2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Services are making a huge impact in the business sector especially in the developed countries. As services are customer-centric, there is a need for an enhanced process framework connected to integrated service development. Such a framework should ideally address value propositions meeting specific customer needs in identifying corresponding service offerings. In this context, this thesis aims to explore on how value propositions are defined, developed, and communicated during the introduction of service offerings and to identify the ways to improve the process of value propositions. The work is carried out in the context of a major (Swedish) manufacturing company within a specific product context, namely, the telematics system. The main data collection methods are personal observations, semi-structured interviews, meetings, and company documents. The study seeks to answer three questions: First, what are the value propositions addressed by the current service offerings in telematics system in the context of heavy-duty vehicle equipment? Second, how value propositions are created during the development of these services offerings? Third, how can the service offerings for telematics system be improved through the process of value proposition? The study found that two types of value propositions namely customer value proposition and stakeholder value proposition are addressed by the service offerings in telematics system. Additionally, it is found that value propositions are created in relation to service offerings. Finally, the thesis proposes a six-step conceptual framework to create better value propositions during the development of service offerings. The presented framework is applied to the current value proposition process at the case company and improvement suggestions are proposed, which can impact the service offerings in the near future. The thesis has contributions to enhance or create new service offerings through addressing the value propositions and applying them. The results are beneficial for managers and developers who work in developing the future state scenarios or business models.

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    Master Thesis
  • 4.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A Framework for Achieving Data-Driven Decision Making in Production Development2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 and the development of novel digital technologies is forcing manufacturing companies to introduce drastic changes to their productions systems. These technologies provide unique opportunities for manufacturing companies to collect, process and store large data volumes, which can be used to facilitate the coordination of factory elements. Previous research indicate that decisions based on data can provide fact-based decisions which can contribute to an increased productivity. However, manufacturing companies are not fully exploiting data as support for decision-making, which is desirable for an increased competitiveness. Currently, much attention is pointed towards the technology instead of the humans responsible for interpreting data and making decisions. Adding to this, there is a lack of guidance on how manufacturing companies can go from current decision making practices (i.e., decisions based on gut feelings) to fact-based decisions driven by data. To address this gap, the purpose of this thesis is to propose a framework for achieving data-driven decision making in production development in the context of Industry 4.0. The purpose is accomplished by using a qualitative-based case study approach at a small and medium sized enterprise in the electronics industry. The results indicate that both challenges and enablers for achieving data-driven decision making in production development are related to perspectives and attitudes, processes for data quality, technology and processes for decision making. Four maturity levels of data-data driven decision making are also identified. The proposed framework can be used by manufacturing companies to help them plan and prepare for their own specific development path towards data-driven decision making. Contributing to current understanding, this thesis considers the human decision makers perspective to develop the ability to collect, process, analyze and use the data to support time efficient and high-quality decisions, an insight lacking in prior academic studies. Future research may include confirmation of the findings presented in this thesis with additional use cases and industry types.

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    Agerskans (2020) - A Framework for Achieving Data-Driven Decision Making in Production Development
  • 5.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Digital Technologies for Enabling Smart Production: Examining the Aspects of Selection and Integration2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development towards Industry 5.0, manufacturing companies are developing towards smart production. In smart production, data is used as a resource to interconnect different elements in the production system to learn and adapt to changing production conditions. Common objectives include human-centricity, resource-efficiency, and sustainable production. To enable these desired benefits of smart production, there is a need to use digital technologies to create and manage the entire flow of data. To enable smart production, it is essential to deploy digital technologies in a way so that collected raw data is converted into useful data that can be applied by equipment or humans to generate value or reduce waste in production. This requires consideration to the data flow within the production system, i.e., the entire process of converting raw data into useful data which includes data management aspects such as the collection, analysis, and visualization of data. To enable a good data flow, there is a need to combine several digital technologies. However, many manufacturing companies are facing challenges when selecting suitable digital technologies for their specific production system. Common challenges are related to the overwhelming number of advanced digital technologies available on the market, and the complexity of production system and digital technologies. This makes it a complex task to understand what digital technologies to select and the recourses and actions needed to integrate them in the production system.

    Against this background, the purpose of this licentiate thesis is to examine the selection and integration of digital technologies to enable smart production within manufacturing companies. More specifically, this licentiate thesis examines the challenges and critical factors of selecting and integrating digital technologies for smart production. This was accomplished by performing a qualitative-based multiple case study involving manufacturing companies within different industries and of different sizes. The findings show that identified challenges and critical factors are related to the different phases of the data value chain: data sources and collection, data communication, data processing and storage, and data visualisation and usage. General challenges and critical factors that were related to all phases of the data value chain were also identified. Moreover, the challenges and critical factors were related to people, process, and technology aspects. This shows that there is a need for holistic perspective on the entire data value chain and different production system elements when digital technologies are selected and integrated. Furthermore, there is a need to define a structured process for the selection and integration of digital technologies, where both management and operational level are involved. 

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  • 6.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ashjaei, Seyed Mohammad Hossein
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors for Selecting and Integrating Digital Technologies to Enable Smart Production: A Data Value Chain Perspective2023In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, p. 311-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development towards Industry 5.0, manufacturing companies are developing towards Smart Production, i.e., using data as a resource to interconnect the elements in the production system to learn and adapt accordingly for a more resource-efficient and sustainable production. This requires selecting and integrating digital technologies for the entire data lifecycle, also referred to as the data value chain. However, manufacturing companies are facing many challenges related to building data value chains to achieve the desired benefits of Smart Production. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze the critical factors of selecting and integrating digital technologies for efficiently benefiting data value chains for Smart Production. This paper employed a qualitative-based multiple case study design involving manufacturing companies within different industries and of different sizes. The paper also analyses two Smart Production cases in detail by mapping the data flow using a technology selection and integration framework to propose solutions to the existing challenges. By analyzing the two in-depth studies and additionally two reference cases, 13 themes of critical factors for selecting and integrating digital technologies were identified.

  • 7.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Prerequisites that support the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development2017In: 24th EurOMA conference EurOMA17, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this paper is to explore the prerequisites that support the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development. An exploratory multiple embedded case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company in the manufacturing industry. By studying four pilot plants’ organisational structure and way of working, this paper contributes with an increased understanding regarding how the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development can be supported. This paper describes how a technology roadmap, the usage of master processes and a supportive organisational structure can support the fuzzy front end of new manufacturing technology development.

  • 8.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Eskilstuna.
    The fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development: Exploring the link between the known and the unknown2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that a way of competing on a global market is through the introduction of new manufacturing technologies in the production system that can improve product quality as well as contribute to reducing manufacturing time, reduced product price and in the end increased profits. Manufacturing companies that develop and introduce new manufacturing technologies can differentiate themselves from others and thus achieve increased competitiveness.

    The fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development is characterized by a high degree of technology uncertainty and challenges due to the lack of access to relevant knowledge, lack of a structured development process, and enough resources that are working with development of new manufacturing technologies.

    In the literature only a few empirical studies that explore the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development can be found. Prior research highlights that little is actually known about what should be done in the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development projects, and thus more research is needed. Supporting the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development is important to facilitate a successful introduction of new manufacturing technologies, fast time-to-volume and long-term production system development.

    Based on the above-mentioned importance of developing new manufacturing technology, the objective of the research presented in this thesis is to explore the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development. In order to fulfil the objective, empirical data were collected from five case studies conducted in the manufacturing industry. During the empirical studies four important parts were studied: organising, knowledge development, collaboration and the development process.

    The main findings revealed that development of new manufacturing technology is often conducted in collaboration with external partners and many ad hoc decisions are taken due to lack of a predefined development process for the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development. In addition, in the fuzzy front end access to relevant manufacturing knowledge is important and knowledge needs to be developed in order to reduce technology uncertainty.

    In order to support the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development projects, a supporting framework has been developed. The proposed framework is an elaboration of results from the research questions addressed and can be used as a guideline to overcome the challenges observed in the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development projects. The framework is built on two important dimensions for innovations, degree of technology uncertainty and degree of novelty. The critical factors identified in the analysis are embedded in the proposed framework as central parts in the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development.

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  • 9.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Dept Prod Realizat, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1035-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development projects required to build competitive advantages. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company by following a manufacturing technology development project in real time during a two-year period. Findings - The results show that three different knowledge integration processes exist when developing unique manufacturing technology: processes for capturing, for joint learning, and for absorb learning. The findings of the current research suggest that the three knowledge integration processes are highly interrelated with each knowledge integration process affecting the other two. Research limitations/implications - The major limitation of the research is primarily associated with the single case, which limits generalizability outside the context that was studied. Practical implications - The findings are particularly relevant to manufacturing engineers working with the development of new manufacturing technologies. By using relevant knowledge integration processes and capabilities required to integrate the knowledge in manufacturing technology development projects, companies can improve design and organize the development of manufacturing technology. Originality/value - Previous research has merely noted that knowledge integration is required in the development of unique manufacturing technology, but without explaining how and in what way. This paper's contribution is the identification and analysis of three knowledge integration processes that contribute to the building of competitive advantages by developing unique manufacturing technology and new knowledge.

  • 10.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktorija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sauter, Barrett
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Approaching digital transformation in the manufacturing industry challenges and differing views2023In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, no 4, p. 415-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to support manufacturing companies in their digital transformation, challenges and views of the term 'digital transformation' need to be identified since digital transformation is considered a source of competitive advantages. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the challenges and differing views of digital transformation in the manufacturing industry. A case study was conducted in collaboration with four Swedish manufacturing companies. The results were then mapped into categories of three dimensions (people, process and technology), indicating that digital transformation can have different meanings within a company. We conclude that the term 'digitalisation' is more frequently used in the manufacturing industry than 'digital transformation' and identified challenges relate to lack of best practice for digital transformation, degree of standardisation and therefore affects the workload and limits the possibilities of transferring technical solutions between factories. Our findings are relevant to operations managers and other interested in digital transformation. 

  • 11.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktorija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sauter, Barrett
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Paradoxes in the Digital Transformation of Production Systems2024In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2024, Vol. 52, p. 244-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital transformation of production systems is a challenging task that demands radical responses from existing organizations. During the digital transformation of productions systems tensions occur that need to be managed and the purpose of this paper is to identify paradoxes in the digital transformation of production systems. Paradox theory has been applied as an analytical framework when identifying digital transformation paradoxes and tensions. A case study has been conducted and two manufacturing companies’ digitalization projects have been studied and analyzed in combination with data from workshops around digital transformation. The results were mapped into four types of paradoxes: organizing, performing, belonging, and learning. We conclude that the identified tensions are intertwined, and a major tension is the degree of standardization of technologies (standardization vs customization) and a more agile way of working (learning by doing vs learning before) doing is a trend within the digital transformation of production system. Our findings are relevant to operations managers and others interested in tensions during the digital transformation of production systems.

  • 12.
    Ahmadi, Mansour
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The application of system dynamics and discrete event simulation in supply chain management of Swedish manufacturing industries2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing competition from traditional and emerging channels has placed new emphasis on rapid innovation and continuous differentiation in every aspect of supply chain, from earliest production stage to the final distribution steps. To bridge the gap between brilliant ideas and successful business initiatives, leading companies implement engineering simulation particularly in logistics and supply chain management (LSCM). Discrete event simulation (DES) and system dynamics (SD) are two modeling approaches widely used in this field. However there are not much done researches about the applications of these simulation approaches in supply chain context of Swedish Manufacturing Industries (SMI). This study explores the application of DES and SD in LSCM of SMI by looking at the nature and level of issues modeled. Journal papers and master theses that use these modeling approaches to study supply chains, published between 1990 and 2012 are reviewed. A total of 39 articles are analyzed to identify the frequency with which the two simulation approaches are used as modeling tools in LSCM of SMI. Our findings suggest that DES has been used more frequently to model supply chains in SMI. The results also show that not all the LSCM issues have been addressed evenly and generally tactical/operational issues have been modeled more frequently. The results of this study inform the existing literature about the use of DES and SD in LSCM of SMI.

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  • 13.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ranking of Two Multi Criteria Decision Making Cases with Evidential Reasoning under Uncertainty2017In: Advances in Science, Technology and Engineering Systems Journal V2(3) ASTESJ-V2(3), ISSN 2415-6698, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1059-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many decision problems have more than one objective that need to be dealt with simultaneously. Moreover, because of the qualitative nature of the most of real world problem it is an inevitable activity and very important to interpret and present the uncertain information for making effective decision. The Evidential Reasoning (ER) approach which is one of the latest development within multi criteria decision making (MCDM) seems to be the best fit to synthesize both qualitative and quantitative data under uncertainty. To support this claim, two case studies were tested to illustrate the application of ER for prioritization and ranking of decision alternative to support decision process even with uncertain information. The overall goal of the first case study is to identify and prioritize factors that can be considered maintenance-related waste within the automotive manufacturing industry. The result after applying ER shows “inadequate resources” and “weather /indoor climate,” respectively, are the highest and lowest average scores for creating maintenance-related waste. This prioritization methodology can be used as a tool to create awareness for managers seeking to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste. The aim of the second case study is to look at the possibility of having a new approach for sustainable design. So through a literature review six design strategies were taken into consideration in order to develop a new approach based on all advantages (sustainable factors) of the six approaches. For ranking and finding out about the most important factors the evidential reasoning (ER) approach is used. Based on ER all the important factors, apart from the one collected from interviews are a part of eco-design. So it means among all strategies eco-design is the most dominant strategy in term of environment. However two of the important factors are not found in any strategy but in interviews. These factors can be used as the building blocks for a new approach. The importance of having a better structured decision process is essential for the success of any organization, so it can be applied widely in most of real world problem dealing with making effective decision.

  • 14.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Classification of Maintenance-Related Waste Based on Human Factors2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, Neuchâtel, Switzerland, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this research is to identify and classify factors creating maintenance-related waste. A workshop study has been performed in order to identify root-causes for maintenance-related waste. In total, 16 categories were found in the analysis and it is concluded that these are heavily reliant on human factors as a root- or major contributory cause. These, together with factors based on a literature review have been incorporated into a classification model. The model can be used in creating awareness in, as well as provide a basic framework for decision making of, which waste to target for elimination.

  • 15.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using evidential reasoning approach for prioritization of maintenance-related waste caused by human factors-a case study2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 90, no 9-12, p. 2761-2775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduction and elimination of maintenance-related waste is receiving increasing attention because of the negative effect of such waste on production costs. The overall goal of this research is to identify and prioritize factors that can be considered maintenance-related waste within the automotive manufacturing industry. Five manufacturing companies participated in a workshop to identify root causes of maintenance-related waste; 16 categories were found. The identified factors were heavily reliant on human factors as a root or major contributory cause at different levels affecting performance and productivity. For prioritization, the evidential reasoning (ER) approach which is one of the latest developments in multi-criteria decision-making is applied. A basic tree structure necessary for ER assessment is developed based on the workshop results as well as literature on human factors. Then, a survey on basic attributes at the lowest level of this tree is designed and performed at one of the companies participating in the workshop. The application of ER shows that, on an overall level, "management condition" is in first order and "maintainer condition" and "working condition" are in second and third order respectively as the worst cases for creating maintenance-related waste. On the most delimited level "inadequate resources" and "weather/indoor climate" have the highest and lowest average scores respectively in ER ranking or prioritization. This methodology with its resulting ranking can be used as a tool to create awareness for managers seeking to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste.

  • 16.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jederström, Kathrina
    Mälardalen University.
    Plahn, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Olsson, Anna
    Mälardalen University.
    Foyer, Isabell
    Mälardalen University.
    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT USING EVIDENTIAL REASONING2017In: Numerical Algebra, Control and Optimization, ISSN 2155-3289, E-ISSN 2155-3297, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 435-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those working in product development need to consider sustain ability, being careful not to compromise the future generations ability to satisfy its needs. Several strategies guide companies towards sustainability. This paper studies six of these strategies: eco-design, green design, cradle-to-cradle, design for environment, zero waste, and life cycle approaches. Based on a literature review and semi-structured interviews, it identifies 22 factors of sustainability from the perspective of manufacturers. The purpose is to determine which are the most important and to use them as a foundation for a new design strategy. A survey based on the 22 factors was given to people working with product development; they graded each factor by importance. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using evidential reasoning. The analysis found the factors minimize use of toxic substances, increase competitiveness, economic benefits, reduce material usage, material selection, reduce emissions, and increase product functionality are more important and should serve as the foundation for a new approach to sustainable product development.

  • 17.
    Al Hakim, Hoda
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Al-Delemi, Rend
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Identifiering av slöserier i materialflödet för montering2020Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The introduction aims to provide a background to the problem in manufacturing companies in terms of logistics and material handling. It provides a brief description of the key areas of this study.

    Purpose and research question: The purpose of the study is to investigate the internal material supply flow in a manual assembly line. This is accomplished by identifying potential Lean concepts in the material flow for reduced waste and more efficient work. Based on the purpose of the study, two issues were formulated to solve these problems:

    RQ1: What wastes are present in the material supply flow?

    RQ2: How can wastes be reduced to increase the efficiency of the material supply flow?

    Approach and method: A case study was conducted at a producing company and data was collected through literature review, observations and semi- and unstructured interviews. The literature review was collected in order to link the theoretical frame of reference with the result and was obtained from scientific articles and books.

    Results: A few wastes were identified at the case company, and these were waiting, unnecessary and impractical movements, as well as unused skills. There is no good material handling system at the company that contributes to the cause of some of these wastes. This creates an inefficient flow of material which in turn creates delays.

    Conclusion: The conclusions that can be drawn in this study are that wastes occur on the case company's assembly line, which creates an inefficient material supply flow. Some Lean tools and concepts were introduced to be able to reduce these wastes and give the case company the opportunity to implement these to achieve an efficient material supply flow. An improvement layout was also developed to reduce waste.

    Keywords: Logistics, Material supply, Lean, Wastes, Material flow

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    Identifiering av slöserier i materialflödet för montering
  • 18.
    Alayon, Claudia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sannö, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sustainable production adoption by Surface Treatment SMES: challenges and enablers2015In: Global Cleaner Production & Sustainable Consumption Conference 2015 GCPC2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption to sustainable production is a continuous but necessary strive for manufacturing operations, including small and medium enterprises, SMEs. Meeting the future needs of the economic, social and environmental dimensions provides challenges for SMEs. In order to meet these challenges, understanding of internal and external enablers is required. Studies focusing on the enablers for sustainability among SMEs are rare; hence these companies are important players in the supply chain to focal companies. In order to enhance the understanding of the adoption of sustainable production for the sector surface treatment SMEs, an exploratory study has been conducted. In this study, the focus has been placed in the identification and analysis of the challenges and enablers for adoption of sustainable production. Two stages of empirical data collection were undertaken: a focus group session and an online questionnaire. The findings present challenges based on the limitations of the surface treatment process but also where enablers for the social, economic and environmental for meeting those challenges are interrelated. The results showed that these SMEs face challenges in their way towards sustainable production, mainly due to: low economic profitability, need for improvement in old working procedures, lack of fully understanding regarding environmental legislation, difficulty in ensuring workforce, lack of technology development and resistance towards change. These challenges could be faced through internal and external enablers, where the support of large-size customers and other stakeholders is critical for this sector.

  • 19.
    Alayón, C. L.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Säfsten, K.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Barriers and Enablers for the Adoption of Sustainable Manufacturing by Manufacturing SMEs2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have inherent characteristics, which require specific solutions for improving the sustainability performance of their operations. The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge on barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs and to provide insights into what enablers can be used to overcome existing barriers. Taking, as a starting point, a systematic literature review, this paper presents a categorization of barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs. In total, seven categories for classifying the barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing within SMEs were identified: organizational, managerial and attitudinal; informational; governmental; financial; training and skills development; market and business context; and technological. Additionally, this study elaborates on what barriers could be mitigated through the enablers. This study found specific enablers with the potential to mitigate a significantly higher number of barriers and referred to them as ‘critical enablers’. SMEs aiming to adopt sustainable manufacturing practices or improve their sustainability performance are encouraged to focus on the enablers in these categories. This paper synthesizes and facilitates interpretation of the existing body of evidence on barriers and enablers for adopting sustainable manufacturing in SMEs. 

  • 20.
    Alderman, N.
    et al.
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Ivory, Chris
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Service‐led projects: understanding the meta‐project context2010In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1131-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The service‐led project is driven by the demand for long‐term service provision based on the output of a conventional capital good. The project management implications of the extended timeframe for such projects are considered and the added risks and uncertainties associated with planning for an unknown future business environment. Detailed case studies of three service‐led engineering projects in the context of port facilities, high‐speed trains and sludge treatment are examined. The findings indicate that service‐led projects exist within the context of a meta‐project that encompasses a consideration of critical activities beyond the normal remit of the project manager. Aligning project stakeholders around a vision for the meta‐project becomes a key task in the successful management of the service‐led project.

  • 21.
    Alexander, Dujlo
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Effektivisering av materialhantering vid montering av gruvpumpar: Med en optimerad layout2020Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose and question formulations: The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the material flow during assembly of mine pumps and identify the wastes that occur in it. What will also be presented is a more optimal layout that will reduce the waste that exists today and create a more efficient material flow. Based on the purpose of the study, three question formulations were created and answered:

     

    (1)   What wastes occur in internal material handling during assembly?

     

    (2)   How can material handling be improved during assembly?

     

    (3)   How can the layout be optimized?

     

    Method and implementation: A case study has been conducted on a global company in the mining industry that manufactures customer-specific pumps. Data was collected through time studies, observations, semi- and unstructured interviews and through the internal system. A literature study was conducted to be able to link the theory with the empiricism. The theory was obtained from books and scientific articles.

     

    Results: After analysis of the material flow at the fall company, several wastes were identified in the form of waiting, warehouses, unnecessary transport, unused expertise and defective products. There is no clear communication system between planning, warehousing, quality department and assembly which is a reason for the wastes created. Another reason is that there is no connection between the different stations of assembly which creates an inefficient flow of material due to the current layout.

     

    Conclusions: The conclusions that can be drawn from this study are that a non-optimal layout combined with a missing system between the relevant departments for assembly creates an inefficient flow of material. Some lean tools, the 10 principles for efficient material handling and the guidelines for developing an optimal layout create a more efficient material flow.

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  • 22.
    Almaliki, Rasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Kariksiz, Civin
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Examensarbete: Implementering av2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we discuss the tool, FMEA (Failure Mode Effect Analysis), we look at its usage and realization on identified components that are included in electrical motors made at ABB LV Motors in Västerås. Our goals with this work have been to give knowledge about the method FMEA to the company so they can learn to use this tool and for us to implement the tool on an existing application to analyze the failures that can occur. Since ABB have a project ongoing with a new motor our analyses can also give them input on what changes and actions to take on the new motor.

    After two weeks training in the workshop and a thorough survey of the companys warranty claims we could define our work by identifying which components we would survey our analyses on. After a run through with our instructors at the company we draw the conclusion to survey our work on five components, which there are two components that are very critical that we discovered during our information collection with the warranty claims.

    The analyzed components are:

    1. Bearing

    2. Winding

    3. Sealing of terminal box and terminal cap.

    4. Motor feet’s

    5. Shields

    Bearing which is after the winding the most critical component, it is a sensitive part and it is very important to follow instructions for maintenance and lubrication to avoid early bearing damages.

    Winding is the clearest most critical component in our analyzes, this is because there is many parts that plays role in the windings function, copper wires, isolations, impregnation and during the process you can have failures that affect the winding in a negative way immediately but also in a later phase when the motor is running.

    Sealing of the terminal box and cap describes those failures that can occur when the sealing is not effective and compact, and what happens is that you get dirt and damp in to the box and how it possibly can affect the connection box and other electrical applications.

    The failure analyze on feets and shields deals with design faults, tolerance faults and how it affects the components.

    In the report we describe the functions of the components, processes, maintenance and that is in general what we have in our FMEA analyses, however in the report we describe it more thoroughly. After the description of every component we have the FMEA of respective component attached. The FMEA analyses are our results in this work, in the analyses we show many possible failures at each component and also which failures are most critical to deal with.

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  • 23.
    Almers, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Morrissey, Miguel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kåpning till brandspaningsrobot FUMO 32013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta projekt har utförts på en 10 veckors period och ligger på C-nivå (15högskolepoäng). Projektet gick ut på att ta fram ett kåpningsförslag för FUMO 3. Under denna period har de första 6 veckorna bestått av konceptframtagning och bearbetning av koncept, och de sista 4 av själva prototypframtagningen. Metoderna som använts för idégenerering och konceptframtagning har varit diverse produktutvecklingsverktyg. Då många ändringar och korrigeringar gjordes framför allt gällande basplatta, IP-lådor och externa enheter ganska sent in i projektet kunde gruppen inte fastställa ett konceptförslag förrän närmare slutet av arbetet med detta projekt. Prototypframtagningsprocessen utfördes genom bockning med maskin och för hands samt hopsättning genom popnitning. Mallar för utklippta plåtbitar togs fram genom CAD-ritningar som sedan ritadesut på pappskivor, som sedan provades på roboten i förväg. Då arbetet med prototypframtagningen gjordes i största mån för hand så lämnade gruppen utrymme för felpassningar som kunde uppstå på grund av felklippta plåtar, felaktiga bockningskanter och radier, skissnoggrannhet och annat orsakat av den mänskliga faktorn. Som slutsats ser vi oss ändå nöjda med att ha uppflyllt kraven under den tid som var utsatt.

