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  • 1.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schunnesson, Jonathan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service2018In: ECSCW 2018 - Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Springer , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of how to organise for the introduction of a new service involving the interaction of humans and technologies is both crucial and challenging. Convergence between the community of practice using the technology and the design of the technology is crucial for the technology to become meaningful and usable. While processes of convergence are challenging in themselves, they become more complex if several communities of practice are going to use and collaborate around/through the technology. The co-presence of different communities of practice is a common situation when delivering public welfare services. In particular, the development of welfare technology is a context rich in potential frictions, making convergence challenging. By mobilising the concept of transparency, we analyse the process of implementation of remote night monitoring and highlight how transparency is related to different aspects. Such analysis reveals that processes of convergence are related in this context not only to frictions shared with other settings, but also to specific frictions related to matters of concern in welfare services. This leads us to discuss whether digitalised care services can be argued as still having a human side or not.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cozza, MichelaCrevani, LuciaMälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.Schunnesson, JonathanMälardalen University.
    Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Benozzo, A.
    et al.
    University of Valle d'Aosta, Italy.
    Carey, N.
    Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Elmenhorst, C.
    Fairchild, N.
    University of Chichester, UK.
    Koro-Ljungberg, M.
    Arizona State University, US.
    Taylor, C.A.
    Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
    Disturbing the Academic Conference Machine: Post-Qualitative Re-turnings2019In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 87-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Calás, M. B.
    et al.
    Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, United States.
    Smircich, L.
    Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, United States.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Department of Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale, Università di Trento, Italy.
    Katila, S.
    Department of Management, Aalto University, School of Business, Finland.
    Kuismin, A.
    Department of Language and Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Jääskeläinen, P.
    University of Lapland, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Laine, P. -M
    University of Lapland, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Meriläinen, S.
    University of Lapland, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Vola, J.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Sayers, J.
    School of Management, Massey University, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
    Wickström, A.
    Aalto University, School of Business, Helsinki, Finland.
    Valtonen, A.
    University of Lapland, Faculty of Social Sciences, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Salmela, T.
    Arctic University of Norway, Department of Tourism and Northern Studies, Alta, Norway.
    Pullen, A.
    Macquarie University Business School, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    What to do about "The Human" in Organization Studies?: Thinking/saying/ doing with the Anthropocene, pandemics, and thereafters2023In: A Research Agenda for Organization Studies, Feminisms and New Materialisms, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2023, p. 177-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Each of the chapters in this volume, from the introduction to this end(ing), engaged in a conversation about producing knowledge in, about, with "organization studies" at a time when we (us, the human inhabitants of this Earth) are facing calamitous conditions, probably leading to our/its destruction, and (some more than others) are wondering what is to be done. As members of the management and organization studies (MOS) scholarly community, all the authors in this project are deeply concerned about the "knowledge" our common field is producing as "legitimate", for it seems not only inadequate for addressing those calamitous conditions but also that this kind of knowledge may be implicated in reproducing the harms we all decry. The aim here has not been to critique the field on the basis of what it produces but to acknowledge conditions perpetuating the production of those forms of knowledge more generally, and to offer positive alternatives which may make a difference in what is produced, perhaps contributing to a better world‚ over and over again. The message this chapter and all other chapters hope to convey is the possibility of "thinking, saying and doing otherwise". But can we truly question the very notion of "the human" supporting "legitimate knowledge"? Can we truly focus on producing processual knowledge with indefinite aims? In other words, is the becoming of an organization studies produced with feminist new materialisms possible? Responding to those questions, and following the original proposal for this volume, this chapter is the voice of the collectivity articulating 'the-world-and-beyond' as envisioned in each of the prior chapters. Taking this approach resonates as well with new materialisms: "'a doing with' which cannot be a 'doing alone' -more like a world of on-going assembling".

  • 5.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Affective Engagement in Knowledgemaking2021In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview of the discussion animating the track “Doing research in technoscience as affective engagement” organised at the VIII STS Italia Conference. By acknowledging the inheritance of feminist STS scholars in expanding the theoretical scope of care beyond its traditional sites, this session was devoted to exploring knowledge production as a matter of care as well as a form of affective engagement and entanglement with multiple Others while doing research. Two contributions were presented. The first ethnographically investigates Canadian blood donation practices by drawing on Haraway’s SF figure to develop what the speaker calls ‘Sanguine Figuration’. The second presentation relies on research of women’s animist practices amongst horses in Swiss Alps through a filmmaking practice influenced by Haraway’s work on the natureculture continuum and situated knowledge. Both studies embody efforts to develop non-representational research practices and experimental approaches showing the affective entanglement between researchers and researched, subject and object. Further, these contributions have highlighted the importance of conceptual creativity and imagination in building an apparatus that enables accounting for affective engagements in doing research in STS.

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  • 6.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Anziani, salute e societa’. Politiche di welfare, discorso pubblico e cura quotidiana” [in English: Older people, health and society. Welfare policies, public discourse and daily care], by Francesco Miele, il Mulino, 20212022In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 156-159Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Aprire i modelli di business. Dalla condivisione delle (buone) idee all’organizzazione dell’innovazione2014In: Sviluppo & Organizzazione, ISSN 0391-7045, no 257, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bridging Gender Gaps, Networking in Computer Science2011In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 319-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Contesti di genere della tecnoscienza2011In: Trasformare conoscenza, trasferire tecnologia. Dizionario critico delle scienze sociali sulla trasformazione produttiva della conoscenza / [ed] Andrea Bonaccorsi and MassimianoBucchi, Venezia: Marsilio , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10. Cozza, Michela
    Doing (Open) Innovation through Networking2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11. Cozza, Michela
    Elderliness:the agential in-separability of ageing and assistive technologies2021In: Socio-Gerontechnology – Interdisciplinary critical studies of ageing and technology / [ed] Alexander Peine, Barbara Marshall, Wendy Martin, Louis Neven, Routledge, 2021, p. 70-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12. Cozza, Michela
    Fare e dis-fare il genere. Per una critica dei processi di significazione mediati dalla tecnologia2010In: Temperanter. International Quarterly Journal, ISSN 2037-2965, Vol. 1, no 2/3, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Cozza, Michela
    “Fiori in famiglia. Storia e storie di Eva Mameli Calvino”, Elena Accati2015In: AG About gender: International journal of gender studies, E-ISSN 2279-5057, Vol. 4, no 7Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    From Science Parks to Infrastructures2015In: Information Infrastructure(s). Boundaries, Ecologies, Multiplicity / [ed] Alessandro Mongili and Giuseppina Pellegrino, Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2015, p. 284-308Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gender and Technology: Mind the Gap!2009In: Organizational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICTs for Mobility / [ed] Anette Hallin and Tina Karrbom-Gustavsson, Hershey PA: IGI Publishing-Information Science Reference , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    I parchi scientifico-tecnologici: da strutture insediative a infrastrutture connettive2014In: Polis, ISSN 1120-9488, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 393-416Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Identità, figurazioni, artefatti. Dal fare genere all’orizzonte cyborg2009In: Ai confini del genere. Prospettive emergenti di riflessione e ricerca / [ed] Barbara Poggio, Trento: Edizioni 31 , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Interoperability and Convergence for Welfare Technology2018In: HUMAN ASPECTS OF IT FOR THE AGED POPULATION: APPLICATIONS IN HEALTH, ASSISTANCE, AND ENTERTAINMENT, PT II / [ed] Zhou, J Salvendy, G, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2018, p. 13-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interoperability and convergence are two key features of any working sociotechnical infrastructure that includes a plurality and multiplicity of communities of practice using technologies. However, as information systems scale up and the heterogeneity of users increases, it becomes challenging to actualise interoperability and convergence. When it comes to welfare services, the development of interoperable information systems and converging communities of practice is key to the quality and efficiency of services, both for practitioners and users. This paper elaborates on these concepts and their practical relevance by presenting and discussing data from a research project on ageing and welfare technology in Sweden. A participatory approach is meant to act as methodological support for the actualisation of interoperability and convergence even though socio-organisational and political constraints cannot be fully overcome once for all.

  • 19. Cozza, Michela
    Interoperability and Convergence for Welfare Technology2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 20. Cozza, Michela
    Key Concepts in Science and Technology Studies2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Key Concepts in Science and Technology Studies is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies through concepts that are also used in other areas, from design to organization studies. The book is relevant for students at bachelor and master level as well as for doctoral students and researchers who are approaching the field for the first time and need some initial guidance. It is designed to be an agile tool that provides accessible and authoritative knowledge of essential topics in the field of STS.

  • 21. Cozza, Michela
    La cultura degli opposti: Pensiero scientifico e sviluppo tecnologico in una prospettiva di genere2007In: Sociologia del Lavoro, ISSN 0392-5048, no 105, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Making Kin. Fare parentele, non popolazioni [Making Kin Not Population: Reconceiving Generations]2023In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 4, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Mentoring as Practice, Practices of Mentoring2013In: Mentoring: Practices, Potential Challenges and Benefits / [ed] Michael F. Shaughnessy, Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., , 2013, p. 145-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Narrare il cambiamento, organizzare il significato2011In: Sociologia del Lavoro-La ricerca sociologica e i temi del lavoro / [ed] Michele La Rosa, Milano: Franco Angeli , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25. Cozza, Michela
    Narrare il cambiamento organizzativo: da fuoco a sfondo2012In: Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia, ISSN 0486-0349, no 4, p. 661-685Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Narratives on platform: stories for women in computer science2008In: International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Lifelong Learning, ISSN 1560-4624, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Cozza, Michela
    Pannocchie da Nobel. Storia e storie di Barbara McClintock, Cristiana Pulcinelli,2015In: AG About gender: International journal of gender studies, E-ISSN 2279-5057, Vol. 4, no 7Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Performing the care crisis through the datafication of elderly welfare careIn: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic changes associated with contemporary society are often framed as a 'care crisis' where the aging population is portrayed as threatening the financial security and the future of younger generations. To rationally intervene in these issues, welfare states - particularly in Nordic countries - increasingly rely on digital technology as a 'remedy' and 'promise' of more effective and efficient public governance operating through technopolitical care practices and logics. Technological solutions such as AI, algorithms, apps and robotics are incorporated into elderly care and aligned with care work where the digitization of processes accompanies an intensification of datafication of elderly welfare care. This analysis is aimed at identifying and discussing how the welfare state is transformed through a practice of classification and its logic of standardization, a practice of taskification grounded on time-paced service logic, and a practice of categorization relying on a logic of prioritization. These three practices and logics embody tensions emerging where caring intersects with data sourcing, that is, where the datafication of elderly welfare care lies. Feminist posthumanism allows approaching them by resisting both techno-utopian and techno-dystopian claims about the datafication of elderly welfare care.

  • 29.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Remembering and telling the past: a qualitative study of organizational change2013In: Educational Reflective Practices, ISSN 2240-7758, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 123-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, ITALY.
    Science and Technology Parks in Italy2013In: EASST Review, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 6-8Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 31. Cozza, Michela
    Technology, Culture, Family. Influences on Home Life, Elisabeth B. Silva2013In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32. Cozza, Michela
    Thinking Smart Doing Gender: ri-pensare il Trentino in un’ottica di genere2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Cozza, Michela
    University of Trento, Italy.
    VEGA-VEnice GAteway for Science and Technology park: it is a generative infrastructure?2015In: Knowledge-creating Milieus in Europe: Firms Cities and Territories / [ed] Augusto Cusinato and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, Springer , 2015, p. 139-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Betti, Dario
    Centro Ricerche GPI s.r.l., Italy.
    Da architettura tecnologica a infrastruttura sociotecnica2015In: Strumenti, diritti, regole e nuove relazioni di cura. Il paziente europeo protagonista nell’e-health / [ed] Carla Faralli, Raffaella Brighi, and Michele Martoni, Torino: Giappichelli , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bruzzone, Silvia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Materialities of care for older people: caring together/apart in the political economy of caring apparatus2021In: Health Sociology Review, ISSN 1446-1242, E-ISSN 1839-3551, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 308-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By applying a posthuman perspective to the analysis of care for older people (COP), we analyse the agential cuts (together/apart) enacted by humans (mainly caregivers and older people) and more-than-humans (a camera intra-acting with other objects) whose agential entanglement configures and reconfigures the political economy of the caring apparatus. Our study identifies 'targeting', 'monitoring', and 'aligning' as interrelated caring practices, thus contributing to advance a posthuman understanding of welfare technology, and advancing a critical use of the possibilities enacted by technologies.

  • 36.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cersosimo, Giuseppina
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    A Responsible Approach to Age, Aging, and Digital Technology2023In: Italian Journal of Sociology of Education, E-ISSN 2035-4983, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 37.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Future ageing: welfare technology practices for our future older selves2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 109, p. 117-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we elaborate on how the future older person is characterised and what future ageing entails in relation to welfare technologies highlighting which actors, social and material, affect innovation governance and discussing who does not. Starting from a distinction between public, private, and academic perspectives we discuss how companies, public sector organisa- tions, and research-oriented actors construct future ageing through sociomaterial practices in the welfare technology arena. We base our reasoning on an ethnographic study conducted during the 2017 edition of the yearly MVTe-Mötesplats Välfärdsteknologi och E-hälsa Swedish event (in English: Meeting place for Welfare Technology and e-Health). We use the concept ‘welfare technology practices’ to describe how actors perform future ageing by producing and reprodu- cing a scenario where the positive effects of technology are assumed and the plurality of future older selves is overlooked. We problematise this view by reflecting on ageing as a complex so- ciomaterial process that calls for welfare technology practices and policies open to a pluralistic view of the future as futures. This study may inspire research that further explore how future ageing is constructed as well as support the development of welfare technology practices for addressing current blind spots.

  • 38.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cusinato, Augusto
    Department of Design and Planning in Complex Environments, IUAV University of Venice, Venice, Italy.
    Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulosc, Andreas
    The Westminster Law & Theory Lab, University of Westminster, London, UK.
    Atmosphere in Participatory Design2020In: Science as Culture, ISSN 0950-5431, E-ISSN 1470-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 269-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between democracy and design has been the topic of significant discussion in the design community. It is also at the core of participatory design that relies on the principle of genuine participation. According to this, users are not mere informants but legitimate participants in the design process. A great deal of participatory design, however, is driven by instrumental logics rather than participatory and democratic principles. In analysing these power relations, science and technology studies (STS) provides the starting point to introduce the concepts of ‘engineering an atmosphere’ (i.e. the process) and ‘engineered atmosphere’ (i.e. the outcome). These concepts problematise the principles and modes of participatory design, highlighting the tensions between economic and social agendas and top-down and bottom-up interactions. This problematic can be shown in the way that new teachnologies are targeted at older populations, necessitating an interrogation of the processes underpirnning the design and development of technological products and devices. It is important to reflect on who is included and who is excluded from technological design and innovation, which is always, and necessarily so, a fluid process.

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  • 39. Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    Infrastructuring diversity in stereotypes2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    Scaling up participatory design2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    De Angeli, Antonella
    University of Lincoln, UK; University of Trento, Italy.
    Tonolli, Linda
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Ubiquitous technologies for older people2017In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 607-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a close reading of work in ubicomp of applications for older people. Starting from three lines of enquiry defined in the inaugural issue of this journal, we discuss how ubicomp research has presented the relationship between technologies and older users. We base our reasoning on a review of papers published in Personal and Ubiquitous Computing(1997–2014). The lines of enquiry refer to paradigms (functional vs. sociotechnical), users(stereotype and involvement), and contexts (indoor and/or outdoor). These themes address the presentation of SUITCASE project (SUstainable Integrated & Territorial CAre SErvices). This is a two-year research on care services for older citizens within the smart home construct. We develop an initial framework that not only provides a cohesive view of technologies for older people, but also serves as a salient guideline for reflective design which extends beyond the target population. This framework may also address future design projects, funding schemes, and editorial policies.

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  • 42.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ellison, Kirsten L.
    Department of Communication Media & Film, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Katz, Stephen
    Department of Sociology, Trent University, Canada.
    Hacking age2022In: Sociology Compass, E-ISSN 1751-9020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a critical interdisciplinary study of biohacking as a specific case of transhumanism and its goals of enhancement and age intervention. It focuses on the organising principles underlying the biohacking movement's relationship to ageing and technoscience. The argument traces how the historical and scientific body technologies of molecularisation, functional age, optimisation, and quantification made possible the biohacking vision of the ageing body as amenable to modification, enhancement and improvement beyond its natural limits. Conclusions consider the wider implications of biohacking by pointing out four important issues that frame our cultural ambivalence about ageing: the tension between biohacking's supposedly liberating enhancement technologies and their obeisance to a tyranny of self-disciplinary practices and the authority of bio-data; the social meaning of biohacking hierarchies of human value, based on modifiable fitness and enhanceable performance; the implications of the biohacking program for gendered ageism; and the ethical limits of biohacking, not only in terms of potential harms to a person but what it can mean to exceed the natural limits of life.

  • 43.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gallistl, Vera
    Univ Vienna, Vienna, Austria..
    Wanka, Anna
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Manchester, Helen
    Univ Bristol, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Moreira, Tiago
    Univ Durham, Durham, England..
    Ageing as a Boundary Object Thinking Differently of Ageing and Care2020In: Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2038-3460, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 117-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing is not only a chronological matter. The following contributions at the crossroad of STS, material gerontology, design, and medical sociology offer alternative views on ageing and care. Ageing emerges as a boundary object through which authors explore the relationship with technologies and technology-based processes and practices. Authors point out that becoming older is a sociomaterial process and emphasize the importance of thinking with care when designing technology as well as the relevance of the socio-technical imaginary in conceptualizing older people.

  • 44. Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Gennai, F.
    Il genere nelle organizzazioni2009Book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Università di Trento, Italy..
    Feminism under erasure in new feminist materialism as a case of symbolic manspreading2023In: A Research Agenda for Organization Studies, Feminisms and New Materialisms, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2023, p. 33-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, by metaphorically extending the meaning of the word "manspreading", on one hand we describe how the term "feminist" in "new feminist materialism" has been placed "under erasure". On the other hand, we show how the feminism has been always already all set for disturbing the discursive male order of new materialism. We foreground three main feminist ethico-onto-epistemological assumptions: decentering the subject, (re)materializing all bodies; intra-acting responsibly. Correspondingly, we articulate three alternative forms of politics - a politics of location, a politics of re-materialization, and an ethical politics of response-ability - which, we deem, embody the generative and affirmative posture of new feminist materialism and pave the way for a different knowledge production practice in Management and Organization Studies.

  • 46. Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Narrare la quotidianità in FBK2010In: Trasformazioni. Identità istituzionale e organizzazione della ricerca: la Fondazione Bruno Kessler / [ed] Alberto Zanutto, Trento: FBK Press , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Posthuman feminism and feminist new  materialism: towards an ethico-onto-epistemology in research practices2023In: Handbook of Feminist Research Methodologies in Management and Organization Studies / [ed] Saija Katila; Susan Meriläinen; Emma Bell, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 55-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 48.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gherardi, SilviaMälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Posthumanist Epistemology of Practice Theory: Re-imagining Method in Organization Studies and Beyond2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within and beyond organization studies, an epistemology of practice allows us to view the ongoing interaction between doing and knowing, the knowing subject and the known object, social and material, humans, nonhumans, more-than-humans. This book is a collection of reflections by scholars across the social sciences around epistemological practices and the epistemology of posthumanist practice theory.Practice theories and practice-based studies have developed a rich methodology for studying working practices. This book is an epistemological reflection that challenges the distinction between theory and method, questions the knowing practices that give form to the object of knowledge, how they draw boundaries between what comes to matter and what is excluded from mattering. It will be of great interest to scholars and students of organization studies and beyond, allowing social science researchers to rethink their positioning within their own research practices and leaving them open to a broader, looser and more generous understanding of qualitative methodologies.Chapters 1, 2, 5 and 6 are available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com.

  • 49.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Gherardi, Silvia
    Univ Trento, Res Unit Commun Org Learning & Aesthet, Trento, Italy.
    Graziano, Valeria
    Coventry Univ, Fac Res, Ctr Postdigital Cultures, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Johansson, Janet
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Management & Engn Business Adm, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Mondon-Navazo, Mathilde
    Univ Milan, Dept Social & Polit Sci, Milan, Italy.
    Murgia, Annalisa
    Univ Milan, Dept Social & Polit Sci, Milan, Italy.
    Trogal, Kim
    Univ Creat Arts, Canterbury Sch Architecture, Farnham, Surrey, England.
    COVID-19 as a breakdown in the texture of social practices2021In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. S1, p. 190-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'A lot of things need to be repaired and a lot of relationships are in need of a knowledgeable mending. Can we start to talk/write about them?' This invitation - sent by one of the authors to the others - led us, as feminist women in academia, to join together in an experimental writing about the effects of COVID-19 on daily social practices and on potential (and innovative) ways for repairing work in different fields of social organization. By diffractively intertwining our embodied experiences of becoming together-with Others, we foreground a multiplicity of repair (care) practices COVID-19 is making visible. Echoing one another, we take a stand and say that we need to prevent the future from becoming the past. We are not going back to the past; our society has already changed and there is a need to cope with innovation and repairing practices that do not reproduce the past.

  • 50.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Murgia, Annalisa
    Poggio, Barbara
    Traiettorie ed intrecci nelle storie di carriera di uomini e donne. Una lettura di genere delle transizioni tra lavoro e non lavoro2008In: Sociologia del Lavoro, no 110, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 64
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