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  • 1.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Evaluation of Advanced Manufacturing Technology during New Product Development2014In: The 21st EurOMA Conference EurOMA 2014, Palermo, Italy, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that affect evaluation of advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) during new product development (NPD). Particular attention is given to the new product development process and how it has affected the acquisition and evaluation process of AMT. An embedded case study has been conducted at a large Swedish manufacturing company, consisting of semi structured interviews, document analysis, and passive observations. This paper identifies seven factors that affect the evaluation of AMT during NPD and which can be classified into three categories: NPD project, AMT acquisition project and the internal organization.

  • 2.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    FACTORS AFFECTING DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES IN A MACHINING ENVIRONMENT2014In: Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering 2014 TMCE 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify critical factors forcing manufacturing companies to improve the development of production technology in a machining environment. The focus in the paper is on industrial challenges within product design and production system development when introducing new products in a machining environment. Particular attention is given to the product development process and the production equipment acquisition process. A single case study is presented, consisting of interviews, observations, document studies and an analysis of a large Swedish manufacturing company. The case study company is characterized by advanced production technology, high mechanization and high automation level. In parallel with the case study a literature review was conducted in order to identify state-of-the-art methods/models for efficient design and product introduction within a production system. The paper identifies a gap in the current way of working within the case company as well as challenges regarding the development of production technology. Based on the study, the need for future research has been identified including the need of developing an improved working support for efficient production technology development when industrializing new products.

  • 3.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Joint Development of a Manufacturing Technology: A Longitudinal Case Study within the Manufacturing Industry2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compete within the manufacturing industry, there is a need to acquire and develop new manufacturing technologies to differentiate the company from others. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analyse factors affecting development of a manufacturing technology in a joint development project with an equipment supplier. A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company and the collaboration between a manufacturing company and an equipment supplier has been studied. The findings reveal that tacit knowledge and good equipment supplier relationship are highly important factors that facilitate development of a manufacturing technology.

  • 4.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Dept Prod Realizat, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1035-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development projects required to build competitive advantages. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company by following a manufacturing technology development project in real time during a two-year period. Findings - The results show that three different knowledge integration processes exist when developing unique manufacturing technology: processes for capturing, for joint learning, and for absorb learning. The findings of the current research suggest that the three knowledge integration processes are highly interrelated with each knowledge integration process affecting the other two. Research limitations/implications - The major limitation of the research is primarily associated with the single case, which limits generalizability outside the context that was studied. Practical implications - The findings are particularly relevant to manufacturing engineers working with the development of new manufacturing technologies. By using relevant knowledge integration processes and capabilities required to integrate the knowledge in manufacturing technology development projects, companies can improve design and organize the development of manufacturing technology. Originality/value - Previous research has merely noted that knowledge integration is required in the development of unique manufacturing technology, but without explaining how and in what way. This paper's contribution is the identification and analysis of three knowledge integration processes that contribute to the building of competitive advantages by developing unique manufacturing technology and new knowledge.

  • 5.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Managing early manufacturing technology development – phases and key activities2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compete within the manufacturing industry, there is a need to acquire and develop new manufacturing technologies to differentiate the company from others. This paper builds on extant operations management and innovation management literature with the focus on how to managing early manufacturing technology development. A multiple case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company in the automotive industry and our paper proposes a conceptual process for early manufacturing technology development and the key activities therein. The findings are relevant for managers working with long-term development and the paper concludes by discussing implications and research limitations.

  • 6.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Manufacturing Technology Readiness Assessment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss how the MRL scale can support the assessment of a manufacturing technology’s maturity level. A single case study within the manufacturing industry has been conducted investigating the use of a MRL scale. An assessment of MRL 4 has been studied.

