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  • 1.
    Pop, P.
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
    Scholle, D.
    Alten Sverige AB, Kista, Sweden.
    Šljivo, Irfan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hansson, Hans
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Safe cooperating cyber-physical systems using wireless communication: The SafeCOP approach2017In: Microprocessors and microsystems, ISSN 0141-9331, E-ISSN 1872-9436, Vol. 53, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled “Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication” (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016–2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless communication, multiple stakeholders, dynamic system definitions (openness), and unpredictable operating environments. SafeCOP will provide an approach to the safety assurance of CO-CPS, enabling thus their certification and development. The project will define a runtime manager architecture for runtime detection of abnormal behaviour, triggering if needed a safe degraded mode. SafeCOP will also develop methods and tools, which will be used to produce safety assurance evidence needed to certify cooperative functions. SafeCOP will extend current wireless technologies to ensure safe and secure cooperation, and also contribute to new standards and regulations, by providing certification authorities and standardization committees with the scientifically validated solutions needed to craft effective standards extended to also address cooperation and system-of-systems issues. The project has 28 partners from 6 European countries, and a budget of about 11 million Euros corresponding to about 1,300 person-months. 

  • 2.
    Pop, Paul
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Scholle, Detlef
    Alten Sverige AB.
    Hansson, Hans
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    The SafeCOP ECSEL Project: Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication2016In: Proceedings - 19th Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design, DSD 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2016, p. 532-538, article id 7723596Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled 'Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication' (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016 - 2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless communication, multiple stakeholders, dynamic system definitions (openness), and unpredictable operating environments. SafeCOP will provide an approach to the safety assurance of CO-CPS, enabling thus their certification and development. The project will define a runtime manager architecture for runtime detection of abnormal behaviour, triggering if needed a safe degraded mode. SafeCOP will also develop methods and tools, which will be used to produce safety assurance evidence needed to certify cooperative functions. SafeCOP will extend current wireless technologies to ensure safe and secure cooperation. SafeCOP will also contribute to new standards and regulations, by providing certification authorities and standardization committees with the scientifically validated solutions needed to craft effective standards extended to also address cooperation and system-of-systems issues. The project has 28 partners from 6 European countries, and a budget of about 11 million Euros corresponding to about 1,300 person-months.

  • 3.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Annual Report 2010 Innovation and Product Realisation2011Other (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2010 Intelligent Sensor Systems2011Other (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2010 Mälardalen Real-Time Research Centre2011Other (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2010 Scool of Innovation, Design and Engineering2011Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Annual Report 2011 Innovation and Product Realisation2012Other (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2011 Intelligent Sensor Systems2012Other (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2011 Mälardalen Real-Time Research Centre2012Other (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2012 Embedded Systems2013Other (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Annual Report 2012 Innovation and Product Realisation2013Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Annual Report 2013 Embedded Systems2014Other (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Davis, Ann-Catrin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Annual Report 2013 Innovation and Product Realisation2014Other (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    et al.
    ABB Robotics.
    Liberg, Anna
    ABB Robotics.
    Farnsworth, Alexander
    Green robots: Robot-based automation is enabling energy efficiency in the plastics industry2009In: ABB review, ISSN 1013-3119, no 1, p. 63-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sundström, Angelina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Industrial PhD students and their projects2016In: Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 100, p. 739-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the usual case a PhD student is enrolled and supervised at an academic faculty, in Sweden also most often employed at a department of the university. The whole doctoral education takes part in one single environment. There is an opportunity to enroll “classes” of industrial PhD students in industrial graduate schools. The PhD student is in these cases most often employed by an industry. Each PhD student has at least one academic supervisor, but also an industrial mentor. Sometimes the industrial mentor also holds a PhD and can formally also be an industrial co-supervisor. Even if the funding of the PhD student is a research project, the doctoral work is often not performed as a project. There are often severe delays of the dissertation. The public defense often happens a year after the funding has ended. This represents a large cost for the university or for the industry. The progression of the student lies outside the control of the university management and also the funding industry. We have conducted a case study to explore the organizing of PhD work with the purpose to describe whether project methodology could support industrial PhD students in their progression towards a PhD.

  • 16.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Creating a consortium: Book of industry papers, poster papers and abstracts of the ProjMAN 2014 - International Conference on Project MANagement2014In: Book of industry papers, poster papers and abstracts of the ProjMAN 2014 - International Conference on Project MANagement ProjMAN, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mälardalen Real-Time Research Center (MRTC) has been a part of several proposals and projects selected and partly funded by ARTEMIS-JU. In this paper we want to present an example how the process of building a consortium can be handled by the main proposer in this kind of calls. The traditional way to do it is a “snow ball strategy” where the consortium lead might lose the control of the development of the consortium. Our approach is to be open, but keep control, by giving successive tasks and instructions to the interested partners, without any promises. When a core team of committed and productive partners is selected, they provide a first draft that is used to select the total consortium. Our strategy is a structured semi-open selection process for the consortium, paired with the development of the proposal.

  • 17.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Dealing with complex projects in a research environment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The School of Innovation, Design and Engineering (IDT) at Mälardalen University (MDH), Sweden, has built its research environment in cooperation with European industry. As the number of research project has increased, the challenge to manage the projects is correspondingly increasing. To allow researchers to focus on research, IDT has invested in training for professional project management and designated the department for research coordination (RECO) to be the school´s project management office, providing professional project management to research projects. RECO has launched a number of quality processes to increase the professionalism in applying for and managing research projects, and is now carrying experience between projects and researchers. The combination of excellent research and professional project management is a success factor when handling the large portfolio of complex projects. This poster will present how MDH improve productivity and quality in research management by adding project management competencies to the research environment.

  • 18.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    On Top of the Consortium: Keeping the Control of Consortium Building in ICT R&D Programmes2016In: International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation 2015 ICE 2015, 2016, article id 7438648Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research projects in the engineering domain are often performed in partnership between Academia and Industry. Some kinds of funding presuppose a specific blend and participation of different partners in the projects. The initiator of a project, the prospective consortium leader, thus has to take on board a selection of organizations to meet the requirements from the funding program or funding body. One usual way is to ask “old friends”, partners you know from previous collaboration, but sometimes it is not sufficient to get a well-balanced consortium with sufficient competence and/or country representation. On the European level, there are many attempts to help the proposers to build a consortium, often named “brokerage event”, “proposer´s days” or the like. These often seems to encourage large consortia, both in principle and in practice. Large consortia can possibly help to be more complementary and well balanced, but there is no evidence that the quality of the project performance or result is better. The encouraged process can be described as a “snow ball” method. New partners arrive more or less spontaneously, and in their turn bring more partners to the consortium. Often, groups of partners who already know each other tend to join a developing consortium cluster-wise, either by country or by research or competence area. From the funding program or funding body, consortia are also encouraged to merge with each other, which gives the process of building a consortium another level of complexity. An advantage of this model can be that partners with previous experience join the consortium, group-wise. An opposite approach is to be open, but to stay in control of the consortium building process. This can be done by giving successive tasks and instructions to the interested partners, without any promises, and just successively incorporate new partners in the consortium. This strategy is a structured semi-open selection process for the consortium, paired with the development of the proposal. We state the hypothesis that the “standard” mechanisms might lead to large consortia, loss of control and possibly bad performance, and that a more restricted method can lead to sufficiently sized consortia, help the consortium leader to keep the control, and possibly lead to better quality of performance. To learn more about this, we have interviewed a number of experienced project managers to find out how they perform consortium building in practice. We have also been interested in learning more about how they examine new research partners before inviting them to a research cooperation proposal or project.

  • 19.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Project Management in Complex Environments2015In: 21st Century Projects IPMA 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The School of Innovation, Design and Engineering (IDT) at Mälardalen University (MDH), Sweden, has built its research environment in cooperation with industry by funding from external sources. As the number of research project has increased, the challenge to run and manage the projects is increasing. To allow researchers to focus on research rather than project management, IDT has invested in training for professional project management and designated the department for research coordination (RECO) to be the project management office (PMO), providing professional project management to research projects. RECO are now carriers of experience between different projects. RECO project managers, however, are not experts in the research conducted at the school, which is a challenge. Nevertheless, the combination of excellent research and professional project management is a success factor when it comes to handling the large portfolio of complex projects within the school. This session will present a survey among Swedish PMO, and set it in relief to how MDH improve productivity and quality in research management by adding project management competencies to the research environment at the university.

  • 20.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Researchers strategies: Parallel or Sequential working style2016In: 22nd EARMA Annual Conference 2016 NEW HORIZONS IN RESEARCH MANAGEMENT EARMA*16, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are different styles among researchers in their activities to apply for funds and to perform research project. Our observation has been that you can see at least two radically different styles. Some researchers have a style of acting that we would call a parallel or even an entrepreneurial style. That means that you apply for new projects even if the portfolio is full, and although there are no current resources to perform the project. If a new project is granted, the resources are also recruited. The consequence is that the environment has to grow both by recruitment and by promotion of juniors. The application work will have to be industrialized, and also calls for several support structures. On the opposite a sequential style means to apply for a new project only when another runs into its end. This attitude will be conservative and just allow for a small expansion of the working environment. Partly it may relate to the ‘ivory tower’ and ‘strategic research’ (Kurek et al 2007), but in this study we just address the “habit” of applying for external research projects and contributing to a growing research environment. We would like to propose a study where we correlate the number of applications and granted proposals from individual researchers, with usual key figures for a research environment, such as publications, citations and awarded PhDs. If a certain researcher applies a parallel or a sequential style, how will he or she perform in terms of recruitment and supervision of PhD students, writing papers and getting citations? We would also like to correlate the appearance of these different styles in different environment, to trace where they appear. In our close proximity, we notice for example that a parallel style or even strategy is apparent in some environments, but lacking in others. Is that distribution just random or systematically? What does it look like at other universities? How many individuals are needed or sufficient to influence an environment? The expected outcome is to settle that these characters actually exists, the two styles. And if they do, to find which factors will be beneficial for the development of a more entrepreneurial style, a parallel style. And also how environments dominated by this kind of researchers develop especially in relation to environment with the other style.

  • 21.
    Widforss, Gunnar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Rosqvist, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    The Project Office as Project Management Support in Complex Environments2015In: Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 64, p. 764-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the academic sector, most engineering research funding presupposes collaborative projects. Collaboration between academia and industry is encouraged. This approach creates successive complexity in most Research and Development (R&D) projects in many ways. Projects funded by the European Commission or jointly funded by national agencies are often encouraged to become large, competing companies may become partners, objectives are unclear, and overall vagueness usually increases with consortium size. Many companies and some research organizations have created project management offices (PMO) to deal with project complexity. Typically, project managers in research organizations are excellent researchers but less skilled or interested in project management. To help researchers stay focused on research and not get side tracked by project management, the PMO provides professional project management services to researchers and research projects. The combination of excellent research and professional project management is a success factor when handling a large portfolio of complex projects. We surveyed the directors of PMOs in Sweden to determine how PMOs cope with complexity in different organizations. This paper presents the results of that small survey and compares them with similar efforts at one Swedish university in a brief case study.

1 - 21 of 21
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