https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlström, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Managing Responsibly Together: How an Obligation is Made to Matter in Top Management Team Work2023In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to research on responsible management by developing knowledge on how managing responsibly together in a Top Management Team (TMT) may be accomplished, thus complementing research in the area that focuses on the work of individual managers. To this end, we mobilize the concept of obligation to characterize what emerges as what a TMT needs to respond to. Having followed the TMT for a municipal company working together in meetings over time, we propose that three accomplishments (making the obligation present, making the obligation enable action and accounting for the obligation) shape how an obligation is made to matter. This is no linear process, but rather it unfolds in a series of materializations of the obligation in text and talk, as the TMT goes about its work. The article thus provides a contribution to research on responsible management but also has practical consequences for developing how a TMT works in order to address the urgent demands for change related to sustainable development.MAD statementIn this article, we develop knowledge on how managing responsibly together may be accomplished in a Top Management Team (TMT). Besides adding to the responsible management literature, we also provide theoretical tools that may be mobilized in order to develop the work practices of TMTs that want to contribute to sustainable development.

  • 2.
    Alvehus, J
    et al.
    Lund Univ Helsingborg, Dept Serv Management & Serv Studies, Box 882, S-25108 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Micro-ethonography: Towards An Approach for Attending to the Multimodality of Leadership2022In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 231-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the need for further developing an understanding of leadership as practice in its multimodality by means of theoretically motivated qualitative methods, allowing researchers to come close to the doing of leadership. Empirical studies of this kind are still relatively rare. By articulating a microethnographic approach, we encourage short-term-focused engagements in empirical work and the writing of closed vignettes. Through this, current theoretical developments are connected to recommendations for fieldwork and for writing practices. We thereby articulate one possible coherent and consistent position from which to study the multimodality of leadership and to understand leadership as an accomplishment of direction.

  • 3.
    Alvehus, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Micro-ethnography and closed vignettes: Eight propositions for fieldwork and write-work in multimodal leadership studies2018In: Co-Lead workshop 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schunnesson, Jonathan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service2018In: ECSCW 2018 - Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Springer , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of how to organise for the introduction of a new service involving the interaction of humans and technologies is both crucial and challenging. Convergence between the community of practice using the technology and the design of the technology is crucial for the technology to become meaningful and usable. While processes of convergence are challenging in themselves, they become more complex if several communities of practice are going to use and collaborate around/through the technology. The co-presence of different communities of practice is a common situation when delivering public welfare services. In particular, the development of welfare technology is a context rich in potential frictions, making convergence challenging. By mobilising the concept of transparency, we analyse the process of implementation of remote night monitoring and highlight how transparency is related to different aspects. Such analysis reveals that processes of convergence are related in this context not only to frictions shared with other settings, but also to specific frictions related to matters of concern in welfare services. This leads us to discuss whether digitalised care services can be argued as still having a human side or not.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cozza, MichelaCrevani, LuciaMälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.Schunnesson, JonathanMälardalen University.
    Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Our new digital co-workers: How introducing an RPA changes the relational fabric of workManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace technologies today not only support work but also perform it. Whereas the general debate often focuses on quantitative effect in terms of possible jobs lost, what is still largely missing is how workplace technologies impact the quality of employee’s work-life, in particular for office and administrative work. By mobilizing the literature conceptualizing work as accomplished in digital/human configurations, in this article we aim at unpacking how introducing digital automation technologies may lead to repositioning the human worker at work. We study the very start of introducing an RPA in a Swedish municipality with an ethnographic sensibility. Building on close readings of three episodes, we discuss how such the human/digital emergent configuration produced a re-distribution of categories of tasks and responsibilities and, consequently, a dichotomous distinction between human and digital co-workers. This means also a changing fabric of relationships supporting work, which could be characterized in terms of asymmetrical co-workership. 

  • 7.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Swedish Academy of Management (FEKIS), Sweden.
    LEADERSHIP AS CARE-FUL CO-DIRECTING CHANGE: A PROCESSUAL APPROACH TO ETHICAL LEADERSHIP FOR ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE2023In: Organizational Change, Leadership And Ethics: Leading Organizations Towards Sustainability, 2nd Edition, Taylor and Francis , 2023, p. 83-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter makes the case for a processual approach to understanding ethical change leadership in order to develop a more fine-grained understanding of how leadership matters. It starts with a vignette taken from current empirical studies on digitalization, leadership, and organizing. This vignette is utilthere isized as an illustration of the theoretical argument made. The argument is presented in three steps. First, the vignette is reread and some critical questions as posed. Second, it delves deeper into the perspective that leadership may be understood as a process, and what this means for understanding leadership for change. Third, a processual conceptualization of ethics that is not centered on individuals, but focused on what is produced, re-produced, and not-produced in the doing of leadership for organizational change, is presented. This leads to the introduction of the concept of care, and propose the idea of care-ful co-directing change.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ingvarsson, Caroline
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ivory, Chris
    Anglia Ruskin University, United Kingdom.
    Lammi, Inti José
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindell, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Popova, Irina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Uhlin, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hyper-Taylorism and third-order technologies: Making sense of the transformation of work and management in a post-digital era2021In: Management and Information Technology after Digital Transformation, Taylor and Francis , 2021, p. 63-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bruzzone, Silvia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Supporting and Studying Organizational Change for Introducing Welfare Technologies as a Sociomaterial Process2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 787223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welfare technologies (WT) for older people is a rapidly expanding sector that offers a way to tackle the challenge of an aging population. Despite their promise in terms of advances in care services and financial savings, their use is still limited. Their design and implementation remain problematic, as they require changes in working practices through coordination among a multiplicity of actors. In order to address these challenges, the need for change is often expressed in terms of a lack of working methods appropriate to their scope. This has led to a proliferation of different toolkits, guidelines, models, etc.; however, these methods often imply a linear understanding of an implementation project and thus fail to take into consideration the emergent and situated character of the processes that lead up to the adoption of welfare. The aim of this article is to propose an alternative means of providing support for the introduction of these technologies by initiating a process for organizational change. The term "change" is understood here as something that is produced by practitioners-in collaboration with researchers-and not brought by researchers to practitioners. To this end, using the tradition of intervention research as inspiration, a learning process at the crossroads of different practices and objects was initiated. The center of attention of this article' is the sociomaterial process by which different communities of practitioners interact on the co-creation of a checklist. This is a new working method in which the focus is not the artifact in itself but how it emerges through successive interactions and iterations among different objects, practitioners and researchers, resulting in a joint sociomaterial process that reconfigures power relations and the work objective associated with WT. In other words, a new working method artifact is developed in a process in which practitioners, researchers and contextual objects interact and become one with each another.

  • 10.
    Clegg, Stewart
    et al.
    Univ Stavanger, Business Sch, Stavanger, Norway.;Univ Nova, Sch Business & Eco, Carcavelos, Portugal..
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Uhl-Bien, Mary
    Texas Christian Univ, Neely Sch Business Soc & Engn, Ft Worth, USA..
    By, Rune Todnem
    Univ Stavanger, Business Sch, Stavanger, Norway..
    Changing Leadership in Changing Times2021In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This leading article is setting out to Make a Difference (MAD) through catalysing the further exploration and development of leadership theory and practice by facilitating the reimagining and reframing of challenges and solutions ahead. It does so by integrating the academic concerns of the current literature with the issues raised by recent events marked by the cataclysmic end of the Trump presidency in the United States.

  • 11.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bruzzone, Silvia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Materialities of care for older people: caring together/apart in the political economy of caring apparatus2021In: Health Sociology Review, ISSN 1446-1242, E-ISSN 1839-3551, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 308-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By applying a posthuman perspective to the analysis of care for older people (COP), we analyse the agential cuts (together/apart) enacted by humans (mainly caregivers and older people) and more-than-humans (a camera intra-acting with other objects) whose agential entanglement configures and reconfigures the political economy of the caring apparatus. Our study identifies 'targeting', 'monitoring', and 'aligning' as interrelated caring practices, thus contributing to advance a posthuman understanding of welfare technology, and advancing a critical use of the possibilities enacted by technologies.

  • 12.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Future ageing: welfare technology practices for our future older selves2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 109, p. 117-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we elaborate on how the future older person is characterised and what future ageing entails in relation to welfare technologies highlighting which actors, social and material, affect innovation governance and discussing who does not. Starting from a distinction between public, private, and academic perspectives we discuss how companies, public sector organisa- tions, and research-oriented actors construct future ageing through sociomaterial practices in the welfare technology arena. We base our reasoning on an ethnographic study conducted during the 2017 edition of the yearly MVTe-Mötesplats Välfärdsteknologi och E-hälsa Swedish event (in English: Meeting place for Welfare Technology and e-Health). We use the concept ‘welfare technology practices’ to describe how actors perform future ageing by producing and reprodu- cing a scenario where the positive effects of technology are assumed and the plurality of future older selves is overlooked. We problematise this view by reflecting on ageing as a complex so- ciomaterial process that calls for welfare technology practices and policies open to a pluralistic view of the future as futures. This study may inspire research that further explore how future ageing is constructed as well as support the development of welfare technology practices for addressing current blind spots.

  • 13.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Att skapa handlingsutrymme: Mot nya sätt att utveckla ledarskap i organisationer2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Chairs without tables: The sociomaterial challenge to and reenactment of work meetings legacy in a postdigital era2023In: 39th EGOS Colloquium 2023: Organizing for the Good Life: Between Legacy and Imagination, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Clearing for Action: Leadership as a Relational Phenomenon2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although leadership is deemed to matter, scholars seldom pay attention to the phenomenon itself, as it is happening. Hence definitions abound, but there is a lack of vocabulary for expressing what leadership is about without ending up talking of individual leaders and/or descriptions of abstract “goodness”. Such an idealised and individualistic construct of leadership has consequences, both in theory and practice, in terms of providing a reductionist account, segregating and putting people in hierarchies, reinforcing the dominance of masculinities, and constraining how leadership is to be performed. Therefore, in order to contribute to our still limited knowledge of leadership beyond ideals and individualised conceptions, the purpose of this thesis is to add to our understanding of leadership as a social phenomenon going on at work and to contribute to developing a vocabulary for it.

    Reading the empirical material more and more closely, produced through an ethnography-inspired approach at two Swedish organisations and consisting of transcripts of interactions and interviews, the initial research question, “how is leadership shared in practice?” is subsequently modified and different strands of theories are applied: shared leadership, postheroic leadership and a radical processual view of leadership. In this way, different understandings of leadership are analysed. As a result, the theoretical concepts of organisational becoming, relational leadership and work practices are combined in an alternative approach. Two leadership practices are thus identified: constructing positions and positioning, and constructing issues. Such an analysis also leads to an alternative way of understanding leadership: leadership as clearing for action. Clearing is both a space, a bounded space, and an action. Therefore it expresses a relational perspective in which there are no stable entities, by suggesting a more dynamic view, at the same time as it also conveys the idea that we are talking about a constrained space.

    I thus define clearing for action as an emergent bounded aggregate of actions and talks that become possible, making others impossible or less probable. Actors and their worlds are constructed in certain ways that expand or contract the space of possible action. The result is a specific reading of leadership to add to the field of leadership studies. In this reading, leadership is an ordinary, repeated, social achievement at work in which possibilities for action and talk are constructed in constrained terms.

     

  • 16.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. IMIT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: Exploring the ongoing production of direction in organizing2018In: Leadership, ISSN 1742-7150, E-ISSN 1742-7169, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 83-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the idea of leadership being a process is clearly stated in leadership definitions, most researchers focus on individuals rather than observing and studying processes. This contradiction has been highlighted by a number of scholars turning to leadership processes and practices, thereby drawing attention to the interactional and social aspects of the phenomenon. Such contributions mostly take process perspectives in which entities still play an important role. In this article, I therefore aim at contributing to leadership studies based on a process ontology by exploring one central aspect of leadership work, the production of direction, processually. I do so by building on geographer Massey’s conception of space, thus adding a spatial dimension that enables me to conceptualize direction as the development of an evolving relational configuration. In order to empirically explore such a conceptualization, two constructs are proposed: the construction of positions and the construction of issues. The reading of leadership work thus produced leads me to suggest ‘clearing for action’ as a means of conveying the spatio-temporal and constructive (reality constructing) character of leadership work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: The idea of ”Clearing for action” as a possible way of conceptualizing the ongoing production of direction in organizing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Leadership as clearing for action: Behind the myth, the mystery of producing direction for action at work2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leadership, not leaders: Abstract of a study trying a process perspective on leadership2007In: Nordic Academy of Management, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Leadership or organizing?: Leadership practices in processes of organizational becoming2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH – Royal Institute of Technology.
    Naming it as leadership: A relational construction of leadership as an alternative to heroic masculinity in an empirical study of two Swedish companies2008In: Engendering Leadership Through Research and Practice: Conference Proceedings, Perth, 21 – 24 July 2008 / [ed] Jacquie Hutchinson, 2008, p. 148-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional leadership theory is based on the conflation of leadership with leaders. Lately the focus has been on heroic leadership, a leadership practice tightly intertwined with masculinity. Male success has been depicted in terms of an independent, aggressive, secure, decisive, worldly leader (Ely & Padavic, 2007). The first aim of this paper is to contribute to post-heroic leadership theory by offering a relational and non-individual/masculine/heroic conception of leadership. I will question the idea that leadership is something leaders do as well as I will try to keep the focus on the leadership that is done, not on the individuals doing it, and name it as leadership. The second aim of the paper is to ask what happens with a relational conception of leadership, is it also gendering? I will therefore analyse the practicing of leadership (in my conceptualization) at the intersection with the practicing of gender and show that, even if leadership as analyzed in this paper is a practicing that does not directly imply heroic masculinity, if gender (and seniority) is not taken into consideration and critically analyzed and reflected upon, inequality and exclusion from the doing of leadership will persist.

  • 22.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Organizational presence and place: Sociomaterial place work in the Swedish outdoor industry2019In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore the relation between organizational presence and the place in which such a presence is enacted. To this end I mobilize Doreen Massey’s processual conceptualization of place as an event consisting of a bundle of trajectories. By following the presentification of a Swedish company, Fjällräven, in the natural environment in the North of Sweden during Fjällräven Classic, I show that the organization is not made present in place, but through place production. I propose the concept of place work to express the work done by representatives of the organization, but also by other humans and nonhumans, to make the throwntogetherness of the place result in a rather coherent and stable construction through which the organization is made present. Place work is therefore work through which organizational presence and place are recursively co-creating. The concept of place work expands what we can learn about the “where” of an organization when building on an ontology of performativity.

  • 23.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    ‘Placing the organisation’: Studying the communicative constitution of organisation as the production of place2015In: APROS/EGOS 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I want to add to studies exploring how ‘organisations’ are ‘made real’, how they are made present and materialised (Cooren, Brummans, & Charrieras, 2008) by focusing on the spatial dimension of such processes (Vásquez and Cooren, 2013). Leaning on Doreen Massey’s work on space and place (2005), I propose that the processes making ‘the organisation’ present may be studied as processes producing a specific (but contested) place (‘the organisation’) and I empirically explore such a possibility. This way, the relational and material character of such an achievement, the role played by co-evolving trajectories, is foregrounded. In my analysis I focus on how the production of an organisation as a place is strengthened through the ongoing production of other places (the ‘landscape’ (Cooren et al. , 2008)). In particular, given the empirical case analysed, it is possible to see how the production of certain organisations (outdoors industry) is intertwined with the production of ‘Sweden’ as a place (or in other word, with ethnicity constructions). This enables to foreground also power dimensions that make such a process a ‘powerfull’ rather than neutral process. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Privilege in place: How organisational practices contribute to meshing privilege in place2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 35, no 2, article id UNSP 101035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of social difference have often focused on segregation and oppression, leaving out the ‘up -side of discrimination’: privilege. Privilege is the unrecognised advantage positioning certain people in a favoured state and systematically conferring power on groups of people in specific contexts. Privilege is also situated: it accumulates in place. Building on processual understanding of space and place, the purpose of this paper is to add to our understanding of processes of privilege accumulation in place by exploring the relationship between privilege and place when both are considered processes rather than entities. Building on Doreen Massey’s work (2005, 2011) for analysing an empirical case, Nordic Outdoor, the article shows that privilege can be understood as meshed in place: privilege accumulates in the same process of configuring trajectories that gives shape to the place in which privilege emerges. Mobilising the concept of place, trajectories and power geometries enables us to direct our attention to constructions of convergence. These concepts are thus not only helpful in studying privilege and power, but they also allow us to treat privilege accumulation as sociomaterial process, taking form locally as the throwntogetherness of a place is negotiated, but also related to many other places and times.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Relational leadership2015In: Leadership: Contemporary critical perspectives / [ed] Carroll, Ford, Taylor, London: Sage Publications, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. KTH, Sweden.
    Studying intersections as production of place(s): illustrations from outdoors entrepreneuring2013In: the Nordic Academy of Management,NFF, Aug 21-23, 2013, Iceland, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of intersections by focusing on the simultaneous accomplishment of gender, ethnicity and body ableness. While such enterprise in organization studies often draws on the concept of identity, I propose to bring the concepts of space and place into the discussion. Space is seen as “the sphere of a multiplicity of trajectories”. Hence, space does not exist prior to identities or entities and their relations, space is relationally constituted, space unfolds in interactions and is continuously being made. And space allows for thinking of coexisting heterogeneity, of a plurality of trajectories contemporaneously existing, the simultaneity of stories-so-far. Drawing on human geography, and in particular the work of Doreen Massey, and on a strong process perspective in organization studies, I thus focus on the production of specific places as central to entrepreneuring in the outdoors industry. The idea of place as the local, genuine, “real”, closed, coherent is also challenged by such a take on space. It thus becomes interesting studying how places are produced and reproduced, made coherent (or contested), in connections and disconnections, while doing entrepreneurship – and what kind of configurations of relations are thus achieved, configurations producing and reproducing gender, ethnicity and body ableness. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    What kind of place is taking space?: Studying intersections as production of place(s)2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of intersections by focusing on the simultaneous accomplishment of gender, ethnicity and able bodiness. While such enterprise in organization studies often draws on the concept of identity, I propose to bring the concepts of space and place into the discussion. Space is seen as “the sphere of a multiplicity of trajectories”. Hence, space does not exist prior to identities or entities and their relations, space is relationally constituted, space unfolds in interactions and is continuously being made. And space allows for thinking of coexisting heterogeneity, of a plurality of trajectories contemporaneously existing, the simultaneity of stories-so-far. Drawing on human geography, and in particular the work of Doreen Massey, and on a strong process perspective in organization studies, I thus focus on the production of specific places as important to organizing in the outdoors industry. The idea of place as the local, genuine, “real”, closed, coherent is also challenged by such a take on space. It thus becomes interesting studying how places are produced and reproduced, made coherent (or contested), in connections and disconnections, while organizing unfolds – and what kind of configurations of relations are thus achieved, configurations producing and reproducing gender, ethnicity and able bodiness. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28. Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Cozza, Michela
    Complementary representational practices for articulating matters of concern2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Cozza, Michela
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Bruzzone, Silvia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Matters of care when introducing technology: The case of remote monitoring at night by camera2020In: Gerontechnology, 19 (suppl) / [ed] International society for gerontechnology, 2020, Vol. 19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Purpose Professional caregivers are asked to use various technological devices, which are expected to support them or even act in their place. From a theoretical perspective, care is more and more delegated to technologies1. Care practices are transformed by this relationship between humans and artifacts2. The purpose of the paper is to explore how the issues that emerge during the implementation of new technology are attended to by caregivers and what this means for developing care mediated by technology committed to older people’s quality of life.  Method We study the process of introducing a camera for remote monitoring at night in older people’s houses (see figure 1) in a Swedish municipality by means of interviews and ethnographic observations. We analyze how this technology becomes part of care practices by following its implementation.  Results In a previous paper3, we mobilized Latour’s concept of matter of concern4 for describing the need to foreground “complicated, engaging, diverse, fragile, and situated issues”3  (p 1) to be addressed, not concealed, when introducing technology for older people. With this paper, we advance the argument by following Puig de la Bellacasa in her move from matters of concern to matters of care. By focusing on the process of delegation of caring to the camera we show how it turned to be a matter of care for several caregivers as issues concerning its use emerged. The concept of care adds a stronger affective and ethical connotation5 (p 89) to the issues we focus on. It helps us to highlight that caregivers are not only affected by interacting with technologies at work. Caregivers are also strongly committed to ethically dealing with such issues in order to provide good care. We conclude by discussing how attending to matters of care can support developing care committed to enhancing older people’s quality of life.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. KTH, Stockholm. Sweden.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, Stockholm. Sweden.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Stockholm. Sweden.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Stockholm. Sweden.
    Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms2015In: International Journal of Public Leadership, ISSN 2056-4929, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of leadership culture and analyse how leadership cultures are produced in higher education reforms, in a hybridised discursive context of traditional academic values and emerging managerialism and leaderism.

    Design/methodology/approach: Building on a perspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in processes in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources are invoked, this study adds to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involved in the transformation of higher education organisations. To this end, the method combines a traditional qualitative study of change initiatives over a long period of time with participative observation. Focusing on two vignettes, the analysis centres on how several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction.

    Findings: The emergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction is illustrated. This paper emphasises how hybrid cultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursive influences.

    Research limitations/implications: An extended empirical material would enable further understanding of what cultural constructions of leadership that become confirmed, re-formulated or rejected. International comparisons would also enrich the analysis.

    Practical implications: This paper may influence leadership, leadership development and change initiatives in higher education organization.

    Social implications: Higher education organizations are crucial for societal development and this paper contributes to better understanding how they are changing.

    Originality/value: The perspective proposed builds on recent developments in leadership studies and expands the means for focusing on social processes rather than individuals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, Organisation och ledning.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Organisation och ledning.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Organisation och ledning.
    Leadership cultures in transition: On the cultural construction of leadership in university change processes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Endrissat, Nada
    Mapping the Leadership-as-Practice Terrain: Comparative elements2016In: Leadership‐as‐Practice: Theory and Application / [ed] Raelin, Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by the practice turn in organization and social theory (Schatzki et al., 2001), there has been increasing recognition of the value of theorizing about and studying leadership from a practice perspective (Denis et al., 2005, 2010; Carroll et al., 2008; Crevani et al., 2010; Raelin, 2011; Endrissat & von Arx, 2013). The resulting notion of “leadership-as-practice” gives rise to high expectations but may also cause misunderstandings among leadership scholars and practitioners alike. To recognize its potential we believe it is important to bring to the fore some of its underlying assumptions and outline its similarities and differences to other relatively close concepts. Hence, this chapter provides an introduction to the leadership-as-practice perspective by means of two central comparisons. First, we probe into leadership studies and consider the similarities and differences of a leadership-as-practice perspective with related leadership approaches such as the leadership style approach (and the subsequent situational leadership and contingency models) and the relational leadership approach. We highlight the consequences of doing research from each one of these three perspectives, mainly with respect to the underlying understanding of reality (ontology) and, consequently, the “unit of analysis” (i.e. what is studied and focused on to produce knowledge about leadership). We include examples of typical research questions and exemplary studies in each of the three domains to support our reasoning. Of course, the comparison cannot be completed by considering just two other approaches. However, the two seem most relevant because they share several similarities with the leadership-as-practice approach that need closer examination to define the specific contribution of leadership-as-practice. The style (and the situational/contingency) approach is widely known, entitative in character, but with a similar focus on leadership actions to the practice approach. By making the differences between the two approaches explicit, we hope to inspire the broad range of scholars familiar with the style approach to consider the practice perspective as a potential alternative that allows them to enrich understanding of the accomplishments of leadership. The relational approach, on the other hand, is the closest to the practice approach, and this is sometimes even used synonymously. However, differences exist and we believe that it is important to make them explicit to better understand the critical contribution of leadership-as-practice.

    In the second comparison we look outside leadership studies and focus instead on the “as-practice” approach, outlining the similarities and differences between leadership-as-practice and other practice approaches in organization studies, namely strategy-as-practice and coordination-as-practice. As we will show, although the underlying assumptions are the same, they differ with respect to the social accomplishment on which they focus, that is the consequences of organizing processes that they try to explain and understand. Because of space restrictions, we had to limit our comparison to those organizational phenomena that we consider most relevant for defining leadership-as-practice. Both coordination and strategy work share similarities with leadership that sometimes make it difficult to distinguish among them. We hope that the focus on ‘social accomplishment’ will help the reader to better understand what the unique contribution of each of these organizational constructs is.

  • 33.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Endrissat, Nada
    Bern university of applied sciences, Suisse.
    New furniture, but no new spirit: When collaborative workspaces don’t work (as planned)2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Discourses of gender and inclusion: Using women to make peace sustainable2011In: Nordic Academy of Management conference 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Narcissistic organization: or business as usual?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Performative narcissism: When organizations are made successful, admirable, and unique through narcissistic work2017In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 431-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dramatic stories of corporate crises appear in newspapers and magazines all over the world; one explanation offered by scholars has been that the affected organization suffered (literally) from narcissism. As responsible, ethical, non-narcissistic behavior is claimed to be crucial for management, the purpose of this article is to advance our knowledge about narcissism in organizations by developing an understanding of which organizational work enacts organizations as successful, admired, and unique. The dominant use of narcissism as a pathological condition limits the possibility to learn about organizing processes since it provides simplistic explanations. By introducing the notion of performative narcissism, we re-focus attention from the pathological condition of organizations to potentially pervasive organizational practices. Thus, we see that narcissistic work is a sociomaterial process not limited to organizational borders, but connecting and enrolling people, artifacts, animals, and places into mutually dependent, shifting, and composite assemblages that emerge through practices reproducing the organization as successful and unique.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindell, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Ledarskap i en digitaliserad värld2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tre trender – idén om ledarskap som praktik, projektifieringen och flexibiliseringen – påverkar framtidens ledarskap i en digitaliserad värld och leder till flera utmaningar. Det nya ledarskapsidealet skapas i spänningsfältet mellan å ena sidan större frihet och inkludering och å andra sidan större segregering, kontroll och övervakning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Entrepreneurship, gender and profession: A research agenda2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lammi, Inti José
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Leadership and Practice Theories: Reconstructing Leadership as a Phenomenon2023In: The SAGE Handbook of Leadership / [ed] Doris Schedlitzki; Magnus Larsson; Brigid Carroll; Michelle C. Bligh & Olga Epitropaki, Sage Publications, 2023, 2nd, p. 16-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we describe how leadership studies have benefitted by (re)attending to practice theories. We elaborate on how these theories have offered the possibility to develop new understandings of leadership by reimagining the study of this phenomenon. 

    The first section of the chapter presents an introduction to practice theories and their entrance in leadership studies. Then, in the second section, we illustrate what studies mobilizing practice theories have contributed to. In the third section we dig into a discussion of the different positionings that researchers drawing on practice theories have taken, in order to provide the reader with the possibility to navigate the sensitizing framework that these theories provide. The chapter ends with a discussion of criticalities and possibilities, including the possible need to advance our methodological tools. 

  • 40.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Articulating the performativity of leadership: Opening up for re-constructing leadership in order to change its practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Leadership as a collective construction: Re-conceptualizing leadership in knowledge-intensive firms2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH - Royal Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Genus, organisation och ledning.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Genus, organisation och ledning.
    Leadership, not leaders: On the study of leadership as practices and interactions2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we suggest a perspective within leadership research that has an analytical focus on leadership as it is practiced in daily interaction, rather than on individual leaders. We draw upon recent developments in leadership research that emphasize leadership as processes, practices and interactions in formulating basic scientific assumptions of such a perspective. The suggested perspective will enable us to gain new understandings of how leadership activities emerge in social interaction and of how institutionalized notions of leadership are brought into and re-constructed in these same activities. Given this reasoning, we would suggest that the empirical study of leadership should be based in a process ontology, focused on leadership practices as constructed in interactions.

  • 43.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Leadership virtues and management knowledge: Questioning the unitary command perspective in leadership research2007In: Moral foundations of management knowledge / [ed] M-L. Djelic & R. Vranceanu, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH.
    Ledarskap bortom idén om den ensamma hjälten2013In: Leda mot det nya / [ed] Kreuger, Crevani, Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013, p. 43-61Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. KTH, Sweden; IMIT Stiftelsen, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Sweden.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Sweden.
    Ledarskapsarbete skapar utveckling och innovation2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Kreuger, Martin; Crevani, Lucia; Larsen, Kristina, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Shared leadership: A post-heroic perspective on leadership as a collective construction2007In: International Journal of Leadership Studies, E-ISSN 1554-3145, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 40-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of leadership practices, there is an emergent movement towards viewing leadership in terms of collaboration between two or more persons. At the same time, traditional literature on leadership and organization theory has been dominated almost exclusively by the perspective that leadership is something that is exercised by a single person—the idea of unitary command (Pearce & Manz, 2005). This has been challenged by the theoretical perspective of postheroic leadership, of which one practical consequence is to view leadership activities as collective rather than individual. In this paper, we argue that by shifting perspective from viewing leadership as a single-person activity to viewing it as collective construction processes, we will see new patterns in how leadership is exercised in practice. Thematic data from four qualitative case studies of organizations are presented. A discussion towards future research agendas where the articulation and questioning of the foundations of leadership practices and leadership research are central to the development of postheroic leadership ideals concludes the paper.

  • 47.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Sweden.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Sweden.
    Towards process studies of project leadership2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Towards sustainable management: On collective constructions of leadership2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    We don’t need another hero: Towards the study of leadership as everyday practices2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Manca, C.
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Spatial agencing, privilege and new ways of working2023In: Space and Organizing, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2023, p. 16-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Privilege is ubiquitous but seldom discussed in organization studies. However, its analysis may enable us to explore those unrecognized advantages that systematically confer power on certain groups and individuals in specific contexts. In this chapter, we focus on the organizing agential properties of space and their power effects in terms of privilege. Building on Massey’s work on space and place, we discuss privilege as an aspect of spatial agencing by illustrating how this is meshed into contemporary workplaces promoting new ways of working. This allows us to expand on spatial agencing by unpacking how, in the new workplace, the performative effects of assemblages can place some humans and nonhumans into privileged positions in terms of center-periphery, natural presence and otherness. Since such achievements are not only local but also related to other achievements in different times and places, we can also discuss how ‘power-geometries’ travel in time and space.

12 1 - 50 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf