mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Brunoe, Thomas Ditlev
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kjeld
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Towards a generic design method for reconfigurable manufacturing systems: Analysis and synthesis of current design methods and evaluation of supportive tools2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 42, p. 179-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In  today’s global manufacturing environment, changes are inevitable and something that every manufacturer must respond to and take advantage of, whether it is in regards to technology changes, product changes, or changes in the manufacturing processes. The reconfigurable manufacturing system (RMS) meets this challenge through the ability to rapidly and efficiently change capacity and functionality, which is the reason why it has been widely labelled the manufacturing paradigm of the future. However, design of the RMS represents a significant challenge compared to the design of traditional manufacturing systems, as it should be designed for efficient production of multiple variants, as well as multiple product generations over its lifetime. Thus, critical decisions regarding the degree of scalability and convertibility of the system must be considered in the design phase, which affects the abilities to reconfigure the system in accordance with changes during its operating lifetime. However, in current research it is indicated that conventional manufacturing system design methods do not support the design of an RMS and that a systematic RMS design method is lacking, despite the fact that numerous contributions exist. Moreover, there is currently only limited evidence for the breakthrough of reconfigurability in industry. Therefore, the research presented in this paper aims at synthesizing current contributions into a generic method for RMS design. Initially, currently available design methods for RMS are reviewed, in terms of classifying and comparing their content, structure, and scope, which leads to a synthesis of the reviewed methods into a generic design method. In continuation of this, the paper includes a discussion of practical implications related to carrying out the design, including an identification of potential challenges and an assessment of which tools that can be applied to support the design. Conclusively, further areas for research are indicated, which provides valuable knowledge of how to develop and realize the benefits of reconfigurability in industry.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 4.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 5.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Core plant capabilities for competitive production development - a literature review2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although plant role issues have been discussed in a number of studies, there is limited insights in literature on the capabilities that are required for the core plant to be excellent. Drawing on a capability based perspective, the purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding of core plant capabilities for competitive production development by analysing the multidisciplinary literature on the core plant concept. We synthesis our findings into a conceptual model that distinguishing capabilities required to be (come) and act as an excellent core plant and thus widen the core plant concept and offer several contributions.

  • 6.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Support for successful Production System Development: Handbook2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For Swedish manufacturing companies active on the global market, high-performance production systems that contribute to the growth and competitiveness of the company are essential and one way to keep production in Sweden. Among a wide range of Swedish manufacturing companies it is becoming increasingly acknowledged that superior production system capabilities are crucial for competitive success. This being said, major attention has been paid to improving the operational performance of the production system. The focus in industry is mostly on the serial making of products, rather than on the prior development of the corresponding production system. At the end of the day, the real root cause of many problems and losses in production stem from issues that emanate from the development process of the production system. The potential of gaining a competitive edge by improving both the way the production system is developed and the way it is operated is hence ignored, even though it is a well-known fact that it is during the design phase that the most important decisions are made. In today’s industry, production system development is often still made ad hoc on the basis of past experiences and without any long-term perspective. If the production system is not designed in a proper way, it will eventually result in disturbances during both start-up and serial production. This leads to low capacity utilization, high production cost, and hence low profitability. To succeed, commitment is required as well as a shift in attention from the operations phase to the under-utilized potential of the design of production systems. The ideal outcome of production system development is the best possible production system that can easily be realized and is high-performing in operation. This will contribute to the growth and competitiveness of the company. To stay competitive, a shift in mind-set is required at many Swedish industries. Production system development is not only something that should work; it must be regarded as a competitive means and consequently be worked with systematically.

  • 7.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier integration throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As production equipment is often designed and built by equipment suppliers rather than made in-house, a collaborative buyer-supplier-relationship could be utilized in order to create robust solutions and enhance innovative ideas. The purpose with this paper is to explore critical user-supplier collaboration activities throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment development. The purpose is accomplished by a literature review and a case study including more than 30 semi-structured interviews at four companies. The challenges vary depending on equipment life cycle phase and user/supplier perspective. A life cycle model with eight stages is proposed including critical interconnected activities for each stage.

  • 8.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier collaboration in production equipment development – a lifecycle perspective2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to refine existing theories on collaboration between users and suppliers in joint production equipment development projects by exploring critical collaboration activities throughout the lifecycle stages of the production equipment. By means of a literature review and a multiple case study of two equipment suppliers and two users, a lifecycle perspective on production equipment development is adopted. Our results show that collaboration intensity depends on the specific lifecycle stage of the production equipment. The contributions of this paper are illustrated in a developed lifecycle model in order to facilitate practitioners in organising critical collaboration activities.

  • 9.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Development of Robust Production Equipment: A guide to strong collaboration between users and suppliers2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of today’s global and increasingly tough competition is narrow market windows and a demand for quick volume increases in production. This in turn means increased demands for a rapid and effective development of production equipment that ensures high performance right at the start of production. Robust production equipment with a high level of production efficiency and reduced costs for operation and maintenance therefore make up one of the most important factors for strong competitiveness and high profitability for Swedish industrial enterprises. Strong collaboration between users and suppliers is the key to success in this type of investment project. This handbook therefore presents a model that can be used by manufacturing companies who want to develop robust production equipment. The model and the other recommendations of the handbook focus on projects that are to be carried out in strong collaboration and are targeted at both users and suppliers. The model has been deve-loped through “EQUIP – User-supplier integration in production equipment design”, which has received funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013–2016. The model consists of seven development phases based on the production equipment life cycle: Phase 1 – Preliminary study Phase 2 – Concept study Phase 3 – Procurement Phase 4 – Detailed design Phase 5 – Construction Phase 6 – Installation and commissioning Phase 7 – Production In each phase, critical activity steps and recommendations are presented for how to distribute responsibility within and between the parties involved. The model adopts a life cycle perspective for development projects in order to facilitate collaboration and to more clearly visualise the link between activities and their impact on the project success. Within the scope of an investment project, there is a great potential for developing sustainable production solutions. For this reason, this handbook also presents seven guidelines that may provide you with support in developing production equipment that remains secure, lean and sustainable throughout the equipment life cycle. The main purpose of the handbook is to facilitate collaboration through the whole investment project in a way that benefits both parties and which contributes to lasting relationships. The results of the research project show that there is a great interest in improved collaboration from both users and suppliers. For this reason, support, tools and preparedness from both parties are required to venture into investing time and resources in collaboration from the beginning, in the early phases of a new development project. This is then the potential to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration and for designing the best possible production equipment in the shortest time possible.

  • 10.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Utveckling av Robust Produktionsutrustning: En guide för god samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Av dagens globala och allt hårdare konkurrens följer korta marknadsfönster och krav på snabb volym- uppgång i produktion. Det innebär i sin tur ökade krav på snabb och effektiv utveckling av produktions- utrustning som säkerställer hög prestanda direkt vid produktionsstart. Robust produktionsutrustning med hög produktionseffektivitet och minskade kostnader för drift och underhåll är därför en av de viktigaste faktorerna för stark konkurrenskraft och hög lönsamhet för svenska industriföretag. God samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör är nyckeln till framgång i denna typ av investerings- projekt. Denna handbok presenterar därför en modell som kan användas av tillverkande företag som vill utveckla robust produktionsutrustning. Modellen och övriga rekommendationer i handboken fokuserar på projekt som ska genomföras i stark samverkan och riktar sig till både beställaren och leverantören. Den har utvecklats i forskningsprojektet ”EQUIP – kund- och leverantörsintegration i utformning av produktionsutrustning” som finansierats av KK-stiftelsen under 2013-2016. Modellen består av sju utvecklingsfaser som är baser- ade på produktionsutrustnings livscykel: Fas 1 – Förstudie Fas 2 – Konceptstudie Fas 3 – Upphandling Fas 4 – Detaljerad utformning Fas 5 – Uppbyggnad Fas 6 – Installation och driftsättning Fas 7 – Produktion I varje fas presenteras kritiska aktivitetssteg och rekommendationer för hur ansvaret för dessa bör fördelas inom och emellan deltagande parter. Modellen använder ett livscykelperspektiv för utvecklingsprojekt för att underlätta samverkan samt tydligare visualisera sambandet mellan aktiviteter och deras påverkan på projektets framgång. Inom ramen för ett investeringsprojekt finns stor potential att utveckla hållbara produktionslösningar. Därför presenterar denna handbok även sju guider som kan stödja er i att ta fram produktionsutrustning som är säker, lean och hållbar under hela utrustningens livscykel. Huvudsyftet med handboken är att underlätta samverkan under hela investeringsprojektet på ett sätt som gagnar båda parter och bidrar till varaktiga relationer. Forskningsprojektets resultat visar att det finns ett stort intresse för främjad samverkan från både beställ- are och leverantör. Därför behövs stöd, verktyg och beredskap från båda parter för att våga investera tid och resurser på samverkan redan från början, i de tidiga faserna av ett nytt utvecklingsprojekt. Det är då potentialen att lägga grunden till långsiktig samverkan och utforma bästa möjliga produktionsutrustning på kortast möjliga tid är som störst.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring the integration process of new practices for knowledge sharing2019In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide new perspectives on the implementation of new operations management practices by applying three different but interrelated frameworks: Human Interaction Dynamics, Normalization Process Theory, and Professional competence as ways of being. The empirical material in this paper is based on a case study within a global manufacturing company, and more specific the development and implementation of a new OM practice for knowledge sharing at one of the sites in Sweden. A mixed-method approach is used, and the empirical material is collected through analysis of a database, two group interviews, and a survey.

  • 12.
    Kvarnemo, A.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Project portfolio management in technology transformation situations2020In: 26th International Association for Management of Technology Conference, IAMOT 2017, International Association for Management of Technology Conference (IAMOT) and the Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria , 2020, p. 480-487Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project portfolio management (PPM) is central for project-based firms to achieve structure and prioritization among multiple projects. Competitive pressures, emergence of new technology and constantly changing customer demand imply a dynamic nature of PPM that calls for adjustments to different situations. This paper investigates PPM challenges that a company in the lighting industry face during a technology transformation from fluorescent technology to LED technology. The technology transformation resembles a modular innovation and the question asked is: How does technology transformation influence the project selection process? The findings rest upon an in-depth case study where data was collected via narrative interviews with representatives having detailed insights into the company's PPM activities and decisions. The key findings from the study are: (1) When a company faces a technology, which involves most products in the portfolio to be converted to a new technology, the project selection focus shifts from “what products should be developed” to “in what order should the products be developed”. (2) The technology transformation might lead to that the planned order for carrying out projects can be frequently changed due to reprioritizations during project execution phase. Based on the key findings it can be concluded that PPM selection seems more dynamic than postulated in the literature. This paper contributes with increased insights into the dynamic nature of project selection, specifically related to a technology transformation situations characterized by modular innovation. Further studies are needed regarding effects of other kinds of technology transformations on project selection activities and decisions as well as other factors contributing to the dynamics of PPM.

  • 13.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Manufacturing Involvement in New Product Development: An Explorative Case Study in Heavy Automotive Component Assembly2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 65-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clear and well-defined new product development (NPD) process, cross-functional development teams and project fit with manufacturing resources and skills, are three areas critical to achieve lower cost, high quality and short time to market in NPD. However it is not clear who from manufacturing function should be involved and in which phase during the NPD project. In order to address this issue, the purpose of this paper is to identify how and when manufacturing functions such as engineers and operators are involved in a NPD project. Results from a conducted case study in heavy automotive component assembly show that manufacturing engineers have been more actively involved compared to manufacturing operators during the early phases of the studies NPD. It confirms earlier results that it is not easy to involve operators in the early phases of project due to abstraction and ambiguity associated with early design.

  • 14.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Manufacturing Engineering Requirements in the Early Stages of New Product Development: A Case Study in Two Assembly Plants2018In: Advanced Applications in Manufacturing Engineering, Elsevier, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15. Nanda, Gautam
    et al.
    Yalman, John-Pierre
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards core plant excellence - Prerequisites and challenges with the core plant role2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, Lund, Sweden, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A core plant should be a centre of excellence, have a central role for production development and should ensure that latest knowledge is to be diffused in the organization’s production network. This paper widens the core plant concept by exploring the core plant role including perquisites required for acting as a core plant and challenges faced of being core plant. Based on a multiple-case study with seven manufacturing companies our findings extent current knowledge about the core plant. Although the core plant concept is not new, our findings show that the core plant role is unclear including how to achieve a strong networking capability and specifically with regard to coordinating the network of different plants all over the world. Core plants do not want to lose control while at the same time local development activities of subsidiaries should be supported. The findings also reveals the urgent need of a core plant the handle the trade?off of being both process innovative and cost efficient to stay competitive and also to secure the core plant role in the future.

  • 16.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Considering Reconfigurability Characteristics in Production System Design2011In: Enabling Manufacturing Competitiveness and Economic Sustainability: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual production (CARV2011), Montreal, Canada, 2-5 October 2011, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 57-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production systems must be easy to change in different configurations in order to meet the demands of e.g. changing product volumes and product types. In order to meet the demands efficient support for design of reconfigurable production systems that is easy to apply in an industrial setting is needed. The problem is to get an understanding of how the production system design process can capture and support the design of reconfigurable production systems with technology, organization, and personnel under consideration. The objective of this paper is to describe and define reconfigurability and discuss how reconfigurability characteristics better can be considered in the production system design process. A literature review is made in order to describe the RMS design research and what is characterizing reconfigurability. A case study has also been carried out in order to analyze how the reconfigurability characteristics were considered in a production system design process. The case study motivate a structured and systematic way to consider reconfigurability in the production system design process. A tentative structure of a support to concider reconfigurability in the production system design process is presented

  • 17. Rösiö, Carin
    Enable Changeability in Manufacturing Systems2009In: Proceedings at the CARV International Conference on Changeable , Agile, Reconfigurable, and virtual Production, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Supporting the Design of Reconfigurable Production Systems2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To compete, manufacturing companies need production systems that quickly can respond to changes. To handle change drivers such as volume variations or new product variants, reconfigurability is advocated as a competitive means. This implies an ability to add, remove, and/or rearrange the structure of the production system to be ready for future changes. Still, it is not clear how the production system design process can capture and support the design of reconfigurable production systems. Therefore, the objective of this thesis is to increase the knowledge of how to support the design of reconfigurable production systems.

    Reconfigurability could be defined by a number of reconfigurability characteristics including convertibility, scalability, automatibility, mobility, modularity, integrability, and diagnosability. In eight case studies, reconfigurability characteristics in production system design were studied in order to investigate reconfigurability needs, knowledge, and practice in manufacturing companies. In three of the case studies reconfigurable production systems were studied to identify the links between change drivers and reconfigurability characteristics. In the remaining five case studies, reconfigurability in the production system design processes was addressed in terms of needs, prerequisites, and consideration.

    Based on the literature review and the case studies, support for reconfigurable production system design is suggested including two parts. The first part comprises support for analyzing the need for reconfigurability. Based on relevant change drivers the need for reconfigurability must be identified to enable selection of right type and degree of reconfigurability for each specific case of application. A comprehensive view of the reconfigurability characteristics is presented and links between change drivers and reconfigurability characteristics are described. The characteristics are divided into critical characteristics, that lead to a capacity or functionality change of the production system, and supporting characteristics, that reduce system reconfiguration time but do not necessarily lead to a modification of functionality or capacity of the production system. The second part provides support in how to consider reconfigurability in the production system design process. A holistic perspective is crucial to design reconfigurable production systems and therefore constituent parts of a production system are described. According to their character physical, logical, and human reconfiguration must be considered through the whole production system design process.

  • 19.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Focusing Early Phases in Production System Design2014In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 440, 2014, no PART 3, p. 100-107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a well-known fact that it is in the early phases of production system design where the most important decisions are made. If the production system is not designed in a proper way, this will eventually end up with disturbances and problems during serial production and it is in the early phases the potential to influence is greatest. The purpose with this paper is therefore to describe how to work and what activities to focus on in early phases of production system design by proposing a structured production system design model focusing on the early phases which can be applied by practitioners and academics. Six production system design projects were studied in three real-time case studies and three retrospective case studies. Combined with literature studies a production system design model is developed describing the initial phases of initiation, project definition and concept including activities and decision points. 

  • 20.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment Operation, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Yang, Qi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Atlas Copco.
    Remanufacturing of production technology - Challenges in collaboration projects and decision-making2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, Trondheim, Norway, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a global manufacturing context it becomes clear that to stay competitive production technology design and implementation needs to be carefully considered. When technology is changing it is important to assess the needs in order to decide whether new or remanufactured production equipment is the best alternative. The purpose of this article is to explore key parameters that differentiate the remanufacturing from the acquisition of new production technology projects and their impact on the collaboration with the equipment supplier. Based on these parameters we propose support for deciding whether to develop new production technology or to remanufacture the current one.

  • 21.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Early production involvement in new product development2015In: POMS 26th Annual Conference POMS, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early phases of production system design important decisions are made that set prerequisites for the whole project. However, production engineers often gets involved when the decisions already are made. This paper aims to develop support for early production involvement founded on multiple case studies.

  • 22.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hedsttöm, Robert
    Linking Production Strategy to Production System Specification - A Case Study2009In: Proceedings of The International 3'rd Swedish Production Symposium, Göteborg, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping Tekniska Högskolan.
    Jackson, Mats
    Högskolan i Jönköping Tekniska Högskolan.
    Enable Changeability in Manufacturing Systems by Adopting a Life Cycle Perspective2009In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production, October 5-7, Munich, Germany, 2009, p. 612-621Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overall industrial objective is to develop and operate manufacturing systems that easily can be changed according to customer requirements, production volumes, and new product generations. Such a manufacturing system needs to be developed with the manufacturing footprint in mind, comprising solutions at a conceptual and technical level that can be standardized and duplicated for new geographical locations. This demands the mindset and the incentives of the anufacturing industry to define and implement a life cycle approach when designing, thinking in system generations and recycling of solutions. It requires an integrated development process of the product and the manufacturing system with conscious planning of a ‘manufacturing systems portfolio’ that corresponds to the product portfolio. These are issues addressed in this paper with the objective to investigate available methods or tools for manufacturing system design, how they correspond to the product portfolio, and how they support life cycle perspective.

  • 24.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University.
    Reconfigurable production system design – theoretical and practical challenges2013In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 7, p. 998-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore theoretical and practical challenges to achieve reconfigurable production system designs. Design/methodology/approach - The empirical material of this paper includes a multiple-case study with an embedded design (Yin) including four cases, where each case represents a production system design project. The consideration of reconfigurability and its characteristics in the production system design projects was studied. To enhance validity, two real-time studies were combined with two retrospective studies (Leonard-Barton). Findings - For more than a decade foresight reports have pointed out the need for responsiveness to change through reconfigurability in production system design. In order to achieve reconfigurable production systems, three challenges were identified: to use a structured design methodology, to gain knowledge in reconfigurability and its characteristics, and to include the reconfigurability knowledge in a structured design methodology. Still there is no comprehensive support available for reconfigurability in the production system design process. Research limitations/implications - Limitations are mostly related to the chosen methodology approach, and additional empirical studies to establish generic results are required. Practical implications - By combining knowledge from the production system design field with the reconfigurable manufacturing system field a potential of meeting identified challenges is pointed out. Originality/value - This paper adds to current knowledge by pointing out three main challenges to achieving reconfigurable production systems. The paper also contributes with ideas on how to respond to these challenges.

  • 25.
    Rösiö, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Risk Analysis in Manufacturing Footprint Decisions2013In: International Conference on Manufacturing Research: International Conference on Manufacturing Research 2013, Cranfield University Press , 2013, p. 495-500Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key aspect in the manufacturing footprint analysis is the risk and sensitivity analysis of critical parameters. In order to contribute to efficient industrial methods and tools for making well-founded strategic decisions regarding manufacturing footprint this paper aims to describe the main risks that need to be considered while locating manufacturing activities, and what risk mitigation techniques and strategies that are proper in order to deal with these risks. It is also proposed how the risk analysis should be included in the manufacturing location decision process.

  • 26.
    Schedin, Joel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Considering Production Localisation in the Production System Design process2012Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf