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  • 1. Biesta, Gert
    A new ‘logic’ of emancipation: The methodology of Jacques Ranciere2010In: Educational Theory, ISSN 0013-2004, E-ISSN 1741-5446, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 39-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    A school for citizens: Civic learning and democratic action in the learning democracy2008In: Transforming learning in schools and communities, London: Continuum , 2008, p. 170-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Acerca de la humanidad2008In: Mensajes e-ducativos desde tierra de nadie / [ed] J. Masschelein & M. Simons, Barcelona: Laertes, S.A de Ediciones , 2008, p. 119-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    An alternative future for European educational research2010In: Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Historiographie, ISSN 1424-845X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 105-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Beyond learning: Democratic education for a human future2006Book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Bortom lärandet: Demokratisk utbildning för en mänsklig framtid2006Book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Bridging the gap between educational research and educational practice: The need for critical distance2007In: Educational Research and Evaluation, no 13 (3), p. 295-301Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Building bridges or building people? On the role of engineering in education2009In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, no 41 (1), p. 13-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    D is for democracy: Critical education between inclusion and interruption. In I. Gur Ze’ev (ed)2010In: The possibility/impossibility of a new critical language in education, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2010, p. 293-304Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    De burgerschool als leerplaats voor democratie2007In: Alternatieven voor de school, Den Haag: Onderwijsraad , 2007, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Democratic education after Dewey?2007In: Bildung und Öffentlichkeit, Weinheim: Beltz , 2007, p. 78-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Den kommunikative vändningen i Deweys Demokrati och Utbildning2007In: Utbildning som kommunikation / [ed] Englund, Tomas, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 33-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    ”Det här är min sanning, berätta din.” Dekonstruktiv pragmatism som filosofi för utbildning2007In: Erfarenheter av Pragmatism / [ed] Y. Boman, C. Ljunggren & M. Von Wrigh, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, p. 47-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Sterling.
    “Don’t count me in.” Democracy, education and the question of inclusion2007In: Nordisk Pedagogik, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 18-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Exeter.
    Education and the democratic person: Towards a political understanding of democratic education2007In: Teachers College Record, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 740-769Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Education between accountability and responsibility2009In: Re-reading education policies: A handbook Studying the policy agenda of the 21st century / [ed] Maarten Simons, Mark Olssen & Michael Peters, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2009, p. 679-695Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Educaţie, ni iniţiere. (Education, not initiation)2006In: Paideia, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Institute of Education, University of Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Encountering Foucault in lifelong learning2008In: Foucault and lifelong learning: governing the subject, London/New York: Routledge , 2008, p. 193-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Institute of Education, University of Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Encountering Foucault in lifelong learning2008In: Foucault and lifelong learning: governing the subject, London/New York: Routledge , 2008, p. 193-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Evidenz und Werte in Erziehung und Bildung.  Drei weitere Defizite evidenzbasierter Praxis. In H.-U. Otto, a. Polutta & H. Ziegler (Hrsg.)2010In: What Works - Welches Wissen braucht die Soziale Arbeit?, Opladen: Barbara Burdich , 2010, p. pp 99-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Five theses on complexity reduction and its politics2010In: Complexity theory and the politics of education / [ed] D.C. Osberg & G.J.J. Biesta, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2010, p. pp 5-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Foundations of democratic education: Kant, Dewey, Arendt2007In: Democratic practices as learning opportunities / [ed] R. van der Veen, D. Wildemeersch, J. Youngblood & V. Marsic, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2007, p. 7-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Good Education in an Age of Measurement2009In: Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 33-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Biesta, Gert
    How to exist politically and learn from it: Hannah Arendt and the problem of democratic education2010In: Teachers College record (1970), ISSN 0161-4681, E-ISSN 1467-9620, Vol. 112, no 2, p. 556-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In discussions about democratic education, there is a strong tendency to see the role of education as that of the preparation of children and young people for their future participation in democratic life. A major problem with this view is that it relies on the idea that the guarantee for democracy lies in the existence of a properly educated citizenry so that once all citizens have received their education, democracy will simply follow.Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: The question that is explored in this article is whether it is possible to think of the relationship between education and democracy differently than in terms of preparation. This is important not only to be able to acknowledge the political nature of democratic education but also to be able to acknowledge the political "foundation" of democratic politics itself.Research Design: The argumentation in the article is developed through a critical analysis and discussion of the work of Hannah Arendt, with a specific focus on her ideas about the relationship between education and politics and her views on the role of understanding in politics.Findings/Results: Arendt's writings on the relationship between education and politics seem to be informed by a "developmentalistic" perspective in which it is maintained that the child is not yet ready for political life, so education has to be separated from politics and seen as a preparation for future participation in political life. Arendt's writings on politics and the role of understanding in political life point in a different direction. They articulate what it means to exist politically-that is, to exist together in plurality-and highlight that political existence is neither based on, nor can be guaranteed by, moral qualities such as tolerance and respect.Conclusions/Recommendations: The main conclusion of the article is that democratic education should not be seen as the preparation of citizens for their future participation in political life. Rather, it should focus on creating opportunities for political existence inside and outside schools. Rather than thinking of democratic education as learning for political existence, it is argued that the focus of our educational endeavours should be on how we can learn from political existence.

  • 25.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    How to use pragmatism pragmatically: Suggestions for the 21st century2009In: Education and Culture, ISSN 1085-4908, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 34-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    How to use pragmatism pragmatically: Suggestions for the 21st century2009In: John Dewey at 150. Reflections for a New Century / [ed] A.G. Rud, Jim Garrison, and Lynda Stone, Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press , 2009, p. 30-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Exeter.
    Interrupting hope. In D. Vokey et al.2007In: Philosophy of Education 2006, p. pp 280-282Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Biesta, Gert
    Knowledge production and democracy in educational research: The case of evidence-based education2005In: South African Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1011-3487, no 19, p. 1334-1349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Biesta, Gert
    Learner, student, speaker. Why it matters how we call those we teach2010In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 42, no 5-6, p. 540-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I discuss three different ways in which we can refer to those we teach: as learner, as student or as speaker. My interest is not in any aspect of teaching but in the question whether there can be such a thing as emancipatory education. Working with ideas from Jacques Rancière I offer the suggestion that emancipatory education can be characterised as education which starts from the assumption that all students can speak. It starts from the assumption, in other words, that students neither lack a capacity for speech, nor that they are producing noise. The idea of the student as a speaker is not offered as an empirical fact but as a different starting point for emancipatory education, one that positions equality at the beginning of education, not at its end

  • 30.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Læring retur: demokratisk dannelse for en menneskelig fremtid2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    '"Of all affairs, communication is the most wonderful." Education as communicative praxis.'2006In: John Dewey and our educational prospect. A critical engagement with Dewey’s Democracy and Education / [ed] David T. Hansen, Albany, NY: SUNY Press , 2006, p. 23-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. Biesta, Gert
    On the weakness of education2010In: Philosophy of Education 2009 / [ed] Deborah Kerdeman, University of Washington, Seattle, Urbana-Champaign, IL: Philosophy of Education Society , 2010, p. 354-362Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Pedagogy with empty hands: Levinas, education and the question of being human2008In: Levinas and education: At the intersection of faith and reason / [ed] D. Egéa-Kuehne, London/New York: Routledge , 2008, p. 198-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Pragmatism and the philosophical foundations of mixed methods research2010In: Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research. Second edition / [ed] Tashakkori & C. Teddlie, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage , 2010, 2, p. pp 95-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling, UK.
    Pragmatism’s contribution to understanding learning-in-context2009In: Rethinking contexts for teaching and learning: Communities, activities and networks / [ed] R. Edwards, G.J.J. Biesta & M. Thorpe, London/New York: Routledge , 2009, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Problemlösen2009In: Handwörterbuch Erziehungswissenschaft / [ed] S. Andresen, R. Casale, T. Gabriel, R. Horlacher, S. Larcher Klee & J. Oelkers, Weinheim: Beltz , 2009, p. 666-681Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling, Scotland, UK.
    Sporadic democracy: Education, democracy and the question of inclusion2009In: Education, democracy and the moral life / [ed] Katz, S. Verducci & G. Biesta, Dordrecht: Springer , 2009, p. 101-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    The education-socialisation conundrum. Or : ‘Who is afraid of education ?’2007In: Utbildning och demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    “The most influential theory of the century.” Dewey, democratic education and the limits of pragmatism2010In: Pragmatism and modernities / [ed] D. Troehler, T. Schlag & F. Osterwalder, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2010, p. 197-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Theorising learning through complexity: An educational critique2009In: Complicity, ISSN 1710-5668, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 28-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling, UK.
    “This is my truth, tell me yours.” Deconstructive pragmatism as a philosophy for education2010In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 710-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to characterise pragmatism is to see it as a philosophy that placed communication at the heart of philosophical, educational and political thinking. Whereas the shift from consciousness to communication can be seen as a major innovation in modern philosophy, it is not without problems. This article highlights some of these problems and suggests a way 'forward' by staging a discussion between pragmatism and deconstruction. Although there are striking similarities between pragmatism and deconstruction, it is argued that pragmatism and deconstruction cannot sit as easily together as some authors assume. The reason for this is not that pragmatism and deconstruction are incompatible philosophies but rather that deconstruction occurs at the very heart of pragmatism. This implies that pragmatism can only retain its commitment to communication in philosophy, education and politics if it acknowledges and, in a sense, embraces the occurrence of deconstruction in communication. This suggests that the future of pragmatism as a philosophy for education o lies in its deconstruction, something which is expressed in the idea of a deconstructive rather than a deconstructed pragmatism.

  • 42.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Towards a new ‘logic’ of emancipation: Foucault and Rancière. In R. Glass et al2008In: Philosophy of Education, ISSN 8756-6575, p. pp 169-177Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    Towards the knowledge democracy? Knowledge production and the civic role of the university2007In: Studies in Philosophy of Education, no 26 (5), p. 467-479Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Exeter.
    Understanding learning cultures2007In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, Educational Review, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 415-427Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Exeter.
    Vad är det för mening med livslångt lärande, om livslångt lärande inte har någon mening? Från en lärande ekonomi till den lärande demokratin2006In: Nät och bildning. Tidskrift för folkbildningens flexibla lärande, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Values and ideals in teachers’ professional judgement: International trends, challenges and ways forward2009In: Changing teacher professionalism / [ed] S. Gewirtz, P. Mahony, I. Hextall & A. Cribb, London: Routledge , 2009, p. pp 184-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Valuing what we measure or measuring what we value? On the need to engage with the question of purpose in educational evaluation, assessment and measurement2010In: Evaluation, Bildung und Gesellschaft: Steuerungsinstrumente zwischen Anspruch und Wirklichkeit / [ed] Wolfgang Böttcher, Jan Nikolas Dicke, Nina Hogrebe, Munster: Waxman , 2010, p. 35-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    What is at stake in a pedagogy of interruption?2009In: Philosophy of Education: Modern and Contemporary Ideas at Play / [ed] T.E. Lewis, J.G.A. Grinberg and M. Laverty, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt , 2009, p. 785-807Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    What kind of citizen? What kind of democracy? Citizenship education and the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence2008In: Scottish Educational Review, no 40 (2), p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Biesta, Gert
    University of Stirling.
    What kind of citizenship for European Higher Education?: Beyond the competent active citizen2009In: European Educational Research Journal, ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 146-157Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 105
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