mdh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Already there?: cultivating emergent places for radical innovation in operations2017In: International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 131-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter proposes a way of understanding and cultivating places for radical innovation in operations. This chapter describes how, organisations can, instead of letting an innovation laboratory be its single economic and managerial priority, foster a decentralised, varied and emergent palette of places in use where radical innovation can occur. The chapter suggests that this can be done in lean production facilities and radical innovation be balanced with incremental innovation. 

  • 2.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design as Information: How May Design and Information Relate?2009In: Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal, ISSN 1833-1874, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 161-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Pettersson, design may be a process and/or the result of the process, a product. The area of design is multidisciplinary and involves several notions. One is in the subject field of Information Design, which includes language, communication, art, cognition and information science. These disciplines refer to the concept of information differently. There is therefore a need for a fruitful theory of information, terms and concepts in order to enrich the reasoning of design as information. Bates presents a definition of information and several fundamental information forms. There, she offers a theoretical framework, the main core of which is that information may take different forms related to architecture, graphic design, interior design, and interface design, etc. Such a framework may contribute to understanding the meaning of design. Bates’ theory is applied in a study involving spatial design in industrial environments. The conclusions of the study illustrates how design and information relate to a design process and a design product that enriches the understanding of the meaning of design.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    It Could Just as Well Have Been in Greek:: Experiences from Introducing Code as a Design Material to Exhibition Design Students2016In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction Pages 126-132, EINDHOVEN, Netherlands: ACM , 2016, p. 126-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the experience and learning from introducing programming in a museum exhibition design course. Thirty-seven information design students from Sweden, with no previous experience in programming, participated in the course in 2014 and 2015. The students' tasks were to create interactive exhibition stations at a county museum in five weeks. We introduced Arduino and Processing programming in the course to enlarge the information design students' repertoire and to find ways to develop the interactive aspects of the exhibition medium. We aim to identify and discuss challenges and strengths when introducing code as design material in design education. The education of future exhibition designers is an important matter relevant the TEI community.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Palmgren, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Visionary Expectations and Novice Designers: Prototyping in Design Education2017In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In information design education, we strive to find methods that provide students with opportunities to explore different ways of learning and designing. We seek to support development of contextual competences that will be helpful in navigating an unknown future of design in society. A challenge in today's design education is to formulate and use methods that support design students in developing competencies in the space between basic form training and context-rich training. The aim of this study was to evaluate prototyping exercises in design education where the focus was in that in-between space. The study is based on 33 prototyping workshops done between 2008 and 2015 and involving 160 students and two design teachers. Four different approaches to prototyping exercises are described, examined and evaluated: "spatial prototyping," "multi-material prototyping," "physical prototyping," and a mix between the latter two, "physical multi-material prototyping." The results show that the prototyping exercises did support the learning of diverse competencies in the in-between space of basic form training and context training. However, the exercises were also counterproductive and met with different kinds of resistance. The results of the study invite to a dialogue on how different prototyping techniques can stimulate learning in relation to future design competences.

  • 5.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Communication space: Spatial design in manufacturing industry2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main concern of this licentiate thesis is to discuss how built space is used for communication in the manufacturing industry, from a visual communication perspective. The thesis presents and develops the notion of 'communication space' and presents a model to describe the relation between different factors in the communication space.

    In a multiple case study, six different cases from the manufacturing industry are described and analyzed to highlight how built space is used for communication in a lean production context. Research results on how built spaces such as improvement places, meeting places and a development workshop affect improvement processes and communication are presented. What the studied improvement areas, meeting places and workshop can be said to communicate about the improvement processes is analyzed.

    The research results show that the built spaces in manufacturing industry are used for communication on two levels, both as places for interaction between employees and as a part of a communication process. The study also shows a relation between architecture from a specific time and the relation to the improvement work in the industrial context. How the results can be used to facilitate communication in the built spaces used for improvement processes in manufacturing industry is suggested in the thesis.

  • 6.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    ‘Company-selfies’ Boundary Negotiating Artefacts in Group Discussions on Innovation2015In: The Proceedings of The XXVI ISPIM Conference 2015 Budapest, Hungary - 14-17 June 2015, Budapest, Hungary, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, one practice-oriented approach to incorporate nonexperts in early stages of innovation work is presented and analysed: the method of photo-based group discussions on innovation. The result is based on studies in 7 different organizations during 2013-2014. The method was developed as a response to a current innovation management problem in manufacturing companies in mid-Sweden, i.e. the problem how to enable all employees to use their talent and potential in relation to innovation initiatives on all levels. The results show how the photographs were used by the participants to negotiate different interpretations of innovation. The photographs were used for self-reflection, borrowing, inclusion and denominating actions. The results contribute to the theoretical understanding in the innovation management community of photographs in innovation processes. It does so by the introduction of the notion 'company-selfie' and the analyse of the photograph as a boundary negotiation artefact in groupdiscussion on innovation.

  • 7.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rumslig omgestaltning : – en visuell signal i förändringsprocesser2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract

    Detta är en teknisk rapport om en fallstudie, utförd på en utvecklingsverkstad, 2007-2008. Som metod användes intervju, enkätundersökning, studier av tryckt material och arkitekturanalys. En rumslig förändring kopplas till aspekter som orientering, professionalitet, den anställdes känsla av värde för företaget, motivation och status. Andra aspekter i studien är rumslig gestaltning som signal för förändring, nöjda medarbetare, trivsel, framtid, attraktiv arbetsplats, verkstad i världsklass och effektivitet.

    Resultatet indikerar att en rumslig förändring i den studerade utvecklingsverkstaden fungerar som en positiv visuell signal för en pågående förändringsprocess när det gäller organisation på avdelningen som helhet. I det empiriska resultatet har det blivit tydligt att förändringar av rumsliga element starkt kan förknippas med – och vara ett resultat av – agerad information (Bates, 2006). De övertygelser och förhoppningar som genomsyrar avdelningens ledning visar sig i form av effekter i de rumsliga elementen. I slutsatsen diskuteras studiens resultat kort i relation till Hawthornestudien (Mayo, 1933).

     

  • 8.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Space for Creative Dialogue: context and content in practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: How do Spaces for Creative Dialogue evolve and how are they experienced in practice? In this paper we will present findings on how space is experienced by informants in the structure of a dialog seminar in an innovation research project. We are investigating the relationship between the physical context and mental content, between the created mental space and the experience of physical space. In the project studied here, the aim of the research was to share ideas and also to develop strategies and methods for radical change in production systems in manufacturing industry from an engineering, innovation and design research perspective. In a way the research project itself was under the demand to be innovative and different competences had to work together. In the method of dialog seminars the explanation of the organisation is focused around the structure of the seminar, but the physical spaces is an unexplored part of the dialog seminar. The success of the innovation process today depends on the use of both organizational structure and physical space. Furthermore, the organizational structure and physical space must be designed to encourage the very communication that spurs innovation, a view put forward by Allen and Henn (2007). So, how was the project organised to encourage a dialogue that spurs innovation and how were the physical spaces experienced? Keywords: creative spaces; dialogue; thinking style; radical innovation.

  • 9.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Spaces for innovation2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Workspace design, as an enabling factor in innovation, is an emerging topic for innovation and design research. However, little research has been done on users’ experience on workspaces for innovation in a manufacturing industrial context. The aim of the dissertation is to develop knowledge and understanding of workspaces for innovation from a user perspective.

    The dissertation is based on studies done in four manufacturing industries and in one design and innovation consultancy, with a focus on the employees' experience of the physical space in relation to innovation. The research method used was the photo elicitation interview. The 31 participants made photographs that served as a basis for verbal interviews to communicate the relationship they experienced between their workspace and innovation. The analysis and the interpretation of the material, supported by information, cultural and phenomenological theoretical perspectives, intend to contribute to the current scientific discourse in innovation and design.

    A pattern was found in the results. In the manufacturing industrial companies, the majority of workspaces that users described as supporting or hindering innovation were motifs showing aculture promoting innovation in small steps. Their examples were found to be in close similarity to what previous research describe as characteristics of exploitative innovation. In the design company, the most photographed motifs were workspaces and objects that supported different variations of what previousresearch defines as characteristics for a culture supporting radical, explorative innovation.

    The dissertation presents results contributing to the research on ambidexterity, with focus on a possible coexistence between different innovation cultures. The results indicate that spatial differentiation creates possibilities for coexistence between the two innovation cultures. Six spatial characteristics were found in the descriptions of the workspaces related to the marginalised explorative culture in the manufacturing companies.

    The dissertation discusses the possibilities of creating spaces for explorative innovation (SEIs) and space as a tool for innovation. An initial version of a support for design is presented.

  • 10.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Cadavid, Juan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Spatial design for continuous improvement: The case study of three manufacturing companies2010In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 23, no 8-9, p. 791-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are places in industry intended for communication regarding continuous improvement. This paper presents an observation of the state of practice today in one large and two medium-sized companies. It explores spatial design in

    continuous improvement areas and how spatial design may hinder or support communication regarding

    improvements. Although implementation and development of lean manufacturing is a subject for research in an

    industrial context, the spatial design is not well developed as a supporting variable. Computers or digital

    visualisation tools are not used in the improvement areas of the studied companies, even though the companies have

    a highly automated production. The improvement areas serve as a complement to the integration of manufacturing

    through computers. The improvement areas enhance the possibility to develop shared knowledge of how the

    production works and to coordinate actions. The architectural and semiotic analysis of the spatial design for

    continuous improvement in industry implies a different perspective and includes aspects of cognition, information,

    communication and treats how and what the elements in the improvement areas communicate.

     

  • 11.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Spatial design and communication for Improved Production Performance2009In: Proceedings of The International 3rd Swedish Production Symposium: Göteborg, Sweden, 2-3 december 2009 / [ed] Rosén, B.G., Swedish Production Academy, 2009, p. 317-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper present research results on how a spatial design can communicate and support

    production performance in relation to lean production. The main concern of this paper is to

    discuss the role of interior design and its affect on humans in a production system and to

    contribute to a more profound understanding of lean production from a communicative aspect.

    This paper is focusing on three case studies: a project studio, a prototype workshop, and a

    development workshop in manufacturing companies. The study in the development workshop

    is conducted during a period of two years, with an ambitious survey as follow up. The

    two others are context cases to exemplify and investigate the role of interior design in an

    industrial environment, with project studios as the main subject.

    The research method chosen is case study methodology including a literature review related

    to examples from the industrial case studies.

    In industry, spatial design in interaction with visual artefacts can be used to reduce the 8th

    waste by supporting effective communication, cross-functional work, decision-making processes,

    reinforcing the project identity, facilitating project management, save time, shorten

    led time for development projects and inspire employees to a positive view of the company

    and the project.

     

  • 12.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, M.c
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The emergence of socio-material assemblages in a university, company, and municipality collaboration2018In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL, Academic Conferences Limited , 2018, p. 506-512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report on an attempt to let students, companies, and organisations themselves discover the kinds of technologies that could be useful when co-producing knowledge in a Master’s-level course in innovation and design. Traditionally, and for various good reasons such as security and stability, universities have had certain online tools and systems for collaboration, while companies and municipalities have had others. These systems support internal communication within organisations but do not necessarily enhance communication with external contacts. This use of different systems creates barriers to the iterative, recurring, convenient, non-hierarchical, and open online collaboration needed in an innovative design process involving multiple stakeholders. During a ten-week Master’s-level course in innovation and design in 2016 and 2017 the 38 students divided into five project groups established contact with five companies and organisations and could choose their own online tools in dialogue with them. This paper presents the students’ and organisations’ emerging practices during the process based on observations and reflective evaluations conducted during and after the course. The results are discussed in light of how socio-material assemblages formed in this special setting and how the results might be used to improve the teaching of online literacy in design collaboration. The result indicates that for co-production of knowledge in innovation and design projects, three new social media literacies would be useful: meta communication, peak performance, and design awareness.

  • 13.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bozic, Nina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Creating an innovative culture using the physical space as an artifact. Findings in art and manufacturing industry2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The method of photo-elicitation from a phenomenological perspective.2014In: Proceedings of 13th International design conference Design 2014, 2014, p. -58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in the relation between workspace design and innovation. On the one hand, is the idea of designing an “innovation lab” that supports innovation. There are substantial financial investments involved when creating an innovation lab and there is evidence that such spaces can have short useful lifespan and some of them fail because they are not used as intended [Lewis and Moultrie 2005; Fayard and Weeks 2011]. On the other hand, workspaces can be altered by the users for short or long terms to support innovation activities. The users hence become spatial designers themselves. A gap exists in research on the underlying mechanisms, architecture, and dynamics by which organisations can create an environment supporting continuous improvements and radical innovation on both individual and organisational levels [Turner, Swart and Maylor 2013, Turner and Lee-Kelly 2013]. From design research we can contribute with a perspective on the underlying mechanisms and the dynamics in play in the area of workspace design and innovation. We can form the design research for the innovation labs, i.e. utopian specifically designed spaces for innovation, or the relationship between innovation, users and daily workspaces. We have chosen to acknowledge and study the complexity in relations between users, daily workspaces and innovation. Our hypothesis was that photo-elicitation could be a method to study that weave of complexity and research underlying dynamics.

    In this article we discuss the method of the photo-elicitated interview (PEI), as a tool in human-centred design research with respect to context and workspace. A phenomenological perspective focus on the human experience, examine and clarify situations, events and experiences as they occurs spontaneously in daily life (Seamon, 2000). This article intend to provide background theories from phenomenology and examples from an empirical study to discuss if and how PEI is instrumental in getting information from interviewees about their relation to their workspaces and innovation. Although the phenomenological theoretical perspective is relevant and therefore used here to describe human relation to workspaces and discuss the method, our use of specific notions from phenomenology aims firstly to support the analyse of the method to inform design research, and is not intended develop the phenomenological concepts themselves.

  • 15.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Spaces for Innovation: A Photo-elicitated Study in Three Companies from Manufacturing Industry and the Design Firm IDEO2014In: The International Journal of Design Education, ISSN 2325-128X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 49-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility that physical space can support or disturb processes for innovation in production systems is overlooked in the manufacturing industry and in research. This article rests on three studies in manufacturing industries and one in a design firm, with a focus on the employees' subjective experience of the physical space in relation to innovation. The employees made photographs and used keywords (followed up with verbal interviews) to communicate the relationship they perceived between physical space and innovation. The study shows that there is a relationship between company culture and the individual’s choices of physical spaces understood to support or hinder innovation. From the results, it can be concluded, that manufacturing companies which were studied form cultures that produce few spaces that support divergent thinking, while such spaces are prioritized in the design firm. This article show clean and orderly spaces for innovation in the manufacturing industry; for the design company, informal, collaborative, and visually simulative environments.

  • 16.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tool complexes of innovation:: Spaces for explorative innovation in four manufacturing industrial companies2014In: DRS 2014, Design´s big debates: Pushing the boundaries of design Research / [ed] Design Research Society, Umeå, 2014, p. 663-676Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing an environment in which both radical innovation and continuous improvement can exist, i.e. an ambidextrous environment, is one of the biggest challenges manage­ment faces. While having an ambidextrous organisation is of central importance to the competitive advantage of a firm, there is limited understanding of how to manage it.

    In this article, we are reporting on our research on the design of workspaces and the relations between design and ambidexterity in innovation. We studied the workspaces as artefacts in innovation cultures. We analysed relations between users and spaces that could enable an explorative innovation culture to emerge, and found spaces related to explorative innovation that coexisted with an exploitative innovation culture in production in the manufacturing industry.

    The results indicate that to develop ambidexterity on an individual level in a culture dominated by exploitative innovation, one strategy is spatial differentiation. The result shows that artefacts relating to a culture for explorative innovation in the studied manufacturing companies are artefacts in a marginalised culture. We present six spatial characteristics for artefacts in the marginalised culture: undercover spaces, grey zone spaces, satellite spaces, chameleon spaces, temporal spaces and accession spaces.

  • 17.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tool-complexes of innovation.: Spaces for explorative innovation in four manufacturing companies2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design’s Big Debates, Umeå, Sweden, 2014, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 663-676Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing an environment in which both radical innovation and continuous improvement can exist, i.e. an ambidextrous environment, is one of the biggest challenges manage-ment faces. While having an ambidextrous organisation is of central importance to the competitive advantage of a firm, there is limited understanding of how to manage it. In this article, we are reporting on our research on the design of workspaces and the relations between design and ambidexterity in innovation. We studied the workspaces as artefacts in innovation cultures. We analysed relations between users and spaces that could enable an explorative innovation culture to emerge, and found spaces related to explorative innovation that coexisted with an exploitative innovation culture in production in the manufacturing industry. The results indicate that to develop ambidexterity on an individual level in a culture dominated by exploitative innovation, one strategy is spatial differentiation. The result shows that artefacts relating to a culture for explorative innovation in the studied manufacturing companies are artefacts in a marginalised culture. We present six spatial characteristics for artefacts in the marginalised culture: undercover spaces, grey zone spaces, satellite spaces, chameleon spaces, temporal spaces and accession spaces.

  • 18.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Spatial design supporting the management of radical improvements within the manufacturing industry2013In: Proceedings of the 19th international conference on engineering Design, Seoul, Korea, Dem. Republic of: the Design Society , 2013, p. 129-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for the manufacturing industry to become more innovative. Doing what we always have done is not enough. External pressure and the required speed of change, requires industry to improve the management of incremental and radical improvement work. There is thus a need for new methods, tools, and processes to improve the innovative capabilities. In this paper we discuss the use of spatial design to support the management of radical improvement within the manufacturing industry. The designs of the physical spaces are in the paper presented as frames that are cultivating, facilitating and enabling radical improvement without imposing a regime of control and forced change. The spatial design enables the process and contributes to an ecosystem supporting radical improvement. To better manage radical improvement processes, one option suggested in this paper is to create five dedicated places - five enabling frames - for five phases in a radical improvement process, firstly to bring attention to the different phases of the process and secondly to support the actions in each part.

  • 19.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Design to engage?: Embodied information in control rooms2015In: Vision Plus 2015 Conference VisionPlus, Birmingham City , United Kingdom, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and the design of information effect the situation in control rooms for automated industrial processes. The design conveys to the operators the state and changes of state of the process. According to the common view among control room equipment developers, issues for design in highly automated control rooms, include the operators likely ignoring information, being bored and are not noticing variations until the variation triggers an alarm. Such problems can have economic and environmental consequences. In the highly automated control rooms of the future, these risks of can be dealt with from various point of view. The current thinking behind human-computer interaction (HCI) design is engineering the ‘human factor’ instead of understanding the human situation. Visionary areas in computing might convert HCI product development processes to design-driven processes that focus on user experience. The TAIPA research project presented in this paper focuses on the user experience in two control rooms. Based on the results and previous research, we examine how the information might be given a tangible and ambient design to engage operators. This paper presents illustrations of aspects of future design for the control room.

  • 20.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Emotions in design: Considering user experience for tangible and ambient interaction in control rooms2016In: Information Design Journal, ISSN 0142-5471, E-ISSN 1569-979X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operators in highly automated control rooms are said to be constantly bored, and boredom is an emotional state that can have economic and environmental consequences. This article presents insights into users’ emotions and their role in the design of control rooms. The study focused on the users’ experience in two control rooms, where operators explored their emotions in relation to a situation, object, place, or action. Based on the results of the study and previous research, this article examines control room’s information design and makes recommendations on how it might be given a tangible and ambient form.

  • 21.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Palmgren, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Prototyping in the in-between: A Method for Spatial Design education2016In: 2016 Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference DRS'16, Brighton, United Kingdom, 2016, no 50, p. 653-669Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in today's design education practice is to formulate and use methods that support competences in the in-between-space between basic form training and learning that is relevant for designers in the future society. The aim of the paper is to discuss and to evaluate prototyping exercises in design education placed in that in-between space. Four different approaches to prototyping exercises are described, examined and evaluated in the paper. The prototyping exercises are engaging the students in the learning cycle phases of learning by experimentation and learning by experiencing. The result shows that the prototyping exercises did support learning of diverse competences in that in-between space but were also counterproductive and met different kinds of resistance in the students. This paper invites to a dialogue on how different prototyping techniques in design education might be used when educating designers.

  • 22.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Poetics of Workplaces2017In: Experiencing the Everyday / [ed] Carsten Friberg and Raine Vasquez, Aarhus, DK: Aarhus Universitetsforlag , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information design is a practice and an academic field that views information through its representations, for example, through images, spaces, and texts. It is also human centered, not technological driven, in that its focus is on the users and their conditions and environments. As an academic field, information design is at an intersection of disciplines; cognitive science, media and communication, linguistics, visual studies, and art and aesthetics meet in information design. In our research, we have come to focus on the connection between aesthetics and visual-spatial information design; we are addressing the understanding of aesthetic matters in information design and its implications, using examples from the manufacturing sector.

  • 23.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Enacted Creative Spaces. The Aesthetic and the Poietic Elements of Embedded, Recorded and Enacyed Forms of Information in Manufacturing Industrial Environments2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aesthetic aspects, along with a vitalisation of traditional discussions on aesthetic matters, can be a key to a better understanding of the design of working places in manufacturing industry of today. In this paper we address a rethinking of aesthetic matters and therefore also the aes-thetic in design practice, while examining examples of superabundant visual communication in industrial environments. The environments are studied from an information design perspec-tive. Theories discussed in the field of aesthetics are, for example, Jauss’ view on the con-cept ’poiesis’. Jauss’ line of thought are put to use, in this paper, as an alternative perspective focusing on the production of artefacts, compared to the more commonly perspective that highlights the concept ’aesthetic’ (Gr. ’aisthesis’) in a focusing on the perception of artefacts. In this paper the industrial environments are analysed as different fundamental forms of in-formation and Marcia J Bates’ notion of the nature of information is put to use in a visual- and spatial context. We argue that instead of underlining the relationship of aesthetic and architec-ture, it is more fruitful for the information design practice in manufacturing industrial envi-ronments, to highlight poiesis as a significant aspect of design. The analysis circle around three examples from industrial environments.

  • 24.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    et al.
    RISE SICS, Sweden.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Blackbright, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A New Survey Instrument for Assessing the Innovation Climate2017In: XXVIII ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Cozza, Michela
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ageing and Assistive Technologies: An Epistemological Framework2016In: Beyond Interpretivism? New Encounters with Technology and organisation, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Teachers' Role in Blended Learning: The Emperor's new Clothes?2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 16TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON E-LEARNING (ECEL 2017) / [ed] Mesquita, A Peres, P, ACAD CONFERENCES LTD , 2017, p. 163-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a theoretical perspective, this paper problematizes the future role of teachers in higher education, especially in the Swedish context, placing opportunities and raised challenges by blended learning in a historical context of distance education. Distance education was introduced in the late 19th century and has been offered by two main actors in Sweden: the correspondence school Hermods and universities. It has been viewed as a part of life-long learning, a concept introduced in the 1960s. The correspondence schools offered elementary education courses, and in-service training for various professions, while universities largely focused on higher education but also provided education or training commissioned by other organizations. Recently, the teaching requirements and role of the teacher in distance education have changed dramatically, from formulating exercises and commenting on students' work to giving videotaped lectures in English for an open audience. However, there is still a lack of appropriate guidance for teachers on effective pedagogical practice in the new settings. Specifically, there is an increasing need to support teachers in designing and creating effective videotaped lectures that are accessible for a dispersed audience. The TED talks seem to provide a role model for performance as a lecturer, but the average teacher hardly has time to both prepare regular face-to-face lectures and distance lectures, e.g. extensively rehearse before recording. The paper discusses how the challenges of future roles of teachers can be met when lecturing in front of a camera.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bjelkemyr, M.c
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schaeffer Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Teachers' role in blended learning: The emperor's new clothes?2017In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL, Academic Conferences Limited , 2017, p. 163-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a theoretical perspective, this paper problematizes the future role of teachers in higher education, especially in the Swedish context, placing opportunities and raised challenges by blended learning in a historical context of distance education. Distance education was introduced in the late 19th century and has been offered by two main actors in Sweden: the correspondence school Hermods and universities. It has been viewed as a part of life-long learning, a concept introduced in the 1960s. The correspondence schools offered elementary education courses, and in-service training for various professions, while universities largely focused on higher education but also provided education or training commissioned by other organizations. Recently, the teaching requirements and role of the teacher in distance education have changed dramatically, from formulating exercises and commenting on students' work to giving videotaped lectures in English for an open audience. However, there is still a lack of appropriate guidance for teachers on effective pedagogical practice in the new settings. Specifically, there is an increasing need to support teachers in designing and creating effective videotaped lectures that are accessible for a dispersed audience. The TED talks seem to provide a role model for performance as a lecturer, but the average teacher hardly has time to both prepare regular face-to-face lectures and distance lectures, e.g. extensively rehearse before recording. The paper discusses how the challenges of future roles of teachers can be met when lecturing in front of a camera.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Helena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Assessment competence and its importance for IMA-tool use2017In: XXVIII ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Karlsson, Helena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Winbo, Karolina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Assessment and Support?: AI,R - A Pilot Project on Support Systems for Innovation in Automation Industry2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various methods to assess innovation are used in companies and organizations. Audits provide little support for day to day use and few explicitly address how companies can benefit from the audit results in terms of e.g. how to learn, formulate goals and operationalization. Based on a concrete example, this paper explores how innovation assessment can be considered a tripartite audit process designed to support learning and give an increased cultural support for innovation. In the paper the audit process will be discussed from the perspectives of what, who and how. 'What' address the tool and assessment area, 'who' focus on the people that participates in the assessment process and 'how' on the very assessment execution. The awareness of the notion 'innovation' among the 70 industrial companies in the Automation Region Network in mid-Sweden are typically low, and as a response to that a pilot study project Automation Innovation Region (AiR) started in 2012 to develop support for innovation. During one year 2014/2015, employees in five companies (N=44) participated in the study. The project developed a process, AiR Innowatch (Innowatch), combining a photo-based workshop on innovation, three workshops with themes on innovation climate, a web based weekly assessment tool, and a quarterly survey. The tools focus on innovation culture (what), the process highlights reflection, learning and integration (how) on assessment results from the perspective of individual, group and organisational (who) perspective. The goal was to design a learning based audit process that supports the companies to independently continue their work for increased innovativeness after the formal assessment process. This paper present the tools developed and the results from the pilot study as a base for discussion on auditing as a tool that supports learning and development of an organisational culture for increased innovativeness in established organisations. 

  • 30.
    Lindell, Rikard
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Tahiroglu, Koray
    Department of Media, Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
    Riis, Morten
    School of Communication and Culture - Information Science Aarhus University.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Materiality for Musical Expressions:: an Approach to Interdisciplinary Syllabus Development for NIME2016In: Proceedings of New Interfaces for Music Expression (NIME) Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We organised an elven day intense course in materiality for musical expressions to explore underlying principles of New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) in higher education. We grounded the course in different aspects of ma-teriality and gathered interdisciplinary student teams from three Nordic universities. Electronic music instrument makers participated in providing the course. In eleven days the students designed and built interfaces for musical expressions , composed a piece, and performed at the Norberg electronic music festival. The students explored the relationship between technology and possible musical expression with a strong connection to culture and place. The emphasis on performance provided closure and motivated teams to move forward in their design and artistic processes. On the basis of the course we discuss an interdisciplinary NIME course syllabus, and we infer that it benefits from grounding in materiality and in the place with a strong reference to culture .

  • 31.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Presencing and Downloading: in Photo-supported Group Discussions on Innovation2017In: XXVIII ISPIM Innovation Conference ISPIM 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The overall research focus in the study is how photographs can be used in workplace innovation processes. This work-in-progress paper discusses photo-supported group discussions on innovation as an approach to incorporate employees in the development of a radically innovative culture. The method involves managers and engineers in a process that transforms their conceptions of innovation into visuals and words, and provides a possibility for collective reflection based on these formulations. Enabling all employees to use their experiences and knowledge in workplace innovation is an opportunity being pursued in Sweden. The paper is a starting point to discuss whether or not the method of photo supported discussion on innovation could be helpful to support a shift to a radically innovative culture. The concepts of downloading or presencing are introduced to analyse the method.

  • 32.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Arduino in Museum Exhibition: Lessons Learned When Working With Design Students Inexperienced in Coding2015In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, 2015, p. 715-720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work-in-progress paper describes the lessons learned when introducing Arduino and Processing programming into a museum exhibition design course. 20 information design students from Sweden, with no previous knowledge in programming, participated in the course. The students' task was to create five interactive exhibition stations at a museum in five weeks. As an experiment, Arduino and Processing programming was introduced into the course in 2014. The ambition with the experiment was to enlarge the information design students' repertoire and find ways to develop the interactive aspects of the exhibition medium. The aim of the paper is to identify and discuss challenges and strengths when introducing code as design material in information design education. The findings presented are based on the students' reflection stories. This work is in progress and we aim in the future to 1) continue the analysis of the material 2) with the findings develop the information design education further and 3) explore the relation between tangible and intangible experience of interactive museum artifacts from a designer's and a museum visitor's perspective. We consider this to be an important matter with branches into the TEI community. We appreciate any feedback on our work.

  • 33.
    Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Emotions in design2016In: Information Design Journal, ISSN 0142-5471, E-ISSN 1569-979X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operators in highly automated control rooms are said to be constantly bored, and boredom is an emotional state that can have economic and environmental consequences. This article presents insights into users' emotions and their role in the design of control rooms. The study focused on the users' experience in two control rooms, where operators explored their emotions in relation to a situation, object, place, or action. Based on the results of the study and previous research, this article examines control room's information design and makes recommendations on how it might be given a tangible and ambient form.

  • 34.
    Wikström, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Öberg, Åsa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The Use of Storyboard to Capture Experience2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED11), Vol. 10: Impacting Society Through Engineering Design, Design Society , 2011, p. 331-340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, product realization is becoming more squeezed in time and the need to capture experience from previous projects is an important factor for being successful in developing new products and services. This paper aims to investigate the use of storyboard to highlight earlier experiences from a narrative theory perspective and in relation to contemporary cognitive theories regarding how external representations facilitate collaborative work. This paper will discuss and come up with suggestions as to why storyboard can be a supportive method through the use of narrative theories. One of the objectives of the actual research project is to assist industry in developing strategies and methods to capture “lessons learned” in previous projects and use earlier experiences to avoid repeating mistakes. This will then release working capacity to be used for creativity and innovations instead. The conclusion of the paper presents storyboard as a supportive method for capturing earlier experience from a product realization project. It also argues that it is valid to borrow the concept focalizer from narrative theory.

1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf