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  • 1.
    Derehag, Jesper
    et al.
    Ericsson AB, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Weyuker, Elaine
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ostrand, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Daniel, Sundmark
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Transitioning Fault Prediction Models to a New Environment2016In: Proceedings - 2016 12th European Dependable Computing Conference, EDCC 2016, 2016, p. 241-248, article id 7780365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the application and evaluation of fault prediction algorithms to a project developed by a Swedish company that transitioned from waterfall to agile development methods. The project used two different version control systems and a separate bug tracking system during its lifetime. The algorithms were originally designed for use on systems implemented with a traditional waterfall process at American companies that maintained their project records in an integrated database system that combined bug recording and version control. We compare the performance of the original prediction model on the American systems to the results obtained in the Swedish environment in both its pre-agile and agile stages. We also consider the impact of additional variables in the model.

  • 2.
    Strandberg, Per Erik
    et al.
    Westermo RandD AB, Sweden.
    Ostrand, Thomas J.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    WEYUKER, ELAINE
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Daniel, Sundmark
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Automated test mapping and coverage for network topologies2018In: ISSTA 2018 - Proceedings of the 27th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2018, p. 73-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication devices such as routers and switches play a critical role in the reliable functioning of embedded system networks. Dozens of such devices may be part of an embedded system network, and they need to be tested in conjunction with various computational elements on actual hardware, in many different configurations that are representative of actual operating networks. An individual physical network topology can be used as the basis for a test system that can execute many test cases, by identifying the part of the physical network topology that corresponds to the configuration required by each individual test case. Given a set of available test systems and a large number of test cases, the problem is to determine for each test case, which of the test systems are suitable for executing the test case, and to provide the mapping that associates the test case elements (the logical network topology) with the appropriate elements of the test system (the physical network topology). We studied a real industrial environment where this problem was originally handled by a simple software procedure that was very slow in many cases, and also failed to provide thorough coverage of each network's elements. In this paper, we represent both the test systems and the test cases as graphs, and develop a new prototype algorithm that a) determines whether or not a test case can be mapped to a subgraph of the test system, b) rapidly finds mappings that do exist, and c) exercises diverse sets of network nodes when multiple mappings exist for the test case. The prototype has been implemented and applied to over 10,000 combinations of test cases and test systems, and reduced the computation time by a factor of more than 80 from the original procedure. In addition, relative to a meaningful measure of network topology coverage, the mappings achieved an increased level of thoroughness in exercising the elements of each test system.

  • 3.
    Strandberg, Per Erik
    et al.
    Westermo Research and Development AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sundmark, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ostrand, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Weyuker, Elaine
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Experience Report: Automated System Level Regression Test Prioritization Using Multiple Factors2016In: 27th International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering ISSRE'16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new method of determining an effective ordering of regression test cases, and describe its implementation as an automated tool called SuiteBuilder developed by Westermo Research and Development AB. The tool generates an efficient order to run the cases in an existing test suite by using expected or observed test duration and combining priorities of multiple factors associated with test cases, including previous fault detection success, interval since last executed, and modifications to the code tested. The method and tool were developed to address problems in the traditional process of regression testing, such as lack of time to run a complete regression suite, failure to detect bugs in time, and tests that are repeatedly omitted. The tool has been integrated into the existing nightly test framework for Westermo software that runs on large-scale data communication systems.  In experimental evaluation of the tool, we found significant improvement in regression testing results. The re-ordered test suites finish within the available time, the majority of fault-detecting test cases are located in the first third of the suite, no important test case is omitted, and the necessity for manual work on the suites is greatly reduced.

  • 4.
    WEYUKER, ELAINE
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, United States.
    Ostrand, Thomas J.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Experiences with academic-industrial collaboration on empirical studies of software systems2017In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 28th International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering Workshops, ISSREW 2017, p. 164-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have held both academic and industrial research positions, and have designed and carried out many empirical studies of large software systems that were built and maintained in industrial environments. Their experiences show that the most crucial component of a successful study is the participation of at least one industrial collaborator who is committed to the study’s goals and is able to provide advice and assistance throughout the course of the study. This paper describes studies carried out in three different industrial environments, discusses obstacles that arise, and how the authors have been able to overcome some of those obstacles. 

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