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  • 1.
    J. Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ewa
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Swenningsson, Kristina
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Success factors when implementing innovation teams2020Inngår i: Event Proceedings: LUT Scientific and Expertise Publications, 2020Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores the success factors of the research-based process for creating high-performing innovation teams, called the CIT-process. This paper is part of a study through which problems in the implementation of high-performing innovation teams were identified (Johnsson et al., 2019) when being used by innovation management practitioners (practitioners). The CIT-process is a five-step process prior to the innovation process. Before organizations were involved, practitioners at an innovation management firm were educated in the CIT-process and evaluated. Three innovation teams were created by the practitioners, conducting real innovation projects, facilitated by the practitioners. Data were collected through filed notes and interviews with participants and the practitioners. Three main themes appeared as key success factors: knowledge adoption, knowledge transition and knowledge transfer. Limitations are highlighted and future research is suggested.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Success factors when implementing innovation teams
  • 2.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Creating Global High-Performing Innovation Teams: Insights and Guidelines2023Inngår i: Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 11, nr 2, s. 71-117Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a model, process and guidelines supporting the creation of global high-performing innovation teams. As global innovation work by teams has become more common, global companies conducting or aiming to conduct global innovation work would benefit from using the suggested proposals. Through a two-pronged research approach, data were collected through a systematic literature review to identify key factors enabling global innovation work from the innovation team perspective and its context, which were validated through interviews and questionnaires with senior management, management, and team members involved in innovation teams spanning six countries. The analysis enabled the proposition of an original model describing a global high-performing innovation team and its context and perspectives alongside a process and guidelines to create such teams in practice, adding knowledge to previous literature, particularly the research field of Innovation Management. Limitations and further research are discussed.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Creating Global High-Performing Innovation Teams – Insights and Guidelines
  • 3.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Creating High-performing Innovation Teams2017Inngår i: Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 23-47Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research suggests a conceptual process of how to create highperforming

    innovation teams to meet the market’s need of faster ways of

    conducting innovation work. The CIT-process (Creating high-performing

    Innovation Teams) is a five-step-process systematically developed to meet

    organizational-, team-, and individual perspectives. On a holistic level, this

    research contributes to prior research by bringing research on innovation teams

    and high-performing teams together to become a pre-stage to established group

    dynamic processes and innovation processes. Practical implications and future

    research are suggested.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering. Mälardalen University.
    Factors enabling global innovation teams - a reveiw2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, a systematic literature review of factors enabling global innovation teams has been conducted. In innovation work, global companies can benefit from, for example, accessing talents and working around the clock. On the other hand, the call for reduced travelling may be hinder global innovation teams from conducting innovation work. Previous research has developed knowledge of team models, virtual teams and innovation teams. In this study, a distinction is made between virtual teams and global teams, even though both types of team connect through technology. Virtual team members can meet under certain circumstances, while global team members cannot meet without travelling far distances. Building on prior research, the study proposes factors enabling global innovation teams and a model to demonstrate and illustrate the different perspectives of the global innovation team. Limitations are discussed, and further research is proposed.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Factors enabling global innovation teams - a review
  • 5.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Factors influencing temporary innovation teams - research in progress2022Inngår i: Event Proceedings: LUT Scientific and Expertise Publications, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this ongoing research, I aim to develop an understanding of factors influencing temporary innovation teams. An innovation team is defined as a purposely created team conducting innovation, meaning they are not just “any” team that accidentally innovates. Innovation teams have gained more and more interest lately, stemming from group development research, team building and organisational development. Except for “ordinary” innovation teams, innovation work is also conducted using Hackathons, where teams purposely are created aiming to solve defined problems in a limited time, i.e., temporary innovation teams. In research covering Hackathons, innovation-related aspects, for example, immaterial property rights, the benefit of collaboration, the problem with dysfunctionality, and the structure for planning and executing Hackathons, are explored. Not covered fully is the understanding of factors influencing temporary teams positively and negatively, to which this study aims to contribute. The following research will focus on the process of creating temporary innovation teams.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Factors influencing temporary innovation teams - research in progress
  • 6.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    How to create high-performing innovation teams2022Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective teamwork is essential if innovation projects are to succeed. How to create high-performing innovation teams provides practical guidance and advice on creating high-performing teams regardless of type or size of company, organization, or public institution. It offers the reader pivotal tools and insights to use in practice.

    Both the theory and practice for creating high-performing innovation teams are discussed and new tools and insights are provided for managers, consultants, and academics. It answers the call for rapid innovation to respond to the increasingly changing market and to shorter product life cycles.

    How to create high-performing innovation teams addresses specifically the factors that enable innovation work from the perspective of the organization, the innovation team, and its members. In addition to co-located innovation teams, the book also discusses the differences among global organizations and what to consider in the creation of global high-performing innovation teams.

    Download (pdf)
    Sammanfattning/Summary
  • 7.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    How Understanding of Agile Innovation Work Affects Innovation Teams2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     This research aims to explore how the understanding of agile innovation work methodologies affect innovation teams and the progress of innovation projects. In a long-term research, three innovation teams were studied through questionnaires, interviews, audio-recorded interviews and rich notes from. The data was analysed using group development theories and knowledge taxonomy to determine the relation of the teams' estimated knowledge and their performance in relation to the teams’ group development status. The results indicate that innovation teams that are unfamiliar with agile innovation work tend to not seek collaboration due to uncertainty, which results in slow progress. When an innovation team’s surrounding organisation is unfamiliar with agile innovation methodologies it tends to not offer their support until the innovation team can prove progress, also slowing the progress down. The opposite is noticed when innovation teams and the organisation understands how to apply agile innovation work methodologies, collaboration occurs easily, resulting in positive progress. Further research is suggested.

  • 8.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Högpresterande innovationsteam - steg för steg2018 (oppl. 1)Bok (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det bubblar om innovation överallt. Alltfler förstår att innovation är avgörande för fortsatt framgång och överlevnad oavsett typ av organisation. Men nu är det dags att ta nästa steg - att få någonting gjort och dessutom snabbt och effektivt.

     

    I Högpresterande innovationsteam får du veta hur du kan skapa innovationsteam i din organisation, som aktivt arbetar med att utveckla till exempel nya produkter, tjänster och processer mot ett givet mål. I boken finns konkreta tillvägagångssätt, råd och tips på hur du steg-för-steg skapar och etablerar ett högpresterande innovationsteam. Kärnan är att skapa ett team som är skapat utifrån sitt uppdrag – att innovera – som samtidigt inte hamnar i grupprelaterade problem.

     

    Boken vänder sig till dig som är verksam med innovationsfrågor i din organisation, både i ledning och operativt, som utbildar om innovation på universitet och högskola eller som är konsult. Varje kapitel avslutas med reflektionsfrågor som hjälper dig att tänka igenom och konkretisera vägen framåt i skapandet av innovationsteam i din verksamhet.

  • 9.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Important innovation enablers for innovation teams2016Inngår i: ISPIM Innovation Symposium; Manchester 2016, Manchester, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to study if innovation enablers (Enablers), i.e. factors that enable innovation work, are important for innovation teams in on-going innovation work and if lack of Enablers affects innovation projects negatively. The background to this study is that prior research states that numerous factors are important for innovation work, but there’s still knowledge to gain whatever these Enablers are perceived to be important by innovation teams. Data from three innovation teams on-going innovation projects, supported by an external facilitator, were used within this study. The long-term qualitative study shows that all Enablers are important, but also that a facilitator is important. Lack of Enablers may cause negative effects on innovation projects, where nine enablers within this study were identified to be critical for avoiding project delays. Further research is suggested.

  • 10.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Innovation Enablers and Their Importance for Innovation Teams2016Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to develop an understanding of factors that enable innovation teams to conduct agile innovation work in an industrial context. The background and reason for this research are not only that innovation is necessary for companies that want to stay in business, but also that these companies need to increase the speed of their innovation work to stay competitive. Research has demonstrated that cross-functional (X-functional) innovation teams are fast and agile, and are therefore assumed to be suitable for these activities. Still, there is much knowledge to be gained.

    Prior research has identified factors that are seen as important from an organizational, team, and individual perspective to enable teams to work with potentially innovative outcomes. However, in cases where teams have been created with the purpose of conducting innovation work, i.e. innovation teams, problems related to e.g. performance and learning have occurred, and the innovation work has stopped shortly after conducted research projects due to the high level of complexity.

    The research question (RQ) that this thesis explores is the following: “Which innovation enablers are important for innovation teams when conducting agile innovation work in an industrial context?” Based on the RQ, two sub-questions are formulated and operationalized to answer the RQ.

    Qualitative data have been collected from five innovation teams in two phases. Two innovation teams in two small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) were studied in the first phase to clarify the situation for innovation teams before innovation work is begun. In the second phase, which built on the first one, three innovation teams in a large industrial company were studied as they conducted three separate innovation projects.

