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  • 1.
    Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Landström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Supporting production system development through the Obeya concept2013In: Supporting Production System Development through the Obeya Concept: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2012, Rhodes, Greece, September 24-26, 2012, Revised Selected Papers, Part I, 2013, Vol. 397, p. 653-660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing Industry as an important part of European and Swedish economy faces new challenges with the daily growing global competition. An enabler of overcoming these challenges is a rapid transforming to a value-based focus. Investment in innovation tools for production system development is a crucial part of that focus which helps the companies to rapidly adapt their production systems to new changes. Those changes can be categorized to incremental and radical ones. In this research we studied the Obeya concept as a supporting tool for production system development with both of those approaches. It came from Toyota production system and is a big meeting space which facilitates communication and data visualization for a project team. Four lean companies have been studied to find the role of such spaces in production development. Results indicate a great opportunity for improving those spaces and their application to radical changes in production development projects.

  • 3.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Volvo Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Waste flow mapping to improve sustainability of waste management: A case study approach2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative, resource-efficient solutions and effective waste management systems capture value in business and contribute to sustainability. However, due to scattered waste management responsibilities in the vehicle industry and the orientation of operations management and lean tools, which mostly focus on lead-time and labour-time improvements, the requirement of a collaborative method to include material waste efficiency in operational development is identified. The main purpose of this research is to study how operations management and environmental management can be integrated on an operational level and include the waste management supply chain. Based on a literature review of environmental and operational improvement tools and principles, the gaps and needs in current practice were identified. A large case study implementing a waste flow mapping (WFM) method on a set of manufacturing sites revealed potentials in terms of reducing material losses and inefficiencies in the handling of materials and waste. Finally, the integrated WFM method was analysed with respect to the gaps and needs identified in the existing body of tools for operational and environmental improvement. The method combines lean manufacturing tools, such as value stream mapping with cleaner production and material flow cost accounting strategies. The empirical data showed that the WFM method is adequate for current state analysis of waste material efficiency potentials, especially when multiple organisations are involved. However, further development and specific methods are needed such as, for example, logistics inefficiencies, root cause analysis, implementation guidelines for best practice and systems for performance monitoring of actors.

  • 4.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Amprazis, Pernilla
    Waste flow mapping: Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Landström, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB , Sweden.
    Myrelid, Andreas
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB , Sweden.
    Present state analysis of business performance measurement systems in large manufacturing companies2016In: PMA Conference 2016 PMA2016, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to empirically investigate the present state of the performance measurement systems (PMS) at 7 sites of 6 different large Swedish manufacturing companies. The methodology has both a bottom-up and a top-down perspective. Important findings are that the PMSs are very similar in how they function but differ a lot in what is measured.

  • 6.
    Marcus, Bjelkemyr
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sasha, Shahbazi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    C., Jönsson
    Swerea IVF, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Individuals’ perception of which materials are most important to recycle2015In: ADVANCES IN PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS: INNOVATIVE PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE GROWTH (AMPS 2015), PT I, 2015, Vol. 459, p. 723-729Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have asked respondents to rank ten different waste fractions that are both common in manufacturing industry and easily recognizable. The purpose of the study has been to clarify to what extent individuals are able to identify the waste fractions that are most important to recycle from an environmental perspective. The individuals’ perception has then been correlated with a life cycle assessment of the ten materials. In addition, the respondents were also asked to rank the fractions according to cost. The results show that metals are consistently considered most important to recycle, and plastics are commonly among the top five amongst the ten waste fractions together with glass. The cellulose based fractions, cotton, and compost are commonly rated low. In addition, there is a perceived correlation between the environmental and economic impact.

  • 7.
    Rastegari, Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo GTO, Köping, Sweden.
    Sasha, Shahbazi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Condition-based maintenance effectiveness from material efficiency perspective2017In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 23-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the controversial gap between the environmental perspective and the cost perspective in a manufacturing context. The results of an empirical study on the heat treatment and phosphating processes performed by a manufacturing company indicate that implementing condition-based maintenance contributes not only to cost savings by preventing production losses and reducing equipment downtime but also to a more efficient use of resources by avoiding the generation of scraps and material wastage.

  • 8.
    Sannö, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ström, Carin
    City of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Management of environmentally driven change projects2016In: International Journal of Sustainable Economy, ISSN 1756-5804, E-ISSN 1756-5812, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 189-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry is a key player in the transition to a more sustainable society. Nevertheless, even though several efforts have been made in practice and in academia, more research is needed in relation to implementing sustainable solutions. Accordingly, the aim of the paper is to understand how manufacturing organisations can develop their operations to improve their way to respond to and manage change projects driven by environmental requirements. A multiple international case study is conducted, including nine case companies. The paper explores how the key factors for managing environmentally driven change can be integrated in the organisation, from the project – the core process – and the cultural perspective. A model is developed that can be used for operations managers to support their strategic planning of environmental change projects.

  • 9.
    Sannö, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ström, Carin
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Management of environmentally driven change projectsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry is a key player in the transition to a sustainable society. Still, even if several efforts have been made in practice and academia, more research is addressed in relation to implementing sustainable solutions. In accordance, the aim of the paper is to understand the management of environmentally driven projects in the manufacturing industry. A multiple international case study is conducted, including nine case companies. The study explores how the key factors for managing environmentally driven change relate to the organisational abilities. Apart from defining the supportive key factors, three important links for managing environmentally driven change are identified: how the requirements are introduced, the link between strategic and operational level and how the need for change is transferred to action and implementation. A model is developed that can be used for operations managers to consider the degree of proactivity in strategic planning of environmental change projects.

  • 10.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    MATERIAL EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT IN MANUFACTURING2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Material efficiency is a key solution to provide a reduction in the total environmental impact of global manufacturing, which contributes to avoid generating larger volumes of industrial waste, to reduce extracting and consuming ever more resources and to decrease energy demand and carbon emissions. However, the area of material efficiency in manufacturing has been under-researched and related knowledge is limited.

    The research objective of this thesis is to contribute to the existing body of knowledge regarding material efficiency in manufacturing - to increase understanding, describe the existing situation and develop support for improvement. This thesis focuses on value of process and residual materials in material efficiency: to increase homogenous quality of generated waste with higher segregation rate, decreasing the amount of material becoming waste and reduce total virgin raw material consumption without influencing the function and quality of a product or process.

    To achieve the objective, material efficiency strategies, existing state of material efficiency in manufacturing and barriers that avert higher material efficiency improvement have been investigated. The results are supported by four structured literature reviews and two [MW1] empirical multiple case studies at large global manufacturing companies in Sweden, mainly automotive. Empirical studies include observations, interviews, waste stream mapping, waste sorting analysis, environmental report reviews and walkthroughs in companies to determine the material efficiency and industrial waste management systems.

    The empirical results revealed that material efficiency improvement potential of further waste segregation to gain economic and environmental benefits is still high. Determining different waste segments and relative fractions along with calculating material efficiency performance measurements facilitate improvements in material efficiency. In addition to attempts for waste generation reduction, avoiding blending and correct segregation of different waste fractions is an essential step towards material efficiency. The next step is to improve the value of waste fractions i.e. having more specific cost-effective fractions. Waste Flow Mapping proves to be an effective practical tool to be utilized at manufacturing companies in order to check and explore the improvement opportunities.

    In addition, a number of barriers that hinder material efficiency was identified. The most influential material efficiency barriers are Budgetary, Information, Management and Employees. The majority of identified material efficiency barriers are internal, originate inside the company itself and are dependent upon the manufacturing companies’ characteristics. As a result, management and employees’ attitude, environmental knowledge and environmental motivation, as well as their internal communication and information sharing, and companies’ core value and vision are the enablers for material efficiency improvement.

  • 11.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sustainable Manufacturing through Material Efficiency Management2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Material efficiency contributes to reduced industrial waste volumes, reduced extraction and consumption of virgin raw materials, increased waste segregation, decreased energy demand, and reduced carbon emissions, thereby generally mitigating the environmental impact of the manufacturing industry. However, the area of material efficiency in manufacturing is under-researched, and related knowledge is limited particularly at individual manufacturing sites and lower levels. These levels are crucial to achieve improved material efficiency, as a great amount of material is consumed and waste flows are generated on manufacturing shop floors. There are still gaps in both literature and industrial practice regarding material efficiency in manufacturing, where materials are consumed to make products and great volumes of waste are generated simultaneously.

    The research objective of this dissertation is to contribute to existing knowledge on management and improvement of material efficiency in manufacturing. To achieve this objective, three research questions were formulated to investigate material efficiency barriers, material efficiency tools and strategies, and material efficiency performance measurement. The results are supported by four structured and extensive literature reviews and also by five empirical case studies conducted at a total of fourteen Swedish global manufacturing companies. These empirical studies entail observations, interviews, waste stream mapping, waste sorting analyses, environmental report reviews, and company walkthroughs.

    A number of material efficiency barriers in manufacturing were identified, categorized and clustered to facilitate an understanding of material efficiency to effectively mitigate the barriers. The clustered barriers cited most often in the literature are budgetary, information, technology, management, vision and culture, uncertainty, engineering, and employees. In the empirical studies, vision and culture, technology, and uncertainty were replaced by communication. Most of the material efficiency barriers identified appear to be internal and are dependent on the manufacturing company’s characteristics.

    A number of tools and strategies were identified and some were used to assess, manage, and improve material efficiency in the manufacturing companies studied. Empirical studies indicated that certain criteria are necessary to select and use operational tools. These criteria include being hands-on, time efficient, based on lean principles, easy to use and learn, visualized, promoting engagement, and being connected to a predetermined goal. These criteria are essential for mutual understanding, intra-organizational communication, performance improvement, and becoming a learning organization.

    A model for a material efficiency performance measurement system was proposed that included the most common material efficiency-related key performance indicators from literature and empirical findings. The model divides material and waste flows into four main categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, products, and residual output materials. The four main categories should be measured equally to realize material efficiency performance improvements in an operation.

    This research contributes to the research area of material efficiency and sheds light on different inter-connected aspects, which affect one another and contribute to assess, manage and improve material efficiency in a manufacturing context. The studied conducted and the results are presented in five appended papers. 

  • 12.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The effect of environmental and economic perception on industrial waste management2014In: 1st International EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum EurOMA.Sus, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essence of industrial waste management is evaluated in term of economy and resource efficiency. With optimal waste management system companies are able to make a correct assessment when balancing the economic benefits and environmental risks. However, the economic and environmental benefits need to be known and understood to allow individuals making correct waste management decisions. In this study the ability of individuals to assess the economic and environmental impact of ten common waste fractions in manufacturing was examined. These results can be used to direct educational efforts to increase industrial waste management efficiency and enhance recyclability.

  • 13.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Javadi, Siavash
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Supporting production system development through Obeya concept2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing Industry as an important part of European and Swedish economy faces new challenges with the daily growing global competition. An enabler of overcoming these challenges is a rapid transforming to a value-based focus. Investment in innovation tools for production system development is a crucial part of that focus which helps the companies to rapidly adapt their production systems to new changes. Those changes can be categorized to incremental and radical ones. In this research we studied the Obeya concept as a supporting tool for production system development with both of those approaches. It came from Toyota production system and is a big meeting space which facilitates communication and data visualization for a project team. Four lean companies have been studied to find the role of such spaces in production development. Results indicate a great opportunity for improving those spaces and their application to radical changes in production development projects

  • 14.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IV, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency measurement: Swedish case studies2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

  • 15.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments, industrialization and mass production have triggered rapid increase of raw material consumption and great volumes of industrial waste, while industrial waste management infrastructure has not been developed with the same pace. One mean in striving for industrial waste management is the management of process materials. This paper introduces the performance measure sorting rate for each segment of waste material, along with a method for sorting analysis to help improving overall material efficiency and industrial waste management. The results revealed that more than 50% of combustible bins’ content could be separately segregated as plastic, wood, paper, cardboard and bio-degradable.

  • 16.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Industrial waste management within manufacturing: a comparative study of tools, policies, visions and concepts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial waste is a key factor when assessing the sustainability of a manufacturing process or company. A multitude of visions, concepts, tools, and policies are used both academically and industrially to improve the environmental effect of manufacturing; a majority of these approaches have a direct bearing on industrial waste. The identified approaches have in this paper been categorised according to application area, goals, organisational entity, life cycle phase, and waste hierarchy stage; the approaches have also been assessed according to academic prevalence, semantic aspects, and overlaps. In many cases the waste management approaches have similar goals and approaches, which cause confusion and disorientation for companies aiming to synthesise their management systems to fit their waste management strategy. Thus, a study was performed on how waste management approaches can be integrated to reach the vision of zero waste in manufacturing.

  • 17.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Mohammadi, Zahra
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors in Designing of Lean and Green Equipment2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Anna-runa, Kristinsdottir
    RISE IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: a case study2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

  • 19.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material Efficiency Measurement: Empirical Investigation of Manufacturing Industry2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 8, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving material efficiency contributes to reduce the volume of industrial waste as well as resource consumption. However, less has been published addressing on what to measure for material efficiency in a manufacturing company. This paper presents the current practice of material efficiency performance indicators in a manufacturing context through a bottom-up approach. In addition to literature review, the empirical data was collected via a multiple case study at seven global manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The results show that existing material efficiency indicators are limited and are mainly measured as a cost or quality parameter rather than environment. The limited number of measurements relates to the fact that material efficiency is not considered as a central business in manufacturing companies and is managed by environmental department with limited correlation to operation. Additionally, these measurements do not aim to reduce waste volume or improve homogeneity of generated waste.

  • 20.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sjödin, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A foresight study on future trends influencing material consumption and waste generation in production2014In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation / [ed] F. Frank Chen, San Antonio, Texas, United States: DEStech Publications, Inc. , 2014, p. 249-257Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are boundless upcoming factors that influence future of material waste in production. This broad range of factors needs to be scanned, categorized and analyzed in a structured way. This paper by a foresight study, aims to give an insight and increase awareness about external macro-level future trends concerning raw material consumption and waste generation in production. A limited pilot study indicated that technological forecasting and some reaction upon obvious trends are being taken, although in an ad hoc manner and without structured tools. However, political influences, economic visions and social-cultural shifts were seldom or never discussed. External macro trends and tendencies were examined through PEST analysis to identify potentials and opportunities influencing strategic decisions and innovation initiatives. It is vital to understand the whole picture of possible changes and not only considering the technological trends, but also other relevant development areas that might affect production in different ways.

  • 21.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kurdve, M.
    Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Using the green performance map: Towards material efficiency measurement2018In: Operations Management and Sustainability: New Research Perspectives, Palgrave Macmillan , 2018, p. 247-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous environmental studies indicate several barriers to circular economy and material efficiency including a lack of detailed methodologies for manufacturing improvement in terms of environmental and operational performances to measure, monitor and evaluate material consumption and waste generation. A lean and green tool, the green performance map (GPM), is an appropriate tool for different environmental initiatives including training, improvement, reporting and development. Through literature review and multiple case study methodology, this chapter presents the current application of GPM in industry and its usage to regularly measure and monitor material efficiency measurements on different levels and to remove barriers to improved material efficiency. 

  • 22.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Supply chain risks: an automotive case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using the Green Performance Map: towards the next step in material efficiency measurement2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Importance of higher waste segregation for improving material efficiency.• Presentation of barriers towards improved material efficiency in a new categorization.• Material efficiency barriers are mainly internal.• Lack of material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies.

  • 25.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategies2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 127, p. 438-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved material efficiency is a key to improve the circular economy and capturing value in industry. Material efficiency reduces the generation of industrial waste, the extraction and consumption of resources, and energy demands and carbon emissions. However, material efficiency in the manufacturing sector, as a means of improving the recyclability, reusability, reduction and prevention of industrial waste, is little understood. This study aims to investigate, on a micro-level, further material efficiency improvement opportunities, barriers and strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Sweden, focusing on increasing waste segregation into high quality circulated raw material. Improvement opportunities at large global manufacturing companies are investigated; barriers hindering material efficiency improvement are identified and categorized at two levels; and strategies that have been deployed at manufacturing companies are reviewed. Empirical findings reveal (1) further potential for improving material efficiency through higher segregation of residual material from mixed and low quality fractions (on average, 26% of the content of combustible waste, in weight, was plastics; 8% and 6% were paper and cardboard, respectively); (2) the most influential barriers are within budgetary, information, management, employee, engineering, and communication clusters; (3) a lack of actual material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies. According to our analysis, the majority of barriers are internal and originate within the manufacturing companies, therefore they can be managed (and eradicated if possible) with sufficient resources in terms of man hours, education and investment, better operational and environmental (waste) management, better internal communication and information sharing, and deployment of material efficiency strategies.

  • 26.
    Zackrisson, M.
    et al.
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Winroth, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Landström, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Windmark, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, A.E.
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Myrelid, A.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Sweden.
    Sustainability Performance Indicators at Shop Floor Level in Large Manufacturing Companies2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, p. 457-462Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates sustainability in the performance measurement systems of Swedish manufacturing companies. It builds on a previous study that documents relatively few direct environmental indicators at shop floor level, which raises questions about possible indirect links between existing indicators and the environment that could be used to improve the environmental aspect of company's sustainability ambitions. A method for identifying and categorizing indirect links to sustainability issues was defined and used. The results suggest that at shop floor level 90% of the indicators have at least an indirect relation to one or more of the sustainability dimensions economy, environment and social, of which 26% are at least indirectly related to the environmental dimension. Despite the many indirect connections, participating companies perceive a need to improve sustainability indicators and some ideas are suggested. 

1 - 26 of 26
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