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  • 24.
    Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Landström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Brunoe, Thomas Ditlev
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kjeld
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Towards a generic design method for reconfigurable manufacturing systems: Analysis and synthesis of current design methods and evaluation of supportive tools2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 42, p. 179-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In  today’s global manufacturing environment, changes are inevitable and something that every manufacturer must respond to and take advantage of, whether it is in regards to technology changes, product changes, or changes in the manufacturing processes. The reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS) meets this challenge through the ability to rapidly and efficiently change capacity and functionality, which is the reason why it has been widely labelled the manufacturing paradigm of the future. However, design of the RMS represents a significant challenge compared to the design of traditional manufacturing systems, as it should be designed for efficient production of multiple variants, as well as multiple product generations over its lifetime. Thus, critical decisions regarding the degree of scalability and convertibility of the system must be considered in the design phase, which affects the abilities to reconfigure the system in accordance with changes during its operating lifetime. However, in current research it is indicated that conventional manufacturing system design methods do not support the design of an RMS and that a systematic RMS design method is lacking, despite the fact that numerous contributions exist. Moreover, there is currently only limited evidence for the breakthrough of reconfigurability in industry. Therefore, the research presented in this paper aims at synthesizing current contributions into a generic method for RMS design. Initially, currently available design methods for RMS are reviewed, in terms of classifying and comparing their content, structure, and scope, which leads to a synthesis of the reviewed methods into a generic design method. In continuation of this, the paper includes a discussion of practical implications related to carrying out the design, including an identification of potential challenges and an assessment of which tools that can be applied to support the design. Conclusively, further areas for research are indicated, which provides valuable knowledge of how to develop and realize the benefits of reconfigurability in industry.

  • 26.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Rosio, Carin
    Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, Vol. 52, p. 139-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the development of a strategically integrated product and production system portfolio could be enabled by the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing. In previous research, several critical challenges related to developing production system portfolios have been identified, but it has not been investigated how developing a reconfigurable manufacturing concept could aid some of these. Therefore, through a multiple case study, these critical challenges have been investigated in two companies that have recently developed reconfigurable manufacturing concepts for multiple variants and generations of products. The findings reveal that the companies need to deal with several challenges in order to enable a functioning RMS. By running the project separately from the NPD project and to include several product types and production sites the company overcome several challenges. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Carina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Essential Information Forms in a Condition Monitoring Context2009In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 10-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to describe an information theory in order to achieve a fruitful discussion of information within condition monitoring in a condition based maintenance context. The paper is based on a qualitative and interdisciplinary approach. A case study is performed at four Swedish paper mills and one condition monitoring supplier. Interviews have been the main method for data collection; however, observations and studies of artifacts are included in the study also. The main contribution of the study is a framework that visualizes how data and five different forms of information interact and turns into knowledge about a machine’s condition. These forms of information are all necessary to take into consideration when implementing and operating a condition based maintenance program. The research results state that it is relevant to allow and encourage the technicians and operators to utilize several forms of information when assessing the condition of an asset, and, thus, to not put too much trust in the condition monitoring technology alone. Also, it can be important to encourage user interface designers to reflect upon the different contexts and information forms as they design information in a condition monitoring interface.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Carina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Elfving, Sofi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Design of Information in a Virtual Factory Influence Collaborative Product Development2004In: Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering / [ed] Horváth, I. and Xirouchakis, Lausanne: Millpress , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Andersson, Carina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Elfving, Sofi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shifting Communication Paradigm Changes Course of Product Development in Clusters2003In: Proceedings of the International Visual Literacy Conference. IVLA’03 / [ed] Griffin, R. E., Lee, J. & Chandler, S., Newport: USA: Changing Tides , 2003, p. 35-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Andersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Linnakallio, Caroline
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
     Basstation-FUMO 32013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 31.
    Andersson, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Tholén, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development.
    Styrkan i OEE som arbetsmetod2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The E-department at GETRAG All Wheel Drive in Köping have problems with the efficiency on parts of their production equipment. The equipment with the most significant efficiency problems are four automated multifunctional production cells that produces housing for rear drive units. The major part of the problem is the large amount of small stops that causes the low efficiency.

    The department already worked with logging of interruptions and efficiency calculations before this project started. However this work was not done to the extent considered necessary for a systematic follow-up of the interruptions.

    The aim of this paper is to point out a more effective and systematic way to work with logging of interruptions and the follow-up. In addition the equipment were studied with a method for efficiency calculation that – if used properly- is a more powerful and a visually better method than the one used by the company today.

    As the initial current state analysis of the equipment was made a lack of documented knowledge about the equipment was discovered. In addition the efficiency appeared to be lower than the companies previously presented figures.

    With the help of new methods for logging of interruptions and a deeper failure analysis the production equipment were studied for ten weeks. These studies showed that the department have big opportunities to a more effective and more profitable production. This can be done by reducing the chronicle interruptions through a more systematic work with continuous improvements.

    On the basis of the performed studies and the theoretical references a new working method that is based on the commitment of all employees is presented. This method can be used by the E-department to work with continuous improvements in a more systematic way than today.

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  • 32.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Already there?: cultivating emergent places for radical innovation in operations2017In: International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 131-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter proposes a way of understanding and cultivating places for radical innovation in operations. This chapter describes how, organisations can, instead of letting an innovation laboratory be its single economic and managerial priority, foster a decentralised, varied and emergent palette of places in use where radical innovation can occur. The chapter suggests that this can be done in lean production facilities and radical innovation be balanced with incremental innovation. 

  • 33.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design as Information: How May Design and Information Relate?2009In: Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal, ISSN 1833-1874, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 161-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Pettersson, design may be a process and/or the result of the process, a product. The area of design is multidisciplinary and involves several notions. One is in the subject field of Information Design, which includes language, communication, art, cognition and information science. These disciplines refer to the concept of information differently. There is therefore a need for a fruitful theory of information, terms and concepts in order to enrich the reasoning of design as information. Bates presents a definition of information and several fundamental information forms. There, she offers a theoretical framework, the main core of which is that information may take different forms related to architecture, graphic design, interior design, and interface design, etc. Such a framework may contribute to understanding the meaning of design. Bates’ theory is applied in a study involving spatial design in industrial environments. The conclusions of the study illustrates how design and information relate to a design process and a design product that enriches the understanding of the meaning of design.

  • 34.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Communication space: Spatial design in manufacturing industry2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main concern of this licentiate thesis is to discuss how built space is used for communication in the manufacturing industry, from a visual communication perspective. The thesis presents and develops the notion of 'communication space' and presents a model to describe the relation between different factors in the communication space.

    In a multiple case study, six different cases from the manufacturing industry are described and analyzed to highlight how built space is used for communication in a lean production context. Research results on how built spaces such as improvement places, meeting places and a development workshop affect improvement processes and communication are presented. What the studied improvement areas, meeting places and workshop can be said to communicate about the improvement processes is analyzed.

    The research results show that the built spaces in manufacturing industry are used for communication on two levels, both as places for interaction between employees and as a part of a communication process. The study also shows a relation between architecture from a specific time and the relation to the improvement work in the industrial context. How the results can be used to facilitate communication in the built spaces used for improvement processes in manufacturing industry is suggested in the thesis.

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  • 35.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Spatial design and communication for Improved Production Performance2009In: Proceedings of The International 3rd Swedish Production Symposium: Göteborg, Sweden, 2-3 december 2009 / [ed] Rosén, B.G., Swedish Production Academy, 2009, p. 317-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper present research results on how a spatial design can communicate and support

    production performance in relation to lean production. The main concern of this paper is to

    discuss the role of interior design and its affect on humans in a production system and to

    contribute to a more profound understanding of lean production from a communicative aspect.

    This paper is focusing on three case studies: a project studio, a prototype workshop, and a

    development workshop in manufacturing companies. The study in the development workshop

    is conducted during a period of two years, with an ambitious survey as follow up. The

    two others are context cases to exemplify and investigate the role of interior design in an

    industrial environment, with project studios as the main subject.

    The research method chosen is case study methodology including a literature review related

    to examples from the industrial case studies.

    In industry, spatial design in interaction with visual artefacts can be used to reduce the 8th

    waste by supporting effective communication, cross-functional work, decision-making processes,

    reinforcing the project identity, facilitating project management, save time, shorten

    led time for development projects and inspire employees to a positive view of the company

    and the project.

     

  • 36.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Västmanlands County Museum, Sweden.
    Komazec, Ksenija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Vaara, Elsa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Strineholm, Andreea
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Whose place is it?: Enacted territories in the museum2022In: DRS2022, DRS Conference Proceedings, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     There is a growing trend to embrace the idea of public participation in the work of museums, from exhibition design to collections. To further develop participatory cultures in museums, these negotiations and emerging practices should be examined more closely. This paper explores a museum’s whole-hearted attempt to engage with the societal issue of climate change and work with a high degree of participationfrom civic society when staging a temporary exhibition. We investigate experiences inthe process of building, measuring, separating and transgressing during the collaboration. Based on these explorations the paper presents three emerging and interconnected territories in the staging of participatory temporary exhibitions, the territory of aesthetics, the territory of action (autonomy), and the territory of unpredictability. The result contributes to research on public participatory practices mainly in museum context

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  • 37.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Supporting the Implementation of Industrial Robots in Collaborative Assembly Applications2021Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently, few technologies have been applicable to increase flexibility in the manufacturers’ assembly applications, but the introduction of industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications provides such opportunities. Specifically, these collaborative assembly applications present an opportunity to, in a fenceless environment, combine the flexibility of the human with the accuracy, repeatability, and strengths of the robot while utilizing less floor space and allowing portable applications. However, despite the benefits of industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications, there are significant gaps in the literature preventing their implementation.

    Based on this background, the objective of this work is to support the implementation of industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications. To fulfill this objective, this work included two empirical studies; first, an interview study mapped the attributes of industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications. Second, a multiple-case study mapped the critical challenges and enabling activities when implementing these collaborative assembly applications. The studies were also combined with literature reviews aiming to fill the theoretical gaps. 

    The work provides an implementation process with enabling activities that can mitigate critical challenges when implementing industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications. The implementation process shows enabling activities in the three first phases: pre-study, collaborative assembly application design, and assembly installation. These enabling activities are mapped to the 7M dimensions as a way to clearly show how they can support the implementation of industrial robots in collaborative assembly applications. The implementation process contributes to filling the identified gaps in the literature and provides practitioners with activities that managers could consider when implementing collaborative robots in collaborative assembly applications. Finally, this work suggests that future research could aim to validate the implementation process in a case study or investigate further the last two phases of the process. 

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  • 38. Andersson, Staffan Karl Lennart
    et al.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors Supporting the Implementation of Collaborative Robot Applications2021In: IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, ETFA, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The industrial collaborative robot (ICR) is a promising technology for automating assembly systems in manufacturing industries. Yet, ICRs are not widely implemented in the manufacturing industry as there are challenges during its implementation. Furthermore, current research lacks real-world case studies on ICR implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical factors supporting the implementation of ICR applications in assembly systems. A multiple-case study with eight case companies is presented in this paper, consisting of thirteen interviews. Moreover, critical factors were identified that could mitigate challenges in the ICR implementation process. By this, the study contributes to the current body of research by identifying and structuring the critical factors using a newness perspective. These factors can support the mitigation of potential challenges when manufacturers implement technology with a high novelty into their assembly systems. Specifically, this paper suggests that manufacturing companies focus on relieving operators from unergonomic tasks rather than focusing on high financial and efficiency gains. This finding contradicts previous research suggesting that financial gains are the main goal for manufacturing companies when implementing ICR applications. Moreover, how manufacturers work with external actors might change when implementing ICR applications, compared to traditional robots. Finally, we suggest testing the critical factors in a real-world case study investigating the whole implementing process to see if these factors, in fact, mitigate challenges. 

  • 39.
    Andersén, Jim
    Mälardalen University, School of Business. University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    A holistic approach to acquisition of strategic resources2007In: Journal of European Industrial Training, ISSN 0309-0590, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 660-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of this article is to provide a holistic framework for the acquisition of strategic resources. Design/methodology/approach - The literature dealing with resource creation is reviewed and analyzed from a resource-based point of view. The major methods of acquiring resourcesare identified through the literature review and the applicability of the framework proposed is illustrated with an empirical example. Findings - Three ways of acquiring strategic resources are identified - direct investments, organizational processes, and product market positioning. All three ways of acquisition can be intentional or unintentional. Arguments for using this six-dimension scale are provided through deductive reasoning, literature review, and the empirical example. Research implications/limitations - The study identifies the six dimensions of strategic resource acquisition. However, integration of these dimensions is not a subject addressed in this study. Cluster analysis of companies according to these dimensions could enhance our understanding of the characteristics of companies regarding resource acquisition. Originality/value - Whereas previous studies have generally used a single-theory approach, this study highlights the importance of having a holistic outlook when analyzing resource-based competitive advantages.

  • 40.
    Antser, Charlie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lundvall, Kimmy
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The Quest for the Hydroponic Pepper: Applying Design Research Methodology to Develop Support Tools for Successfully Designing a Post-harvest System for a Plant Factory2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The world is facing a food shortage as the world’s population increases and arable land decreases. Despite this, the food industry is wasteful, and 30% - 40% of all produced food is lost before reaching the end consumer. Emerging technologies aim to increase the amount of food that can be grown per m2 or allow the growing of food in climates or on lands previously impossible. Four main farming techniques utilising these emerging technologies are Controlled Environment Agriculture, Hydroponic Farming, Urban Farming and Vertical farming. When used together, these techniques form the basis for what can be called a Plant Factory. Despite the positive effects these technologies have on the production rate, few Plant Factories have managed to achieve profitability. By creating support for developing the post-harvesting system for a plant factory, this thesis aims to aid in the development of profitable plant factories.

    The thesis uses Design Research Methodology to achieve this aim in three parts. The first part identifies the underlying factors of the post-harvesting system affecting plant factory profitability. The second presents a set of support components that will aid the developers to improve key factors affecting profitability. The third part is a case study where the support components applicability at targeting the key factors are evaluated, and suggestions for further improvements and testing of the support is suggested. 

    Further, using Design Research Methodology, the methods used to develop support in this thesis are presented to easily be replicated by other researchers to aid them in developing support for other industries and circumstances.

    The suitability of the developed support was tested using the principles of an initial DS-II. The developed support proved very useful for the investigated case, and with its conditions, the application evaluation was considered a partial success. Two key factors were successfully improved and indicated that the intended support is ready for a comprehensive DS-II. A third support component needs more work to provide the intended support fully. Therefore a second  PS iteration is recommended before a comprehensive DS-II is done to increase its value.

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    The quest for the hydroponic pepper, Antser & Lundvall
  • 41.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. RISE, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Florin, Ulrika
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, Kristian
    RISE, Västerås, Sweden.
    TO SUPPORT IOT COLLABORATIVE EXPRESSIVENESS ON THE SHOP FLOOR2021In: Proceedings of the Design Society, E-ISSN 2732-527X, Vol. 1, p. 3149-3158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of new research for IoT support and the human-centric perspective of industry 4.0 opens a gap to support operators in unleashing their creativity so they can provide improvements opportunities with IoT technology. This paper presents a case-study carried out in four Swedish manufacturing companies, where four different workshops were facilitated to support operators in the conceptualization of manufacturing improvements with IoT technologies. The empirical material gathered during these workshops has been analyzed in five different reflective sessions and discussed in light of previous research from industry 4.0, operators, and IoT support. Results indicate that operators can collaboratively create conceptual IoT solutions and that expressiveness in communicating their ideas and needs using IoT technology is more relevant than technical aspects and details of their proposed IoT solutions. This technological expressiveness is identified as a necessary skill to be cultivated on the shop floor and can potentially contribute to making a more effective and socially sustainable industrial landscape in the future.

  • 42.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. RISE, Sweden.
    Florin, Ulrika
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, K.
    RISE, Sweden.
    THE KARAKURI CARD DECK: CO-DESIGNING INDUSTRIAL IOT CONCEPTUAL SOLUTIONS2020In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ISSN 2220-4334, E-ISSN 2220-4342, Vol. 1, p. 807-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel IoT market solutions and research promise IoT modules that do not require programming or electrical setup, yet shop floor personnel need to face problem solving activities to create technical solutions. This paper introduces the Karakuri card deck and presents a case study composed of four workshop sessions in four manufacturing settings, where shop floor personnel tested the cards as a means of ideating and presenting conceptual IoT solutions in the form of diagrams. The results indicate the validity of the proposed conceptual solutions and suggest prototyping as a next step.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Aroian, Naanar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Awaijan, Kristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The Effect of Ergonomics in an Assembly Line System’s Work Environment - A Literature Study2022Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this literature study is to explore the most important ergonomic factors that play a role in shaping the work environment of assembly line systems. Since the subject of ergonomics in production systems has continuously gained great interest in the past years, it was decided to conduct research around this topic. The literature study type was chosen to answer the research questions. This was done because even though various articles discuss the mentioned areas, they usually still have a specific focus. For example, human errors, automation, simulation, virtual reality, etc. Therefore, it was decided to carry on with a more comprehensive review that takes into account the most important ergonomic factors in general and how they influence assembly workstations both positively and negatively. Thus, two research questions were explored:

    Research question:  What are the most important ergonomic factors that influence an assembly line system’s work environment?

    Sub-research question: What are the positive and negative effects and what causes them?

    In order to proceed with the study, a systematic literature review and thematic analysis were conducted through the use of secondary data only. This was done by searching for different articles through two academic databases; ScienceDirect and Scopus. Lastly, the words that were used to search for articles were highly relevant in terms of the research questions.

    In regards to the analysis and conclusion, different factors were found including automation and cobots, job rotation, the implementation of human factors, and repetitive manual tasks. The results showed that all these factors can affect an assembly line system’s work environment to a great extent, both positively and negatively. First of all, cobots contribute by helping human operators with difficult tasks, yet, the collaboration of humans and robots is viewed as risky to some extent. Furthermore, the level of the implementation of ergonomics at workplaces is crucial to provide a healthy work environment. Ultimately, repetitive tasks can have a great impact on workers, and thereby the whole work environment becomes affected. Therefore, convenient training sessions are highly important to ensure safety in such cases.

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    fulltext
  • 44.
    Asadi, Narges
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Flexibility in assembly systems using product design2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing customer demands for product variety, new and rapid technological developments, and the short life cycle of products characterise the current volatile market. To maintain a competitive edge in the market, manufacturing companies need to accommodate flexibility in their assembly systems that are essential parts of the manufacturing systems with respect to cost, time, and creating product variety. Given the importance of establishing flexible assembly systems, the complexity raised by increasing product variety and the value of appropriate product designs to assembly systems highlight the pivotal role of product design in a flexible assembly system. Despite its significance to theory and practice, however, the characteristics of flexibility in an assembly system and its links to product design are still ambiguous and unexplored.

    The objective of this thesis is to expand the current knowledge of flexibility in assembly systems and using product design to support its achievement. To accomplish the objective and by adopting an interactive research approach, five case studies were conducted in the heavy machinery manufacturing industry. A literature review underpins all the case studies comprising one multiple and four single case studies.

    Through its findings, this research defines flexibility in an assembly system, identifies its dimensions, and pinpoints its enablers. Additionally, three requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design are identified: a common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts. These requirements, if fulfilled in product design across distinct product families, reduce the perceived complexity and support various flexibility dimensions in the assembly system. Moreover, the development of a common assembly sequence and similar assembly interfaces, as the two key requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design, is described.

    Further, based upon developing understanding and knowledge about a flexible assembly system and its requirements for product design, a model and a framework are proposed. The model addresses the role of product design in achieving flexibility in an assembly system. To support the alignment of product design with the key requirements of a flexible assembly system during the product design process, the assembly-oriented framework details the development of these requirements. Through its outcomes, this thesis contributes to the research area of flexible assembly systems and sheds light on its interface with the engineering design field. Moreover, the proposed model and framework aim to assist assembly practitioners and product designers in establishing a flexible assembly system and aligning product design with its key requirements.

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  • 45.
    Asadi, Narges
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Supporting flexibility in an assembly system through product design2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing customer demands for product variety in conjunction with the short lifecycle of products has caused manufacturing companies to introduce a wide range of products by accommodating flexibility. An assembly system is an essential part of the manufacturing system from both cost and time perspectives. Hence, the shift towards flexibility in manufacturing companies highlights the significance of establishing flexible assembly systems and designing products that are closely aligned with them. Despite its significance, however, the flexible assembly system concept and its requirements for product design have not been clearly defined in research and from a practical point of view. Most research on flexible assembly systems has mainly approached either the design or the balancing and scheduling issues of these systems, whereas only a few studies have briefly defined the flexible assembly system they focused on, without further specifying the characteristics of a flexible assembly system and its requirements for product design.

    Taking that into account, the objective of this work is to provide a framework to contribute to the understanding of the concept of flexibility in an assembly system and its requirements for product design. In order to fulfil the objective, four empirical studies combined with literature reviews have been conducted. The empirical studies, a multiple case study and three single case studies, investigate the definition of flexibility in an assembly system as well as the requirements that a flexible assembly system imposes on product design.

    Through its findings, this research provides a definition of flexibility in assembly systems that mainly revolves around volume, mix and new product flexibility. In addition, six constituents of a flexible assembly system have been identified: adaptable material supply, versatile workforce, increased commonality, standardised work content, integrated product properties and strategic planning. Furthermore, three requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design are defined, which, if fulfilled, reduce the complexity created by product variety and consequently support flexibility in the assembly system. Accordingly, to increase the understanding of the concept of flexibility in an assembly system and its requirements for product design, a four-staged framework is suggested. The proposed framework deals with the activities related to the concept and the development of a flexible assembly system and is expected to be received by assembly practitioners as a link between assembly and product design teams in the product realisation process. Future research can further validate the framework in practice.

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    fulltext
  • 46.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry2015In: Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, ISSN 0972-2696, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major challenge of today’s manufacturing industry in tackling demands for a wider range of products with short life-cycle times and meeting customisation requirements has drawn considerable attention towards flexibility in manufacturing systems. As a prominent part of a manufacturing system, an assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, owing to the dearth of a unified and clear definition of the constituents of flexible assembly systems, in both theory and practice, the recognition of flexibility in assembly systems still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound base for discussing the constituents of flexible assembly systems, this research paper explores the literature concerning flexibility in manufacturing and assembly as well as in flexible systems management domains. To reflect an industrial perspective, a multiple case study of five manufacturing plants in the heavy vehicle industry is performed. By identifying six essential constituents of flexibility in assembly systems, the study proposes a clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems which mainly revolves around mix and volume flexibility. To further enhance the findings, the compatibility of a few previously identified types of manufacturing flexibility in the assembly systems of the case plants is investigated and additional dimensions of flexibility in assembly systems are revealed. Finally, the implications for theory and practice as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

  • 47.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Guaragni, F.
    Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany.
    Johannknecht, F.
    Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.
    Saidani, M.
    CentraleSupélec, Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Scholle, P.
    Paderborn University, Germany.
    Borg, J.
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Panasiuk, D.
    University of Technology of Troyes, France.
    Success factors of an ipd based approach in a remote multidisciplinary team environment - Reflections on a case study2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-9, p. 31-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated Product Development (IPD) is comprehensively discussed in literature. The human-centered approach offers a parallelized set of work activities in interdisciplinary teams. Due to the rapid globalization of IPD activities in the companies, project members are often obliged to work remotely in teams and through virtual means of communication. However, with the recent shift towards working remotely in IPD teams new challenges have emerged that might adversely affect the success of IPD projects. The objective of the paper is to outline the key factors strengthening and weakening the IPD process in a remote multidisciplinary team environment. To fulfill the objective, a case study on an international multidisciplinary team of postgraduate students working on a design project with an IPD approach, was conducted. The results highlight key success factors and their contributions to the project success in a remote multidisciplinary team environment. Additionally, key weaknesses of such approach and their negative impacts are also indicated.

  • 48.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Augustsson, P.
    FlexQube, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    An assembly-oriented product design methodology to develop similar assembly operations in a mixed-product assembly line2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-5, p. 131-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing demands for product variety, Mixed-Product Assembly Lines (MPALs) as an effective means of creating product variety are recently increasing in manufacturing companies. However, handling different products from distinct product families creates high complexity in performing assembly operations in an MPAL. The elevated complexity, calls for increased similarity between assembly operations in an MPAL which requires product design changes accordingly. Hence, the objective of this paper is to suggest an assembly-oriented product design methodology to increase similar assembly operations for various products cross-product families. The proposed methodology uses Interface Diagram, a product architecture modelling tool, for comparing assembly operations crossproduct families, suggesting an assembly-oriented design, and communicating it to designers. The methodology has been developed by conducting a case study in heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. The results highlight a visual approach towards establishing a common language between assembly and design teams to consider the requirements of an MAPL in product design.

  • 49.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system- A case study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

  • 50.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, Vol. 4, p. 41-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s fast-changing global market, using mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) and mixed-model assembly lines (MMALs) allows manufacturing companies to be flexible and to maintain their competitive edge through product variety. Balancing and sequencing issues have been recognized as the main challenges of MPALs and MMALs, but other practical needs of MPALs remain unclear. Recognizing the practical needs of MPALs helps in identifying related requirements for product design, leading to products that closely align with the MPAL concept. The objective of this paper is to offer an industrial perspective on the needs of MPALs and to identify its requirements vis-à-vis product design. To achieve this objective, a single real-time case study in a heavy-vehicle-manufacturing company has been performed. The results from this industrial case study suggest that in order to handle product variety in MPALs and to reduce the related complexity, certain dimensions of flexibility need to be created in the assembly system, and requirements related to product design should be considered simultaneously in order to support assembly processes.

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