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  • 1.
    Akbari, Keramatollah
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Mahmoudi, Jafar
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Öman, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Simulation of ventilation effects on indoor radon in a detached house2012In: WSEAS Transactions on Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1790-5087, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CFD is widely used in indoor air quality, air flow pattern, indoor pollutant distribution and thermal comfort as a cost effective and powerful tool and it can be used to predict, estimate and visualize the indoor radon level. The intention of this article is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD), as a standalone tool to simulate indoor radon distribution and ventilation effects. This technique can be used to predict and visualize radon content and indoor air quality throughout a one family detached house in Stockholm. In this study a mechanical balanced ventilation system and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) were also used to measure the indoor ventilation rate and radon levels. In numerical approach the FLUENT, CFD package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and ventilation effects. Results of numerical study indicated that indoor pressure made by means of ventilation systems and infiltration through door or window has significant effects on indoor radon content. It is observed that the location of vents can affect the indoor radon level, particularly in breathing (seating) zone. The analytic solution is used to validate numeric results at 3 distinct air change rates. The comparison amongst analytical, numerical and measurement results shows close agreement.

  • 2.
    Akbari, Keramatollah
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Oman, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Impacts of heat recovery ventilators on energy savings and indoor radon level2013In: Management of environmental quality, ISSN 1477-7835, E-ISSN 1758-6119, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 682-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the impact of heat recovery ventilators (HRVs) on the energy use and indoor radon in a one family detached house. Heat recovery ventilation systems, because of reducing ventilation loss through recovered exhaust air, can play a good role in the effectiveness of ventilation to reduce energy use. In addition HRVs can maintain pressure balance and outdoor ventilation rate at a required level to mitigate indoor radon level. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a multizone model of a detached house is developed in IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (IDA ICE 4.0). The model is validated using measurements regarding use of energy for heating, ventilation and whole energy use. The performance of the heat recovery ventilation system is examined with respect to radon mitigation and energy saving by measuring the radon concentration and analyzing the life cycle cost of a heat exchanger unit. Findings: The results of the measurements and dynamic simulation showed that the heat recovery ventilation system could lead to 74 per cent energy savings of the ventilation loss, amounting to about 30 kWh m-2 per year. Life cycle cost analysis used for assessing total costs and the result showed that using this system is quite cost-effective and investment would payback during 12 years. Research limitations/implications: Limitations of this study generally refer to radon measurement and simulation because of radon complex behavior and its high fluctuations even during short periods of time. Practical implications: Heat recovery ventilation systems with reducing radon concentration improve indoor air quality and decrease environmental problems with energy savings. Social implications: Using balanced heat recovery ventilation can have benefits from the viewpoint of environmental impacts and household economy. Originality/value: Employment of a heat recovery unit to control indoor radon level is a new usage of this technology which along with energy savings can improve sustainable development.

  • 3.
    Akbari, Keramatollah
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Öman, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Impacts of heat recovery ventilators on energy savings and indoor radon in a Swedish detached house2013In: WSEAS Transactions on Environment and Development, ISSN 1790-5079, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 24-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat recovery ventilation systems, because of reducing ventilation loss through recovered exhaust air, can play a good role in the effectiveness of ventilation to reduce energy use. In this paper, the impact of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) on the energy use and indoor radon in residential buildings is investigated. This paper describes the effects of a heat recovery ventilation system on energy consumption in a detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. The performance of the heat recovery ventilation system is examined with respect to radon mitigation and energy saving by measuring the radon concentration and analyzing the life cycle cost of a heat exchanger unit. In this study, a multizone model of a detached house is developed in IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (IDA ICE 4.0). The model is validated using measurements regarding use of energy for heating, ventilation and whole energy use. The results of the measurements and dynamic simulation showed that heat recovery ventilation system 74% energy savings of the ventilation loss, amounted about 30 kWh.m-2 per year. Life cycle cost analysis used for assessing total costs and the result showed that using this system is quite cost-effective and investment would payback during 12 years.

  • 4.
    Akbari, Keramatollah
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Öman, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Radon Mitigation using Heat Recovery Ventilation system in a Swedish Detached House2013In: WSEAS Transactions on Environment and Development, ISSN 1790-5079, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balanced ventilation with heat recovery has strong effects on radon mitigation and energy saving in residential buildings. This new technology enables improvement of both indoor air quality and energy efficiency without sacrificing either. Reducing radon by means of forced ventilation requires an increase in outdoor supplied air (i.e. ventilation rate), which in turn can increase energy use. Energy losses in ventilation systems are inevitable, but new technologies such as heat recovery systems make it possible to recover most of this ventilation heat loss. Heat recovery ventilation systems, which recover energy from exhaust air, can significantly reduce ventilation losses, and balancing the indoor air pressure plays a positive role in the effectiveness of ventilation to reduce and mitigate radon levels and control indoor air quality. This paper describes a case study which considers the effects of a heat recovery ventilation system on the radon concentration and energy consumption in a detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. The performance of the heat recovery ventilation system is examined with respect to radon mitigation and energy saving by measuring the radon concentration and analyzing the life cycle cost in winter. The results of the measurements and dynamic simulation showed that a heat recovery ventilation system was able to reduce the radon level from around 600 Bq.m-3 to below 100 Bq.m-3 and reduce energy loss from ventilation by 80%, equivalent to around 3500 kWh per year. The results of life cycle cost analysis used to assess total costs showed that this system is cost-effective and investment would pay for itself in 12 years. It should be noted that this saving is a representative sample, and that actual savings would be influenced by a large number of factors. IDA 4.0 Indoor Climate and Energy software was used to perform the dynamic simulations.

  • 5. Spinos, A.
    et al.
    Kvarnström, A.
    Öman, Robert
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    OPTISEL - Optimized Selection of Windows and Glass for Large Buildings, Based on Energy, Economy and Indoor Climate2006In: 8th International Conference and Exhibition on Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon, Portugal, 2006, p. 241-246Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Öman, Robert
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Arnryd, Bengt
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Possibilities and Limitations with Different Ventilation Systems. Putting Together a Basis for Future Research2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Öman, Robert
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Spinos, Antonios
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thermal Comfort Near Windows. Measurements and Computer Calculations for an Office Room2006In: HB 2006 - Healthy Buildings: Creating a Healthy Indoor Environment for People, Proceedings, 2006, p. 149-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Windows can have a significant influence on the thermal indoor climate. In most cases the lowest surface temperatures in a room are the surface temperatures on the inside of windows, and the infiltration of cold outdoor air around windows can be significant. This study demonstrates possibilities to evaluate thermal comfort near windows in office rooms in wintertime in Scandinavian climate. Results in the form of PPD at different distances from a window are compared based on measurements made by a thermal comfort meter and computer calculations with a program for energy and indoor climate. The influence of different room conditions are measured and analyzed.

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