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  • 1.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Cavrak, Igor
    University of Zagreb.
    Orlic, Marin
    University of Zagreb.
    Zagar, Mario
    University of Zagreb.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Avoiding Scylla and Charybdis in Distributed Software Development Course2011In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering 2011, 2011, p. 26-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching Distributed Software Development (DSD) is a challenging task. A convincing simulation of distributed environment in a local environment is practically impossible. Teaching DSD in distributed environment is more realistic since the students directly experience all its specifics. However, teaching in distributed environment, in which several geographically separated teams participate, is very demanding. Different types of obstacles occur, from administrative and organizational to technical ones. This paper describes some of the challenges, lessons learned, but also success stories of the DSD course performed now eight year in a row.

  • 2.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Cavrak, Igor
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Orlic, Marin
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Zagar, Mario
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Student Motivation in Distributed Software Development Projects2011In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering 2011, 2011, p. 31-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss challenges faced in conducting distributed student projects within a scope of a distributed software development university course. Student motivation and demotivation factors, along with perceived cultural differences, are identified and analyzed on the basis of data collected from a number of student projects.

  • 3.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Cavrak, Igor
    University of Zagreb.
    Zagar, Mario
    University of Zagreb.
    Land, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Customers' Role in Teaching Distributed Software Development2010In: Software Engineering Education Conference, Proceedings, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, 2010, p. 73-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes different aspects of teaching distributed software development, regarding the types of project customers: industry and academia. These approaches enable students to be more engaged in real-world situations, by having customers from the industry, local or distributed customers in universities, distributed customers in software engineering contests or being involved in an ongoing project, thus simulating the company merging. The methods we describe are used in a distributed project-oriented course, which is jointly carried out by two universities from Sweden and Croatia. The paper presents our experiences of such projects being done during the course, the differences in each approach, issues observed and ways to solve them, in order to create a more engaging education for better-prepared engineers of tomorrow.

  • 4.
    Bosnic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Ciccozzi, Federico
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Cavrak, Igor
    University of Zagreb.
    Orlic, Marin
    FER, University Zagreb, Croatia.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Multi-dimensional Assessment of Risks in a Distributed Software Development Course2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organizational shift from local to global settings in many software development initiatives has triggered the need for entailing it when educating the future software engineers. Several educational institutions have embraced this need and started collaborating for the provision of global software engineering courses. The rather complex nature of such courses results in a wider range of risks, in comparison to standard software engineering courses, that arise in different dimensions, ranging from course- to result-related, and for different reasons. In this work we provide an assessment of such a variety of risks as well as their causes, and we give a hint on how they may affect each other based on our 10-year-long experience with a tightly integrated GSD course.

  • 5.
    Cavrak, Igor
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Orlic, Marin
    University of Zagreb.
    Crnkovic, Ivica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Collaboration Patterns in Distributed Software Development Projects2012In: Proceedings - International Conference on Software Engineering, 2012, p. 1235-1244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for educating future software engineers in the field of global software engineering is recognized by many educational institutions. In this paper we outline the characteristics of an existing global software development course run over a period of nine years, and present a flexible project framework for conducting student projects in a distributed environment. Based on data collected from fourteen distributed student projects, a set of collaboration patterns is identified and their causes and implications described. Collaboration patterns are a result of the analysis of collaboration links within distributed student teams, and can assist teachers in better understanding of the dynamics found in distributed projects.

1 - 5 of 5
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