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  • 1.
    Ayala, Ana
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Mother’s Experiences and Perceptions of a Continuous Caring Model with Fathers after Caesarean Section: A Qualitative Study2015In: The Open Women's Health Journal, ISSN 1874-2912, E-ISSN 1874-2912, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Chile, mothers and newborns are separated after caesarean sections. The caesarean section rate in Chile is approximately 40%. Once separated, newborns will miss out on the benefits of early contact unless a suitable model of early newborn contact after caesarean section is initiated.

    Aim: To describe mothers experiences and perceptions of a continuous parental model of newborn care after caesarean section during mother-infant separation.

    Methods: A questionnaire with 4 open ended questions to gather data on the experiences and perceptions of 95 mothers in the obstetric service of Sótero Del Rio Hospital in Chile between 2009 and 2012. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: One theme family friendly practice after caesarean section and four categories. Mothers described the benefits of this model of caring. The fathers presence was important to mother and baby. Mothers were reassured that the baby was not left alone with staff. It was important for the mothers to see that the father could love the baby as much as the mother. This model of care helped create ties between the father and newborn during the period of mother-infant separation and later with the mother.

    Conclusions: Family friendly practice after caesarean section was an important health care intervention for the whole family. This model could be stratified in the Chilean context in the case of complicated births and all caesarean sections.

    Clinical Implications: In the Chilean context, there is the potential to increase the number of parents who get to hold their baby immediately after birth and for as long as they like. When the mother and infant are separated after birth, parents can be informed about the benefits of this caring model. Further research using randomized control trials may support biological advantages.

  • 2.
    Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Personal and Professional Developement (PPD) at the Midwifery Education, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden2018In: Personal and Professional Developement (PPD) at the Midwifery Education, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    The Implementation of Personal and Professional Developement (PPD) in the Midwifery Education at Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden2017In: Abstract accepted for presentation in the International Congress of Midwives conference Toronto, Canada, 18-22/6-2017, at the sub-theme area, Midwives: Making a difference through professionalism., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Reflection as a learning activity facilitates professional learning, but has not been implemented in the midwifery curricula in a structured way. Background: The Swedish midwife work within three essential areas: Sexual and reproductive health, research, development and training as well as management and organization. One partial competence area is Personal and Professional Development (PPD), as the midwife should have the ability to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of their professional skills and to continuously develop skills in sexual and reproductive health. National educational goals for midwifery students in Sweden are to; demonstrate self-awareness and empathy, demonstrate the ability of the whole person and make assessments based on relevant scientific, social and ethical aspects, take particular account to human rights, demonstrate the ability to adopt a professional approach to women and their families and to identify one’s own need of further knowledge and continuously develop professional skills. Aim: To implement reflective tasks in the midwifery program to improve the students Personal and Professional Development (PPD) in becoming a professional midwife adopting the national educational goals for midwives in Sweden. Method: To improve the midwifery student’s professionalism, we have introduced reflection tasks in the curricula in order to develop the student's Personal and Professional Development (PPD). Result: The reflection tasks were divided in three areas to facilitate a clear professional progression during the midwifery program: 1) students own personal and professional development 2) students relating to and interacting with patients and 3) students collaboration with other health professionals. In interaction between student, lecturer and clinical supervisor the student expressed orally and in written text their PPD. Conclusion: The lecturer’s and supervisor’s pedagogical task may be to initiate and carry out skills from training to reflection, to train students to verbalize their own experience, to express values, help to reflect on student’s own thoughts and feelings in specific situations which may extend action preparedness. To discuss difficult situations and to reflect on different scenarios and how they can be managed is one way of training PPD. Significance of the project and Making a difference through professionalismBy introducing the PPU can midwifery students be better prepared for their future profession, have a greater awareness of themselves, of the patients / clients that they are expected to interact with and about other health professions that they will work with. By example, reflection and analysis, and appropriate tools for this, students can gain a greater self-knowledge, which in turn may also contribute to an increased understanding of the various processes such as communication, teamwork and leadership. One way to spot professional development is to reflect on their own way to act in different learning situations during training. The purpose of the PPU is: to improve and deepen students' knowledge of themselves and their future profession, to train and develop a professional attitude, to contribute to a professional interaction with patients / clients, developing their ability to work with other health professionals and collaborate in teamwork and be able to take the leadership and decision making , especially in emergency situations.

  • 4.
    Thitasan, Anchalee
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Boromarajonani, College of Nursing, Sunpasithiprasong, Thailand.
    Aytar, Osman
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Annerbäck, E. -M
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Young people's health and risk behaviours in relation to their sexual orientation: A cross-sectional study of Thailand and Sweden2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 21, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study examined the associations between sexual orientation of young people and their health and risk behaviours in Thailand and Sweden, and to explore similarities and differences between the countries. Study design: A cross-sectional study using data from the Life and Health – Young surveys in Thailand and Sweden. Three different statistical analyses were used to examine the associations of the variables. Results: In total, 3869 students aged 16–18 years old were included: 1488 Thai students and 2381 Swedish students. Significantly more Thai (20%) than Swedish (9%) students identified themselves as bisexual, homosexual or unsure (p < .001). Bivariate analysis showed that, in Thailand, self-harm was more often reported by the homosexual, unsure, and bisexual groups than by the heterosexual group (p = .005). In Sweden, early sexual debut was more often reported by the unsure, bisexual, and homosexual groups than by the heterosexual group (p = .033). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that homosexual and unsure sexual orientations were significantly associated with self-harm (p < .05) among Thai students. Unsure sexual orientation was significantly associated with early sexual debut (p = .04) among Swedish students. Multiple correspondence analysis indicated that sexual orientation was associated with health and risk behaviours, and varied by different subcategories of students’ backgrounds such as country, sexual orientation, family structure and adult support. Conclusions: Sexual minority young people reported more risk behaviours and poorer health than their heterosexual counterparts. The findings are useful for policy programmes on sexual and reproductive health and rights of young people.

  • 5.
    Thitasan, Anchalee
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Aytar, Osman
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Life and health of young people in relation to their sexual orientation: A study in Thailand and Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life and health of young people in relation to their sexual orientation: A study in Thailand and Sweden

     

    Anchalee Thitasan a*, Osman Aytar b, Eva-Maria Annerbäck c, Marianne Velandia d

    a Obstetric Department, Boromarajonnani College of Nursing Sunpasittiprasong, Muang, Ubon Ratchathani, 34000

    b School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, P.O. Box 325, SE-631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden

    c Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna Sweden.

    d School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, P.O. Box 883, SE-721 23, Västerås, Sweden

    Corresponding Author Anchalee Thitasan; E-mail: anrakar@yahoo.com

     

    Abstract

     

    Background: In many societies sexual minorities are not fully accepted. The experiences of oppression, stigma and discrimination may negatively influence young people’s life and health, in relation to the heterosexual norm as a standard. There is a lack of studies comparing sexual orientation of young people in relation to their living conditions and health between Asian and European countries, therefore Thailand and Sweden were purposively selected. In Sweden youth friendly services concerning sexual and reproductive health and rights are provided for all young people through youth clinics. Unlike in Sweden, young people in Thailand are likely to receive less support regarding sexual health and sexuality. This can lead to different health consequences especially among sexual minority groups.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine associations between sexual orientation and life and health of young people in Thailand and Sweden.

    Study design: A cross-sectional study was performed using data from the Life and Health – Young surveys in Thailand and Sweden in year 2014. Data were analyzed for grade 11 students in Thailand (n=1,488) and year 2 students in Sweden (n=2,381). Multiple correspondence analysis was used to examine the association among variable categories of sexual orientation, living conditions, lifestyles and health variables. Preliminary result showed that students who identified themselves as bisexual, homosexual or unsure sexual orientation were more closely related with self-harm and poor health than their heterosexual counterparts. Conclusion: Sexual orientation was associate with life and health of young people both in Thailand and in Sweden. The findings can be beneficial to improve health and wellbeing of young people in relation to their sexual orientation.

  • 6.
    Thitasan, Anchalee
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Aytar, Osman
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Howharn, Churalat
    Extern.
    Annerbäck, Eva-Maria
    Extern.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Risk factors for being a victim of sexual violence of young people in Thailand and Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk factors for being a victim of sexual violence of young people in Thailand and Sweden

     

    Anchalee Thitasan a*, Osman Aytar b, Chularat Howharn c, Eva-Maria Annerbäck d, Marianne Velandiae

    a Obstetric Department, Boromarajonnani College of Nursing Sunpasittiprasong, Muang, Ubon Ratchathani, 34000

    b School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, P.O. Box 325, SE-631 05, Eskilstuna, Sweden

    c Praboromrajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand,

    24/64 Soi Thanphuying Ngamwongwan Rd. Ladyao Chatuchak Bangkok 10900 Thailand

    d Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna Sweden.

    e School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, P.O. Box 883, SE-721 23, Västerås, Sweden

    Corresponding Author’s E-mail: anrakar@yahoo.com

     

    Abstract

    Background: Young people both girls and boys worldwide have been a victim of sexual violence. Sexual violence can have physical and mental effects on the victims. Sexual violence remains highly stigmatized in all settings, therefore levels of disclosure of the assault can vary between countries and can be associated with multiple factors. It is worthy to get better understanding of risk factors for being a victim of sexual violence as it can be used to inform programs seeking to promote sexual and reproductive health of young people. Aim: To examine sexual violence and associations with background factors and other types of violence in Thailand and Sweden.  Method: A cross-sectional comparative study was performed among 7,334 high schools students who participated in the 2014 Life and Health Young survey in Thailand and Sweden. Data were analyzed for grade 9 and 11 or year 2 students (2,717 Thailand, 4,617 Sweden). Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the associations of demographic factors, substance use, life in school, violence, mental health, and sexual violence. Preliminary results: About 7.3% of the students in Thailand (6.8% girls and 8.1% boys) and 5.6% of students in Sweden (5.8% girls and 5.5% boys) were exposed to sexual violence. Prevalence of sexual violence was not different between girls and boys in each country. After controlling demographic factors, sexual violence of the students in the two countries was associated with getting beaten by adult and being bullied. Feeling depressed and feeling bad during the last three months were associated with sexual violence among the students in Sweden but not among the students in Thailand. Regarding to gender difference, in Thailand, sexual violence was associated with getting beaten by adult among girls but not among boys. In Sweden, sexual violence was associated with feeling bad during the last three months among boys but not among girls. Conclusions: Sexual violence and a risk of becoming sexual violence victim vary by countries. To get better understanding of the risk of becoming sexual violence victim a disparity of personal factors of young people in individual level needed to be considered.

  • 7.
    Velandia, Marianne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthisen, A.S.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, K.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Environm & Hlth, Skara, Sweden.
    Nissen, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Onset of vocal interaction between parents and newborns in skin-to-skin contact immediately after elective cesarean section2010In: Birth Issues, ISSN 1038-023X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Cesarean section is associated with delayed mother-infant interaction because neither the mother nor the father routinely maintains skin-to-skin contact with the infant after birth. The aim of the study was to explore and compare parent-newborn vocal interaction when the infant is placed in skin-to-skin contact either with the mother or the father immediately after a planned cesarean section.

    METHODS:

    A total of 37 healthy infants born to primiparas were randomized to 30 minutes of skin-to-skin contact either with fathers or mothers after an initial 5 minutes of skin-to-skin contact with the mothers after birth. The newborns' and parents' vocal interaction were recorded on a videotape and audiotape. The following variables were explored: newborns' and parents' soliciting, newborns' crying and whining, and parental speech directed to the other parent and to the newborn.

    RESULTS:

    Newborns' soliciting increased over time (p=0.032). Both fathers and mothers in skin-to-skin contact communicated more vocally with the newborn than did fathers (p=0.003) and mothers (p=0.009) without skin-to-skin contact. Fathers in skin-to-skin contact also communicated more with the mother (p=0.046) and performed more soliciting responses than the control fathers (p=0.010). Infants in skin-to-skin contact with their fathers cried significantly less than those in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers (p=0.002) and shifted to a relaxed state earlier than in skin-to-skin contact with mothers (p=0.029).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Skin-to-skin contact between infants and parents immediately after planned cesarean section promotes vocal interaction. When placed in skin-to-skin contact and exposed to the parents' speech, the infants initiated communication with soliciting calls with the parents within approximately 15 minutes after birth. These findings give reason to encourage parents to keep the newborn in skin-to-skin contact after cesarean section, to support the early onset of the first vocal communication.

  • 8.
    Velandia, Marianne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, K.
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, Skara, Sweden.
    Nissen, E.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sex differences in newborn interaction with mother or father during skin-to-skin contact after Caesarean section2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, p. 360-367Article in journal (Refereed)
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