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  • 1.
    Anund Vogel, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Per
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arias, Jaime
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Problem areas related to energy efficiency implementation in Swedish multifaily buildings2016In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates problem areas related to energy efficiency implementation in Swedish multifamily buildings. The paper first presents a generic list of (theoretical) problem areas identified through a literature survey. Using a qualitative approach, the paper also investigates if the problem areas identified in the literature also have an impact on the Swedish building sector. Results from the interview study reveal a strong coherence between problem areas in the literature and those expressed by the interviewees. However, this paper identifies seven novel challenges that cannot be derived from the list of barriers in the literature. Moreover, results reveal that as many as 12 problem areas have their origin in national factors such as agreement structures, incentive schemes, and cost calculation methods.

  • 2.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    De nyföddas drivhus: Teknik och etik i den svenska neonatalvårdens historia 1945-20052004In: Polhem: Tidskrift för teknikhistoria, ISSN 0281-2142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    ”Den ”goda vägen” in i bilsamhället”1997In: Drömmen om bilen, Fataburen 1997 / [ed] Barbro Bursell och Annette Rosengren, Nordiska museet , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fartens entreprenörer och den teknifierade hastigheten: lobbygrupperna och massbilismens framväxt i Sverige under efterkrigstiden2005In: Den jyske historiker, ISSN 0109-9280, E-ISSN 1902-472XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [da]

    Artiklen undersøger den rolle hastighed, højhastighed og’ flow’ spillede ved etableringen af det svenske bilsamfund. Den fokuserer på de argumenter og strategier billobbyen benyttede sig af i deres promovering af den uhindrede (auto)mobilitet, med særlig fokus på efterkrigstiden, da massebilismen blev en realistisk mulighed. Det lykkedes billobbyen ved hjælp af argumenter med rødder i det nye vejbygnings- og trafikmangementparadigme – ”American Traffic Engineering” -  at gøre trafikdebatten til et teknisk spørgsmål.

  • 5.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Method for engineering students: Degree projects using the 4-phase Model2015Book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ny teknik som politisk ideologi1999In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, Vol. 4, no 92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    ”Ny teknik som politisk strategi. Svenska vägföreningen och det gryende bilsamhället 1914-1924”1998In: Den konstruerade världen. Tekniska system i historisk belysning / [ed] Pär Blomkvist och Arne Kaijser, Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Sweden.
    Om förvaltning av gemensamma resurser: Enskild väghållning och allmänningens dilemma i svensk historia 1200–20102010Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roads for flow - roads for peace: Lobbying for a European Highway System2006In: Networking Europe: Transnational Infrastructures and the Shaping of Europe, 1850-2000 / [ed] Kaijser, Arne and Erik van der Vleuten, Science History Publications Ltd. , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Sweden.
    Systemdiagnos - ett managementverktyg: Läromedel2008Other (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Sweden.
    Transferring Technology - Shaping Ideology: American Traffic Engineering, Experts and Commercial Interests in Establishment of a Swedish, and European, Car Society in the Post War Period2004In: Comparative Technology Transfer and Society, ISSN 1542-0132, E-ISSN 1543-3404, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 273-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to discuss the actors involved, and the arguments used, in the process leading to the implementation of The Road Plan for Sweden. The Road Plan, a 20-year program to improve and modernize Sweden, aimed to rebuild and adapt the country's network of roads to suit the needs of mass motorization. It marked a breakthrough as a new kind of far-reaching societal planning, with the car as the point of departure. This article analyzes the means by which technical ideas and planning approaches developed elsewhere found their way into the plan. The Swedish road system was connected to the European road network, but the technical ideas of traffic engineeringon which the plan rested derived from an even wider base that reached all the way to the United States. This article investigates and explains the influence of the international road and car lobby—specifically the International Road Federation and its "local branch" the Swedish Road Federation—in encouraging the adoption of American-based traffic engineering ideals in the Swedish Road Plan.

  • 12.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Emanuel, Martin
    KTH, Sweden.
    Co-evolution of Technology and Institutions: Government Regulation and Technological Creativity in the Swedish Moped History 1952–702014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first of July 1952, the moped was legislatively excluded from existing restrictions for heavier two-wheeled motorized vehicles. A driver/owner of a “bicycle with auxiliary engine” – this was the original denomination of the vehicle – thus needed no registration, driver’s license or insurance, nor pay any vehicle tax. The legislators did, however, postulate some technical requirements. Besides regulation of the engine, the vehicle should be “bicycle-like” and have pedals. It should thus be driven primarily by means of human, not mechanical, power (i.e., it was not supposed to be a lighter version of a motorcycle). In terms of social and economic goals, the state assumed workers to be the primary users, and a utilitarian use rather than one connected to pleasure and spare time. Very quickly, however, the moped lost all resemblance with the ordinary bicycle (except for the pedals). In a new legislation in 1961, the state yielded to the technical development. The moped no longer needed to resemble a bicycle or have pedals. Meanwhile, the moped also became more of a toy for boys – a vehicle for freedom – rather than the useful tool the state had wished for. In fact, we argue that the demands from user groups not foreseen played a crucial role in changing the legal technical requirements of the moped.This paper deals with the co-evolution, technically and institutionally, of the moped during the period 1952–75. Using a method inspired by evolutionary theory, the moped models released in Sweden in these years are grouped in “families” with distinctive technical features and accompanying presumed uses. We analyze this development using concepts from the theoretical fields of innovation studies and the history of technology

  • 13.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Emanuel, Martin
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Från nyttofordon till frihetsmaskin: Teknisk och institutionell samevolution kring mopeden i Sverige 1952–752009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blomkvist, Pär & Martin Emanuel, From Utility to Freedom: The Co-evolution of Technology and Institutions in the History of the Swedish Moped 1952–75, Division of Industrial Dynamics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Stockholm 2009)

    The first of July 1952, the moped was legislatively excluded from existing restrictions for heavier two-wheeled motorized vehicles. A driver/owner of a “bicycle with auxiliary engine” – this was the original denomination of the vehicle – thus needed no registration, driver’s license or insurance, nor pay any vehicle tax. The legislators did, however, postulate some technical requirements. Besides regulation of the engine, the vehicle should be “bicycle-like” and have pedals. It should thus be driven primarily by means of human, not mechanical, power (i.e., it was not supposed to be a lighter version of a motorcycle). In terms of social and economical goals, the state assumed workers to be the primary users, and a utilitarian use rather than one connected to pleasure and spare time.

    Very quickly, however, the moped lost all resemblance with the ordinary bicycle (except for the pedals). In a new legislation in 1961, the state yielded to the technical development. The moped no longer needed to resemble a bicycle or have pedals. Meanwhile, the moped also became more of a toy for boys – a vehicle for freedom – rather than the useful tool the state had wished for. In fact, we argue that the demands from user groups not foreseen played a crucial role in changing the legal technical requirements of the moped.

    This report treats the co-evolution, technically and institutionally, of the moped during the period 1952–75. Using a method inspired by evolutionary theory, the moped models released in Sweden in these years are grouped in “families” with distinctive technical features and accompanying presumed uses. For understanding how demands of different user groups can alter the “dominant design” of a technology (Abernathy & Utterback, 1978), the concept pair of technical and functional demand specifications are developed. While dominant design may capture conservative features in technological development, our concepts seem to better capture the dynamics in technical and institutional change – the co-evolution of technology and institutions.

     

  • 14.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Emanuel, Martin
    Regulating a Freedom Machine: Swedish Moped History, 1952–61In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motorization was a superordinate societal goal in post-war Sweden. Through planning and regulation, politicians and technocrats within the state administration made common cause with industry and lobby groups to establish a road traffic system and to build a ‘car society.’ This article investigates a small sub-system, or niche, of this road traffic system, populated by smaller two-wheeled motorized vehicles, i.e. the bicycle with an auxiliary engine, soon popularly called a moped. The purpose of the article is to analyse legislators’ attempts to regulate moped technology and usage, and their ultimate failure to do so. It is difficult to bring about a specific usage of a consumer technology by imposing technical requirements. Users and producers are often able to avoid the intentions of regulators; they find ways to innovate and mould the technology for their own purposes. The article also highlights the importance of historical context. As society change, during the implementation of a regulation, some factors that originally motivated the rules fade away and become less important.

     

    Keywords: freedom, moped, regulation, road traffic system, Sweden, welfare state

  • 15.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Method for engineering students: Degree projects using the 4-phase Model2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Method for engineering students provides an overview of how to formulate, design, produce and deliver a thesis of good quality. The book is relevant for all types of degree projects on bachelors’ and masters’ levels and is also useful when performing research work in other contexts. This is the first comprehensive book on research methodology for engineering students who are performing their degree project within or close to the social sciences. The book has been inspired by modern product design – the thesis is seen as a product – and takes as its starting point the fact that one may have two clients when carrying out a degree project (Academia and Industry). It also describes how to work one’s way through the process through the development of different prototypes. We see the thesis work as a form of craft and the book contains the most important scientific tools that are needed in order to make informed choices.

  • 16.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindell, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Metod för företagsekonomer: Uppsats enligt 4-stegsmodellen2018 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsats enligt 4-stegsmodellen

    I den här boken får du hjälp genom hela uppsatsprocessen – från forskningsidé och problemformulering till färdig text. Boken bygger på 4-stegsmodellen, som består av att problemformulera, undersöka, producera och leverera. Genom de fyra stegen i uppsatsprocessen arbetar du successivt fram alltmer färdiga utkast. Den grundläggande principen är att det mest effektiva sättet att komma framåt i arbetet är genom att skriva och presentera dessa utkast.

    Att skriva uppsats är ett hantverk och boken innehåller en genomgång av de viktigaste vetenskapliga verktyg du behöver använda för att kunna göra medvetna val för just din uppsats.

    Boken vänder sig i första hand till dig som ska skriva en uppsats i företagsekonomi på kandidat-, magister- eller masternivå. Men den fungerar också för dig som skriver uppsats inom andra samhällsvetenskapliga ämnen.

  • 17.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Johansson, PetterKTH, Stockholm.
    A Dynamic Mind. Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Johansson, Petter
    KTH, Sweden.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Sweden.
    This is Industrial Dynamics2016In: A Dynamic Mind. Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius / [ed] Pär Blomkvist och Petter Johansson, Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics, Department of Industrial Economics and Management, KTH. , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Larsson, Jesper
    KTH, Sweden.
    An analytical framework for common-pool resource-large technical system (CPR-LTS) constellations2013In: International Journal of the Commons, ISSN 1875-0281, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 113-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces an analytical framework for a special phenomenon: when a common-pool resource (CPR) institution and a large technical system (LTS) are connected and mutually interdependent. The CPR in this case is a node managed by its appropriators within a centrally planned and managed system; here named CPR-LTS constellations. Our framework is empirically derived from two historical investigations of CPR institutions within two LTSs, the agricultural-technical system and the road transport system of Sweden. By comparing similarities and differences it is possible to identify paths to successes and failures. To understand why one survived and the other disappeared we connect Elinor Ostrom's theories about management of CPRs with Thomas P. Hughes's theories about LTSs. We are proposing a framework that can bridge the gap between theories about management of CPRs and LTSs. By combining the two theories it should be possible to better understand how small-scale producers using bottom-up CPRs can be linked to top-down LTSs. We will argue that to fit within an LTS, a CPR needs alignment between different parts or components within the constellation/system and alignment with other systems and institutions in society. We propose three analytical levels to deal with the phenomenon of aligning a CPR project to an existing, large sociotechnical system: Local alignment (CPR): How are CPRs organized and managed 1. at local sites? 2. Sociotechnical alignment (CPR-LTS): How are CPRs connected to the sociotechnical system? 3. Contextual alignment: How are CPR-LTS constellations aligned with neighboring institutions and systems in society? Our work indicates that for successful management of a CPR-LTS constellation it is important that the CPR be included in legislation and that government agencies support the CPR in alignment with the LTS. Legislators must recognize the CPR-part in the CPR-LTS constellation so that its institutional body is firmly established in society. In this study, we have used the framework ex-post; however, we anticipate that the framework could be a diagnostic tool ex-ante for CPR-LTS constellations

  • 20.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Petter, Johansson
    Systems thinking in Industrial dynamics2016In: A Dynamic Mind. Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius / [ed] Pär Blomkvist och Petter Johansson, Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics, Department of Industrial Economics and Management, KTH. , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Sandberg, Thomas
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Vindkraft och samfällighetsförvaltning2011In: Aspect, ISSN 2000-4877, no 7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, Stockholm.
    A Chain is only as Strong as its Weakest Link: Managing Change in the Curriculum of Industrial Management Education2012In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstracIn this paper we discuss the process of designing a new Industrial Management Master Program given by the department of Industrial Economics and Management at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. The foundation of the IM-master program lies in the notions of authenticity and change. We decided early on in the design process, that our aim was to teach the skills of real world change management and to "mould" our students into industrial managers able to master complex industrial change processes. But we realized that we also had to "mould" our own pedagogical tools, examination forms, and not the least, faculty, to reach our goals. These insights lead us to emphasize a Systems perspective, both in regards to program and course design and in regards to the actual management skills we wanted to teach. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss our explicit use of a systems perspective in designing the Industrial masters program. We have identified four major parts of "our system" where changes had to be made: Premises - Learning activities - Examination - Program management. These four system parts are divided into ten subsections - "systems components". We discuss all four system parts in relation to our goals to enhance authentic skills in change management.

  • 23.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Learning to love ambiguity: authentic live case methodology in industrial management education2012In: International Journal of Case Method Research & Application, ISSN 1554-7752, Vol. XXIV, no 4, p. 272-285Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bråsjö, Ellinor
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Swedish Strengths in the Environmental Industry: Background study of Environmental Foresight, IVA, September 20062006Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nilsson, David
    et al.
    KTH, Filosofi och historia.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Sweden.
    Understanding system alignment: Combining LTS and MLP to investigate urban water transitions in Kenya and Uganda2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we want to contribute to a theoretical framework suited for analysing and understanding infrastructural change in Africa, and to explore how such a framework may offer a different, more comprehensive and historically informed perspective, which will be necessary for a transformative shift towards global sustainability. We examine the socio-technical dynamics of large water infrastructure in a developing country, Kenya. In particular, we look at the provision of water to the capital Nairobi and its historical trajectory over the past one hundred years. We also discuss tentative results from an ongoing case study on pre-paid metering in the water system in Kampala, Uganda.

    In our theoretical approach we combine ideas from the fields of history with innovation- and system studies. We revisit some of the thinking once assembled in the global North around how large infrastructure systems grow and change (the Large Technical Systems, LTS) and try to make parallels and divergences to the trajectories of water infrastructure in Nairobi, while we also bring on board key concepts from the multi-level perspective (MLP). Essentially, we try to locate to which level in the system innovation activity has been concentrated, and what has been the main direction of this activity over a longer period of time. For a broad-brush picture such as this one, we draw our empirical material mainly from our earlier historical research, much of which has already been published, as well as other authors. The novelty of this paper is our re-interpretation of the broad transformation patterns which we enable by using a long time perspective and by the recombination of theory and historical observations.

    Our conclusion is that key actors have focussed the continued supply of capital for expansion of the large-scale infrastructure of the system, particularly in its upstream sections. At the same time, the piped part of the water system has become increasingly misaligned with the plurality of sub-systems delivering water outside the borders of the system, which forms the downstream environment of the system. Notably, poor people living in so called “informal settlements” or “slums” have remained disenfranchised to the regime, as they have been defined by regime actors as illegal and thus as externalities of the system. A re-alignment process has taken place in the past two decades through sector reform which has re-enabled capital supply and thus large-scale infrastructure growth. On the other hand, this growth is of a kind that is of marginal benefit to the growing group of low-income urban consumers on the periphery of the large-scale piped system. We suggest that the system exhibits a dual structure of a conservative core serving the middle and high-income population, and with peripheral parts of the system containing a plethora of local innovations. 

    Our proposition is the development of an analytical and policy-oriented framework which focuses on alignment processes between what we argue is the most critical level of system interface; between the established water system (regime) and the peripheral sub-systems (local innovation). If we are serious about universal service provision and the human right to water, we must understand this interface, its actors, subsystems and processes; and how alignment between system levels can be achieved.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, David
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Karpouzoglou, Timos
    Lawhon, Mary
    The city beyond the network2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, the modern infrastructure ideal has dominated the imagination of urbanists. As a consequence, cities and their infrastructures of pipes, roads, wires and trams, have largely been built in the same way all over world. Or have they? Recent urban scholarship suggests that cities and their modes of service provision needs to be re-envisaged, especially in the global South, not just through the lens of the ’situated’ but through disentangling it from the modernist framing altogether. The multilayered challenges - including new types of vulnerabilities of technology and users - experienced by cityregions worldwide imply that a new thought-model is called for. This paper picks up the concept of ‘Heterogeneous Infrastructure Configuration’ (HIC) suggested by Lawhon, Nilsson, Silver, Erntson and Lwasa (2017). In somewhat speculative fashion we go on to hypothesise that Stockholm, Nairobi and Kampala are at interesting historical junctures in terms of conceiving infrastructures and how they distribute power and risk across user spectrums. Are urban infrastructures across the globe being re-engineered from below, but for different reasons? We sketch at a research agenda where grounded and diverse experiences of global North and South will generate new insights for sustainable transformation of cities globally.

  • 27.
    Uppvall, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Bergqvist, William
    KTH, Stockholm.
    Opening the black box of collaborative writing: experiences from a teamwork-based course in industrial management2017In: Produção, ISSN 0103-6513, E-ISSN 1980-5411, Vol. 27, no SpecialArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the introduction of collaborative writing (CW) tools in a course designed with learning activities based on problem-based learning (PBL), authentic case methodology, and teamwork. We argue that CW is a vital, but poorly understood, part of teamwork, and a black-box activity. Our ambition is to open the black box of CW and discuss how CW concepts can enrich teamwork activities. We build on our students’ reflections on challenges linked to CW in a teamwork setting. In total the data consisted of 77 individual reflection papers, which were analyzed using constructs from prior literature on CW. Our results show that our students actively used CW tools and strategies and that CW had a large impact—and, in fact, enhanced teamwork management. The CW tools also helped in creating sustainable teamwork in the sense that they enhanced the three criterions of team performance: productivity, cohesion, and learning.

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