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  • 1.
    Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Landström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Höckerdal, Karin
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green Performance Map: Handbok2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Machining Equipment Life Cycle Costing Model with Dynamic Maintenance Cost2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 48, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how a Life cycle cost or Total cost of ownership analysis has been performed on machining equipment in a Swedish company. Life cycle cost models used in case studies are compared to an empirical model, used at the company, where dynamic energy, fluid, and maintenance cost are included. Linear and variable factors in the models are analyzed and discussed regarding data availability and estimation, especially with emphasis on maintenance. The life cycle cost aspect of the equipment give guidelines to consider operation, maintenance, tools, energy, and fluid cost in addition to acquisition cost, when designing/specifying the equipment.

  • 4.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Development of Robust Production Equipment: A guide to strong collaboration between users and suppliers2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of today’s global and increasingly tough competition is narrow market windows and a demand for quick volume increases in production. This in turn means increased demands for a rapid and effective development of production equipment that ensures high performance right at the start of production. Robust production equipment with a high level of production efficiency and reduced costs for operation and maintenance therefore make up one of the most important factors for strong competitiveness and high profitability for Swedish industrial enterprises. Strong collaboration between users and suppliers is the key to success in this type of investment project. This handbook therefore presents a model that can be used by manufacturing companies who want to develop robust production equipment. The model and the other recommendations of the handbook focus on projects that are to be carried out in strong collaboration and are targeted at both users and suppliers. The model has been deve-loped through “EQUIP – User-supplier integration in production equipment design”, which has received funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013–2016. The model consists of seven development phases based on the production equipment life cycle: Phase 1 – Preliminary study Phase 2 – Concept study Phase 3 – Procurement Phase 4 – Detailed design Phase 5 – Construction Phase 6 – Installation and commissioning Phase 7 – Production In each phase, critical activity steps and recommendations are presented for how to distribute responsibility within and between the parties involved. The model adopts a life cycle perspective for development projects in order to facilitate collaboration and to more clearly visualise the link between activities and their impact on the project success. Within the scope of an investment project, there is a great potential for developing sustainable production solutions. For this reason, this handbook also presents seven guidelines that may provide you with support in developing production equipment that remains secure, lean and sustainable throughout the equipment life cycle. The main purpose of the handbook is to facilitate collaboration through the whole investment project in a way that benefits both parties and which contributes to lasting relationships. The results of the research project show that there is a great interest in improved collaboration from both users and suppliers. For this reason, support, tools and preparedness from both parties are required to venture into investing time and resources in collaboration from the beginning, in the early phases of a new development project. This is then the potential to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration and for designing the best possible production equipment in the shortest time possible.

  • 5.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Utveckling av Robust Produktionsutrustning: En guide för god samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Av dagens globala och allt hårdare konkurrens följer korta marknadsfönster och krav på snabb volym- uppgång i produktion. Det innebär i sin tur ökade krav på snabb och effektiv utveckling av produktions- utrustning som säkerställer hög prestanda direkt vid produktionsstart. Robust produktionsutrustning med hög produktionseffektivitet och minskade kostnader för drift och underhåll är därför en av de viktigaste faktorerna för stark konkurrenskraft och hög lönsamhet för svenska industriföretag. God samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör är nyckeln till framgång i denna typ av investerings- projekt. Denna handbok presenterar därför en modell som kan användas av tillverkande företag som vill utveckla robust produktionsutrustning. Modellen och övriga rekommendationer i handboken fokuserar på projekt som ska genomföras i stark samverkan och riktar sig till både beställaren och leverantören. Den har utvecklats i forskningsprojektet ”EQUIP – kund- och leverantörsintegration i utformning av produktionsutrustning” som finansierats av KK-stiftelsen under 2013-2016. Modellen består av sju utvecklingsfaser som är baser- ade på produktionsutrustnings livscykel: Fas 1 – Förstudie Fas 2 – Konceptstudie Fas 3 – Upphandling Fas 4 – Detaljerad utformning Fas 5 – Uppbyggnad Fas 6 – Installation och driftsättning Fas 7 – Produktion I varje fas presenteras kritiska aktivitetssteg och rekommendationer för hur ansvaret för dessa bör fördelas inom och emellan deltagande parter. Modellen använder ett livscykelperspektiv för utvecklingsprojekt för att underlätta samverkan samt tydligare visualisera sambandet mellan aktiviteter och deras påverkan på projektets framgång. Inom ramen för ett investeringsprojekt finns stor potential att utveckla hållbara produktionslösningar. Därför presenterar denna handbok även sju guider som kan stödja er i att ta fram produktionsutrustning som är säker, lean och hållbar under hela utrustningens livscykel. Huvudsyftet med handboken är att underlätta samverkan under hela investeringsprojektet på ett sätt som gagnar båda parter och bidrar till varaktiga relationer. Forskningsprojektets resultat visar att det finns ett stort intresse för främjad samverkan från både beställ- are och leverantör. Därför behövs stöd, verktyg och beredskap från båda parter för att våga investera tid och resurser på samverkan redan från början, i de tidiga faserna av ett nytt utvecklingsprojekt. Det är då potentialen att lägga grunden till långsiktig samverkan och utforma bästa möjliga produktionsutrustning på kortast möjliga tid är som störst.

  • 6.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Applying industrial waste management in practice2008In: Reassessing the economics of the waste hierarchy / [ed] Kenny Tang, Jacob Yeoh, Middlesex University Press , 2008, p. 141-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kurdve, Martin
    IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Chemical Management Services from a Product Service System Perspective: Experiences of fluid management services from Volvo Group metalworking plants2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses fluid management services (FMS) in metalworking industry and determines environmental and economic outcomes of FMS as compared to traditional, in-house, fluid management. Fluid management services, or as it is often called chemical management services (CMS), mean that the suppliers of chemicals are also involved in managing and maintaining the fluids in the use phase. Usually one supplier is responsible for managing all the different fluids on a site, but the management may be restricted to some processes or fluids only

  • 8.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Lund University.
    Chemical Management Services: Safeguarding Environmental Outcomes2009In: Environmental Management Accounting (EMA) as a Support for Cleaner Production / [ed] Stefan Schaltegger (2) Martin Bennett (3) Roger L. Burritt (4) Christine Jasch, Springer Netherlands , 2009, p. 209-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year hundreds of new chemicals with uncertain life-cycle impacts on our health and the environment are being developed and introduced to the market. Reducing the amount and volume of chemicals in use is seen as an important option for reducing associated environmental effects. Chemical management services (CMS) is seen by environmental experts as a business strategy that may allow reduction in the volume of chemicals sold, while maintaining profits from use of chemicals for suppliers. In traditional business the user would try to achieve the same reduction with less support from the supplier. The goal of this paper is to investigate how common performance indicators can be used to monitor the environmental performance of different chemical management strategies and how CMS customers and suppliers can safeguard environmental improvements. The paper draws on experiences from implementing CMS in one of Sweden’s automotive companies and meetings with European CMS providers.

  • 9.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Development of collaborative green lean production systems2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with development of lean and green production systems from an action research point of view. The studies focus on Swedish-based automotive and vehicle industries and their aims to integrate sustainable thinking and environmental care into their operations management.

    Starting from operations management in manufacturing and corporate sustainable development, the research is built on how to integrate these two views into one production system. The systematic structure of a multiple-target improvement process with methodologies and tools designed to achieve the sustainability vision has been studied. Since lean as well as green production is based on the entire value chain, the research has gone beyond legal company limits and included the collaborative efforts between suppliers and customers in the value chain.

    The thesis includes six papers and describes approaches on how to implement integration, how to structure and integrate improvement management systems, how to set up an integrated monitoring and control system for the business and how to organise and redesign green lean tools and methodologies to support collaboration towards common targets.

    The results can be used for exploration and hypothesis formulation for further studies and development of integrated production systems and collaboration systems. The thesis helps answering how to integrate and implement company-specific green lean production systems.

  • 10.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Digital assembly instruction system design with green lean perspective-Case study from building module industry2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. 762-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual “easy jobs” need to be efficient, standardised and quality assured to remain competitive against automated production. Digitalised work instructions offer an opportunity to support standardisation and quality assurance for manual work tasks in industry. Inspired by axiomatic design this study aims at selecting design of lean methods and equipment for digital assembly instructions and standardised work. Literature regarding standardised work and green lean production system is applied in a case study. Interviews, observations and green lean equipment design methods are used to conclude system requirements of a digital work instruction-system designed for assembly of modular buildings at Husmuttern AB.

  • 11.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    KTH.
    Daghini, L
    Sustainable metalworking fluid systems: Best and common practice for metalworking fluid maintenance and system design in Swedish industry2012In: International Journal of Sustainable Manufacturing  (IJSM), ISSN 1742-7223, E-ISSN 1742-7231, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 276-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the function of metal working fluid (MWF) emulsions in automotive industries in Sweden and looks at how the negative environmental and health impact of their use can be reduced through means of monitoring and system design. Major input to this study has been collected from several of the large companies in Sweden, through a literature review, interviews, questionnaires, findings from workshops and comparisons with other countries. The mapping of this data was carried out, firstly by defining several concepts and terms related to MWFs in order to give an unambiguous terminology. The MWF system design, with its impact on economical, environmental and health and safety parameters, is then described more in detail. Finally, applied monitoring methodologies are reviewed and analysed in terms of common and best practices. Insights gained were formulated as general recommendations for designing a state-of-the-art sustainable MWF system. The article gives examples of how these recommendations translate into practical design features and requirements of monitoring, and maybe of interest for professionals and researchers working with machining technology, process fluid system design and control methodology.

  • 12.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    De Goey, H.
    Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Can Social Sustainability Values be Incorporated in a Product Service System for Temporary Public Building Modules?2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, Vol. 64, p. 193-198Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temporary constructions industry has cost efficiency and sustainability challenges that may require new innovative business models as well as product and processes. This paperaims to discuss how social sustainability services can be included in product service system (PSS)by investigating a case where employment is offered in distributed temporary building module manufacturing in the PSS context. The case has been evaluated against PSS literature. Recent reviews and literature on inclusion of social sustainability and PSS for buildings were used. It is concluded that the current concept fits basic definitions of PSS although it is not typical. The social value of employment is difficult to evaluate and inclusion in PSS needs further research. Design practice could be used to further develop the services in the studied concept. 

  • 13.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Volvo Technology AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hanarp, P.
    Volvo Technology AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Chen, X.
    Volvo Technology AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Qiu, X.
    Volvo Technology AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Zhang, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Stahre, J.
    Volvo Technology AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Use of environmental value stream mapping and environmental loss analysis in lean manufacturing work at Volvo2011In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Production Symposium, Lund, Sweden, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT Green production systems requires efficient production and low use of resources such as energy, material etc. To achieve this, there is a need for further development of continuous improvement tools in the “lean and green” area. This work deals with environmental value stream mapping (Environmental-VSM), which has been applied in two case studies at Volvo Penta Vara and Volvo Construction Equipment Braas. In the performed studies Environmental-VSM, as described by the US-Environmental Protection Agency, has been extended by the introduction of a loss model to show environmental losses. The combination of methods provides the user with hands-on tools supporting strategic as well as operational management. Examples of practical improvement actions that were found include reduction of energy use trough minimising idling losses and floor space as well as reduced waste flow through lowered packaging material usage. Keywords: Green Lean, Green production systems, Competitiveness, Manufacturing industry, Production management

  • 14.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF.
    Design for green lean building module production - Case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 594-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an increasing societal need for temporary buildings, while construction industry faces resource and time efficiency challenges, factory assembly of modular buildings can be a solution. This case study at a start-up company uses experiences from assembly system design and eco-design literature to propose green lean design principles to be used in the design and development of building modules and their assembly stations. The eco-design strategy wheel is used as a basis and adapted for the assessment of green and lean building manufacturing.

  • 15.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Granzell, Ann-Sofie
    Smart Planet Business AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Development of the urban and industrial symbiosis in western Mälardalen2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 96-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a product service systems business model development perspective, this paper presents a case study of Västra Mälardalens industrial symbiosis, its maturity level and potentials for further development. The status and potentials of the symbiosis network, based on a survey, interviews and workshops, together with background statistics, is used to evaluate the potential improvement areas and suggest future research. The study contributes with application of evaluation models and confirms earlier research and in addition suggests future research in the field. The Symbiosis network has potential to be acting as innovation catalyst supporting companies to go beyond core business development.

  • 16.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Mont, Oksana
    Lund University.
    Arnold Tucker, Ursula Tischner, New Business for Old Europe. Product-Service Development, Competitiveness and Sustainability2006In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 14, no 17, p. 1559-1560Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Romvall, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Torstensson, Emma
    A systematic approach for identifying lean and green improvements related to packaging material in assembly2011In: Proceedings of the Swedish Production Symposium 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One significant environmental impact from assembly operations includes packaging material use and subsequent waste generation. Although current practice involves reduction of unnecessary materials handling, there is potential to adapt packaging material in order to simultaneously improve the environmental performance and reduce cost in a “lean and green” mindset. Hence, with increased emphasis on sustainable and efficient production systems, there is a growing need for analysis and decision support tools to be used by operators and engineers as well as management. This paper approaches the gap by presenting an industrial application in the form of a set of simplistic analysis methods, as a systematic approach for identifying lean and green improvement potentials for packaging material in assembly. The methodology uses the advantages of eco-mapping, waste sorting analysis and material handling analysis and combines them with the systematic prioritisation of the five-step waste hierarchy and Bill of Material (BOM) structure. A pilot test indicates that a systematic use of these tools can be an efficient decision support for implementing focused improvements, providing cost reductions, productivity improvements and resource savings. Hence, the methodology adds to the general assembly optimisation toolbox, providing rapid answers for packaging decisions, including materials usage, handling and disposal processes.

  • 18.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Volvo Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Waste flow mapping to improve sustainability of waste management: A case study approach2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative, resource-efficient solutions and effective waste management systems capture value in business and contribute to sustainability. However, due to scattered waste management responsibilities in the vehicle industry and the orientation of operations management and lean tools, which mostly focus on lead-time and labour-time improvements, the requirement of a collaborative method to include material waste efficiency in operational development is identified. The main purpose of this research is to study how operations management and environmental management can be integrated on an operational level and include the waste management supply chain. Based on a literature review of environmental and operational improvement tools and principles, the gaps and needs in current practice were identified. A large case study implementing a waste flow mapping (WFM) method on a set of manufacturing sites revealed potentials in terms of reducing material losses and inefficiencies in the handling of materials and waste. Finally, the integrated WFM method was analysed with respect to the gaps and needs identified in the existing body of tools for operational and environmental improvement. The method combines lean manufacturing tools, such as value stream mapping with cleaner production and material flow cost accounting strategies. The empirical data showed that the WFM method is adequate for current state analysis of waste material efficiency potentials, especially when multiple organisations are involved. However, further development and specific methods are needed such as, for example, logistics inefficiencies, root cause analysis, implementation guidelines for best practice and systems for performance monitoring of actors.

  • 19.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Amprazis, Pernilla
    Waste flow mapping: Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Sjögren, P.
    ABB Offshore Wind Connections, Gårdatorget 1, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Widfeldt, M.
    Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production System Change Strategy in Lightweight Manufacturing2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 160-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two change management strategies: a minimum change, exploitation strategy (kaizen) and a maximum output, exploration strategy (kaikaku) have been applied in a manufacturing case study. Value stream mapping and discrete event simulation were used to analyse the production system changes, with regards to robustness and total lead-time, to increase knowledge of how to choose change management strategy. The results point out that available time is crucial. It is important to consider not only product specification and return of investment, but also the change and risk management. Future research should develop engineering change management further.

  • 21.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants,.
    Bengtsson, Catarina
    Volvo Group, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Waste Flow Mapping: Improve sustainability and realize waste management values2012In: Greening of Industry Network (GIN2012), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient Waste Management System creates increased business value contributing to manufacturing industry sustainability and realizes economic opportunities. Previous studies have shown the economic potential of improving material efficiency by climbing the waste hierarchy and turning waste liabilities into assets. World economic forum also identifies innovation for resource efficient solutions and business models as the most strategic option to capture value in industry. The main responsibility for waste lies with the operations owner but since waste management usually is operated by other functions or companies, supportive methods to include material waste in operational development are needed. The main purpose of the research has therefore been to develop a method framework for identifying and analysing potentials for waste management in manufacturing industry, including residual material values of metals, combustible and inert waste, process fluids and other hazardous waste. Case studies were conducted to find economically competitive environmental improvements on team, site and multisite level and to define suitable performance indicators for continuous improvements. A novel approach: waste flow mapping (WFM), combining Value Stream Mapping (VSM), Eco mapping and a waste composition analysis with basic lean principles is used. The material’s value flow and the information flow is analysed in a VSM. Eco-mapping is used to give a graphical structure for the analysis of labour and equipment, with subsequent costs. Finally the waste hierarchy and composition analysis is used to imply the potential for business improvements and best practice examples are used. The developed method reveals the potential in an easy way and support integration of waste management in operations and continuous improvement work.

    Empirical data from a full scale multi-site study of waste management of material residuals at a global manufacturing company’s operations in Sweden are used to exemplify that with the WFM approach the mapping can be done in an efficient and consistent manner, revealing value losses and improvement potentials. Fraction definitions and operational practice standards were essential to realise cost efficiency and reach a more sustainable footprint. Comparisons between sites show that with simple actions, substantial improvements in recycling efficiency can be made, leading to proposed performance indicators and highlighting the need for established standardized implementation solutions. The results further point out the importance of avoiding mixing material with lower quality grade of that material. The experiences prove that Waste Flow Mapping is a suitable method to efficiently identify sustainability improvement potentials.

  • 22.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green performance map: visualizing environmental KPI’s2013In: EurOMA conference: At the Heart of Recovery, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyse the current practice in environmental key performance indicator (KPI) allocation and presents an industrially applicable tool, focusing on the link between KPIs and environmental sustainability. The empirical base for the paper is a study of operational KPIs and environmental performance control within two Swedish manufacturing companies, on corporate, plant, and workstation level. It is concluded that the presented Green Performance Map gives managers, environmental specialists and improvement teams a common but comprehensive view of the manufacturing’s environmental performance and a method to collect, visualize and prioritize improvement efforts.

  • 23.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Lean and green integration into production system models – experiences from Swedish industry2014In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 85, p. 180-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on integration of operations management, specifically production system models with environmental management and related issues such as quality and safety. Based on knowledge concerning lean-based improvement programmes for company-specific production systems (XPS) and integration between formal management systems, such as ISO 9001 and 14001, industrial practices from integrating management systems with the XPS were studied. A literature-based comparison between formal management systems and XPS is made, indicating integration potentials. The empirical research is an analysis of five vehicle and automotive companies in which various efforts have been made to integrate their management systems with their XPS. The results show that although conscious steps have been taken since the introduction of ISO 14001 in integrating environmental management into everyday operations, there are still obstacles to overcome. To fully include sustainability aspects, the characteristics of the improvement systems have to be adapted and extended. One barrier to extended integration is the lack of integration strategy. There is further a lack of sustainability metrics and adaptation of improvement methods to push companies' operational performance. In addition, organisational issues still arise concerning the responsibility and ownership of environmental management in relation to operations. Based on these results it is concluded that processes for integration are recommended; however, each organisation needs to consider its operations, corporate culture and business opportunities of its environmental management. Still, incorporating environmental management systems into XPS is seen as an effective way of establishing company commonality in continuous improvement, resulting in holistic understanding and improved organisation performance.

  • 24.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Lean and Green integration into production system models – Experiences from Swedish industry2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Landström, A.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Winroth, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Andersson, C.
    Lund University.
    Öberg, A.E.
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Arvika.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Shahbazi, S.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, C.
    Lund University.
    Zackrisson, M.
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 126-133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtually every company has implemented a Business Performance Measurement System (BPMS) with the purpose of monitoring production and business performance and to execute the corporate strategy at all levels in a company. The purpose of this article is to shed light on common pitfalls related to the practical use of BPMS and further to present a life cycle model with the purpose of introducing structured approach to avoiding the pitfalls. The article contributes to further development of the BPMS life cycle concept and practical examples of how it can be used.

  • 26.
    Landström, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB , Sweden.
    Myrelid, Andreas
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB , Sweden.
    Present state analysis of business performance measurement systems in large manufacturing companies2016In: PMA Conference 2016 PMA2016, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to empirically investigate the present state of the performance measurement systems (PMS) at 7 sites of 6 different large Swedish manufacturing companies. The methodology has both a bottom-up and a top-down perspective. Important findings are that the PMSs are very similar in how they function but differ a lot in what is measured.

  • 27.
    Romvall, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wictorsson, J
    Haldex AB, Sweden.
    Green Performance Map:  An Industrial Tool for Enhancing Environmental Improvements within a Production System2011In: Glocalized Solutions for Sustainability in Manufacturing - Proceedings of the 18th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer , 2011, p. 353-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical findings indicate a need of support for environmental management within the manufacturing industry for improving the environmental performance of their production systems. This paper elaborates on a generic, three step visualization tool, here called Green Performance Map (GPM). The GPM adds to the framework of ISO 14001, providing the user with a systematic procedure to visualize environmental performance in order to facilitate the identification, prioritization and communication of relevant environmental aspects. The results are based on theoretical studies and an extensive case study at a Swedish automotive company. Pilot tests indicate a vast potential for the GPM tool.

  • 28.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments, industrialization and mass production have triggered rapid increase of raw material consumption and great volumes of industrial waste, while industrial waste management infrastructure has not been developed with the same pace. One mean in striving for industrial waste management is the management of process materials. This paper introduces the performance measure sorting rate for each segment of waste material, along with a method for sorting analysis to help improving overall material efficiency and industrial waste management. The results revealed that more than 50% of combustible bins’ content could be separately segregated as plastic, wood, paper, cardboard and bio-degradable.

  • 29.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Industrial waste management within manufacturing: a comparative study of tools, policies, visions and concepts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial waste is a key factor when assessing the sustainability of a manufacturing process or company. A multitude of visions, concepts, tools, and policies are used both academically and industrially to improve the environmental effect of manufacturing; a majority of these approaches have a direct bearing on industrial waste. The identified approaches have in this paper been categorised according to application area, goals, organisational entity, life cycle phase, and waste hierarchy stage; the approaches have also been assessed according to academic prevalence, semantic aspects, and overlaps. In many cases the waste management approaches have similar goals and approaches, which cause confusion and disorientation for companies aiming to synthesise their management systems to fit their waste management strategy. Thus, a study was performed on how waste management approaches can be integrated to reach the vision of zero waste in manufacturing.

  • 30.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Mohammadi, Zahra
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors in Designing of Lean and Green Equipment2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material Efficiency Measurement: Empirical Investigation of Manufacturing Industry2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 8, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving material efficiency contributes to reduce the volume of industrial waste as well as resource consumption. However, less has been published addressing on what to measure for material efficiency in a manufacturing company. This paper presents the current practice of material efficiency performance indicators in a manufacturing context through a bottom-up approach. In addition to literature review, the empirical data was collected via a multiple case study at seven global manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The results show that existing material efficiency indicators are limited and are mainly measured as a cost or quality parameter rather than environment. The limited number of measurements relates to the fact that material efficiency is not considered as a central business in manufacturing companies and is managed by environmental department with limited correlation to operation. Additionally, these measurements do not aim to reduce waste volume or improve homogeneity of generated waste.

  • 32.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using the Green Performance Map: towards material efficiency measurementIn: Sustainable Operations Management / [ed] Luitzen De Boer and Poul Houman Andersen, UK: Palgrave MacmillanChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • Importance of higher waste segregation for improving material efficiency.• Presentation of barriers towards improved material efficiency in a new categorization.• Material efficiency barriers are mainly internal.• Lack of material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies.

  • 34.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategies2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 127, p. 438-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved material efficiency is a key to improve the circular economy and capturing value in industry. Material efficiency reduces the generation of industrial waste, the extraction and consumption of resources, and energy demands and carbon emissions. However, material efficiency in the manufacturing sector, as a means of improving the recyclability, reusability, reduction and prevention of industrial waste, is little understood. This study aims to investigate, on a micro-level, further material efficiency improvement opportunities, barriers and strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Sweden, focusing on increasing waste segregation into high quality circulated raw material. Improvement opportunities at large global manufacturing companies are investigated; barriers hindering material efficiency improvement are identified and categorized at two levels; and strategies that have been deployed at manufacturing companies are reviewed. Empirical findings reveal (1) further potential for improving material efficiency through higher segregation of residual material from mixed and low quality fractions (on average, 26% of the content of combustible waste, in weight, was plastics; 8% and 6% were paper and cardboard, respectively); (2) the most influential barriers are within budgetary, information, management, employee, engineering, and communication clusters; (3) a lack of actual material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies. According to our analysis, the majority of barriers are internal and originate within the manufacturing companies, therefore they can be managed (and eradicated if possible) with sufficient resources in terms of man hours, education and investment, better operational and environmental (waste) management, better internal communication and information sharing, and deployment of material efficiency strategies.

  • 35.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fagerström, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Callavik, Magnus
    ABB China, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Managing emergent changes: ad hoc teams' praxis and practices2018In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1086-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how emergent changes are handled in research and development (R&D) projects. R&D projects' business potential lies in their exploration of the unknown; conversely, this makes them uncertain endeavours, prone to emergent changes. Design/methodology/approach Uses a single-case-study design, based on a projects-as-practice perspective and a soft systems methodology (SSM) analysis, to map how ad hoc R&D teams handle emergent changes, specifically the solution identification and assessment phase and the implementation plan. An R&D project in the power industry, involving over 250 engineers, was analysed. Findings This paper shows how emergent changes are handled differently from initiated changes during the decision-making phase. The system analysis shows that the most critical factors for managing these changes are: collective reflection between project parties; and including experienced engineers in implementation-plan reviews. Practical implications The results are of relevance both to R&D managers aiming to improve team performance and to general project management. Informal notions of emergent changes can be formalised in the change request process. Weaknesses in the project team's organisation are highlighted, and details of how of how to mitigate these are provided. Originality/value Combines engineering-design and project-management research on emergent changes, adding to the former regarding people-organisational and strategic issues. Furthers understanding of the projects-as-practice approach and emergent change (deviations) handling by ad hoc teams in a project environment. SSM has not previously been used to explore aspects of projects-as-practice, and this is a novel way of adding to the body of knowledge on project praxis and practise.

  • 36.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fagerström, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Thomas, Lechler
    Opportunity discovery in initiated and emergent change requestsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, we analyze practitioner practices and praxes associated with discovering and exploiting opportunities in project-based change requests. Change requests are the aggregation of engineering changes and are considered in a redesign process. Raising a change request initiates the formation of an ad hoc team to manage it. A single case study design was employed using change request records and practitioner interviews from an engineering project. Additionally, the collected data was used to analyze discovered and exploited opportunities from a projects-as-practice perspective. Prior research on change requests has shown that practitioners often view changes in a risk-averse manner. However, a risk-averse mindset does not encompass opportunities. Our findings emphasize the importance of the informal structure of ad hoc teams, as opposed to formal structures, to aid in opportunity discovery. The informal structure enables cross-hierarchal discussions among team members and draws on the proven experience of the team members. Finally, the dynamic, dual structure of ad hoc teams (engineering and on-site teams) is an essential part of opportunity discovery. Adding to the existing knowledge in the field of engineering change management, we present a framework that supports practitioners in identifying how to turn engineering changes into successful opportunities. 

  • 37.
    Sjögren, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Norouzilame, Farhad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Aspects In Engineering Change Management Of Engineering To Order Projects: A Review2016In: POMS EUROMA WORLD CONFERENCE POMS-EUROMA, Havanna, Cuba, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Zackrisson, M.
    et al.
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Winroth, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Landström, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Windmark, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, A.E.
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Myrelid, A.
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Sweden.
    Sustainability Performance Indicators at Shop Floor Level in Large Manufacturing Companies2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, p. 457-462Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates sustainability in the performance measurement systems of Swedish manufacturing companies. It builds on a previous study that documents relatively few direct environmental indicators at shop floor level, which raises questions about possible indirect links between existing indicators and the environment that could be used to improve the environmental aspect of company's sustainability ambitions. A method for identifying and categorizing indirect links to sustainability issues was defined and used. The results suggest that at shop floor level 90% of the indicators have at least an indirect relation to one or more of the sustainability dimensions economy, environment and social, of which 26% are at least indirectly related to the environmental dimension. Despite the many indirect connections, participating companies perceive a need to improve sustainability indicators and some ideas are suggested. 

  • 39.
    Zafarzadeh, Masoud
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Vedapatti Ranganathan, Hariram
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Sustainable supply chain management in automotive industry- Supplier company relationship and Integration management challenge2012In: International Journal of Academic Conference Proceedings, v. 1, n. 2, 2012, Institute of Management Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing competition in automotive industry has forced companies to have serious attention towards the sustainability concept. Obviously environmental, social and economic challenges do not only happen inside companies, but rather involves the whole supply chain process. Most of the practical efforts are focusing on manufacturing phase and less attention has been paid to supply and distribution areas. However, it is not possible to achieve a sustainable supply chain unless the current situation is accurately mapped and long term policies toward a sustainable future state are defined. In this respect, the authors consider two major challenges, first supplier coordination with sustainability requirements and second investigating the alliance of current managerial policies. In theory, the paper aim is to represent sustainable supply chain management by focusing on supplier company relations. Integration as a vital element to meet sustainable supply chain is discussed by exploring the coherence of lean and green with sustainability. In practice, three leading automotive companies’ Sustainable Supply Chain Management (SSCM) systems (TOYOTA, VOLVO and Volkswagen) are investigated in order to figure out their perspective toward SSCM.

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