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  • 1.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Carlson, Per
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Social capital - a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow2016Inngår i: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 4, nr 1, artikkel-id 37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a major health problem worldwide, especially among women. The condition has been related to a number of factors, such as alcohol consumption, economic situation and, more recently, to social capital. However, there have been relatively few studies about the social capital-depression relationship in Eastern Europe. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the association between different forms of social capital and self-rated depression in Moscow. Differences between men and women will also be examined, with a special focus on women.

    METHODS: Data was obtained from the Moscow Health Survey, which was conducted in 2004 with 1190 Muscovites aged 18 years or above. For depression, a single-item self-reported measure was used. Social capital was operationalised through five questions about different forms of social relations. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to estimate the association between social capital and self-rated depression, separately for men and women.

    RESULTS: More women (48 %) than men (36 %) reported that they had felt depressed during the last year. An association was found between social capital and reported depression only among women. Women who were divorced or widowed or who had little contact with relatives had higher odds of reporting depression than those with more family contact. Women who regularly engaged with people from different age groups outside of their families were also more likely to report depression than those with less regular contact.

    CONCLUSIONS: Social capital can be a mixed blessing for women. Different forms of social relations can lead to different health outcomes, both positive and negative. Although the family is important for women's mental health in Moscow, extra-familial relations across age groups can be mentally distressing. This suggests that even though social capital can be a valuable resource for mental health, some of its forms can be mentally deleterious to maintain, especially for women. More research is needed on both sides to social capital. A special focus should be placed on bridging social relations among women in order to better understand the complex association between social capital and depression in Russia and elsewhere.

  • 2.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Sociologi.
    The historical development of suicide mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015Inngår i: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1543-6136, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 117-130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernisation processes.

  • 3.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Baburin, Aleksei
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Sparén, Pär
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-20052017Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, nr 1, artikkel-id 235Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Russian suicide mortality rates changed rapidly over the second half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to differentiate between underlying period and cohort effects in relation to the changes in suicide mortality in Russia between 1956 and 2005.

    METHODS: Sex- and age-specific suicide mortality data were analyzed using an age-period-cohort (APC) approach. Descriptive analyses and APC modeling with log-linear Poisson regression were performed.

    RESULTS: Strong period effects were observed for the years during and after Gorbachev's political reforms (including the anti-alcohol campaign) and for those following the break-up of the Soviet Union. After mutual adjustment, the cohort- and period-specific relative risk estimates for suicide revealed differing underlying processes. While the estimated period effects had an overall positive trend, cohort-specific developments indicated a positive trend for the male cohorts born between 1891 and 1931 and for the female cohorts born between 1891 and 1911, but a negative trend for subsequent cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the specific life experiences of cohorts may be important for variations in suicide mortality across time, in addition to more immediate effects of changes in the social environment.

  • 4.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Norström, Thor
    Alcohol and Suicide in Russia, 1870-1894 and 1956-2005: Evidence for the Continuation of a Harmful Drinking Culture Across Time?2011Inngår i: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 72, nr 2, s. 341-347Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous research suggests that a strong relation exists between alcohol consumption and suicide in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. This study extends this analysis across a much longer historical time frame by examining the relationship between heavy drinking and suicide in tsarist and post-World War 11 Russia. Method: Using alcohol poisoning mortality data as a proxy for heavy drinking, time-series analytical modeling techniques were used to examine the strength of the alcohol-suicide relation in the provinces of European Russia in the period 1870-1894 and for Russia in 1956-2005. Results: During 1870-1894, a decreasing trend was recorded in heavy drinking in Russia that contrasted with the sharp increase observed in this phenomenon in the post-World War 11 period. A rising trend in suicide was recorded in both study periods, although the increase was much greater in the latter period. The strength of the heavy drinking suicide relation nevertheless remained unchanged across time, with a 10% increase in heavy drinking resulting in a 3.5% increase in suicide in tsarist Russia and a 3.8% increase in post-World War II Russia. Conclusions: Despite the innumerable societal changes that have occurred in Russia across the two study periods and the growth in the level of heavy drinking, the strength of the heavy drinking-suicide relation has remained unchanged across time. This suggests the continuation of a highly detrimental drinking culture where the heavy episodic drinking of distilled spirits (vodka) is an essential element in the alcohol-suicide association. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 72, 341-347, 2011)

  • 5.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Sabawoon, W
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    McKee, M
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Loneliness and health in Eastern Europe: findings from Moscow, Russia2015Inngår i: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 403-410Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine which factors are associated with feeling lonely in Moscow, Russia, and to determine whether loneliness is associated with worse health.

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: Data from 1190 participants were drawn from the Moscow Health Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with feeling lonely and whether loneliness was linked to poor health.

    RESULTS: Almost 10% of the participants reported that they often felt lonely. Divorced and widowed individuals were significantly more likely to feel lonely, while not living alone and having greater social support reduced the risk of loneliness. Participants who felt lonely were more likely to have poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38-3.76), and have suffered from insomnia (OR: 2.43; CI: 1.56-3.77) and mental ill health (OR: 2.93; CI: 1.88-4.56).

    CONCLUSIONS: Feeling lonely is linked to poorer health in Moscow. More research is now needed on loneliness and the way it affects health in Eastern Europe, so that appropriate interventions can be designed and implemented to reduce loneliness and its harmful impact on population well-being in this setting.

  • 6.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Sweden.
    Unhealthy Societies?: Health Stagnation and Growing Health Inequalities Are Not Consistent with Sustainable Development2006Inngår i: Realizing a Common Vision for a Baltic Sea Eco-Region: Report from a Research Symposium on Sustainable Development Patterns 28-29 October 2005 / [ed] Lars Rydén, Uppsala: Baltic University Programme , 2006, s. 39-46Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
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