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  • 1.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Intelligent Driver Mental State Monitoring System Using Physiological Sensor Signals2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving a vehicle involves a series of events, which are related to and evolve with the mental state (such as sleepiness, mental load, and stress) of the driv- er. These states are also identified as causal factors of critical situations that can lead to road accidents and vehicle crashes. These driver impairments need to be detected and predicted in order to reduce critical situations and road accidents. In the past years, physiological signals have become conven- tional measures in driver impairment research. Physiological signals have been applied in various studies to identify different levels of mental load, sleepiness, and stress during driving.

    This licentiate thesis work has investigated several artificial intelligence algorithms for developing an intelligent system to monitor driver mental state using physiological signals. The research aims to measure sleepiness and mental load using Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG signals, if pro- cessed correctly and efficiently, have potential to facilitate advanced moni- toring of sleepiness, mental load, fatigue, stress etc. However, EEG signals can be contaminated with unwanted signals, i.e., artifacts. These artifacts can lead to serious misinterpretation. Therefore, this work investigates EEG arti- fact handling methods and propose an automated approach for EEG artifact handling. Furthermore, this research has also investigated how several other physiological parameters (Heart Rate (HR) and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) from the Electrocardiogram (ECG), Respiration Rate, Finger Tem- perature (FT), and Skin Conductance (SC)) to quantify drivers’ stress. Dif- ferent signal processing methods have been investigated to extract features from these physiological signals. These features have been extracted in the time domain, in the frequency domain as well as in the joint time-frequency domain using wavelet analysis. Furthermore, data level signal fusion has been proposed using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE) analysis by combining five physiological sensor signals. Primarily Case-Based Reason- ing (CBR) has been applied for drivers’ mental state classification, but other Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques such as Fuzzy Logic, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) have been investigat- ed as well.

    For drivers’ stress classification, using the CBR and MMSE approach, the system has achieved 83.33% classification accuracy compared to a human expert. Moreover, three classification algorithms i.e., CBR, an ANN, and a SVM were compared to classify drivers’ stress. The results show that CBR has achieved 80% and 86% accuracy to classify stress using finger tempera- ture and heart rate variability respectively, while ANN and SVM reached an accuracy of less than 80%. 

  • 2.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Multivariate Data Analytics to Identify Driver’s Sleepiness, Cognitive load, and Stress2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving a vehicle in a dynamic traffic environment requires continuous adaptation of a complex manifold of physiological and cognitive activities. Impaired driving due to, for example, sleepiness, inattention, cognitive load or stress, affects one’s ability to adapt, predict and react to upcoming traffic events. In fact, human error has been found to be a contributing factor in more than 90% of traffic crashes. Unfortunately, there is no robust, objective ground truth for determining a driver’s state, and researchers often revert to using subjective self-rating scales when assessing level of sleepiness, cognitive load or stress. Thus, the development of better tools to understand, measure and monitor human behaviour across diverse scenarios and states is crucial. The main objective of this thesis is to develop objective measures of sleepiness, cognitive load and stress, which can later be used as research tools, either to benchmark unobtrusive sensor solutions or when investigating the influence of other factors on sleepiness, cognitive load, and stress.

    This thesis employs multivariate data analysis using machine learning to detect and classify different driver states based on physiological data. The reason for using rather intrusive sensor data, such as electroencephalography (EEG), electrooculography (EOG), electrocardiography (ECG), skin conductance, finger temperature, and respiration is that these methods can be used to analyse how the brain and body respond to internal and external changes, including those that do not generate overt behaviour. Moreover, the use of physiological data is expected to grow in importance when investigating human behaviour in partially automated vehicles, where active driving is replaced by passive supervision.

    Physiological data, especially the EEG is sensitive to motion artifacts and noise, and when recorded in naturalistic environments such as driving, artifacts are unavoidable. An automatic EEG artifact handling method ARTE (Automated aRTifacts handling in EEG) was therefore developed. When used as a pre-processing step in the classification of driver sleepiness, ARTE increased classification performance by 5%. ARTE is data-driven and does not rely on additional reference signals or manually defined thresholds, making it well suited for use in dynamic settings where unforeseen and rare artifacts are commonly encountered. In addition, several machine-learning algorithms have been developed for sleepiness, cognitive load, and stress classification. Regarding sleepiness classification, the best achieved accuracy was achieved using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For multiclass, the obtained accuracy was 79% and for binary class it was 93%. A subject-dependent classification exhibited a 10% improvement in performance compared to the subject-independent classification, suggesting that much can be gained by using personalized classifiers. Moreover, by embedding contextual information, classification performance improves by approximately 5%. In regard to cognitive load classification, a 72% accuracy rate was achieved using a random forest classifier. Combining features from several data sources may improve performance, and indeed, we observed classification performance improvement by 10%-20% compared to using features from a single data source. To classify drivers’ stress, using the Case-based reasoning (CBR) and data fusion approach, the system achieved an 83.33% classification accuracy rate.

    This thesis work encourages the use of multivariate data for detecting and classifying driver states, including sleepiness, cognitive load, and stress. A univariate data source often presents challenges, since features from a single source or one just aspect of the feature are not entirely reliable; Therefore, multivariate information requires accurate driver state detection. Often, driver states are a subjective experience, in which other contextual data plays a vital role. Thus, the implication of incorporating contextual information in the classification scheme is presented in this thesis work. Although there are several commonalities, physiological signals are modulated differently in different driver states; Hence, multivariate data could help detect multiple driver states simultaneously – for example, cognitive load detection when a person is under the influence of different levels of stress.

  • 3.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahlström, Christer
    The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, SE, Sweden.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Automatic driver sleepiness detection using EEG, EOG and contextual information2019In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 115, p. 121-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The many vehicle crashes that are caused by driver sleepiness each year advocates the development of automated driver sleepiness detection (ADSD) systems. This study proposes an automatic sleepiness classification scheme designed using data from 30 drivers who repeatedly drove in a high-fidelity driving simulator, both in alert and in sleep deprived conditions. Driver sleepiness classification was performed using four separate classifiers: k-nearest neighbours, support vector machines, case-based reasoning, and random forest, where physiological signals and contextual information were used as sleepiness indicators. The subjective Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) was used as target value. An extensive evaluation on multiclass and binary classifications was carried out using 10-fold cross-validation and leave-one-out validation. With 10-fold cross-validation, the support vector machine showed better performance than the other classifiers (79% accuracy for multiclass and 93% accuracy for binary classification). The effect of individual differences was also investigated, showing a 10% increase in accuracy when data from the individual being evaluated was included in the training dataset. Overall, the support vector machine was found to be the most stable classifier. The effect of adding contextual information to the physiological features improved the classification accuracy by 4% in multiclass classification and by and 5% in binary classification.

  • 4.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahlström, Christer
    MFT, Linköping Sweden.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Automated EEG Artifact Handling with Application in Driver Monitoring2017In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1350-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated analyses of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals acquired in naturalistic environments is becoming increasingly important in areas such as brain computer interfaces and behaviour science. However, the recorded EEG in such environments is often heavily contaminated by motion artifacts and eye movements. This poses new requirements on artifact handling. The objective of this paper is to present an automated EEG artifacts handling algorithm which will be used as a pre-processing step in a driver monitoring application. The algorithm, named ARTE (Automated aRTifacts handling in EEG), is based on wavelets, independent component analysis and hierarchical clustering. The algorithm is tested on a dataset obtained from a driver sleepiness study including 30 drivers and 540 30-minute 30-channel EEG recordings. The algorithm is evaluated by a clinical neurophysiologist, by quantitative criteria (signal quality index, mean square error, relative error and mean absolute error), and by demonstrating its usefulness as a preprocessing step in driver monitoring, here exemplified with driver sleepiness classification. All results are compared with a state of the art algorithm called FORCe. The quantitative and expert evaluation results show that the two algorithms are comparable and that both algorithms significantly reduce the impact of artifacts in recorded EEG signals. When artifact handling is used as a pre-processing step in driver sleepiness classification, the classification accuracy increased by 5% when using ARTE and by 2% when using FORCe. The advantage with ARTE is that it is data driven and does not rely on additional reference signals or manually defined thresholds, making it well suited for use in dynamic settings where unforeseen and rare artifacts are commonly encountered.

  • 5.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Classifying drivers' cognitive load using EEG signals2017In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 237, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing traffic safety issue is the effect of cognitive loading activities on traffic safety and driving performance. To monitor drivers' mental state, understanding cognitive load is important since while driving, performing cognitively loading secondary tasks, for example talking on the phone, can affect the performance in the primary task, i.e. driving. Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the reliable measures of cognitive load that can detect the changes in instantaneous load and effect of cognitively loading secondary task. In this driving simulator study, 1-back task is carried out while the driver performs three different simulated driving scenarios. This paper presents an EEG based approach to classify a drivers' level of cognitive load using Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). The results show that for each individual scenario as well as using data combined from the different scenarios, CBR based system achieved approximately over 70% of classification accuracy. 

  • 6.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Distributed Multivariate Physiological Signal Analytics for Driver´s Mental State Monitoring2018In: Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social-Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, LNICST, Volume 225, 2018, p. 26-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a distributed data analytics approach for drivers’ mental state monitoring using multivariate physiological signals. Driver’s mental states such as cognitive distraction, sleepiness, stress, etc. can be fatal contributing factors and to prevent car crashes these factors need to be understood. Here, a cloud-based approach with heterogeneous sensor sources that generates extremely large data sets of physiological signals need to be handled and analyzed in a big data scenario. In the proposed physiological big data analytics approach, for driver state monitoring, heterogeneous data coming from multiple sources i.e., multivariate physiological signals are used, processed and analyzed to aware impaired vehicle drivers. Here, in a distributed big data environment, multi-agent case-based reasoning facilitates parallel case similarity matching and handles data that are coming from single and multiple physiological signal sources.

  • 7.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Drivers' Sleepiness Classification using Machine Learning with Physiological and Contextual dataIn: First International Conference on Advances in Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence ASPAI' 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysing physiological parameters together with contextual information of car drivers to identify drivers’ sleepiness is a challenging issue. Machine learning algorithms show high potential in data analysis and classification tasks in many domains. This paper presents a use case of machine learning approach for drivers’ sleepiness classification. The classifications are conducted based on drivers’ physiological parameters and contextual information. The sleepiness classification shows receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for KNN, SVM and RF were 0.98 on 10-fold cross-validation and 0.93 for leave-one-out (LOO) for all classifiers.

  • 8.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Review on Machine Learning Algorithms in Handling EEG Artifacts2014In: The Swedish AI Society (SAIS) Workshop SAIS, 14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain waves obtained by Electroencephalograms (EEG) recording are an important research area in medical and health and brain computer interface (BCI). Due to the nature of EEG signal, noises and artifacts can contaminate it, which leads to a serious misinterpretation in EEG signal analysis. These contaminations are referred to as artifacts, which are signals of other than brain activity. Moreover, artifacts can cause significant miscalculation of the EEG measurements that reduces the clinical usefulness of EEG signals. Therefore, artifact handling is one of the cornerstones in EEG signal analysis. This paper provides a review of machine learning algorithms that have been applied in EEG artifacts handling such as artifacts identification and removal. In addition, an analysis of these methods has been reported based on their performance.

  • 9.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Clustering based Approach for Automated EEG Artifacts Handling2015In: Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, vol. 278, 2015, p. 7-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroencephalogram (EEG), measures the neural activity of the central nervous system, which is widely used in diagnosing brain activity and therefore plays a vital role in clinical and Brain-Computer Interface application. However, analysis of EEG signal is often complex since the signal recoding often contaminates with noises or artifacts such as ocular and muscle artifacts, which could mislead the diagnosis result. Therefore, to identify the artifacts from the EEG signal and handle it in a proper way is becoming an important and interesting research area. This paper presents an automated EEG artifacts handling approach, where it combines Independent Component Analysis (ICA) with a 2nd order clustering approach. Here, the 2nd order clustering approach combines the Hierarchical and Gaussian Picture Model clustering algorithm. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been examined and observed on real EEG recording. According to result, the artifacts in the EEG signals are identified and removed successfully where the clean EEG signal shows acceptable considering visual inspection.

  • 10.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Driver’s State Monitoring: A Case Study on Big Data Analytics2016In: The 3rd EAI International Conference on IoT Technologies for HealthCare HealthyIoT'16, 2016, Vol. 187, p. 145-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driver's distraction, inattention, sleepiness, stress, etc. are identified as causal factors of vehicle crashes and accidents. Today, we know that physiological signals are convenient and reliable measures of driver’s impairments. Heterogeneous sensors are generating vast amount of signals, which need to be handled and analyzed in a big data scenario. Here, we propose a big data analytics approach for driver state monitoring using heterogeneous data that are coming from multiple sources, i.e., physiological signals along with vehicular data and contextual information. These data are processed and analyzed to aware impaired vehicle drivers.

  • 11.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Intelligent automated eeg artifacts handling using wavelet transform, independent component analysis and hierarchal clustering2017In: Lect. Notes Inst. Comput. Sci. Soc. Informatics Telecommun. Eng., Springer Verlag , 2017, p. 144-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Billions of interconnected neurons are the building block of the human brain. For each brain activity these neurons produce electrical signals or brain waves that can be obtained by the Electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. Due to the characteristics of EEG signals, recorded signals often contaminate with undesired physiological signals other than the cerebral signal that is referred to as the EEG artifacts such as the ocular or the muscle artifacts. Therefore, identification and handling of artifacts in the EEG signals in a proper way is becoming an important research area. This paper presents an automated EEG artifacts handling approach, combining Wavelet transform, Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Hierarchical clustering. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been examined and observed on real EEG recording. According to the result, the proposed approach identified artifacts in the EEG signals effectively and after handling artifacts EEG signals showed acceptable considering visual inspection. © ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2017.

  • 12.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Intelligent Automated EEG Artifacts Handling Using Wavelet Transform, Independent Component Analysis and Hierarchical clustering2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Billions of interconnected neurons are the building block of human brain. For each brain activity these neurons produce electrical signals or brain waves that can be obtained by the Electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. Due to the characteristics of EEG signal, recorded signal often contaminate with undesired physiological signals other than cerebral signal that refers to as EEG artifacts such as ocular or muscle artifacts. Therefore, identification of artifacts from the EEG signal and handle it in a proper way is becoming an important research area. This paper presents an automated EEG artifacts handling approach, where it combines Wavelet transform, Independent Component Analysis (ICA) with Hierarchical clustering method. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been examined and observed on real EEG recording. According to result, the artifacts in the EEG signals are identified and removed successfully where after handling artifacts EEG signals show acceptable considering visual inspection.

  • 13.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Scalable Framework for Distributed Case-based Reasoning for Big data analytics2018In: Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social-Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, LNICST, Volume 225, 2018, p. 111-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a scalable framework for distributed case-based reasoning methodology to provide actionable knowledge based on historical big amount of data. The framework addresses several challenges, i.e., promptly analyse big data, cross-domain, use-case specific data processing, multi-source case representation, dynamic case-management, uncertainty, check the plausibility of solution after adaptation etc. through its’ five modules architectures. The architecture allows the functionalities with distributed data analytics and intended to provide solutions under different conditions, i.e. data size, velocity, variety etc.

  • 14.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms to Diagnose Stress for Vehicle Drivers Based on Physiological Sensor Signals2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, Volume 211: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Wearable Micro and Nano Technologies for Personalized Health, 2–4 June 2015, Västerås, Sweden, 2015, Vol. 211, p. 241-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine learning algorithms play an important role in computer science research. Recent advancement in sensor data collection in clinical sciences lead to a complex, heterogeneous data processing and analysis for patient diagnosis and prognosis. Diagnosis and treatment of patients based on manual analysis of these sensor data is difficult and time consuming. Therefore, development of Knowledge-based systems to support clinicians in decision-making is important. However, it is necessary to perform experimental work to compare performances of different machine learning methods to help to select appropriate method for a specific characteristic of data sets. This paper compares classification performance of three popular machine learning methods i.e., case-based reasoning, neutral networks and support vector machine to diagnose stress of vehicle drivers using finger temperature and heart rate variability. The experimental results show that case-based reasoning outperforms other two methods in terms of classification accuracy. Case-based reasoning has achieved 80% and 86% accuracy to classify stress using finger temperature and heart rate variability. On contrary, both neural network and support vector machine have achieved less than 80% accuracy by using both physiological signals.

  • 15.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards Distributed k-NN similarity for Scalable Case Retrieval2018In: ICCBR 2018: The 26th International Conference on Case-Based Reasoning July, 09th-12th 2018 in Stockholm, Sweden, Workshop Proceedings, 2018, p. 151-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Big data era, the demand of processing large amount of data posing several challenges. One biggest challenge is that it is no longer possible to process the data in a single machine. Similar challenges can be assumed for case-based reasoning (CBR) approach, where the size of a case library is increasing and constructed using heterogenous data sources. To deal with the challenges of big data in CBR, a distributed CBR system can be developed, where case libraries or cases are distributed over clusters. MapReduce programming framework has the facilities of parallel processing massive amount of data through a distributed system. This paper proposes a scalable case-representation and retrieval approach using distributed k-NN similarity. The proposed approach is considered to be developed using MapReduce programming framework, where cases are distributed in many clusters.

  • 16.
    Barua, Shaibal
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahlström, Christer
    The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Sweden.
    AUTOMATED EEG ARTIFACTS HANDLING FOR DRIVER SLEEPINESS MONITORING2016In: 2nd International Symposium on Somnolence, Vigilance, and Safety SomnoSafe2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis and Case-Based Reasoning to Classify Physiological Sensor Signals2012In: Proceedings of the ICCBR 2012 Workshops / [ed] Luc Lamontagne and Juan A. Recio-García, 2012, p. 129-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor signal fusion is becoming increasingly important in many areas including medical diagnosis and classification. Clinicians/experts often do the diagnosis of stress, sleepiness, tiredness etc. based on several physiological sensor signals to achieve better accuracy in classification. This paper presents a case-based reasoning (CBR) system that offers an opportunity to classify healthy and stressed persons based on sensor signal fusion. Several sensor measurements for instance, i.e., heart rate, inter-beat-interval, finger temperature, skin conductance and respiration rate have been combined for the data level fusion using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy Analysis (MMSE) algorithm. This algorithm supports complexity analysis of multivariate biological recordings. Here, MMSE is used to formulate cases in the case-based classification system.

  • 18.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    EEG Sensor Based Classification for Assessing Psychological Stress2013In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, Volume 189, 2013, IOS Press, 2013, p. 83-88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) reflects the brain activity and is widely used in biomedical research. However, analysis of this signal is still a challenging issue. This paper presents a hybrid approach for assessing stress using the EEG signal. It applies Multivariate Multi-scale Entropy Analysis (MMSE) for the data level fusion. Case-based reasoning is used for the classification tasks. Our preliminary result indicates that EEG sensor based classification could be an efficient technique for evaluation of the psychological state of individuals. Thus, the system can be used for personal health monitoring in order to improve users health.

  • 19.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    In-Vehicle Stress Monitoring Based on EEG Signal2017In: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, ISSN 2248-9622, E-ISSN 2248-9622, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, improved road safety by monitoring human factors i.e., stress, mental load, sleepiness, fatigue etc. of vehicle drivers has been addressed in a number of studies. Due to the individual variations and complex dynamic in-vehicle environment systems that can monitor such factors of a driver while driving is challenging. This paper presents a drivers’ stress monitoring system based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals enabling individual-focused computational approach that can generate automatic decision. Here, a combination of different signal processing i.e., discrete wavelet transform, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and modified covariance have been applied to extract key features from the EEG signals. Hybrid classification approach Fuzzy-CBR (case-based reasoning) is used for decision support. The study has focused on both long and short-term temporal assessment of EEG signals enabling monitoring in different time intervals. In short time interval, which requires complex computations, the classification accuracy using the proposed approach is 79% compare to a human expert. Accuracy of EEG in developing such system is also compared with other reference signals e.g., Electrocardiography (ECG), Finger temperature, Skin conductance, and Respiration. The results show that in decision making the system can handle individual variations and provides decision in each minute time interval.

  • 20.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Physiological sensor signals classification for healthcare using sensor data fusion and case-based reasoning2014In: Sensors (Switzerland), ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 11770-11785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, clinicians often do diagnosis and classification of diseases based on information collected from several physiological sensor signals. However, sensor signal could easily be vulnerable to uncertain noises or interferences and due to large individual variations sensitivity to different physiological sensors could also vary. Therefore, multiple sensor signal fusion is valuable to provide more robust and reliable decision. This paper demonstrates a physiological sensor signal classification approach using sensor signal fusion and case-based reasoning. The proposed approach has been evaluated to classify Stressed or Relaxed individuals using sensor data fusion. Physiological sensor signals i.e., Heart Rate (HR), Finger Temperature (FT), Respiration Rate (RR), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) are collected during the data collection phase. Here, sensor fusion has been done in two different ways: (i) decision-level fusion using features extracted through traditional approaches; and (ii) data-level fusion using features extracted by means of Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE). Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is applied for the classification of the signals. The experimental result shows that the proposed system could classify Stressed or Relaxed individual 87.5% accurately compare to an expert in the domain. So, it shows promising result in the psychophysiological domain and could be possible to adapt this approach to other relevant healthcare systems. 

  • 21.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A Fusion Based System for Physiological Sensor Signal Classification2014In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2014 MTD10, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, usage of physiological sensor signals is essential in medical applications for diagnoses and classification of diseases. Clinicians often rely on information collected from several physiological sensor signals to diagnose a patient. However, sensor signals are mostly non-stationary and noisy, and single sensor signal could easily be contaminated by uncertain noises and interferences that could cause miscalculation of measurements and reduce clinical usefulness. Therefore, an apparent choice is to use multiple sensor signals that could provide more robust and reliable decision. Therefore, a physiological signal classification approach is presented based on sensor signal fusion and case-based reasoning. To classify Stressed and Relaxed individuals from physiological signals, data level and decision level fusion are performed and case-based reasoning is applied as classification algorithm. Five physiological sensor signals i.e., Heart Rate (HR), Finger Temperature (FT), Respiration Rate (RR), Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Oxygen Saturation (SpO2) are collected during the data collection phase. Here, data level fusion is performed using Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE) and extracted features are then used to build a case- library. Decision level fusion is performed on the features extracted using traditional time and frequency domain analysis. Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is applied for the classification of the signals. The experimental result shows that the proposed system could classify Stressed or Relaxed individual 87.5% accurately compare to an expert in the domain. So, it shows promising result in the psychophysiological domain and could be possible to adapt this approach to other relevant healthcare systems.

  • 22.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Filla, Reno
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Classification of physiological signals for wheel loader operators using Multi-scale Entropy analysis and case-based reasoning2014In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor signal fusion is becoming increasingly important in many areas including medical diagnosis and classification. Today, clinicians/experts often do the diagnosis of stress, sleepiness and tiredness on the basis of information collected from several physiological sensor signals. Since there are large individual variations when analyzing the sensor measurements and systems with single sensor, they could easily be vulnerable to uncertain noises/interferences in such domain; multiple sensors could provide more robust and reliable decision. Therefore, this paper presents a classification approach i.e. Multivariate Multiscale Entropy Analysis–Case-Based Reasoning (MMSE–CBR) that classifies physiological parameters of wheel loader operators by combining CBR approach with a data level fusion method named Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE). The MMSE algorithm supports complexity analysis of multivariate biological recordings by aggregating several sensor measurements e.g., Inter-beat-Interval (IBI) and Heart Rate (HR) from Electrocardiogram (ECG), Finger Temperature (FT), Skin Conductance (SC) and Respiration Rate (RR). Here, MMSE has been applied to extract features to formulate a case by fusing a number of physiological signals and the CBR approach is applied to classify the cases by retrieving most similar cases from the case library. Finally, the proposed approach i.e. MMSE–CBR has been evaluated with the data from professional drivers at Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden. The results demonstrate that the proposed system that fuses information at data level could classify ‘stressed’ and ‘healthy’ subjects 83.33% correctly compare to an expert’s classification. Furthermore, with another data set the achieved accuracy (83.3%) indicates that it could also classify two different conditions ‘adapt’ (training) and ‘sharp’ (real-life driving) for the wheel loader operators. Thus, the new approach of MMSE–CBR could support in classification of operators and may be of interest to researchers developing systems based on information collected from different sensor sources.

  • 23.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Westerlund, Hanna
    Camanio Care AB, Sweden.
    Hjortsberg, Cecilia
    Västerås stad, Sweden.
    Food4You: A Personalized System for Adaptive Mealtime Situations for Elderly2017In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2017 MTD 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Nilsson, Emma
    et al.
    Volvo Car Corporation, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Christer
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Fors, Carina
    VTI, Sweden.
    Lindén, Per
    Volvo Car Corporation, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Bo
    Volvo Car Corporation, Sweden.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Anund, Anna
    VTI, Sweden.
    Vehicle Driver Monitoring: sleepiness and cognitive load2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To prevent road crashes, it is important to understand driver related contributing factors. The overall aim of the Vehicle Driver Monitoring project was to advance the understanding of two such factors; sleepiness and cognitive distraction. The project aimed at finding methods to measure the two states, with focus on physiological measures, and to study their effect on driver behaviour. The data collection was done in several laboratory and driving simulator experiments. Much new knowledge and insights were gained in the project. Significant effects of cognitive load as well as of sleepiness were found in several physiological measures. The results also showed that context, including individual and environmental factors, has a great impact on driver behaviours, measures and driver experiences.

  • 25.
    Rahman, Hamidur
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hök, Bertil
    Hök Instrument AB.
    A Case-Based Classification for Drivers’ Alcohol Detection Using Physiological Signals2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case-based classification system for alcohol detection using physiological parameters. Here, four physiological parameters e.g. Heart Rate Variability (HRV), Respiration Rate (RR), Finger Temperature (FT), and Skin Conductance (SC) are used in a Case-based reasoning (CBR) system to detect alcoholic state. In this study, the participants are classified into two groups as drunk or sober. The experimental work shows that using the CBR classification approach the obtained accuracy for individual physiological parameters e.g., HRV is 85%, RR is 81%, FT is 95% and SC is 86%. On the other hand, the achieved accuracy is 88% while combining the four parameters i.e., HRV, RR, FT and SC using the CBR system. So, the evaluation illustrates that the CBR system based on physiological sensor signal can classify alcohol state accurately when a person is under influence of at least 0.2 g/l of alcohol.

  • 26.
    Rahman, Hamidur
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Intelligent Driver Monitoring Based on Physiological Sensor Signals: Application Using Camera2015In: IEEE 18th International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems ITSC2015, Canary Islands, Spain, 2015, p. 2637-2642Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in low-cost, non-contact and pervasive methods for monitoring physiological information for the drivers. For the intelligent driver monitoring system there has been so many approaches like facial expression based method, driving behavior based method and physiological parameters based method. Physiological parameters such as, heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), respiration rate (RR) etc. are mainly used to monitor physical and mental state. Also, in recent decades, there has been increasing interest in low-cost, non-contact and pervasive methods for measuring physiological information. Monitoring physiological parameters based on camera images is such kind of expected methods that could offer a new paradigm for driver’s health monitoring. In this paper, we review the latest developments in using camera images for non-contact physiological parameters that provides a resource for researchers and developers working in the area.

1 - 26 of 26
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