mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adenfelt, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Knowledge integration in a multinational setting: a study of a transnational business project2009In: International Journal of Knowledge Management Studies, ISSN 1743-8268, E-ISSN 1743-8276, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 295-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to study how communication enables knowledge integration within transnational projects. Using longitudinal case study data to explore the theoretical arguments, interesting findings emerge. The main finding is that knowledge integration within the transnational project was hampered by ignorance – among project managers and members – of the impact and link between the use of different communication tools, subsequent communication process and knowledge integration. Other findings relate to how institutionalised behaviour persist change and subsequently partly explained why the communication process and thereto related communication tools were not adjusted to new circumstances and conditions. Finally, communication is an inherent part of knowledge integration within a transnational project and there is a need for communication to be sensitive to the complexity of the knowledge being integrated.

  • 2.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Theorizing muddy practices in semi-temporary organizations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The projectification of organizations and the increased interest among researchers to developknowledge about temporary organizations has led to a lot of interesting work, most oftenfocusing on project-based organizations or firms. More scarce is research that focuses on howtemporary organizing takes place in permanent host-organizations that perform the larger partof their activities in processual, routine-based operations. Previous researchers have argued thatin such semi-temporary organizations, tensions emerge between the temporary and permanentdue to competing organizational logics. How these tensions are played out in daily workpractices is however not known. This paper addresses this gap, drawing on an in-depth casestudy of a waste management company. Using practice theory as an epistemological lens, weanalyze the practices involved the temporary organizing in the company in light of the fourbasic dimensions of a temporary organization, time, team, task and transition (Lundin &Söderholm, 1995). Doing so, we are able to theorize the “muddy” practices of temporaryorganizing in a permanent host-organization.

  • 3.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Deviations and the breakdown of project management principles2009In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how unexpected events (deviations) are handled and how the limited time available in a project affects the possibilities for reflection and knowledge creation. Since deviations will inevitably occur and they will substantially increase project costs, studies of them are imperative. When only a fraction of the project management literature has focused on the actuality of the project this study gives insights into the practice of project management. Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on an exploratory, in-depth case study of a power plant project found in an integrated provider of projects of this type. The projects were followed by participative observations during ten weeks of onsite visits. Findings – The results show that in contrast to contemporary project management theories, the management of deviations was found to be primarily informal. The reason for this was two-fold. First, there was not enough time to use formal procedures. Second, if the formal routines were to be followed, the window of opportunity would be lost, making the decisions that follow useless. Third, two types of reflection were noted: structured collective reflection and contextual reflection, the former corresponding to formal routines and the later to the solution of deviations which is seen as a trigger for spreading practices around the organization. Research limitations/implications – The research presented that projects should be studied from a practice point of view, where deviations might be a good starting point. Moreover, it is suggested that there is a need to broaden the studies of reflection to accommodate other organizational levels and time spans. Practical implications – The case has several suggestions for practitioners. First, small deviations should be paid attention to. Second, bureaucracy hampers flexibility and the organization should rather set up organizational structures, i.e. dual structures, to allow for a smoother process. Third, networks and confidence were found to be essential for the process. Finally, there is a need to pay attention to different time frames when managing deviations. Originality/value – The paper develops a more intricate view of project organizing coming from the new Project-as-Practice agenda. Rather than focusing on what should be done, it focuses on what is done, which is a research area that needs further attention

  • 4.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Balancing Boundaries: Everyday Boundary Work in Information Technology Project Management2009In: Proceedings of the 42nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Boundary setting and boundary spanning in the life of temporary organizations2008In: Proceedings at the European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS), July 10-12, 2008, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ekman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Sundström, Angelina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bringing practitioners into the classroom: Student reflections and learning styles.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Müllern, Tomas
    Jönköping International Business School.
    A contextual understanding of projects – The importance of space and time2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 327-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the managing of high-tech projects in complex and dynamic settings. Building on recent developments in organization theory and knowledge management, we focus on the importance of understanding the ways in which project-centered activities are shaped in time and space, both in the organization itself and in a wider context embracing customers, consultants and suppliers. A longitudinal case study including semi-structured interviews, observations and secondary data wilt substantiate our findings. The study offers both theoretical and practical insights suggesting that projects are exposed to a varying degree of complexity and dynamics, calling for different managerial approaches. The analysis shows that boundary spanning has many dimensions that have to be considered in the management of projects in space and time. The article concludes by suggesting seven analytical categories for analyzing and understanding projects in their spatial and temporal contexts.

  • 8.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Vince, Russ
    School of Management, University of Bath, UK.
    Sensing Organizaional Limits to Learning2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses organizational limits to learning within a project intensive organization. The idea of 'learning inaction' (the organizational dynamics that underpin a failure to act) is used as a conceptual frame. Our analysis of three case examples from MillCorp, a project intensive firm, revealed three organizational limits to learning. First, underlying anxieties prompt an over-reliance on action. Second, politics in MillCorp make knowledge transfer problematic. Third, inaction is sustained because what managers see as essential, workers see as unworkable. Our conclusion is that organizational limits to learning in MillCorp are recreated in relation to the politics of inaction.

  • 9.
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ.
    Wismén, May
    Jonkoping Int Business Sch.
    Carlsson, Sven A.
    Lund Univ.
    Permanent and temporary work practices: Knowledge integration and the meaning of boundary activities2008In: Knowledge Management Research & Practice, ISSN 1477-8238, E-ISSN 1477-8246, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 260-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge integration is a critical topic in current knowledge management research and practice. Research on this topic focuses primarily on how knowledge is integrated within a work setting. A less researched area is knowledge integration between different work groups. The purpose is hence to describe and analyze how knowledge is integrated between different work groups. We present two intensive case studies – one permanent and one temporary (project) work settings – which were studied using a practice-based perspective. A main result of the study is that knowledge integration in the two cases was more complicated than the literature suggests. Both differences and similarities were found between the two cases. Differences were seen in the use of boundary spanning activities and boundary objects, whereas similarities were found in the organizational structures and mechanisms, that is, purposes, rules, and infrastructures, which facilitated the integration of knowledge and/or functioned as obstacles and impediments.

  • 10. Mork, Bjorn E.
    et al.
    Hoholm, Thomas
    Maaninen-Olsson, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Aanestad, Margunn
    Changing practice through boundary organizing: A case from medical R&D2012In: Human Relations, ISSN 0018-7267, E-ISSN 1741-282X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 263-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to our understanding of practices in innovating organizations. Previous studies have demonstrated how breakthroughs in knowledge may fail to be translated into practices if they are not aligned with existing practices, or if they cut across established boundaries and power structures. By drawing upon an ethnographic study of a medical R&D department that has been highly successful in developing new medical practices, this article investigates how such challenges can be overcome. To date, much of the literature has focused on coordination across single, well-defined boundaries. We here extend this focus and introduce the notion of 'boundary organizing' to analyse highly political and contingent processes of innovation and change within and across different practices. We add to existing literature by highlighting how the handling of multiple boundaries, the indirect effects of boundary work, the negotiation of mutual benefits and interests, and mutual adaptation are key aspects of boundary organizing.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf