mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elfström, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Zander, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    A holistic way ofworking interprofessionally in home care with and for older people2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bergstrom, M.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Sverker, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Act & Hlth, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ranada, A. Larsson
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Valtersson, E.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk, M.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    SIGNIFICANT OTHERS AS BOTH BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS FOR PARTICIPATION IN DAILY ACTIVITIES IN PERSONS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS - AN INTERVIEW STUDY WITHIN THE SWEDISH TIRA PROJECT2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, p. 1518-1518Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergström, M
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Larsson Ranada, Å
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Landstinget i Östergötland, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    “Significantothers as both barriers and facilitators for participation in daily activitiesin persons with rheumatoid arthritis.”: an interview study within the Swedish TIRA project2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linkoping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Department of Activity and Health, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Link€oping University, Norrk€oping, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Department of Activity and Health, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Department of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rheumatology, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Significant others' influence on participation in everyday life: - the perspectives of persons with early diagnosed rheumatoid arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the meaning of significant others in relation to participation in everyday life of persons with early diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and methods: Fifty-nine persons participated in this interview study. Inclusion criteria were three years’ experience of diagnosis and being of working age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using critical incident technique (CIT), and the material was analysed using content analysis. Results: Four categories were revealed: (1) My early RA causes activity adaptations for us all, referring to the person and significant others modifying activities. (2) Making the significant others balance between shortfalls and participation, where the participants distinguished between needing help and feeling involved in activities. (3) Physical interactions with significant others, referring to both the problematic and manageable impact RA could have on body contact. (4) Emotions in relation to activities with others, where participants described feelings of failing others, and anxiety about future activities. Conclusions: For persons with early diagnosed RA, significant others can be both hindering and facilitating for participation in everyday life. As a clinical implication, it is valuable to identify how significant others can be involved in the rehabilitation process, to enhance participation in everyday life early in the disease process.

  • 5.
    Bertilsson, Monica
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Petersson, Eva-Lisa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Wearn, Magda
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Capacity to work while depressed and anxious - a phenomenological study2013In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 35, no 20, p. 1705-1711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to explore experiences of capacity to work in persons working while depressed and anxious in order to identify the essence of the phenomenon capacity to work. Method: Four focus groups were conducted with 17 participants employed within the regular job market. Illness experiences ranged from symptoms to clinical diagnoses. A phenomenological approach was employed. Results: The phenomenon of capacity to work was distinguished by nine constituents related to task, time, context and social interactions. The phenomenon encompassed a lost familiarity with one’s ordinary work performance, the use of a working facade and adoption of new time-consuming work practices. Feelings of exposure in interpersonal encounters, disruption of work place order, lost “refueling” and a trade-off of between work capacity and leisure-time activities was also identified. The reduced capacity was pointed out as invisible, this invisibility was considered troublesome. Conclusions: A complex and comprehensive concept emerged, not earlier described in work capacity studies. Rehabilitation processes would benefit from deeper knowledge of the individual’s capacity to work in order to make efficient adjustments at work. Results can have particular relevance both in clinical and occupational health practice, as well as in the workplaces, in supporting re-entering workers after sickness absence.Implications for Rehabilitation

    • The reduced capacity to work due to depression and anxiety is not always understandable or observable for others, therefore, the rehabilitation process would benefit from increased knowledge and understanding of the difficulties afflicted individuals experience at work.

    • Identifying tasks that contribute to “refueling” at work might enhance the success of the rehabilitation.

    • Rehabilitation programs could be tailored to better address the inabilities that impact on the capacity to work when depressed and anxious.

  • 6.
    Björk, M.
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Valtersson, E.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stenstrom, B.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    Sverker, A.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden..
    DISABILITY IN THE FEET RELATED TO PARTICIPATION IN DAILY LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY RA - AN INTERVIEW STUDY IN THE SWEDISH TIRA PROJECT2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, p. 112-112Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Björk, M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Valtersson, E.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stenström, B.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sverker, A.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Foot Barriers in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Interview Study Among Swedish Women and Men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biologic medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biologic medications. Knowledge of foot impairments needs to be explored further after the introduction of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients’ perspective of foot impairments related to early RA. Methods: The sample included 59 patients (ages 20–63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the critical incident technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. Results: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: foot hindrances in domestic life, foot impairments influencing work, leisure activities restricted by one's feet, struggling to be mobile, and foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease. Conclusion: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal followup of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity, and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. 

  • 8.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Davishpour, Merhdad
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gupta, Shweta
    Kanaskar, Mukesh
    Kulkarni, Vijay
    Verghese, Usha
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Metodik för samarbetsinriktat lärande2016In: Samproduktionens retorik och praktik: inom hälsa och välfärd / [ed] Knutsson Holmström, Inger, Stier, Jonas, Tillgren, Per & Östlund, Gunnel, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 167-177Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Dahlbäck, Maria
    et al.
    Östergötlands läns landsting.
    Dahlgren, Sarah
    Östergötlands läns landsting.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköpings universitet.
    Utveckling och lärande genom interprofessionell samverkan2012In: Personlig och professionell utveckling inom socionomutbildningen: en antologi / [ed] Ottelid, M., Östersund: Mittuniversitetet , 2012, p. 92-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dale, Richard Allan
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hasselberg, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Young adults' experiences with near-injury situations: a critical incident study in Sweden.2017In: International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies, ISSN 1920-7298, E-ISSN 1920-7298, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 97-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As injuries are the main health threat for young adults (18-29 years) in industrial countries, a better understanding of injury risk is needed for this population. Using the Critical Incident Technique, this study explores how young people experience situations that have the potential to cause physical injury (i.e., near-injury situations). Clearly, understanding how and why near-injury situations arise can be used to develop strategies to help prevent severe injury. Content analysis was used to categorize the characteristics of the experiences into unexpected risk in ordinary tasks, duty first, and price for learning. Young adults' exposures to new or unusual environmental conditions, especially in unexpected risk in ordinary tasks, should be considered when planning injury prevention strategies. A combination of individual, social, and contextual demands and expectations was identified in both work-and sports-related experiences with near-injury situations. The price for learning, which arises from the added risk involved in learning situations, is another condition that was identified and requires further attention. The Critical Incident Technique proved to be a useful method for identifying near-injury situations that might otherwise have been difficult to recall. Young adults' efforts to display their ability to handle difficult situations at work and in their everyday lives was identified as a major contributor to near-injury situations.

  • 11.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Zander, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Elfström, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Anbäcken, Els-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    ‘Best fit’ caring skills of an interprofessional team inshort-term goal-directed reablement: older adults’perceptionsIn: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, H
    Swedish Red Cross Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kijsomporn, J
    Minist Publ Hlth, PIHWD, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Barriers to successful treatment of alcohol addiction perceived by healthcare professionals in Thailand: a Delphi study about obstacles and improvement suggestions2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, H
    Swedish Red Cross Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kijsomporn, J
    Minist Publ Hlth, PIHWD, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Healthcare providers' experiences of working with alcohol addiction treatment in Thailand2016In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of alcohol consumption, together with its associated health risk factors, has long-term negative impacts on both society and the economy in Thailand. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of healthcare providers working with people experiencing alcohol addiction and the treatment programs in a Thai hospital. Methods: Qualitative study was applied in this study by conducting focus group interviews with 32 interdisciplinary healthcare providers, most of which were nurses. Content analysis was applied to analyze the verbatim-transcribed data. Findings: Two main topics emerged: (1) the collaborative practices related to alcohol treatment, and (2) the fit of the program, including how the treatment program functions. Obstacles were identified and formulated from several sub-categories. Conclusions: The findings included obstacles linked to the imported (Western) program and the patriarchal structure in Thai culture, which seem to intersect and reinforce each other.

  • 14.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, H
    Swedish Red Cross Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kijsomporn, J
    Minist Publ Hlth, PIHWD, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lived experience of Thai women with alcohol addiction2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of alcohol consumption, together with its associated health risk factors, has long-term negative impacts on both society and the economy in Thailand. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of healthcare providers working with people experiencing alcohol addiction and the treatment programs in a Thai hospital. Methods: Qualitative study was applied in this study by conducting focus group interviews with 32 interdisciplinary healthcare providers, most of which were nurses. Content analysis was applied to analyze the verbatim-transcribed data. Findings: Two main topics emerged: (1) the collaborative practices related to alcohol treatment, and (2) the fit of the program, including how the treatment program functions. Obstacles were identified and formulated from several sub-categories. Conclusions: The findings included obstacles linked to the imported (Western) program and the patriarchal structure in Thai culture, which seem to intersect and reinforce each other.

  • 15.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Redcross university College, Stockholm.
    Kijsompon, Jureerat
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Changwat Nonthaburi, Nonthaburi Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lived experiences of Thai women with alcohol addiction2017In: Asian Nursing Research, ISSN 1976-1317, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored the lived experiences of Thai women in relation to alcohol addiction in treatment. Methods: Twelve women aged 20 to 65 years, were participated. The participants were recruited from two special hospitals and one outpatient clinic in a general hospital. Descriptive phenomenology was applied to analyze the transcripts of the individual interviews. Result: The explored phenomenon of Thai women experiencing alcohol addiction included four essential aspects, (1) feeling inferior and worthless (2) feeling physically and emotionally hurt, (3) fearing physical deterioration and premature death, and (4) feeling superior and powerful. Through these different aspects of Thai women's lived experiences, the following essence was synthesized. The essence of the lived experience of alcohol addiction among the studied Thai women was ambivalence between feeling inferior and worthless and feeling superior and powerful when acting as a man. Drinking alcohol lessened life's difficulties and fears; for example, of violence, bodily demolition, premature death and marginalization from family and society. Conclusion: Thai women who experience alcohol addiction are treated with gender-related double standards when trying to undo gender traditional roles. Their marginalization from family and society deepens making them even more vulnerable to the positive side effects of alcohol drinking. 

  • 16.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Redcross university College, Stockholm.
    Kijsompon, Jureerat
    Basic concept of Nursing Practice Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing Changwat Nonthaburi, Nonthaburi Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thai Men’s experiences of Alcohol Addiction and Treatment.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kijsompon, Jureerat
    Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thai Men’s experiences of Alcohol Addiction and Treatment2014In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, no 1, p. Article number 23712-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Men are overrepresented with regard to alcohol addiction and in terms of alcohol treatment worldwide. In Thailand, alcohol consumption continues to rise, but few of those afflicted with alcohol addiction attend alcohol treatment programs, even though there is universal care for all. No comprehensive studies have been done on men's experiences with addiction and alcohol treatment programs in Thailand.Objective: The aim of this study was to explore men's experiences in terms of the 'pros and cons of alcohol consumption' in order to identify the barriers that exist for Thai men with regard to alcohol addiction and the decision to stop drinking. Design: Purposive sampling was applied in the process of recruiting participants at an alcohol clinic in a hospital in Thailand. Thirteen men with alcohol addiction (aged 32-49 years) were willing to participate and were interviewed in thematic interviews. The analysis of the data was done with descriptive phenomenology. Results: Through men's descriptions, three clusters of experiences were found that were 'mending the body', 'drinking as payoff and doping related to work', and 'alcohol becoming a best friend' as ways of describing the development of addiction. Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of addressing concepts of masculinity and related hegemonic ideas in order to decrease the influence of the barriers that exist for Thai men with alcohol addiction with regard to entering treatment and to stop drinking. © 2014 Kulnaree Hanpatchaiyakul et al.

  • 18.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kijsomporn, Jureerat
    Praboromarajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development .
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    The barriers in accessing alcohol treatment through clients' perspective2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Petersson, Eva-Lisa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Alkoholkonsumtion, alkoholproblem och sjukfrånvaro - vilka är sambanden?: En systematisk litteraturöversikt2010Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Holmström, Inger K
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, JonasMälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.Tillgren, PerMälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.Östlund, GunnelMälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Samproduktionens retorik och praktik: inom hälsa och välfärd2016Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Olsson, Louise
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska institutet.
    Jeppsson Grassman, Eva
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fredrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet.
    Maintaining hope when close to death: insight from cancer patients in palliative care2010In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 607-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article reports the social and psychological processes that 11 cancer patients receiving palliative home care used to keep their hopealive. Method: The patients described their ways of dealing with hope in interviews and diaries, and it was from these accounts that the processes were extracted, using a grounded theory methodology. Results: Two main processes emerged: maintaining life and preparing for death. When the patients focused on maintaining life, they tried to preserve its meaning and to communicate with others about life and death. They found it helpful to shift their focus and to involve fellow 'travellers' in their journey. To prepare for death was to take responsibility for the future and to see possibilities of living on even after death. Conclusion: This paper revealed two parallel and interdependent processes used by patients in the palliative care phase to maintainhope and respond to living close to death.