  • 7.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Rosio, Carin
    Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, Vol. 52, p. 139-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the development of a strategically integrated product and production system portfolio could be enabled by the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing. In previous research, several critical challenges related to developing production system portfolios have been identified, but it has not been investigated how developing a reconfigurable manufacturing concept could aid some of these. Therefore, through a multiple case study, these critical challenges have been investigated in two companies that have recently developed reconfigurable manufacturing concepts for multiple variants and generations of products. The findings reveal that the companies need to deal with several challenges in order to enable a functioning RMS. By running the project separately from the NPD project and to include several product types and production sites the company overcome several challenges. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical interfaces for managing international manufacturing networks – A literature review2019In: 26 th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Environmental Management in Manufacturing Industries2015In: Handbook of Clean Energy Systems / [ed] Jinyue Yan, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental concern requires manufacturing industries to direct resources and effort toward strategies and activities that help reducing their overall environmental impact. Using environmental management systems (EMSs) such as ISO 14001 or similar is common. However, as the EMSs do not put absolute requirements on the organization's environmental performance, it is still up to each manufacturing company to set the ambition level. As part of the EMSs, the identification of the environmental aspects to be dealt with during the operations phase could be supported by an industrial applicable method called Green Performance Map (GPM), engaging the employees on all levels to work with those environmental improvements they could impact. While most manufacturing companies are implementing the concept of lean production, it is advantageous to integrate the environmental improvement work into the existing lean infrastructure with, for example, daily management systems and scheduled activities for continuous improvement. Another approach discussed in the article is the need for emphasizing the design of the production system as an upstream activity that has fundamental impact on the environmental performance downstream, that is, in the operations phase. When designing new production equipment or renovating existing equipment, the opportunities to incorporate more energy- and resource-efficient solutions are much greater and cheaper compared to investing in such solutions afterward during serial production. Arguably, a combined design and operations approach is necessary in order to achieve a complete green mindset that will guide the environmental actions on both the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Managing the environmental tasks is part of the overall strive toward lean and clean energy systems in manufacturing industry.

  • 11.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 12.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 13.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Management of Design Information in the Production System Design Process2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For manufacturing companies active on the global market, high-performance production systems that contribute to the growth and competitiveness of the company are essential. Among a wide range of industries it is increasingly acknowledged that superior production system capabilities are crucial for competitive success. However, the process of designing the production system has received little attention, ignoring its potential for gaining a competitive edge. Designing production systems in an effective and efficient manner is advantageous as it supports the possibility to achieve the best possible production system in a shorter time. One way to facilitate the design of the production system is an effective management of design information. Without managing design information effectively in the production system design process the consequences may be devastating including delays, difficulties in production ramp-up, costly rework, and productivity losses.

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is to develop knowledge that will contribute to an effective management of design information when designing production systems. The empirical data collection rests on a multiple-case study method and a survey in which the primary data derive from two industrialization projects at a supplier in the automotive industry. Each industrialization project involved the design of a new production system.

    The findings revealed ten categories of design information to be used throughout the process of designing production systems. The identified design information categories are grouped in the following way: (1) design information that minimizes the risk of sub-optimization; (2) design information that ensures an alignment with the requirements placed by the external context; (3) design information that ensures an alignment with the requirements placed by the internal context, and (4) design information that facilitates advancements in the design work. In order to improve the management of the broad variety of design information required, a framework is developed. The framework confirms the necessity to consider the management of design information as a multidimensional construct consisting of the acquiring, sharing, and using of information. Further, the framework is based on six characteristics that influence the management of design information. These characteristics are information type, source of information, communication medium, formalization, information quality, and pragmatic information. Supported by the findings, guidelines for the management of design information are outlined to facilitate an effective and efficient design of the production system and thus contribute to better production systems. The guidelines are of value to those responsible for or involved in the design of production systems.

  • 14.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Characteristics affecting management of design information in the production system design process2013In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 3241-3251Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it has been argued that the design of production systems is crucial, there is a general lack of empirical studies analysing and identifying resources and capabilities required for an efficient production system design process. One of these resources is the critical role attributed to design information and one such capability is how the design information is managed. To address this research gap, this paper reports the results from two in-depth case studies in the automotive industry focusing on the management of design information in the production system design process. Our results show that design information management needs to be understood as a multidimensional concept having three dimensions: acquiring, sharing and using design information. By focusing on the three dimensions, six characteristics affecting the management of design information when designing the production system are identified. The characteristics are information type, source of information, communication medium, formalisation, information quality and pragmatic information. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 15.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Creating a competitive edge when designing production systems: facilitating the sharing of design information2012In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1454, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 257-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing production systems, design information must be shared among functions at the manufacturing company and the external equipment supplier in order to integrate the various work activities. In this paper, factors facilitating the sharing of design information are analysed based on an in-depth case study of a supplier in the automotive industry. First, our findings show that the sharing of design information is promoted by formalisation. Second, informal coordination mechanisms are more crucial for internal integration between specialised functions than for external integration with the equipment supplier. Finally, our findings indicate that personal and language barriers appear more difficult to overcome than organisational bounds or geographical distance. Altogether, the findings provide strong evidence for the importance of sharing design information when designing more sophisticated production systems.

  • 16.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Critical factors for successful user-supplier integration in the production system design process2013In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Competitive Manufacturing for Innovative Products and Services: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2012, Rhodes, Greece, September 24-26, 2012, Revised Selected Papers, Part I / [ed] C. Emmanouilidis, M. Taisch, D. Kiritsis (Eds.), Springer, 2013, p. 421-428Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of equipment suppliers in the design of the production system has often been associated with major benefits. However, from a managerial perspective, integration between the user and the suppliers of the production equipment is still challenging. Therefore, the purpose of the research is to explore how manufacturing companies can facilitate and manage equipment supplier integration when designing the production system. Based on an real time case study in the automotive industry 10 critical factors for successful supplier/user integration are identified, which can be classified into three categories: human factors, project management factors and design factors.

  • 17.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 484-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems. Design/methodology/approach - The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers. Findings - The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition? Research limitations/implications - Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value. Practical implications - The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information. Originality/value - External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry

  • 18.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Integrated portfolio planning of products and production systems2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 155-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the research presented is to analyse and discuss critical challenges related A to the development of a production system portfolio. Design/methodology/approach: The study employs a longitudinal case study of an industrialization project at a global supplier in the automotive industry. Findings: This research makes two clear theoretical contributions. First, it extends the existing research on the manufacturing and R&D interface by proposing an innovative structure for production system development facilitating manufacturing companies in their efforts of being fast and cost-effective when introducing new products to the market. Second, this research identifies challenges related to the adoption of a production system portfolio and the necessary actions of a manufacturing company applying such a portfolio strategy. Research limitations/implications: The findings should be seen as a first attempt at assisting the development of a production system portfolio that matches the product portfolio. However, since the findings are based on only one case, the findings are to some extent context-specific and thus need to be complemented by more research. Practical implications: The research unveils challenges related to production system development and provides managers with a better understanding of some of the implications of the adoption of a portfolio strategy. Originality/value: This empirical study is among the first to explore the implications of a production system portfolio strategy. It advances the understanding towards a fully integrated product and production system development.

  • 19.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The critical role of design information for improved equipment supplier integration during production system design2011In: Proceedings of the 44th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of production equipment is one step of the production system design process. When design and building of production equipment is handed over to an equipment supplier, higher requirements are placed on the design information exchange to secure that the equipment corresponds to technical and financial requirements of the buying company. The paper presents results on characteristics of design information exchanged and success factors for effective collaboration between equipment suppliers and manufacturing companies. Results are based on an in-depth case study at a Swedish manufacturing company and a survey of 25 equipment suppliers.

  • 20.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Angelis, J.
    Warwick Business School, Warwick University, Coventry, United Kingdom .
    Information management for production system desingn with a new portfolio approach2011In: 21st International Conference on Production Research: Innovation in Product and Production, ICPR 2011 - Conference Proceedings, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective management of information is vital for successful development of new products. However, knowledge is lacking about the management of information during production system design and its effects on innovation. This exploratory case study in the automotive industry furthers understanding of how management of information contributes to the design of robust and dynamic production systems that can handle changing production situations. The results from the case study indicate that the management of information should consider requirements of current and future production system generations facilitating a conscious planning of a production systems portfolio that corresponds to the product portfolio. This approach allows for new ways of designing production system concepts and production technology solutions, which also can accelerate the innovation capabilities of the manufacturing company.

  • 21.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan Jönköping.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Angelis, Jannis
    3Warwick Business School, Warwick University.
    Information Management for Production System Design with a New Portfolio Approach2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research, Stuttgart: Fraunhofer-Verlag , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective management of information is vital for successful development of new products. However, knowledge is lacking about the management of information during production system design and its effects on innovation. This exploratory case study in the automotive industry furthers understanding of how management of information contributes to the design of robust and dynamic production systems that can handle changing production situations. The results from the case study indicate that the management of information should consider requirements of current and future production system generations facilitating a conscious planning of a production systems portfolio that corresponds to the product portfolio. This approach allows for new ways of designing production system concepts and production technology solutions, which also can accelerate the innovation capabilities of the manufacturing company.

  • 22.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bennett, David
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS2014In: International Conference of the International Association for Management of Technology IAMOT, Proceedings, Washington, United States, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative development between the user and the equipment supplier of production technology has an increasingly important effect in terms of generating innovative, sustainable, and unique production process ideas that can be easily ramped-up to high volume production. However, joint development of production technology is challenging and has received surprisingly limited attention. Against this background the objective of the paper is to explore collaborative challenges from the equipment suppliers and customers’ perspectives in production technology development projects, and to suggest strategies for how these challenges can be addressed. Empirically the results are based on multiple case studies from two manufacturing companies in Sweden (i.e. users) and two equipment suppliers, ensuring that the perspectives of both the user and supplier sides in production technology development projects are considered. Our findings show that the identified collaboration challenges do not only relate to inter-organizational development activities but also to the companies’ internal characteristics, i.e. the prerequisites for company collaboration. Internal characteristics have a clear impact on the ability to bridge the interface with the equipment supplier and thus to advance the collaboration in production technology development projects. Our findings underscore the importance of having intra and inter-organizational strategies to enhance the success related to collaboration in production technology development projects.

  • 23.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Exploring requirement specification of the production system – a position paper2009In: Paper presented at the 3rd SwedishProduction Symposium, Gothenburg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s turbulent environment, manufacturing companies are forced to efficiently change or develop production systems that are robust and dynamic enough to handle changing production situations during its entire life-cycle. To achieve such a production system requires a structured development process that should be carried out simultaneously to the product development process and considers the company’s product portfolio. Within a structured development process, the requirements specification of the proposed system is vital since it will guide the design process and the evaluation of the system on a conceptual as well as a detailed level. The aim of this paper is to address the requirement specification process that covers all aspects of the production system to be designed. This paper argues for the need of a holistic view in the requirement specification process of production systems. A holistic view of the overall process will facilitate to manage the various demands and categories important to deal with in the specification of requirements. Based on the holistic view it will be possible to identify the gates and stakeholders of the process itself, but also the substantial content of this process map.

  • 24.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lakshmikanthan, Jayaprakash
    Tabiri, Godfred
    Sourcing factors affecting production localisation decisions2012In: Capturing Value in International Manufacturing and Supply Networks New models for a changing world: Symposium proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many factors affect the production localisation process of global manufacturing companies. An area of great impact is the strategy for how to source material and components for a new production location. This paper presents a review of the main factors affecting the overall decision of localising production to a new site, and seeks to identify whether the sourcing and supply base development was considered during the decision process or not and in which way. The paper is based on interviews within four global manufacturing companies. The results of the theoretical and empirical studies indicate that the two most important factors affecting the production location at the studied companies were cost and proximity to markets/customers, verifying the expected reasons, while the impact of the sourcing factors was only considered to a less extent when making a location decision.

  • 25.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Core plant capabilities for competitive production development - a literature review2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although plant role issues have been discussed in a number of studies, there is limited insights in literature on the capabilities that are required for the core plant to be excellent. Drawing on a capability based perspective, the purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding of core plant capabilities for competitive production development by analysing the multidisciplinary literature on the core plant concept. We synthesis our findings into a conceptual model that distinguishing capabilities required to be (come) and act as an excellent core plant and thus widen the core plant concept and offer several contributions.

  • 26.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University.
    Dual Perspective on Information Exchanges between Design and Manufacturing2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED11), Vol. 6 / [ed] Culley, S.J.; Hicks, B.J.; McAloone, T.C.; Howard, T.J. & Chen, W., 2011, p. 21-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the exchange of information between the design and manufacturing interface from both perspectives in order to ensure interdepartmental integration and improve the performance of new product development projects. Based on two in-depth case studies, this article illustrates that there are differences in the type of information transferred between design and manufacturing as well as how this information is shared. While design engineers ask for feedback to their work regarding both the product and the project, relies the production system designer heavily on feed-forward information concerning the product per se. For effective new product development, it seems however beneficial that design engineers also should give feedback to the production system concept. The implication is that project managers need to carefully consider how to improve the sharing of information upstream in new product development projects and what communication medium to apply to transfer the information between design and manufacturing.

  • 27.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Karltun, Johan
    Avdelningen industriell organisation och produktion.
    Information Requirements in a Proactive Assembly Work Setting2009In: 3rd International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production / [ed] Michael Zäh, Utz, Herbert , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Support for successful Production System Development: Handbook2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For Swedish manufacturing companies active on the global market, high-performance production systems that contribute to the growth and competitiveness of the company are essential and one way to keep production in Sweden. Among a wide range of Swedish manufacturing companies it is becoming increasingly acknowledged that superior production system capabilities are crucial for competitive success. This being said, major attention has been paid to improving the operational performance of the production system. The focus in industry is mostly on the serial making of products, rather than on the prior development of the corresponding production system. At the end of the day, the real root cause of many problems and losses in production stem from issues that emanate from the development process of the production system. The potential of gaining a competitive edge by improving both the way the production system is developed and the way it is operated is hence ignored, even though it is a well-known fact that it is during the design phase that the most important decisions are made. In today’s industry, production system development is often still made ad hoc on the basis of past experiences and without any long-term perspective. If the production system is not designed in a proper way, it will eventually result in disturbances during both start-up and serial production. This leads to low capacity utilization, high production cost, and hence low profitability. To succeed, commitment is required as well as a shift in attention from the operations phase to the under-utilized potential of the design of production systems. The ideal outcome of production system development is the best possible production system that can easily be realized and is high-performing in operation. This will contribute to the growth and competitiveness of the company. To stay competitive, a shift in mind-set is required at many Swedish industries. Production system development is not only something that should work; it must be regarded as a competitive means and consequently be worked with systematically.

  • 29.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier integration throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As production equipment is often designed and built by equipment suppliers rather than made in-house, a collaborative buyer-supplier-relationship could be utilized in order to create robust solutions and enhance innovative ideas. The purpose with this paper is to explore critical user-supplier collaboration activities throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment development. The purpose is accomplished by a literature review and a case study including more than 30 semi-structured interviews at four companies. The challenges vary depending on equipment life cycle phase and user/supplier perspective. A life cycle model with eight stages is proposed including critical interconnected activities for each stage.

  • 30.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier collaboration in production equipment development – a lifecycle perspective2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to refine existing theories on collaboration between users and suppliers in joint production equipment development projects by exploring critical collaboration activities throughout the lifecycle stages of the production equipment. By means of a literature review and a multiple case study of two equipment suppliers and two users, a lifecycle perspective on production equipment development is adopted. Our results show that collaboration intensity depends on the specific lifecycle stage of the production equipment. The contributions of this paper are illustrated in a developed lifecycle model in order to facilitate practitioners in organising critical collaboration activities.

  • 31.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Development of Robust Production Equipment: A guide to strong collaboration between users and suppliers2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of today’s global and increasingly tough competition is narrow market windows and a demand for quick volume increases in production. This in turn means increased demands for a rapid and effective development of production equipment that ensures high performance right at the start of production. Robust production equipment with a high level of production efficiency and reduced costs for operation and maintenance therefore make up one of the most important factors for strong competitiveness and high profitability for Swedish industrial enterprises. Strong collaboration between users and suppliers is the key to success in this type of investment project. This handbook therefore presents a model that can be used by manufacturing companies who want to develop robust production equipment. The model and the other recommendations of the handbook focus on projects that are to be carried out in strong collaboration and are targeted at both users and suppliers. The model has been deve-loped through “EQUIP – User-supplier integration in production equipment design”, which has received funding from the Knowledge Foundation 2013–2016. The model consists of seven development phases based on the production equipment life cycle: Phase 1 – Preliminary study Phase 2 – Concept study Phase 3 – Procurement Phase 4 – Detailed design Phase 5 – Construction Phase 6 – Installation and commissioning Phase 7 – Production In each phase, critical activity steps and recommendations are presented for how to distribute responsibility within and between the parties involved. The model adopts a life cycle perspective for development projects in order to facilitate collaboration and to more clearly visualise the link between activities and their impact on the project success. Within the scope of an investment project, there is a great potential for developing sustainable production solutions. For this reason, this handbook also presents seven guidelines that may provide you with support in developing production equipment that remains secure, lean and sustainable throughout the equipment life cycle. The main purpose of the handbook is to facilitate collaboration through the whole investment project in a way that benefits both parties and which contributes to lasting relationships. The results of the research project show that there is a great interest in improved collaboration from both users and suppliers. For this reason, support, tools and preparedness from both parties are required to venture into investing time and resources in collaboration from the beginning, in the early phases of a new development project. This is then the potential to lay the foundation for long-term collaboration and for designing the best possible production equipment in the shortest time possible.

  • 32.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Dahlquist, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Swanström, Lennart
    Mälardalen University.
    Utveckling av Robust Produktionsutrustning: En guide för god samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Av dagens globala och allt hårdare konkurrens följer korta marknadsfönster och krav på snabb volym- uppgång i produktion. Det innebär i sin tur ökade krav på snabb och effektiv utveckling av produktions- utrustning som säkerställer hög prestanda direkt vid produktionsstart. Robust produktionsutrustning med hög produktionseffektivitet och minskade kostnader för drift och underhåll är därför en av de viktigaste faktorerna för stark konkurrenskraft och hög lönsamhet för svenska industriföretag. God samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör är nyckeln till framgång i denna typ av investerings- projekt. Denna handbok presenterar därför en modell som kan användas av tillverkande företag som vill utveckla robust produktionsutrustning. Modellen och övriga rekommendationer i handboken fokuserar på projekt som ska genomföras i stark samverkan och riktar sig till både beställaren och leverantören. Den har utvecklats i forskningsprojektet ”EQUIP – kund- och leverantörsintegration i utformning av produktionsutrustning” som finansierats av KK-stiftelsen under 2013-2016. Modellen består av sju utvecklingsfaser som är baser- ade på produktionsutrustnings livscykel: Fas 1 – Förstudie Fas 2 – Konceptstudie Fas 3 – Upphandling Fas 4 – Detaljerad utformning Fas 5 – Uppbyggnad Fas 6 – Installation och driftsättning Fas 7 – Produktion I varje fas presenteras kritiska aktivitetssteg och rekommendationer för hur ansvaret för dessa bör fördelas inom och emellan deltagande parter. Modellen använder ett livscykelperspektiv för utvecklingsprojekt för att underlätta samverkan samt tydligare visualisera sambandet mellan aktiviteter och deras påverkan på projektets framgång. Inom ramen för ett investeringsprojekt finns stor potential att utveckla hållbara produktionslösningar. Därför presenterar denna handbok även sju guider som kan stödja er i att ta fram produktionsutrustning som är säker, lean och hållbar under hela utrustningens livscykel. Huvudsyftet med handboken är att underlätta samverkan under hela investeringsprojektet på ett sätt som gagnar båda parter och bidrar till varaktiga relationer. Forskningsprojektets resultat visar att det finns ett stort intresse för främjad samverkan från både beställ- are och leverantör. Därför behövs stöd, verktyg och beredskap från båda parter för att våga investera tid och resurser på samverkan redan från början, i de tidiga faserna av ett nytt utvecklingsprojekt. Det är då potentialen att lägga grunden till långsiktig samverkan och utforma bästa möjliga produktionsutrustning på kortast möjliga tid är som störst.

  • 33.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing location decision: a case study on process and criteria2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the production location decision: A case study on process and criteria2014In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 74-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the process and criteria used in production location decisions, based on a literature overview and a case study in a Swedish manufacturing company with a global production network. The data collection comprised interviews with top management and project management as well as a document analysis. The findings indicate that the production location decision process is facilitated by following a stepwise process with an initial strategic analysis with a broad scope including also the selection of the future production system concept.

  • 35.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    In search for improved decision making on manufacturing footprint: A conceptual model for information handling2011In: Proceedings of the 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, Lund, 2011, p. 63-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The footprint strategy of a manufacturing company is frequently highlighted as a key aspect to the company's competitive advantage. However, research concerning international location decisions is limited. A comprehensive strategy has to function in a world with limited resources and continuous change of values. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of the process for efficient production localisation decisions by integrating aspects influencing the design of the manufacturing footprint. Research on drivers for location of manufacturing emphasise input factors, market factors and technological knowhow as key factors. Looking at the entire industrial system, earlier research also illustrates the broad range of roles for the manufacturing plant within a company's industrial system. Based upon this discussion of the motive for manufacturing location and the strategic role of the manufacturing plant, a conceptual model is introduced emphasising different levels that should be considered during the process of preparing a localisation decision. It serves as a base for more detailed studies on specific aspects, models and factors for manufacturing footprint analysis.

  • 36.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, M.
    Jönköping University.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson, N.
    Bombardier Transportation, Västerås, Sweden.
    Löv, R.
    Volvo CE Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 169-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the industrialization process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops for both product and production systems development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the industrialization process. Based on a case study at a railway component manufacturing company, the paper presents the identified feedback loops and mechanisms that are working well and not working well within the industrialization process. Further, it explains a practical method to improve the current or establish new feedback loops. The paper contributes to the discussion on the application of lean and agile approaches to the industrialization process where feedback loops act as enablers.

  • 37.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Södertälje, Sweden.
    Jackson, Mats
    Jönköping University Jönköping, Sweden.
    Challenges of Discrete Event Simulation in the Early Stages of Production System DesignIn: International journal of industrial engineering, ISSN 1072-4761, E-ISSN 1943-670XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the challenges of applying discrete event simulation in the early stages of production system design. Highlighting the implications of new production processes and technologies leading to improved competitiveness, this study provides novel contributions to the understanding of discrete event simulation based on three case studies of the transformation of legacy production systems in the heavy vehicle industry. The findings of this study show that equivocal or ambiguous understanding about new production processes or technologies, and uncertainty about necessary data input and the interrelation of subsystems in production, are critical in addressing discrete event simulation-related challenges. These findings highlight the need for an established process to manage assumptions and simplifications during the design, development, and deployment of discrete event simulation models as a countermeasure against uncertainties, improving manufacturing system design and practice.

  • 38.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Decision Making Approaches in Process Innovations: An Explorative Case StudyIn: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management JMTM, ISSN 1741-038XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the selection of decision-making approaches at manufacturing companies when implementing process innovations.Design/methodology/approach: This study reviews the current understanding of decision structuredness for determining a decision-making approach, and conducts a case study based on an interactive research approach at a global manufacturer. Findings: The findings show the correspondence of intuitive, normative, and combined intuitive and normative decision-making approaches in relation to varying degrees of equivocality and analyzability. Accordingly, the conditions for determining a decision-making choice when implementing process innovations are revealed. Research limitations/implications: This study contributes to increased understanding of the combined use of intuitive and normative decision-making in production system design. Practical implications: Empirical data are drawn from two projects in the heavy-vehicle industry. The study describes decisions, from start to finish, and the corresponding decision-making approaches when implementing process innovations. These findings are of value to staff responsible for the design of production systems. Originality/value: Unlike prior conceptual studies, this study considers normative, intuitive, and combined intuitive and normative decision-making. In addition, this study extends the current understanding of decision structuredness, and discloses the correspondence of decision-making approaches to varying degrees of equivocality and analyzability.

  • 39.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards a Reduction of Uncertainty in Production System Design Decisions2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tenet of production system design is to increase a manufacturing company’s competitiveness by introducing novel processes, technologies, and products. However, uncertainties exist regarding the actual benefits that can be attained when novelty and change are introduced into a production system. Addressing this issue, this paper explores how manufacturing companies can reduce uncertainties that challenge production system design decisions when significant changes are introduced into the production system. A real-time case study at a Swedish manufacturing company that decided to change its existing product specific assembly system to a multi-product assembly one was performed. Empirical results identify uncertainties challenging production system design configuration, and the activities targeting reduction of uncertainty. To extend current theory, empirical case study data is synthesized with current findings in production system design decisions, and uncertainty reduction in product design decisions. The paper concludes that information acquisition, uncertainty prioritization, project member background, and complexity of change influence uncertainty reduction in production system design decisions. Managerial implications highlight the importance of information acquisition and a structured approach when reducing uncertainties necessary to achieve an efficient and effective production system design. Thus, academic approaches to uncertainty reduction could benefit manufacturing practice.

  • 40.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    What guides information consensus? Approaching the reduction of equivocality in process innovationsIn: International Journal of Manufacturing Research IJMR, ISSN 1750-0591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the achievement of information consensus and the reduction of equivocality in process innovations. Drawing on the operations management literature, a new framework to guide information consensus in the reduction of equivocality in process innovations is proposed. The analysis is based on a real-time case study in the heavy vehicle industry. The results show that information consensus is not achieved by a single event, but active work towards this goal is necessary, and a clear set of pre-requisites is needed for achieving information consensus. The concepts of strategic objective, decision areas, and external and internal fit are identified as pre-requisites for achieving information consensus about the purpose, characteristics, and functionalities of process innovations.

  • 41.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ruiz Zúñiga, Enrique
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Urenda Moris, Matias
    University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Syberfeldtb, Anna
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Simulation-based Optimization for Facility Layout Design in Conditions of High Uncertainty2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. -339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the increased use of Simulation based Optimization, the design of facility layout is challenged by high levels of uncertainty associated with new production processes. Addressing this issue, this paper aims to understand the conceptual modeling activities of Simulation-based Optimization for facility layout design in conditions of high uncertainty. Based on three in-depth case studies, the results of this paper show how characterization criteria of production systems can be used in conceptual modelling to reduce uncertainty. These results may be essential to support managers and stakeholders during the introduction of new production processes in the design of facility layouts.

  • 42.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. KTH, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Revisiting challenges in using Discrete Event Simulation in early stages of Production System Design2018In: International conference of advances in production management systems APMS, Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 534-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents challenges of using discrete event simulation when supporting decision in early stages of production system design, when significant changes are introduced. It was based on three real-time case studies performed at one manufacturing company during 2014-2016. Challenges in the cases were mapped to previous literature, pointing out discrepancies and highlighting three additional challenges, specifically related to issues in the early stages of the pro-duction system design process. The significant change introduced to the assembly system, and the early phases of evaluation put significant challenges to the use of discrete event simulation and the study points out further efforts needed to support manufacturing companies under change, with an established industrial structure and legacy systems to consider.

  • 43.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Simulation in the Production System Design Process of Assembly Systems2015In: Winter Simulation Conference 2015 WSC15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective production systems are necessary for companies to achieve competitiveness in manufacturing, and the production system design process is fundamental to meet this goal. Discrete event simulation is a tool that can support the production system design process. However, few empirical studies have shown the use of this tool prior to the verification of an already chosen alternative, or an implemented production system solution. There is a need to explore how discrete event simulation can be used in the production system design process. A case study at a global manufacturing company, that used this tool in the design of its assembly system, is presented. The results of this study show where and for what purpose were the DES models used for in the production system design process. This study concludes that DES can support this activity and suggestions for future research are made.

  • 44.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rosio, Carin
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lead factory operationalisation and challenges2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deepens the understanding of the lead factory concept by examining how the lead factory role is operationalised and what challenges are associated with it. The research is based on an explorative case study of eight Swedish lead factories in the manufacturing industry. The empirical findings suggest that the understanding of the lead factory concept should be extended as it is not restricted to one type of set-up. The findings show a spectrum ranging from an entire manufacturing plant, parts of a plant, to a virtual plant considered to be the lead factory. The research also shows a broad range of challenges experienced by lead factories. Several of these are related to and originate from unclear role, responsibility and mandate of the lead factory. The lack of dedicated resources for lead factory activities, specifically long-term development and difficulties in measuring the benefits of the role, were other challenges faced.

  • 45.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bejlegaard, M.
    Aalborg Universitet, Aalborg, Denmark .
    Andersen, A. -L
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The introduction process of low-volume products: Challenges and potentials of information management2016In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Springer New York LLC , 2016, p. 325-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product introduction process plays an important role in development of new products and launching them to the market on-time with a high quality. The product introduction process has been studied primarily in highvolume manufacturing industries and therefore, the influences of the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries on the product introduction process has not been investigated. The aim of this paper is to study challenges and potentials of information management during the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries by a multiple-case study in two Scandinavian low-volume manufacturing companies. The paper contributes in covering the knowledge gap about the information management during the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

  • 46.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Start of Production in Low-Volume Manufacturing Industries: Disturbances and Solutions2015In: Advances in Production Management Systems: Innovative Production Management Towards Sustainable Growth, 2015, Vol. 459, p. 475-483Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing disturbances during start of production of new products is of high importance to assure that products reach the market on-time with the intended quality and volume. Therefore, identification and elimination of sources of such disturbances is necessary. Since the literature about such disturbances in low-volume manufacturing industries are limited, this paper is aimed to identify the common sources of such disturbances and the possible solutions to mitigate them in low-volume manufacturing industries. A multiple-case study has been conducted to achieve this aim. The results show that main sources of disturbances are lack of opportunities to test and refine products, considering the production system “as is” and putting extensive focus on product functionality rather than its manufacturability. Moreover, using the knowledge and experiences from production of previous similar products is identified as a source of learning and compensation for lack of opportunities for test and refinement.

  • 47.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Challenges in the Industrialization Process of Low-Volume Production Systems2013In: International Conference on Manufacturing Research 2013, Cranfield, United Kingdom: Cranfield university press , 2013, p. 39-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical part of new product development projects is the industrialization process of new products which affects both time and the cost. The industrialization of new products or variants in low-volume production systems has some specific challenges which are caused by characteristics of low-volume products and production systems. Therefore, an exploratory case study is made within two Swedish manufacturing companies to understand these challenges and compare the industrialization process in high and low volume production systems. The results of the multiple case studies indicate four challenges including knowledge transfer from the projects into production, development of the work instructions, the need for a higher level of training of the operators and production system design and the obligatory tailoring of the new products to the existing production systems.

  • 48.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

    Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

    Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

    Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

    Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

  • 49.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Product development in low-volume manufacturing industries: Characteristics and influencing factors2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development process has a considerable effect on factors such as time to market and quality of product which are vital for manufacturing companies to remain competitive. Therefore, study of the factors which influence the product development process such as characteristics of products and production systems is necessary to support and improve the product development process. Since most of the studies have been conducted in the context of high-volume manufacturing industries, the influences of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems on the product development process in such industries have not been considered sufficiently. In this paper, characteristics of low-volume products and production systems, their inter-relations and their influences on the product development process have been studied through a multiple case study. A general map of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems and their inter-relations was presented in this paper. Moreover, the influences of these characteristics on product development process including the reduced complexity of the process and lack of opportunities for test and refinement were discussed.

  • 50.
    Johansson, B.
    et al.
    ept Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bärring, M.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Flores-García, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wahlström, M.
    RUAG Space AB, Microwave Prod Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Challenges of data acquisition for simulation models of production systems in need of standards2019In: Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019, p. 691-702Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyze the challenges in data acquisition for simulation models of production systems based on two cases from the robotics and aerospace industries. Unlike prior research, we focus not only on the challenges of data acquisition but also on how these challenges affect decisions in production systems. We examine this linkage using the concepts of strategic objectives, decision areas, and internal fit from operations management literature. Empirical findings show that for data acquisition to lead to improved production system performance it is necessary to develop standards. Standards should consider ownership of data by different functions within a manufacturing company, alignment of data to performance measurements, and the connection between data, information, and production decisions. Using these concepts, this paper proposes a set of guidelines that facilitate the standardization of data acquisition for simulation models in production systems. We conclude by discussing the managerial implications of our findings. 

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