    This research revealed five main findings: first, knowledge about important innovation enablers (Enablers) revealed from a literature study; second, the Innovation Team Model (ITM), demonstrating innovation teams before innovation work is begun in relation to the individuals and organization in a holistic way; third, the innovation team creation process (CIT-process), a stepwise process in how to create an innovation team; fourth, the innovation facilitator, who supports and facilitates the innovation team throughout the CIT-process and the innovation projects; and fifth, the Extended Innovation Process (EIP), an extension of the traditional innovation process by a pre-phase, i.e. a Preparation-phase, to gather and prepare the innovation teams for forthcoming work. The findings regarding the importance of the CIT-process, the EIP, and the innovation facilitator were unexpected.

    The findings formed the Innovation Team Framework (ITF), which represents all of the findings in relation to each other. The EIP is used as the basis for which the other innovation enablers are provided to the innovation teams through an innovation facilitator’s competence throughout the innovation project. The ITF is multidimensional: it could serve as a tool to describe both the simplicity and the complexity when creating an innovation team and forthcoming work and activities.

    All separate findings within this research contribute to prior research in individual ways, however, the ITF is the main scientific contribution of this study to Innovation management.

    Practitioners can use the ITF as a complement to already established methodologies for product development or similar; however one should be aware of the limited nature of the data set that served as the basis for analysis and development of the ITF.

    Further studies regarding the ITF and its detailed models and processes are suggested.

  • 11.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Innovation Enablers for Innovation Teams - A Review2017Inngår i: Journal of Innovation Management, E-ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 5, nr 3, s. 75-121Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This review consolidates research on innovation enablers for

    innovation teams, defined within this research as factors that enable a crossfunctional

    team within an organization to conduct innovation work, to provide a

    deeper understanding of what factors enable innovation teams to conduct

    innovation work, which means that this research involves three areas to provide

    a holistic picture: the organizational context, the team itself, and the individuals

    within the innovation team. A systematic database search was conducted in

    which 208 relevant articles were identified and analyzed thematically way.

    Twenty innovation enablers related to innovation teams were identified:

    awareness, capabilities, climate, collaboration, culture, dedication, economy,

    education, empowerment, entre- / intrapreneurship, human resources,

    incentives, knowledge, knowledge management, management, mind-set, need,

    processes, strategy, and time. This review contributes to prior research a deeper

    understanding of what key factors enable innovative work for innovation teams.

    Suggestions of both academic and practical use for the identified innovation

    enablers are included in this review, and direction for future research is

    suggested.

  • 12.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Innovation groups: Before innovation work is begun2013Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This research project was begun during the financial crisis of 2009 with the objective of increasing the competiveness of SMEs’ (Small and Medium sized Enterprises) by developing their innovation-management capabilities. The research presented in this licentiate thesis (thesis) is a part of the project in which newly-formed innovation groups at two SMEs in Eskilstuna, Sweden have been studied before they began innovation work.

    Prior research has indicated a need to observe processes within on-going innovation projects. My overall hypothesis that reaches beyond this thesis, is that an innovation group that improves its innovation-related knowledge, reduces knowledge gaps and increases innovation-related awareness, generates positive additional values such as motivation or enthusiasm above the results such as patents or project costs that are traditional measurements within innovation projects.

    The first study in the iterative research process focused on the innovation-related knowledge of newly-formed innovation groups. The results led to further immersed studies, in total five case studies, in which 21 respondents participated. A theoretical framework consisting of theories from Knowledge management and System theory was used to analyze the results and the research question of this licentiate thesis emerged as: “What would a model that describes a newly-formed innovation group’s innovation-related knowledge, knowledge gaps, information flow and awareness look like?” Four sub-questions, one per each aspect of the research question, have been used to analyze prior research, theories and the conducted case studies.

    A model, Innovation Group Model (IGM), was created according to the research question and goal for this thesis. A one-sentence-explanation could be: “The organization, the innovation group and the individuals must have the opportunity to be motivated to learn innovation management in theory and practice to achieve innovation-readiness and awareness to detect and utilize innovation-related information available within the internal and external information flow.”

    This thesis contributes to the research area of Innovation and design with knowledge concerning newly-formed innovation groups. Three practical applications of the research results are suggested; (1) IGM can be used in organizations to understand the complex situation when an innovation group is created. (2) IGM can be used when planning for physical or virtual environments in which an innovation group consisting of professionals and customers is intended to develop or generate ideas. (3) IGM can be used when developing innovation-related audits intended to provide a deeper understanding of a respondent’s knowledge.

    On the basis of the results from this licentiate thesis, I suggest further research according to the overall hypothesis. With IGM as a starting point, one could study the progress of innovation groups and where necessary, provide support in specific areas.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Kappa
  • 13.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Innovation Teams: Before Innovation Work is Begun2014Inngår i: ISPIM Innovation Symposium; Manchester, 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on innovation teams before innovation work is begun.

    The reason is that innovation teams are considered to be successful doing such work.

    However, prior studies show problems in innovation-related-knowledge, -

    knowledge gaps, -information and -awareness why this research aims to

    understand these aspects and how they relate to newly formed innovation team as

    they need to handle these aspects. Two case studies conducted during 1,5 years

    show that a newly formed innovation team is in a very complicated situation where

    the identified aspects relate not only to the individual members but also to the

    team, its context and network within and outside the organization. Practical

    implications for this research could be used when planning-, creating- and

    starting up new innovation teams, helping management and team members to

    understand the complexity, for which a model is developed and described.

  • 14.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Prisoner's dilemma as a workshop tool?2018Inngår i: CEUR Workshop Proceedings / [ed] Koivisto J.,Hamari J.,Hamari J., CEUR-WS , 2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Product lifecycles are shorter than ever and agile innovation processes and teams are being developed to meet challenging product lifecycle deadlines. Teaching how to create innovation teams is however shown to be both complex and time consuming, which is not optimal in a time where the business environment demands faster pace when innovating. This research has explored the potential of using Prisoner's dilemma as a workshop tool to stimulate learning and collaboration, which is the core of innovation team’s work, to be further developed to educational tools if being successful. The workshop setting was based on the participating organisations' individual and concrete ideas to be developed, where game elements were designed as game mechanisms. Management from six organisations participated in the research, three of the organisations conducted a workshop designed as a modified Prisoner's dilemma, and the other three organisations participated in a non-gamified workshop based on the same content as the gamified one. Empirical data were collected through statement-based questionnaires, rich field notes, and observations from the video-recorded workshops. The findings indicate that Prisoner's dilemma may be used as a workshop tool for educational purposes. However, significant findings indicate that collaboration felt somewhat mandatory and learning was not optimized due to the dilemma. The research' limitations are discussed and further research is suggested. 

  • 15.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Shared Leadership of Innovation Teams: Is It Even Possible?2023Inngår i: Innovation Leadership in Practice: How Leaders Turn Ideas into Value in a Changing World / [ed] Jensen, K.R., Kaudela-Baum, S. and Sheffield, R., Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is suggested that, to be successful, innovation teams should be small and consist of people with key expertise who want to participate and develop new solutions within their organisations. When it comes to conducting innovation work, I suggest shared leadership may be a factor influencing success. In this chapter, a theoretical framework is presented on the shared leadership of innovation teams. The key to establishing shared leadership in innovation teams is to plan for it as the team is created, not after the team has already been formed, as this may result in various problems in the intended innovation project. The proposed framework details key aspects to consider; some of which are related to external factors such as management and resources, and some to internal factors such as the team's size, competencies, and their ability to develop norms and ways of working together. The proposed framework is applicable for managers, innovation leaders, and team members, and contributes to previous research on shared leadership and innovation leadership. Further research on the proposed framework is suggested.

  • 16.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    The emergence process of innovation teams2017Inngår i: ISPIM Innovation Symposium; Manchester, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2017, s. 1-9Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to gain knowledge regarding the group development process of newly formed innovation teams. In this comparative research, five multi-functional innovation teams based on voluntary members have been studied in an industrial context, all intending to conduct innovation projects after being educated in innovation management. In total 36 respondents have been studied. Qualitative data have repeatedly been collected from observations, interviews, questionnaires, and notes from team meetings in a timeframe of 6 - 18 month. Three of the teams were created in accordance with an explicit and stepwise methodology to create innovation teams, the other two teams were gathered to a sequence of educational seminars. Significant findings were that the teams created in accordance with the innovation-team-creation-methodology didn’t suffer from group dynamic problems, while the other two teams did. Further, the first three teams started innovation projects while the other two teams did not. Further research is suggested.

  • 17.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    The importance of innovation enabler for innovation teams2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to study the importance of innovation enablers (Enablers), i.e. factors that enable innovation work, for innovation teams in on-going innovation work and to identify which Enablers that are most important. Prior research states that Enablers are important for innovation work, but there’s still knowledge to gain regarding their relative importance. Data from three innovation teams, supported by an external facilitator, were used within this study. The long-term qualitative study demonstrates that the Enablers’ importance varies, but Collaboration, Dedication and Mind-set were the most important Enablers in general to overcome innovation project related problems. Further research is suggested.

  • 18.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    The innovation facilitator: characteristics and importance for innovation teams2018Inngår i: Journal of Innovation Management, E-ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 12-44Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research develops the understanding of the innovation facilitator’s (facilitator) role in terms of inexperienced innovation teams in an industrial context. Qualitative data was collected from three X-functional innovation teams’ members and their sponsor to identify the requirements for a facilitator. Forty characteristics were identified and charted in an innovation process. Significant findings, contributing to prior research, are that the facilitator’s presence and involvement in the innovation teams was crucial in the pre-phase and first phase of the innovation process due to the very high complexity; in these phases, personal characteristics as well as skills in, for example, facilitating, teaching, coaching, and group dynamics were central. The importance of the pre-phase was unexpected, resulting in an extended innovation process, during which an initial preparation phase has been added to the traditional innovation process. This knowledge is applicable, for example, when creating and educating new innovation teams within an organization. Future research is suggested.

  • 19. Johnsson, Mikael
    Untapped Innovation Capacity within Ordinary Employees Work-activities2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study shows the existence of potential untapped innovation capacity within employees' ordinary work. Purpose of identifying untapped innovation capacity is to involve a broader participation of employees into innovation-work in order to increase innovation-efficiency in companies. The case study was conducted at one Swedish SME where four participating employees were interviewed and observed when doing their ordinary work. Communication via i.e. e-mails, conversations and phone-calls were identified in 32% of the 267 documented work-activities and is suitable as work-activities when searching for i.e. innovative opportunities, suppliers etcetera according to innovation models, which could contribute to innovation and done by anyone at any department. Future research is suggested to develop and test if communication-based work-activities where innovation-cognition could be added to employees when communicating in their ordinary work with purpose to contribute to an overall innovation-work. The benefits would be that more employees easily could contribute to innovation work by being aware of innovationissues while communication as usual in their ordinary work.

  • 20.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Blackbright, Helena
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jan, Oldebring
    Almi Företagspartner Mälardalen AB, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Why innovation pedagogics matter – A case study2022Inngår i: Event Proceedings: LUT Scientific and Expertise Publications, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the ISO guidance standard “Innovation management - Innovation management system” - ISO56002:2019 (ISO56002) has gained a lot of interest within the innovation management community. Recent research calls for an increased understanding of what innovation pedagogics are needed to support innovation management consultants and advisors (innovation advisors) in their work supporting its clients in the ISO56002 and the relevance of ISO56002’s content for small and medium-sized enterprises (SME). In this study, building on an existing tool for measuring innovation maturity, the Innovation Management Capability Assessment and Reflection tool (IMCAR) was developed to also include a reflective part of the ISO56002 content’s relevance for the responding organisation. Using the IMCAR tool, this study indicates that the ISO56002 is relevant for both SMEs and innovation advisors but also the need for further development of innovation pedagogics related to vocabulary, knowledge, facilitated reflections, and visualisation tools. Limitations and further research avenues are discussed.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Why innovation pedagogics matter – A case study
  • 21.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Börell, Pär
    Västerås Science Park, Sweden.
    Key factors for STPs facilitating the establishment of an innovation-advising organization network to support SMEs in developing Industry 4.0 products/services2019Inngår i: The 4th Industrial Revolution: areas of innovation and science parks as key boosters for a successful transition, September 24-27, Nantes, France, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the role of science and technology parks (STPs) as facilitators in the creation of an innovation-advising organization network (IAON) within the health, social welfare, and medical technology sector (health-tech). The background to this study is that more and more products using Industry 4.0 technology, i.e., robotics, artificial intelligence, and Internet of Things products, are being developed for the health-tech sector, leading to safer and more secure and cost-effective healthcare and social welfare. The challenge, however, as identified by an STP, is that the innovation-advising organizations are not collaborating efficiently, which results in scattered advise to the small and medium-sized enterprise/startups (SME) and an insufficient understanding of each other’s work when advising the same SME. In this study, the STP, successfully, initiated and facilitated the work to develop an IAON. Similar initiatives are suggested. Because challenges and success factors were identified, further studies are also recommended.

  • 22.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Börell, Pär
    Västerås Science Park, Sweden.
    STPs’ role as facilitators when innovation-advising organizations develop a common quality-assured innovation advising process2019Inngår i: The 4th Industrial Revolution: areas of innovation and science parks as key boosters for a successful transition, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores science and technology parks’ (STP) role as facilitators when an innovation advising organization network (IAON) within the health, social welfare, and medical technology sector (health-tech) develops a quality-assured innovation advising process (QAIP). The background is that more and more products using Industry 4.0 technology are being developed for the health-tech sector. The challenge, however, as recognized by an STP, is that the IAON’s members use individual innovation advise processes, which results in inaccurate advice to the SME and insufficient collaboration between the advising organizations when advising the same SME. In this study, one STP initiated and facilitated the work to develop a QAIP, which was developed stepwise through a series of workshops in an iterative process. This study indicates that STPs may play an active part in supporting IAONs developing specialized innovation processes for certain business and technology areas, although further studies are suggested.

  • 23.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Börell, Pär
    Västerås Science Park, Sweden.
    Rundkvist, Mats
    Mats Rundkvist Consulting, Sweden.
    How STPs can support the implementation of Industry 4.0-products in the health-tech sector2019Inngår i: The 4th Industrial Revolution: areas of innovation and science parks as key boosters for a successful transition, 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores what role science and technology parks (STP) can play when aiming to increase knowledge regarding the implementation of products for the health, social welfare, and medical technology sector (health-tech), including Industry 4.0 technology-based products (products), on a national level in Sweden. Such products, have problems reaching the market due to increased complexity from a purchase perspective. In this study, an STP developed a guideline on implementation-advice based on user-needs, literature studies, and focus groups. The guideline was presented at a seminar, where representatives from all regions in Sweden attended. The STP initiated the project, developed the guideline, and disseminated it successfully at a national level. The guideline was evaluated six months after the seminar, indicating that it created value in practice. This indicates that STPs could take an active role supporting products in the health-tech sector. New seminars are planned, and further studies are suggested.

  • 24.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Ekman, Sten
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Innovation Advising in practice: Four cases where the RAFT model has been used in environmental innovations, and how twenty-one STPs offers Innovation Advising.2010Inngår i: XXVII IASP World Conference on Science and Technology Parks, 2010, Daejeon Convention Center, Korea, 2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Science and Technology Park's (STP) often offers business incubators to Idea owners where they can develop ideas into companies. The scope of this paper is a study in how the RAFT-model, a “How to”-model based innovation process, affected four Idea owners with environmental innovations in different business areas. This paper also shows how twenty-one Swedish STPs offer Innovation Advice (IA) to Idea owners and think of IA as a competitive offer. All Idea owners found the RAFT-model useful and consider using the RAFT-model again. Two ideas were still in a developing progress and the other two were shut down. Five of the STPs thought IA as a competitive offer to Idea owners, the others found IA proper to be offered by other organizations. Conclusions from this study are that the RAFT-model was appropriate to environmental innovations and STPs found IA valuable for Idea owners but not as a competitive motive.

  • 25.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Gustafsson, Christopher
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Disrupting the Research Process through Artificial Intelligence: Towards a Research Agenda2022Inngår i: Artificial Intelligence and Innovation Management / [ed] Stoyan Tanev (Carleton University, Canada) and Helena Blackbright (Mälardalen University, Sweden), World Scientific, 2022, s. 161-183Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores how Artificial Intelligence (AI) will potentially disrupt how Innovation Management (IM) research will be conducted. In the recent decades, the research process has remained virtually unchanged, i.e., a structured, stepwise process. Recently, AI has shown new opportunities that affect this process. AI applications have been developed supporting researchers for specific tasks to ease their work, for example, database searching, transcribing and data management. For example, an autonomous literature review (i.e., database search, selection, analyzing, concluding, and writing) has been conducted by AI, vastly exceeding what human research could achieve in the same time frame, which paves the way for interesting reflections on how AI applications affect research from here on going forward. As we have explored AI techniques and AI applications and discussed their potential for conducting research, three themes emerged regarding how future research might be conducted: simplification thorough the use of computational power, augmentation of a researcher’s capabilities, and replacement by automation: Three critical questions are identified: (1) The future use of AI applications in research; (2) Exploring the trust in AI — The black box dilemma, and; (3) Benefits and limitations of AI applications. These topics are discussed, paving a way towards a research agenda.

  • 26.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Hyrén, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Problems when creating inter-organisational innovation teams2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to gain knowledge on how inter-organisational collaborative innovation and research projects can be initiated through a systematic workshop series. A series of workshops was planned and executed by an intermediator organisation. Sixteen participants representing academia, industry, and funding institutions were invited with the goal of initiating collaborative innovation or research projects. Data were collected through observations, statement-based questionnaires, and interviews. At the end of the workshop series, no projects were initiated. The problems were identified as the intermediator’s lack of knowledge in selecting and preparing participants for this setting, but also the participants’ lack of knowledge regarding innovation work and collaboration on an inter-organisational basis. Further research is suggested. 

  • 27.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Jakob, Ilg
    CyberForum e.V., Haid-und-Neu-Strasse 18, 761 31 Karlsruhe, Germany..
    Reesi, Lepa
    Civitta Eesti, Riia 24a, 51010 Tartu, Estonia..
    Restructuring globalisation through cross-country collaboration2023Inngår i: 40th IASP World Conference on Scoence Parks & Areas of Innovation, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how Science and Technology Parks and Areas of Innovation (STP/AOI) can attract SMEs to solve international challenges through cross-country collaboration. In doing so, 11 STPs/AOIs from nine European countries designed the Urban Tech project, aiming to develop solutions for the urban environment, focusing on Health Tech, Greentech and Smart Cities. In Urban Tech’s four phases, exploration, ideation, implementation, commercialisation, the most promising SMEs are stepwise awarded to develop international businesses. This paper reports the first two phases. In cross-country collaboration between the STPs/AOIs, methods for collecting challenges, open call and hackathons were developed. Over 300 challenges from 12 countries were collected and SMEs from 36 countries generated 559 solutions for 35 business-sectors. At eight international hackathons, 228 demonstration solutions were developed. Of these, 80 SMEs (37 cross-border SMEs) were awarded for the following phases, implementation and commercialisation. For inspiration, in-depth details of the process are provided.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Restructuring globalisation through cross-country collaboration
  • 28.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Existence of negative innovation-gaps affecting innovation performance in two Swedish SMEs.2011Manuskript (preprint) (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to achieve a deeper understanding of innovation-gaps, found in a previous study according to innovation-audits made by the authors to this paper. Negative innovation-gap is of interest as they might affect innovation-performance within companies and further on Total innovation management (TIM). TIM is a holistic view of innovation, involving a broad representation of employees and functions for which the innovation-gaps could be crucial. This study was made at two Swedish industrial SMEs, 1170 written questions asked to 18 employees, 12 workshops held with two company-specific-groups and one company-mixed-group with senior management. The major findings were “organisational related innovation-gaps”, “individual related innovation-gaps” and several subgroups to both of them, e.g. conflicting incentives and time-related-gaps. The conclusion is to not try to categorise the gaps, but to be aware of them when practicing innovation management, as gaps, when become too big, seems to affect innovation-performance in a negative way. Keywords: innovation workshop; SME; innovation-gap, innovation management; innovation-gap analysis.

  • 29.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    External Innovation Driver (EID) - a Developing and Organization Learning Service in Innovation Management. Three cases where an EID develop and learn SMEs innovation management2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative companies are more successful than non-innovative ones, but there seems to be a lack of knowledge in innovation-management. Can an EID (External Innovation Driver) develop and learn a SME (Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises) about innovation management? If so, should the EID be supported by a STP (Science and Technology Park)? The scope of this study includes three cases where SME:s in Sweden got education and idea-developing-support through one idea-generating phase and one idea-developing phase. Out of 55 identified ideas in Phase One, 12 ideas were developed in Phase Two. The SME:s got education from “Learning by watching” combined with “Learning by doing” according to the RAFT-model, which resulted in 6 ideas reaching the market, 1 idea became a research project and 5 ideas were terminated. The SME:s felt it secure to know that the EID was a neutral and trusted person, supported by a STP, not claiming for partnerships.

  • 30.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering. Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Klintberg, Mikael
    Almi Företagspartner Mälardalen ABB 26, Port-Anders Gata 9, 722 12 Västerås, Sweden.
    Oldebring, Jan
    Almi Företagspartner Mälardalen ABB 26, Port-Anders Gata 9, 722 12 Västerås, Sweden.
    Sundström, Angelina
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för ekonomi, samhälle och teknik, Industriell ekonomi och organisation. Mälardalen University, Box 325, 631 05 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Developing a programme for educating managers in systematic innovation practices: a case study2023Inngår i: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore how an educational programme can be designed to support managers in learning systematic innovation practices, contributing to the Innovation Management community. Using the community of practice (CoP) concept, we developed a programme to educate managers in systematic innovation practices, including systematic innovation work, innovation climate, and the creation of innovation teams. Our contribution builds on prior studies on the CoP construct. Using a case study with a mixed-methods design, we have explored the educational experiences of ten managers and the practical outcome of their organisations’ participation in the programme. Based on mixed data, we conclude that the educational programme “Management Education on Systematic Innovation Practices” (MEoSIP) supports managers’ understanding of systematic innovation practices in theory and in practice. It also contributes to practitioners who can support clients in improving innovation-related abilities. Agencies can develop training programmes using CoP for other educational purposes. Further research is proposed.

  • 31.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Stefan, Ioana
    Mälardalens universitet, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Ilg, Jakpb
    CyberForum e.V., Haid-und-Neu-Strasse 18, 761 31 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Lepa, Reesi
    Civitta Eesti, Riia 24a, 51010 Tartu, Estonia.
    Problems and Answers When OrganisingInternational Innovation Contests in Cross-border Collaboration2023Inngår i: Proceedings of XXXIV ISPIM Innovation Conference / [ed] Iain Bitran, Leandro Bitetti, Steffen Conn, Jessica Fishburn, Paavo Ritala, Marko Torkkeli & Jialei Yang, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we build on prior research to explore problems arising and answers attempted when an international innovation contest (IC) is organised by multiple organisations in cross-border collaboration. A Consortium involving ten science parks and one university developed a multistage IC, consisting of four phases: exploration, ideation, implementation and international market launch. This study focuses on the first two phases. The Consortium attractedparticipation from 300 challenge owners from twelve countries, generating 559 proposals by 318 SMEs from 36 countries. The empirical setting is explored in great detail. Data were collected through open-ended written questionnaires and field notes. Identified problems were related to four themes: collaboration, coordination, communication, and commitment. These could be further divided into internal and external problems. Practical implications and future research avenues are suggested.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ewa
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Swenningsson, Kristina
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Success factors when implementing innovation teams2021Inngår i: Digitalization: Approaches, Case Studies, and Tools for Strategy, Transformation and Implementation / [ed] Daniel R. A. Schallmo, Joseph Tidd, Springer, 2021, s. 409-420Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores the success factors of the research-based process for creating high-performing innovation teams, called the CIT-process. This chapter is part of a study through which problems in the implementation of high-performing innovation teams were identified when being used by innovation management practitioners (practitioners). The CIT-process is a five-step process prior to the innovation process. Before organizations were involved, practitioners at an innovation management firm were educated in the CIT-process and evaluated. Three innovation teams were created by the practitioners, conducting real innovation projects, facilitated by the practitioners. Data were collected through filed notes and interviews with the participants and the practitioners. Three main themes appeared as key success factors: knowledge adoption, knowledge transition, and knowledge transfer. Limitations are highlighted and future research is suggested.

  • 33.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden.
    Swenningsson, Kristina
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ewa
    Crearum AB, Sweden.
    Problems when creating innovation teams2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores problems occurring when practitioners use a research-based methodology regarding how to create high-performing innovation teams, namely the CIT-process, which has not been used by practitioners before. The CIT-process is recommended to be used prior to the ideation phase, which otherwise is considered to be the first phase in the innovation process. The CIT-process is a five-step process in which the innovation project kick-off is the final step. Prior steps refer to management commitment and identification and to the preparation of a convener and team members. A consultancy firm was educated and evaluated before organisations were involved, who brought real innovation projects to work on. Three innovation teams were created. Data were collected through observations at team meetings and interviews. Any problems were mainly caused by management that underestimated the value of preparation in innovation work. Scepticism towards the newly developed CIT-process and the practitioners' inexperience with the CIT-process were also addressed as reasons. The need for educational tools was highlighted. Further research is suggested.

  • 34.
    Karlsson, Helena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Interview Supported Innovation Audit: how does a complementary interview affect the understanding of an innovation audits results when the interview is based on the audit statements2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs tend to lack the ability of sustainable development through cost-effective and repeated innovation. One way to find out a current innovation state is to run a self-assessment innovation audit, which are well used but got critics to not show reliable results The authors formed research question: How might a complementary interview affect the understanding of the result of the innovation audit when the interview is based on the same statements used in the audit? The study was conducted at two Swedish SMEs with a mix of management and personnel. 21 respondents at both companies answered 840 audit-statements and equal amount of interview questions rephrased from a “how-perspective”. 4 audit-statements were left blank and 103 interview questions were answered, “I don't know”. A great differ in the understanding appeared and the conclusion was that a selfassessment innovation audit might not show reliable results conducted without a complementing interview.

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