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  • 1.
    Eva, Götell
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Brown, Steven
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    The influence of caregiver singing and background music on vocally expressed emotions and moods in dementia care: a qualitative analysis2009In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 422-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background: Music and singing are considered to have a strong impact on human emotions. Such an effect has been demonstrated in caregiving contexts with dementia patients. Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate vocally expressed emotions and moods in the communication between caregivers and persons with severe dementia during morning care sessions. Design: Three types of caring sessions were compared: the "usual" way, with no music; with background music playing; and with the caregiver singing to and/or with the patient. Participants and setting: Nine persons with severe dementia living in a nursing home in Sweden and five professional caregivers participated in this study. Methods: Qualitative content analysis was used to examine videotaped recordings of morning care sessions, with a focus on vocally expressed emotions and moods during verbal communication. Results: Compared to no music, the presence of background music and caregiver singing improved the mutuality of the communication between caregiver and patient, creating a joint sense of vitality. Positive emotions were enhanced, and aggressiveness was diminished. Whereas background music increased the sense of playfulness, caregiver singing enhanced the sense of sincerity and intimacy in the interaction. Conclusion: Caregiver singing and background music can help the caregiver improve the patient's ability to express positive emotions and moods, and to elicit a sense of vitality on the part of the person with severe dementia. The results further support the value of caregiver singing as a method to improve the quality of dementia care.

  • 2.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Caring for elderly patients: a longitudinal study of Swedish nursing students' narratives1998In: Health Care in Later Life, ISSN 1358-7390, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 258-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to interpret and elucidate how Swedish nursing students developed their perceptions of caring for older people during their three years in nursing education. Interviews were carried out at the end of each academic year with a total of 27 students from three colleges of nursing in Sweden. The same interview guide was used for all three years of this longitudinal study; the students also wrote diaries about their clinical experiences. The narratives were analysed using a phenomenologicalhermeneutic method. Four themes emerged that were vital to the students' narrated perceptions of caring; three themes concerned impediments to caring. The findings show a development in the students' perceptions of caring as they proceeded through their nursing education. They moved from a naive, caring perspective, via a second-year stage of deeper relationships with patients, and finally, into a third-year organizational perspective, where they used their gained knowledge and experiences in taking responsibility for providing optimum care. This change could potentially damage students' perceptions of their future work, and could influence their career possibilities and decisions when choosing an area of health care in which to work as a registered nurse after graduation. The findings underline the importance of a forum where students can discuss their often difficult experiences with elderly patients, and also the necessity of receiving support and guidance for their actions.

  • 3.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    KAROLINSKA INST, STOCKHOLM,SWEDEN.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    KAROLINSKA INST, STOCKHOLM,SWEDEN.
    First-Year Swedish nursing students' experiences with elderly patients1977In: Western Journal of Nursing Research, ISSN 0193-9459, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 177-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students' attitudes toward elderly people have frequently been found to be negative. This study's aim was to describe the experiences of first-year nursing students with elderly people. Thirty students from 3 Swedish nursing colleges, interviewed during the last weeks of their first year were asked to describe a memorable event that had occurred when they were caring for an elderly patient. The narratives were analyzed phenomenologically. Three perspectives emerged: the students' perceptions of the patients the staff's roles, and their own roles. From these, two phenomena were identified: patients' helplessness and students' identification/nonidentification of the individual patient. Students described difficult situations for elderly patients patients with difficult diseases, anxiety pride; and conflicting views of how to treat patients.

  • 4.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Swedish nursing students' transition into nursing during education1998In: Western Journal of Nursing Research, ISSN 0193-9459, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 602-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from student to nurse involves the influence of several different educational aspects. The aim of this study is to elucidate the transition to the role of a nurse, which Swedish nursing students underwent during their 3 years in nursing education, as described from the perspective of their experiences with elderly patients. Interviews were conducted with the students at the end of each academic year, and the students wrote diaries about their clinical education in the second and third years. The narratives were analyzed with a phenomenological-hermeneutic method, and sir themes appeared vital for the transition into nursing. The study implies a continuous process during education, involving many aspects of the transition from a student with a genuine and natural interest to care for others to a registered nurse ready to take up her first position. Cooperation with other team members had a strong influence on the students.

  • 5.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Kjerstin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Two studies of the new nursing education in Sweden: 1. The place of gerontology and geriatrics. 2. Student characteristics and expectations1997In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the autumn of 1993, a new system of nursing education started in Sweden, A questionnaire was sent to the presidents of all the colleges of nursing, health and the caring sciences, and questions were asked about the part played by gerontology and geriatrics in the new curricula, The responses showed a considerable variety in the amounts of theoretical and clinical education given at the colleges. During the first or second week of their education, the students admitted to three colleges in the Malaren area answered a questionnaire containing questions about their educational backgrounds, their working experiences in the health care system, why they chose nursing education, their ideas of the tasks that a registered nurse primarily carries out, and their preferences for work after graduation, The result shows a correlation between working experience and the reasons for studies, The students stated a preference for working in emergency care rather than in geriatric care after graduation from college.

  • 6.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heyman, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nursing students' reasoning about two fictitious elderly patient cases1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 247-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine and describe how nursing students developed their reasoning and knowledge about the state of health of, and their possible actions regarding, two fictitious elderly patient case histories during their three-year education. The descriptions were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. The findings show a development in the students' reasoning concerning the more acutecase, but no development in reasoning regarding the case of a confused person. This could be due either to a lack of education in gerontology and geriatrics, or to the students receiving limited guidance during their education on how to reason about and reflect upon different ways of approaching emerging problems. The findings could also be understood in the light of traditions and history in nursing education.

  • 7.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Influencing aspects in nursing education on Swedish nursing students' choice of first work area as graduated nurses2000In: Journal of Nursing Education, ISSN 0022-3158, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is difficult to recruit RNs to positions in various areas of elder care. The aim of this study is to understand the meaning of Swedish nursing students' reasoning during education about where in the health care system they would like to work as RNs after graduation. The students were interviewed using the same guide at the end of each of their three academic years. In the second and the third year the students kept diaries about their clinical education. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method of analysis was used, and eight themes appeared vital for the students' choice ofwork area after graduation. The deeper interpretations of the results imply that the students received contradictory messages during the educationi n elder care. Students found that nurses working in this field were often isolated with no apparent support system, which in turn reinforced their own ambivalence and reluctance towards future work in elder care.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Inger
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, NVS, Enheten för omvårdnad.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institutet, NVS; Enheten för omvårdnad.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    A difficult mission to work as a nurse in a residential care home - some registered nurses´experiences of their work situation2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe Registered Nurses' (RNs) experiences of their work environment in residential care homes for older persons. Twelve RNs were interviewed and latent content analysis was used for analysing the data. The data were collected in the spring of 2006. The findings revealed that these RNs experienced a paradoxical work environment: feeling appreciated and valuable, whilst at the same time feeling underestimated and frustrated. They felt appreciated and valuable when they provided nursing care and trust and support to others. The RNs experienced a positive work environment when the border between social and nursing care were clear. They also felt frustrated when they were expected to 'be everywhere and to know everything', but at the same time they felt invisible and underestimated. They experienced themselves as 'lonely fixers', having the ability to solve practical problems when the older persons were discharged from hospital and expected to be able to provide specialist nursing care without having specialised competence and specialist staff team members. In conclusion, it is important that the RNs can identify the border for nursing care. When these are clear, the nursing care objectives are apparent and the RNs become more autonomous, visible and listened to. The manager should listen to and support the RNs, with continuous supervision and competence development being mandatory elements. It is a difficult task for RNs working in residential care homes to meet all of the expectations placed on them, resulting in a risk of moral distress, making mistakes and developing illnesses caused by stress.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Inger
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    To both be like a captain and fellow worker of the caring team: the meaning of Nurse Assistants´expectations of Registered Nurses in Swedish residential care homes2008In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe the expectations of and to illuminate the meaning of the Nurse Assistants' (NA) expectations of Registered Nurses (RN) who are responsible for the care of older people living in residential care homes in Sweden. Background. Older people in Sweden who are provided with residential care are extremely frail and incapable of independent living. Therefore, when providing care, RN and NA encounter older people who require a great deal of care. An important precondition for the provision of satisfactory care is to have adequate collaboration between NAs and RNs and their expectations of each other. In this paper, the focus is on the NAs expectations of the RNs. Method. The study is based on a qualitative approach and a phenomenological-hermeneutical method. Ten NAs were interviewed and asked to narrate as freely as possible, about their expectations of RNs. The narratives were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The analytical process includes the following steps; naive reading, structural analysis, comprehensive understanding and reflection. Results. The RNs were expected to take responsibility for being fellow human beings and experts in providing care as well as always available to participate in caring. The RNs were expected to make stand-alone decisions and create a sense of safety for both older people and the NAs and have the courage to work alone and create a safe environment for both the older people and the NAs. The meaning of these expectations was that the RNs are like a captain in providing care, but at the same time, fellow workers. Conclusion. When the RNs do not meet the NAs expectations, there is a risk of conflict and therefore also a risk that an unsafe environment being created when caring for older people.

1 - 9 of 9
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