  • 22.
    Olsson, Louise
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Strang, Peter
    KI.
    Jeppsson Grassman, Eva
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fredrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet.
    The glimmering embers: Experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The experience of hope among cancer patients in palliative care is important information for healthcare providers, but research on the subject is sparse. The aim of this article was to explore how cancer patients admitted to palliative home care experienced the significance of hope and usedhope during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their life, and to assess their symptoms and hope status during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their lives.Method: Eleven adult patients with cancer participated in 20 interviews and completed seven diaries. The participants were recruited from two palliative care units in the southeast of Sweden. The method used was Grounded Theory (GT), and analysis was based on the constant comparative method.Results: The core category, glimmering embers, was generated from four processes: (1) The creation of "convinced" hope, with a focus on positive events, formed in order to have something to look forward to; (2) The creation of "simulated hope," including awareness of the lack of realism, but including attempts to believe in unrealistic reasons for hope; (3) The collection of and maintaining of moments of hope, expressing a wish to "seize the day" and hold on to moments of joy and pleasure; and (4) "Gradually extinct" hope, characterized by a lack of energy and a sense of time running out.Significance of results: The different processes of hope helped the patients to continue to live when they were close to death. Hopeshould be respected and understood by the professionals giving them support.

  • 23.
    Pongthippat, Weerati
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. b Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing Udon Thani, Udon Thani, Thailand.
    Darvishpour, Mehrdad
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Kijsompon, Jureerat
    c Praboromrajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Broken dreams of a better life in Sweden: Thai women’s lived experiences of intimate partner violence by Swedish men in international marriages2018In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intimate partner violence by men against women has detrimental effects on equality, health and integration. Migrated and ‘imported’ wives experience an increased risk of intimate partner violence. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore Thai immigrant women’s lived experiences of intimate partner violence in Sweden. Method: Semi-structured interviews based on the critical incident technique with specific questions about experiences of male-to-female intimate partner violence were used to collect data. The participants were Thai immigrant women who had lived in Sweden for more than five years. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify patterns and variations in the transcribed data material. Results: Eighteen interviewees reported psychological, physical, economic and/or sexual violence in their international marriages. These Thai women described being faithful and silent and reliable housewives. However, this did not keep them from being replaced and losing dignity as a result of intimate partner violence, including experiencing broken dreams and deception. Although their dreams were broken, they did not give up their efforts to achieve better lives in Sweden. Conclusions: The vulnerability of imported wives in international marriages needs to be further recognised by health and welfare agencies in Sweden, as elsewhere, to ensure that these women have equal access to human rights, welfare and health as other citizens. From a health promotion perspective, home-based health check-ups are needed to stop the exploitation of imported wives. In Thailand, information and education about the unrecognised negative conditions of the Mia farang role (Imported wife role) need to be disseminated.

  • 24.
    Sverker, A.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Act & Hlth, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bjork, M.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Thyberg, I.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    WOMEN WITH EARLY RA PREFER TO USE INTERACTION AND ADJUSTMENT STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH THEIR EVERYDAY LIFE DILEMMAS: THE TIRA PROJECT)2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, p. 1298-1298Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Sverker, A.
    et al.
    Cty Council Östergötland, Sweden.
    Björk, M.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden.
    Thyberg, I.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden.
    Thyberg, M.
    Linköping Univ, Sweden.
    Valtersson, E.
    Cty Council Östergötland, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    MEN'S STRATEGIES OF HANDLING PARTICIPATION RESTRICTIONS RELATED TO RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (THE SWEDISH TIRA STUDY)2014In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, p. 1219-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Sverker, A.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Act & Hlth, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil Med, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Thyberg, I.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Valtersson, E.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Act & Hlth, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bjork, M.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Hjalmarsson, S.
    Swedish Rheumatism Assoc, Patient Res Partner, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    QUALITIES OF PARTICIPATION AS DESCRIBED BY PEOPLE WITH EARLY RA IN WORKING AGE2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, p. 1784-1784Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Department of Activity and Health, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Department of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Department of Activity and Health, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Department of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rheumatology, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hjalmarsson, Sara
    Patient Research Partner, Swedish Rheumatism Association, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Time to update the ICF by including socioemotional qualities of participation?: The development of a ‘patient ladder of participation’ based on interview data of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (The Swedish TIRA study)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of was to identify and illustrate in what situations and with what qualities people with early RA experience participation in every day’s life.

    Methods: 59 patients (age 18-63 years) were interviewed; 25 men and 34 women. Content analysis was used to identify meaning units which were sorted based on type of situations described and later on, categories based on quality aspects of participation were developed.

    Results: Participation was described as: 1. being part of a group, where a sense of belonging arose. 2. In doing activities with others for example at work or in leisure. 3. When sharing everyday chores and responsibilities for example in domestic duties. 4. When experiencing influence on actions such as when being asked for opinions on how to conduct a specific task. 5. When having the possibility to give direction of goals in rehabilitation, or elsewhere. 6. When sharing decision making and experiencing a high degree of influence in the situation.

    Conclusions: Participation from an individual’s perspective is about belonging and having influence that mediates a positive feeling of being included and that you matter as a person. The results are important when using participation as a goal in clinical care. It’s important to expand participation beyond the definitions in ICF and guidelines to include the patients’ socio-emotional participation in order to promote health.

     

  • 28.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Dilemmas of participation in work and employment in early RA: A qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA study)2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Participation in work in early rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative interview study interpreted in terms of the ICF2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore what work-related dilemmas are experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to their own descriptions, and to interpret this in terms of participation categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Method: In 48 patients with early RA, qualitative interviews were analyzed, followed by linking of concepts to the activity/participation component of the ICF and interpretation of general themes. Results: Work-related dilemmas represented different societal perspectives on work related to acquiring, keeping and terminating a job, self-employment, part-time, full-time and non-remunerative employment. Dilemmas also represented participation priorities in economic self-sufficiency, self-care such as health care, and avoiding social relationships and recreation in favor of work. Leisure time was influenced because efforts of working took energy and time of day-to-day procedures. Embedded actions in work-related dilemmas were carrying out daily routine, mobility including using transportation, self-care, domestic life and social interaction. Conclusion: The general themes societal perspectives, participation priorities and embedded actions, with the included ICF categories that are described in detail according to the experiences of the patients, can support clinical reasoning and research on quantitative relations to disease activity, body functions, ability and contextual factors.Implications for RehabilitationIn early rheumatoid arthritis, keeping a job is complex; patients and practitioners need to know and handle the perspectives of, e.g. employers and social insurance agents.Participation in work is an issue of prioritizing against, e.g. maintaining one's health and social relationships.Rehabilitation practitioners need to analyze what actions are embedded in a work situation.

  • 30.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Börjesson, M
    Sköndals institutet, Sweden.
    Hägerström, M
    Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Gåfvels, C
    Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    The importance of socialwork in health care for individuals with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Quality in Primary Care, ISSN 1479-1072, E-ISSN 1479-1064, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 138-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), often associated with psychosocial problems and reduced quality of life, benefit from the guidance of trained medical social workers. This study explores the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment in patients with RA using a structured interview to detect psychosocial problems for 100 patients. These individuals were offered regular sessions with a medical social worker. Three types of mixed-problems were found: mixed problems related to RA, mixed problems related to the life situation, and mixed problems related to a combination of RA and the life situation. The RA patients who reported mixed-problems at time of their diagnosis received psychosocial treatment from a medical social worker regardless of the mixed problems they experienced. In addition, we found that disease-related mixed problems seemed more treatable than other problems. Social work in somatic healthcare seems most successful in patients with sickness-related social and psychosocial problems.

  • 31.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping universitet.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    ‘I lose all these hours…’ – exploring gender and consequences of dilemmas experienced in everyday life with coeliac diseases2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2009; 23; 342-352 'I lose all these hours⋯'- exploring gender and consequences of dilemmas experienced in everyday life with coeliac disease Few studies have focused on gendered consequences of coeliac disease (CD), despite the fact that women with coeliac disease report lower health-related quality of life than men do. The aim of this study was to explore consequences of dilemmas in everyday lives for women and men, as personally affected by CD or as close relatives to someone affected by the disease and to put these experiences into context regarding household activities. This QUAL-quan study included 28 men and 38 women. A mix method design was used. The critical incident technique that captures, in a structured way, the qualities of experiences was used in interviews to identify dilemmas and their consequences. To describe the social context of these dilemmas, a quantitative questionnaire was developed on food preparations and purchase, as well as on cooking and meal behaviours. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Health Sciences. The consequences were found in cognitive, social, emotional and physical aspects of human life. The overall pattern of these consequences was similar in women and men irrespective of being personally affected or a close relative. The main consequences identified were: daily concerns about gluten, constant preparation, being different, emotional pressure and body sensations because of CD. Descriptive data extracted from the questionnaire showed that women and men reported having a different social situation in relation to preparing food, making decisions about purchases, buying food products and preparing meals. The clinical implications of these findings are that healthcare professionals need to develop family-oriented information in relation to CD. It is necessary to inform the close relatives irrespective of sex of the possible consequences of the disease and to take in to account the different social context that women and men report in relation to food preparations

  • 32.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sharing life with a gluten-intolerant person – the perspective of close relatives.2007In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, ISSN ISSN 0952-3871, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 412-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Several studies indicate the importance of social support in the case of chronic disease. Aim The aim was to explore dilemmas experienced by close relatives living with a person suffering from coeliac disease, and to describe the strategies they used to deal with these dilemmas. Methods Twenty-three informants were interviewed. A systematic inductive qualitative method, the critical incident technique was used. Results Disease-related worries included having bad conscience about not being affected by the disease, experiencing anxiety and witnessing the vulnerability of the affected relative in social situations. Dilemmas related to manage daily life were connected with increased domestic work, restricted freedom of action and the diseased person's preferential right of interpretation of health risks associated with the coeliac disease and deviations from the diet restrictions. Dilemmas related to disturbances in social life, concerned lack of information, knowledge and understanding. Different strategies were described to manage daily life. Conclusions Close relatives experienced a variety of dilemmas that affected the situation of the whole family. The role of relatives in handling the coeliac disease with the diseased person in the everyday life might be underestimated, and to provide relatives with better knowledge regarding the disease might improve the situation also for patients.

  • 33.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Aspects of participation in work and everyday life in early RA:: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA-study)2010In: Ann Rheum Dis: 69 (Suppl 3), 2010, p. 745-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Pain, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Rehabil Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Bjork, Mathilda
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Rehabil Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden.;Jonkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Dilemmas of participation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA Project)2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 14-15, p. 1251-1259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore the experiences of today's patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to dilemmas of everyday life, especially regarding patterns of participation restrictions in valued life activities. Methods: A total of 48 patients, aged 20-63, three years post-RA diagnosis were interviewed using the Critical Incident Technique. Transcribed interviews were condensed into meaningful units describing actions/situations. These descriptions were linked to ICF participation codes according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) linking rules. Results: Dilemmas in everyday life were experienced in domestic life, interpersonal interactions and relationships, community, social and civic life. Most dilemmas were experienced in domestic life, including participation restrictions in, e.g. gardening, repairing houses, shovelling snow, watering pot plants, sewing or walking the dog. Also many dilemmas were experienced related to recreation and leisure within the domain community, social and civic life. The different dilemmas were often related to each other. For instance, dilemmas related to community life were combined with dilemmas within mobility, such as lifting and carrying objects. Conclusions: Participation restrictions in today's RA patients are complex. Our results underline that the health care needs to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to support the early multi-professional interventions in clinical practice.

  • 35.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sverige.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sverige.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sverige.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Landstinget i Östergötland, Sverige.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Sverige.
    Dilemmas ofparticipation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis. A qualitativeinterview study (The Swedish TIRA Project).2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose: To explore the experiences of today's patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to dilemmas of everyday life, especially regarding patterns of participation restrictions in valued life activities. Methods: A total of 48 patients, aged 20-63, three years post-RA diagnosis were interviewed using the Critical Incident Technique. Transcribed interviews were condensed into meaningful units describing actions/situations. These descriptions were linked to ICF participation codes according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) linking rules. Results: Dilemmas in everyday life were experienced in domestic life, interpersonal interactions and relationships, community, social and civic life. Most dilemmas were experienced in domestic life, including participation restrictions in, e.g. gardening, repairing houses, shovelling snow, watering pot plants, sewing or walking the dog. Also many dilemmas were experienced related to recreation and leisure within the domain community, social and civic life. The different dilemmas were often related to each other. For instance, dilemmas related to community life were combined with dilemmas within mobility, such as lifting and carrying objects. Conclusions: Participation restrictions in today's RA patients are complex. Our results underline that the health care needs to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to support the early multi-professional interventions in clinical practice. Implications of Rehabilitation Today's rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience participation restrictions in activities not included in International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core set for RA or in traditionally questionnaires with predefined activities. The health care need to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to meet the individual needs and optimize the rehabilitation in early RA in clinical practice.

  • 36.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Landstinget i Östergötland.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet.
    Dilemmas of participation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA),: a qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA study)2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Sverker, Annette
    et al.
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Östergötlands läns landsting, Sweden.
    Björk, Matilda
    Jönköpings hälsohögskola, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Dilemmas of participation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA study)2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Landstinget i Östergötland, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Reumatolog förbundet, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Känslor relaterade till delaktighets begränsningar vid reumatoid artrit.: En kvalitativ intervjustudie.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Att bedöma professionsspecifika kompetenser2012In: Utbildning-Undervisning- Utmaning- Utveckling, en rapport från LiU:s utvecklingskonferens 10 mars 2011 / [ed] Elinore Edvardsson Stiwne, Linköping: Uni-Tryck , 2012, p. 78-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    From therapeutic communities to evidence based practice - 40 years of experience from the development of addiction treatments and policies in Sweden.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Lekmannaperspektiv på rehabilitering2003In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 2, no 80, p. 120-126Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Personlig utveckling – vägen till professionskompetens i socialt arbete2012In: Personlig och professionell utveckling inom socionomutbildningen, en antologi. / [ed] Ottelid, M., Östersund: Mittuniversitet , 2012, p. 17-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Promoting return to work – Lay experiences after sickness absence with musculoskeletal diagnoses2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Psykosociala aspekter och genusperspektiv2002In: Svensk rehabilitering, ISSN 1403-4468, no 1, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet.
    Reflektionspass som pedagogiskt verktyg för PPU – en uppföljning av samtalsledaruppdraget2012In: Personlig och professionell utveckling inom socionomutbildningen, en antologi. / [ed] Ottelid, M., Östersund: Mittuniversitet , 2012, p. 131-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköpingss universitet.
    Rehabilitering efter sjukfrånvaro ur ett genus- och lekmannaperspektiv2006In: Den komplexa sjukfrånvaron / [ed] Upmark U. Och Edlund C., Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006, p. 109-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    "It was really nice to have someone: Lay people with musculoskeletal disorders request supportive relationships in rehabilitation.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the lay person's perspective on the rehabilitation process. Methods: A total of 20 interviews were conducted with women and men who had recent or more distant experience of sickness absence,vith musculoskeletal diagnoses. Grounded theory was used, which includes an inductive approach and theoretical sampling. The interviews focused on the individuals' own stories and experiences of factors that promoted or hindered the rehabilitation process. Results: The interviewees emphasized how and by whom they had been treated rather than what type of rehabilitation programmes they had attended. They focused on the importance of Supportive relationships From the private, occupational, and health care arenas. The relationship with rehabilitation agents (professionals who implemented rehabilitation) was described as having either supportive or non-supportive qualities. Based on the interviewees' descriptions. a model was developed on the socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agent. The most promoting factor in the rehabilitation process was to have a professional mentor that is a rehabilitation agent who combines a supportive approach with individually chosen rehabilitation measures and goals. Conclusions: The lay person's perspective gave additional knowledge regarding rehabilitation and recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. The socioemotional qualities of the rehabilitation agents were emphasized by the interviewees and a model regarding these qualities was developed, This model needs to be tested further. A clinical implication of the present study is the need for rehabilitation agents to develop their communication skills further.

  • 48.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Bjork, M.
    Linkopings Univ, Rehabil Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkopings Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Dept Rehabil, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Thyberg, I.
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Rheumatol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Valtersson, E.
    Cty Council Ostergotland, Dept Rheumatol Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Sverker, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Fac Arts & Sci, Social Work, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Rehabil, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    ADJUSTMENT, AVOIDANCE, INTERACTION, AND ACCEPTANCE STRATEGIES WHERE USED BY MEN WITH PARTICIPATION RESTRICTIONS DUE TO EARLY RA2015In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, p. 1343-1343Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk, M.
    Cty Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Valtersson, E.
    Cty Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sverker, A.
    Cty Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY PATIENTS WITH EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: A QUALITATIVE INTERVIEW STUDY (THE SWEDISH TIRA STUDY)2014In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, p. 1220-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköpings universitet.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Rehabilitation section NSC, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    The Swedish Rheumatism Association, Sweden.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA project)2014In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1403-1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions, and their relationship to participation restrictions, is scarce.

    Objectives: To explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. 

    Method: In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using Critical Incident Technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to ICF participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized.

    Results: Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings, getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work, but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public.

    Conclusions: Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.

     

12 1 - 50 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf