mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Åkerberg, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lindén, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    How can technology promote physical activity? Opinions from physically inactive non-users of self-monitoring technologiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To achieve a more physically active and healthier population, the opinions of potential future users of physical activity self-monitoring technologies need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of physically inactive non-users of physical activity self-monitoring technologies, regarding how and when technology possibly could measure and encourage physical activity. METHODS: Two focus group interviews were performed, consisting of 11 physically inactive persons who had no previous experience with regular use of physical activity self-monitoring technology. The focus groups were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The transcripts of the two focus groups resulted in 17 subcategories and five categories, which formed two themes: measurement complexity and performance and basic qualities. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the physically inactive non-users of physical activity self-monitoring technologies had positive, innovative and mainly similar opinions about how technology could promote physical activity. Since the concept of encouragement permeates the results, it can be concluded that the physical activity technology for this particular target group should primarily be based on encouraging features and functions. Further, the study indicated that it is preferable to integrate physical activity self-monitoring technology into already existing technology that the user already owns.

  • 2.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    eHomecare – for safety and communication in everyday life: The perspectives of older users, relatives and care managers2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to examine how eHomecare affects the daily lives of older users and their relatives, with a focus on safety and communication. A further aim was to explore care managers’ perspectives, expectations and experiences of eHomecare and its implementation. Methods: Participants in study one and two were older people with granted eHomecare and eight relatives and, care managers in study three and four. Data were collected through four qualitative studies, using individual interviews in the first and second studies before the introduction and after six months’ use of eHomecare, by individual vignette-based interviews in the third study, and with focus-group interviews in the fourth study. Data were analysed using different qualitative content analyses. Results: The participants described safety as a part of everyday life. eHomecare was found to facilitate a ‘new safety’ for older people and a ‘re-established safety’ for relatives, yet its use raised concerns about ethical considerations and reduced human contact. Participants could attain feelings of togetherness and affection through communication, although this was also considered a vulnerable activity due to physical changes and loss of other people. Used correctly, eHomecare increased communication and thus closeness and participation for the participants. For older participants unable to use the technology as hoped, eHomecare led to disappointment. Care managers expressed that eHomecare can increase older peoples’ everyday life-quality if they receive the right tools at the right time. Care managers, however, have difficulties with eHomecare’s management process. While they struggle with their own attitudes, lack of time and high workloads, their decisions are also influenced by surrounding organisations and the older people’s relatives. Care managers’ own organisations, work situations, relevant stakeholders and society in general can hinder them in managing eHomecare as a new homecare service. Widespread information about eHomecare and opportunities for relevant stakeholders to participate in its implementation are good preconditions for fulfilling the mission of care managers. Conclusions: The findings describe eHomecare from the perspectives of its older users, their relatives and the care managers responsible for managing the service. Used correctly, eHomecare increases possibilities for communication and provides safety. However, care managers have a complex mission when managing the service and they express a need for support and knowledge. The findings can be used clinically to develop older peoples’ utilization of eHomecare and to develop support for the fulfilment of care managers’ mission.

    Keywords: care managers, content analysis, communication, eHomecare, experiences, information and communication technology, older people, participation, perceptions, relatives, safety, welfare technology

  • 3.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Care managers' expected and experienced hindrances and preconditions when eHomecare is implemented: A Qualitative Focus Group Study.In: Journal of gerontological social work, ISSN 0163-4372, E-ISSN 1540-4048Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, information and communication technology has been introduced into home care services for older people, i.e., eHomecare. In this study, we explore social workers’ (care managers, [CM]) expected orexperienced hindrances and preconditions affecting their role and missionin eHomecare implementation. Four focus group interviews were conducted with participants from four municipalities in central Sweden during thespring of 2015. One focus group consisted of CMs with experiences of eHomecare and the other three groups of CMs without eHomecare experience. The study found that several hindrances may occur when eHomecare is implemented as part of home care, which in turn affect CMs´mission. CMs need a society that is well-informed in general aboute Homecare and requires relevant stakeholders to participate in the implementation process. CMs need an organization that is clear about their mission and a work situation that gives them the right circumstances for professionally managing eHomecare. It is also understood that older people must be given the right circumstances to adopt the technology, thus facilitating the CMs’ mission. Knowledge and time are assumed to be preconditions for CMs when managing eHomecare.

  • 4.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Care managers’ perceptions of eHomecare: a qualitative interview study2019In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, no 4, p. 634-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To implement information and communication technology (ICT) in elderlycare can be a challenge for healthcare organisations. In Sweden, caremanagers (CMs) are responsible for offering ICT as a new part ofhomecare, i.e. eHomecare. The aim of this study was to focus on CMs’perspectives and describe their perceptions of eHomecare. The studyhas a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews based onvignettes were conducted with 12 CMs in a medium-sized municipalityin central Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis. Thefindings showed that CMs are influenced by surrounding organisationsand relatives in their decision to grant eHomecare. There were alsodifficulties in CMs’ management of eHomecare. Furthermore, eHomecarewas perceived to improve the quality of everyday life for older. It isunderstood that the management of eHomecare is a challenging taskfor CMs and a complex mission. Interactions among CMs, relatives, careproviders, and other factors as for example CMs’ own attitudes have animpact on CMs’ decisions.

  • 5.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    eHomecare – experiences of communicationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, City University London, UK.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    eHomecare and safety: The experiences of older patients and their relatives2018In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, no 2, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study's aim was to extend descriptions of how older patients with granted eHomecare and their relatives understand safety, and further to describe how they experience safety in everyday life. The study was conducted in Sweden. The participants were 12 older patients who had been provided with eHomecare and 8 relatives. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A conceptual framework of safety was used and a qualitative content analysis was conducted in a deductive and an inductive phase. The deductive results are presented in predefined categories: perceived sense of safety, disturbance and threats, re-establishing safety, and new safety. The inductive analysis resulted in two main categories: safety as part of everyday life and eHomecare as safety. The results show that eHomecare can promote safety for older patients and their relatives. Existing doubts and ethical concerns about the service can be minimized by providing adequate information.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf