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  • 1.
    Antony, Jiju
    et al.
    Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates.
    Bhat, Shreeranga
    St Joseph Engineering College, India.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ – the Swedish Institute for Quality, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sony, Michael
    Oxford Brookes Business School, United Kingdom.
    Sorqvist, Lars
    International Academy for Quality, Sweden.
    Bader, Mariam
    Khalifa University, United Arab Emirates.
    Quality management as a means for micro-level sustainability development in organizations2023In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The use of quality management (QM) to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) is a topic of growing interest in academia and industry. The IAQ (International Academy for Quality) established Quality Sustainability Award in 2020, a testament to this growing interest. This study aims to investigate how QM philosophies, methodologies and tools can be used to achieve sustainable development in organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five large manufacturing organizations – three from India and two from China – who reported their achievements about using QM in achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were studied using multiple sources of data collection. A detailed within-case and cross-case analysis were conducted to unearth this linkage's practical and theoretical aspects. Findings: The study finds that QM methodologies effectively met the five organizations' UNSDGs. These organizations successfully used OPEX (Operational Excellence) methodologies such as Lean, Kaizen and Six Sigma to meet UNSDGs 7, 11, 12 and 13. Moreover, UNSG 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production) is the most targeted goal across the case studies. A cross-case analysis revealed that the most frequently used quality tools were Design of Experiments (DoE), Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA), C&E analysis and Inferential statistics, among other essential tools. Research limitations/implications: The study's sample size was limited to large-scale manufacturing organizations in the two most populous countries in the world. This may limit the study's generalizability to other countries, continents, or micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Additionally, the study's conclusions would be strengthened if tested as hypotheses in a follow-up survey. Practical implications: This practical paper provides case studies on how to use QM to impact SDGs. It offers both descriptive and prescriptive solutions for practitioners. The study highlights the importance of using essential QM tools in a structured and systematic manner, with effective teams, to meet the SDGs of organizations. Social implications: The study shows how QM can be used to impact UNSDGs, and this is very important because the UNSDGs are a set of global objectives that aim to address a wide range of social and environmental issues. This study could motivate organizations to achieve the UNSDGs using essential QM tools and make the world a better place for the present and future generations. Originality/value: This case study is the first to investigate at a micro-level how QM can impact UNSDGs using live examples. It uses data from the IAQ to demonstrate how QM can be integrated into UNSDGs to ensure sustainable manufacturing.

  • 2.
    Antony, Jiju
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Fac Business & Law, Newcastle Business Sch, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England..
    Bhat, Shreeranga
    St Joseph Engn Coll, Dept Mech Engn, Mangalore, India..
    Sony, Michael
    Oxford Brookes Univ, Oxford Brookes Business Sch, Oxford, England..
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sorqvist, Lars
    Int Acad Qual, Greater Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molteni, Raul
    Molteni Consulting, Buenos Aires, Argentina..
    Sustainable development through quality management: a multiple-case study analysis of triumphs, trials and tribulations2024In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeIn a highly competitive and globalised era, agile organisations proactively steer towards sustainability. This situation persuaded the organisations to align Quality Management (QM) initiatives to achieve sustainable outcomes. This study aims to explore quality-sustainability linkage, explicitly focusing on attaining the prestigious IAQ Quality Sustainability Award. Further it investigates, the impact of QM as a strategy for promoting sustainability to meet sustainable development goals (SDGs).Design/methodology/approachDue to the lack of substantial literature connecting QM to sustainability, the current research adopted an explanatory multiple-case study. Six cases were purposively chosen for the study. Three cases of those who have achieved the prestigious IAQ Quality Sustainability Award and remaining have been selected that have fallen short of receiving the award. A detailed within-case and cross-case examinations involving six cases that reported their QM achievements aligned with SDGs.FindingsThe findings demonstrate the significant role of QM adoption in achieving positive results from the perspective of SDGs, such as reduced environmental impacts, improved operational efficiency and enhanced quality of life. Effective stakeholder collaboration, proficiency in analytical tools and strategic alignment with SDGs emerged as critical success factors. Conversely, weak linkage with sustainability and unclear approaches were crucial challenges in attaining the IAQ Quality Sustainability Award.Research limitations/implicationsThis paper outlines essential commandments for organisations actively seeking to promote sustainability. It offers valuable insights for decision-makers, facilitating a profound understanding of the challenges and opportunities in pursuing sustainable performance.Originality/valueThe distinctive nature of this study lies in its dedicated exploration of the intricate relationship between QM deployment and its true impact on the achievement of the SDGs.

  • 3.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring optimal flexible assembly systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a prominent part of manufacturing system, assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, due to the lack of a unified and clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems, the recognition of optimal flexibility in assembly system without clashing with efficiency still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound basis to discuss the characteristics of flexible assembly and to address the question of reaching optimal flexibility, this paper makes use of a case study performed in five manufacturing plants. The study proposes a clear definition for flexible assembly and identifies six enablers for flexibility in assembly systems. Further in this research the applicability of few different types of manufacturing flexibility in assembly system is investigated. The paper concludes with discussions and suggestions for future research.

  • 4.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry2015In: Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, ISSN 0972-2696, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major challenge of today’s manufacturing industry in tackling demands for a wider range of products with short life-cycle times and meeting customisation requirements has drawn considerable attention towards flexibility in manufacturing systems. As a prominent part of a manufacturing system, an assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, owing to the dearth of a unified and clear definition of the constituents of flexible assembly systems, in both theory and practice, the recognition of flexibility in assembly systems still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound base for discussing the constituents of flexible assembly systems, this research paper explores the literature concerning flexibility in manufacturing and assembly as well as in flexible systems management domains. To reflect an industrial perspective, a multiple case study of five manufacturing plants in the heavy vehicle industry is performed. By identifying six essential constituents of flexibility in assembly systems, the study proposes a clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems which mainly revolves around mix and volume flexibility. To further enhance the findings, the compatibility of a few previously identified types of manufacturing flexibility in the assembly systems of the case plants is investigated and additional dimensions of flexibility in assembly systems are revealed. Finally, the implications for theory and practice as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

  • 5.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, M.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Implications of realizing mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity—A case study2019In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 52, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable the production of high product variety, mix flexibility in assembly systems is of paramount importance for manufacturing companies. Mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) are growing as the key means of realizing mix flexibility in many manufacturing sectors, as they absorb volume fluctuations and offer high product variety. With the increasing product variety in MPALs, these assembly systems are becoming more complex. However, the practical challenges of these assembly systems, in particular those concerning product design, have not been adequately addressed. By performing a case study of a heavy machinery manufacturing company, this paper investigates the implications of realizing mix flexibility in an assembly system for product modularity. The findings pinpoint the low level of product modularity in assembly as the most important challenge in MPALs. Accordingly, realizing mix flexibility in an MPAL impacts product modularity through establishing a common assembly sequence and defining similar module contents across distinct product families.

  • 6.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Augustsson, P.
    FlexQube, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    An assembly-oriented product design methodology to develop similar assembly operations in a mixed-product assembly line2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-5, p. 131-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing demands for product variety, Mixed-Product Assembly Lines (MPALs) as an effective means of creating product variety are recently increasing in manufacturing companies. However, handling different products from distinct product families creates high complexity in performing assembly operations in an MPAL. The elevated complexity, calls for increased similarity between assembly operations in an MPAL which requires product design changes accordingly. Hence, the objective of this paper is to suggest an assembly-oriented product design methodology to increase similar assembly operations for various products cross-product families. The proposed methodology uses Interface Diagram, a product architecture modelling tool, for comparing assembly operations crossproduct families, suggesting an assembly-oriented design, and communicating it to designers. The methodology has been developed by conducting a case study in heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. The results highlight a visual approach towards establishing a common language between assembly and design teams to consider the requirements of an MAPL in product design.

  • 7.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system- A case study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

  • 8.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, Vol. 4, p. 41-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s fast-changing global market, using mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) and mixed-model assembly lines (MMALs) allows manufacturing companies to be flexible and to maintain their competitive edge through product variety. Balancing and sequencing issues have been recognized as the main challenges of MPALs and MMALs, but other practical needs of MPALs remain unclear. Recognizing the practical needs of MPALs helps in identifying related requirements for product design, leading to products that closely align with the MPAL concept. The objective of this paper is to offer an industrial perspective on the needs of MPALs and to identify its requirements vis-à-vis product design. To achieve this objective, a single real-time case study in a heavy-vehicle-manufacturing company has been performed. The results from this industrial case study suggest that in order to handle product variety in MPALs and to reduce the related complexity, certain dimensions of flexibility need to be created in the assembly system, and requirements related to product design should be considered simultaneously in order to support assembly processes.

  • 9.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Identification of the causes of complexity in mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demands for product variety have directed manufacturing companies towards accommodating flexibility by establishing mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines. However, since greater variety leads to increased complexity, establishing these assembly lines becomes complicated. By conducting a case study, this paper investigates the causes of complexity and the applicability of assembly instructions in one mixed-product and four mixed-model assembly lines in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results indicate a set of causes for complexity and highlight the significance of assembly instructions, as the practical implications for development of flexible assembly systems and design of products closely aligned with them.

  • 10.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Implications of realising mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity - a case studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Linking product design to flexibility in an assembly system: A case study2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 610-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The recent shift towards accommodating flexibility in manufacturing companies and the complexity resulting from product variety highlight the significance of flexible assembly systems and designing products for them. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design from the assembly system's standpoint. Design/methodology/approach - To fulfil the purpose of the paper, a literature review and a case study were performed. The case study was conducted with an interactive research approach in a global market leader company within the heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. Findings - The findings indicate that common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts are the main requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design which reduce complexity and facilitate various flexibility dimensions. Accordingly, a model is proposed to broaden the understanding of these requirements from the assembly system's standpoint. Research limitations/implications - This study contributes to the overlapping research area of flexible assembly systems and product design. Practical implications - The proposed model is largely based on practical data and clarifies the role of product design in facilitating flexibility in an assembly system. It can be used by assembly managers, assembly engineers, and product designers. Originality/value - The key originality of this paper compared to the previous studies lies in presenting a novel assembly-oriented design model. The model enhances understanding of a flexible assembly system's requirements for product design with regard to reducing complexity and managing variation in a flexible assembly system. These requirements can be applied to product design across various product families within a company's product portfolio.

  • 12.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats R.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards Establishing Similar Assembly Interfaces for a Mixed-product Assembly System2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 635-640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing a mixed-product assembly line (MPAL) is an elaborate task due to the complexity raised by product variety. This paper proposes that securing similar assembly interfaces across distinct product families is an essential requirement of MPALs which facilitates flexibility and reduces complexity. The concept of similar assembly interfaces has been developed and analysed in a case study at a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results suggest that assembly interfaces can be defined according to generic assembly operation steps: pick, place and attach. The paper highlights the need for development of a cross-functional methodology to analyse and establish similar assembly interfaces.

  • 13.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schedin, Joel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Considering assembly requirement specifications in product development: identification and approach2014In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation, 2014, p. 969-976Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the major advantages such as reduced time to market and improved quality at lowered cost, the principles of design for assembly capabilities and concurrent engineering are of great significance when developing new products. However, identifying assembly requirement specifications and considering them in New Product Development (NPD) in a timely manner, while securing efficiency and robustness of assembly processes, still remains a challenging task. In presenting a case study of an NPD project in a manufacturing company, this article focuses on the process of capturing and incorporating the requirements related to the assembly system during the early phases of NPD. Further, the results of the research study indicate the different assembly requirements in the case company and pinpoint the challenges in practices involved in handling them. The assembly requirements identified in this research reflect some of the challenges encountered in handling the requirements, through the investigated requirement practice. Based on the results, the issues of when and how to consider the assembly requirements are highlighted in the conclusions and suggestions for future research are made.

  • 14.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Conclusions2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 167-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this concluding chapter, each of the previous chapters are reflected upon based on the emergent quality management paradigm presented in Chap. 9 by Backström. This book introduces four processes: innovation, production, knowledge creation, and value creation processes. It is emphasised that companies must prioritise and develop all four of these processes to survive and prosper. Throughout the book, dichotomies associated with these processes have been elaborated on and discussed. Historically, these dichotomies have often created dilemmas owing to the current understanding of their relations. However, as suggested in this book, alternative perspectives can be used in a constructive way to resolve these potentially high-impact dilemmas. Recognising the dichotomies as mutually dependent gives further possibilities for the development of production systems.

  • 15.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Emergent quality management2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Introduction2017In: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the development of successful business and production systems are full of conflicting forces; initiatives that seem conducive to one line of work can be a constraint on another line of work. This kind of dilemma is the core subject of the current book, and by applying alternative perspectives to such dilemmas, the book will present ideas on how these could be managed in organizations. Organizations need to manage a number of challenges in terms of dualities in order to create a contemporary production system, which seems to be key to future innovative quality improvements in operations. The challenges and dichotomies that are addressed in this book are all part of four interrelated processes that together constitute key elements of a contemporary production system: The innovation process—creation and implementation of new offerings and solutions, The production process—production and distribution of offerings and solutions, The knowledge creation process—emergence and distribution of knowledge, The value creation process—created customer value based on the offerings and solutions developed. 

  • 17.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, AndersMälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.Johansson, Peter EMälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Innovative Quality Improvements in Operations2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines current and emerging challenges in manufacturing related to the ideal of developing production processes with variability and agility on one level of the system, combined with structures ensuring stability and robustness on another level; close to what by other scholars has been discussed in terms of continuous innovation.  However, this ideal has proven to be difficult to achieve in practice, and there is a need for enhanced and more sophisticated theoretical models dealing with the complexity surrounding organizational conditions to foster incremental as well as radical change in production systems, and, at the same time to ensure stability over time.

    As a theoretical frame of reference, a perspective on change where conflicting demands and conflicting activities, e.g., exploration and exploitation, are seen as intertwined and interdependent, is used throughout the book. The ideal from this perspective is to make use of such conflicting forces and to develop the change dynamics by keeping them in the same social system, not to structurally separate them in different departments or different initiatives.

    The main purpose of the book is to address an increased need for quality improvement through innovation and disruptive change in production. Traditional theories and managerial models of production systems are developed with a focus on stability and improvement. There is a need for enhanced models to reach an ability to develop new future production systems. The goal of the book is to provide nuances and new perspectives giving more realistic models of the production system to be able to increase the change potentiality of the organization and thus the long-term competiveness. Learning and organizational perspectives are in focus as enablers to increase the understanding of a production system as such. Long-term competitiveness through adaptability and the potential for radical improvement is of importance throughout the book. The use of dualities and the concept of ambidextrous organizations as a frame of understanding is the innovative strength for this area.

  • 18.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Olsson, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Qureshi, Hassan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Integrating Quality and Maintenance Development: Opportunities and Implications2010In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management (COMADEM 2010): Advances in Maintenance and Condition Diagnosis Technologies towards Sustainable Society / [ed] S. Okumura, T. Kawai, P. Chen, and R. B. K. N. Rao, 2010, p. 821-828Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the drive in many organizations is to focus on reducing production costs while increasing customer satisfaction. One key to succeed with these goals is to develop and improve both quality and maintenance in production as well as quality and maintenance in early phases of the development processes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how and motivate why research within quality and maintenance development may interact, in order to help companies meet customer demand while at the same time increase productivity. The paper is based on ideas and research perspectives of the newly formed competence group on ‘Quality- and Maintenance Development’ at the School of Innovation, Design and Engineering at the Malardalen University, Sweden. This paper elaborates on the concepts of Quality and Maintenance, its important integration, and provides some examples of ongoing research projects within the competence group.

  • 19.
    Bergman, B.L.S
    et al.
    Chalmers university of .
    Fundin, Anders
    Chalmers university of technology, Sweden.
    Gremyr, I.C
    Chalmers university of technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, P.M
    Chalmers university of technology, Sweden.
    Beyond root-cause analysis2002In: Proceedings of the Annual Reliability and Maintainability Symposium (RAMS), 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bojesson, Catarina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring microfoundations of dynamic capabilities – challenges, barriers, and enablers of organizational change2020In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting an organization’s dynamic capability and, consequently, its ability to manage organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A single case study was conducted to provide a deeper understanding of the situation that the case company experienced during a specific phase of reconfiguration. Data were collected through nine in-depth, semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Gioia methodology. Findings: Challenges, barriers and enablers affecting the organization's dynamic capability in the reconfiguration phase were identified. Originality/value: This study contributes to the theory of dynamic capabilities and to the current investigatory stream regarding microfoundations by presenting practical examples of challenges, barriers and enablers that affect an organization’s ability to succeed during an organizational reconfiguration. These examples are intended to aid in discussions on microfoundations of dynamic capabilities and their impact in practice. 

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Strömberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Phases of Co-Production: Follow-up Research on the Industrial Research School INNOFACTURE2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mälardalen Univerity is characterised by its close collaboration with companies and with the public sector in the region. A main strategic directions of the university is to develop co-production with partner companies, expressed in the university vision “A Strong MDH – the Coproducing University”. The concept ’co-production’ is in this paper used interchangeably with concept ’co-creation’, emphasising our view of equal participation and interaction with the goal of knowledge, that by the company can be made useful outside the university (see Terblanche, 2014). Based on Mälardalen University’s vision, co-production is a main goal for the Innovation and Product Realization (IPR) environment. IPR is located at the School of Innovation, Design and Engineering and has a common graduate education with three mutually supportive cooperating research groups: Product realization, Innovation management, and Information design. Here ideas from different fields and cultures meet, creating new ideas, possibilities, and knowledge as a result. The approach to develop new insights and knowledge in order to address societal challenges, through working closer between academics and research users, has a potential to improve how research is conducted. Still, there are many questions and challenges in this approach, with need of development: How is research and research education framed and undertaken? What constitutes co-production? What distinguishes reseach in co-production from other forms of research? What are the benefits and barriers of co-production? As we shall see, the follow-up research aim to contribute to how our third level education in a co-production environment can be undertaken.

  • 22.
    Deleryd, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Towards societal satisfaction in a fifth generation of quality - the sustainability modelIn: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality concept has developed over many generations. The purpose of this article is to review and describe how the quality movement developed through four sequential generations and how a fifth generation is upcoming. Building on the different generations of quality, the fifth generation reveals differing needs between customers and stakeholders. In the new generation of quality, societal satisfaction would be a more appropriate way of measuring sustainable success. Consequently, and to support societal satisfaction, additional quality management models that complement current approaches are needed. For organisations to manage current, fast-changing environments successfully, existing management models need to be further developed. Hence, to support decision makers in the fifth generation of quality, Quality 5.0, achieve societal satisfaction, this paper proposes a generic model for sustainable development, based on a longitudinal trend analysis of two sequential Delphi studies conducted in 2012 and 2018. The sustainability model supports all organisations-private or public, large or small-on their pathway towards sustainable organisational success and a sustainable future.

  • 23.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Quality assurance of information in performance measurement systems2012In: International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management, ISSN 1746-6474, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 514-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to develop and empirically investigate a conceptual framework for quality assurance of information in performance measurement systems. Three different strategies that may be applied for improving the quality of information in performance measurement systems are elaborated upon: craftsmanship, communicative actions and pragmatic assessment. These three strategies focus on different aspects: The craftsmanship strategy pays attention to the procedures that generate information; the communicative action strategy draws attention to the information itself; and the third model, pragmatic assessment, looks at how performance measurement influences decision making from a holistic perspective. Each of the strategies employs different tactics for ensuring quality of information. Based on empirical identification and elaboration of the three strategies, we argue that they have complementary roles.

  • 24.
    Ericson Öberg, A.
    et al.
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Arvika, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, P.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Factors influencing control charts usage of operational measures2017In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 225-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing implementation of control charts on key performance indicators (KPIs). Design/methodology/approach: Factors driving organizational change described in literature are analyzed inspired by the affinity-interrelationship method. A holistic multiple-case design is used to conduct six workshops to affect the usage of control charts on KPIs at a global company in the automotive industry. The theoretical factors are compared with the result from the case study. Findings: The important factors for implementation success differ to some extent between the theoretical and empirical studies. High-level commitment and a clear definition of the goal of change could be most important when creating a motivation for change. Thereafter, having a dedicated change agent, choosing an important KPI and being able to describe the gain in financial terms becomes more important. Practical implications: By using control charts on KPIs, the organization in the case study has become more proactive, addressing the right issues upstream in the process, in the right way, cross-functionally. Originality/value: Factors affecting the implementation of already available solutions in the industry are highlighted. This potentially provides a basis for improved decision making, which has a significant value. 

  • 25.
    Eriksson, H.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gremyr, I.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bergquist, B.
    Luleå University of Technolog, Sweden.
    Garvare, R.
    Luleå University of Technolog, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiklund, H.
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Wester, M.
    Swedish Institute for Quality, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sörqvist, L.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring quality challenges and the validity of excellence models2016In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1201-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore important quality-related challenges facing organizations, and investigate how current excellence models incorporate these challenges. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a Delphi study of Swedish organizations. Forty-nine challenges were generated and ranked according to importance and the ten top-ranked challenges were compared to the principles of four excellence models. Findings: The excellence models still seem to be relevant since their content matches many of the identified challenges. The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the Swedish Institute for Quality models were found to have the most comprehensive coverage, while the International Organization for Standardization model had limited coverage. Research limitations/implications: Three areas for further research were identified: first, how quality management (QM) can evolve in different contexts that have varying needs in terms of adaptive and explorative capabilities; second, the interfaces of QM and sustainability, and ways to understand how customers and stakeholders can be active contributors to improvements; and third, the roles of the owners and board of directors regarding QM, and how to organize and distribute responsibilities of the QM work. Practical implications: There are three important challenges that future revisions of excellence models could address: first, making QM a strategic issue for company owners; second, involving customers in the improvement activities; and third, developing processes that are robust yet still easily adaptable. Originality/value: The Delphi study identified upcoming challenges in the QM area based on input from 188 quality professionals. 

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Visual management for a dynamic strategic change2018In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 712-727Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Strategic changes in an organization will face challenges not only related to the changes as suchbut also with regard to how the vision of the future is interpreted and understood by the organization.Visual management is a field of research that could contribute to change management research as a meansto facilitate management of the dynamics in a change process and to facilitate the process ofcommunication. The purpose of this paper is to problematize episodic change processes with regard tocommunication and to contribute with a proposed model on how to facilitate dynamic strategic changemanagement using visual management.Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses an interdisciplinary approach by linking changemanagement literature to visual communication to be used for visual management.Findings – A proposed model presents how a dynamic episodic change process can be managed in terms ofvisual management, potential pitfalls to avoid, and what ambidextrous capabilities are needed throughout thecomplete episodic change.Research limitations/implications – The proposed model is still yet theoretical, based on a literaturereview of dynamic change management and visual communication. Future research will validate the model inpractice to confirm its robustness.Practical implications – An implementation of visual management in Kotter’s (1995) eight steps on how tostrategically manage change in combination with theories on ambidexterity and episodic change is suggested.Originality/value – The paper contributes to how visual management can support change management bycombining visual communication and change management.Keywords Quality management, Change management, Strategic planning, Operations management,Visual management, Visual

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  • 27.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Dynamics of service attributes: a test of Kano’s theory of attractive quality2004In: Proceedings of, the QUIS-9 Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Exploring modes of service innovation in manufacturing firms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Manufacturing companies differentiating their offerings with new services need to combine both product and service innovation. We study how service development is influenced by the choice of (1) separation or integration of service development and (2) the modes of innovation. Our results show that service development often is more structured if services are developed separately. Furthermore, service innovations often follow a sequence of innovation modes different from those of product innovations. Since different innovation modes benefit from varying degree of structure in the development process, many companies find it hard to develop products and services within the same development project.

  • 29.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Principles for improvement of data quality in performance measurement systems2005In: Proceedings of, the 8th International Conference, Quality Management and Organizational Development (QMOD), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Strategies for emergent quality management2018In: Participatory Innovation Conference 2018 PIN-C 2018, 2018, p. 14-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores strategies for emergent quality improvement, which involve managing both efficiency and effectiveness, or the 'quality dilemma'. An empirical investigation is conducted with seventeen quality managers, representing organisations in ten private companies and one organisation in the public sector. The results indicate five distinct themes of importance to manage the quality dilemma: 1) leadership, 2) the quality organisation, 3) prioritisation, 4) knowledge and competence, and 5) the quality profession. While the dilemmas are categorised into five distinct and critical themes, the second part of the results present tactics regarding how to move positions towards emergent quality management: perspectives, processes, and decision support. The conclusions imply that the current method of organising quality improvement must be revised.

  • 31.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Using the Kano model and technology readiness index to better understand customer satisfaction with e-services2003In: Proceedings of, the 6th International Conference, Quality Management and Organizational Development (QMOD), Paris, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter E
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring the emergent quality management paradigm2018In: The Excellence summit Excellence sum, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter E.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring the emergent quality management paradigm2021In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 32, no 5-6, p. 476-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of successful production systems is affected by conflicting forces, that is, initiatives seemingly conducive for one line of work can be a constraint for another. Consequently, this paper presents an alternative perspective on how these issues could be managed in organisations. There are a number of key challenges in terms of the involved dichotomies for future innovative quality improvements in operations. These dichotomies are part of four interrelated processes that are the central elements of a production system. As such, aiming for stability or change is a production process dilemma in terms of the production and distribution of offerings and solutions. Control and creativity are the main dilemmas of the innovation process, that is, the creation and implementation of new offerings and solutions, while exploitation and exploration are the dilemmas of the knowledge creation process and efficiency and effectiveness of the value creation process. As the simultaneous existence of both parts of the dichotomy seems to be a paradox, this paper suggests the emergent quality management paradigm as an alternative perspective providing the guidance, examples, and practical solutions necessary to solve these dilemmas by recognising the dichotomies as mutually dependent.

  • 34.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bergman, B.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Elg, M.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The quality dilemma: Combining development and stability2017In: International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 9-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this chapter is to problematize the strategic management of both efficiency and effectiveness through quality management. First, the chapter describes five cases with lessons learned from the dichotomy of efficiency and effectiveness on how quality management could be turned into either a constructive or a destructive dilemma. Then, the history of the quality movement and how it has developed during the last century is discussed briefly. Quality management will be considered in relation to organization theory regarding exploration, exploitation, and dual organizational capabilities. Finally, the chapter concludes with proposals on ways forward for quality management as a strategy for both short-term efficiency and long-term effectiveness and survival. 

  • 35.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bergman, Bo
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Exploring the customer feedback process2002In: Proceedings of, the Multinational Alliance for the Advancement of Organizational Excellence (MAAOE), 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Bergman, Bo
    Chalmers.
    Exploring the customer feedback process2003In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bergquist, B.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, H.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gremyr, I.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Challenges and propositions for research in quality management2018In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 199, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From its inception, the field of quality management (QM) has been characterised by practice-driven development. Although QM has reached maturity as a field of research based on empirical enquiry, its practitioners still struggle to adapt QM implementations to reap their benefits. This study aims to identify their challenges to better understand how contemporary QM research addresses them. We propose approaches to bridge the potential relevance gaps between research and practice. A Delphi study of QM practitioners in Swedish private and public organisations, several of which operate globally, generated 49 challenges. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to cluster these challenges into themes, and the literature was reviewed to investigate how each theme has been addressed in QM research. The empirical investigation identified three themes related to future QM challenges—organisations’ adaptability to rapid changes in the business environment, quality as a strategic concern for business owners, and managerial ownership of quality. By analysing these challenges, six propositions for future research were proposed to reduce potential relevance gaps. Future research should focus on how to make QM a strategic concern for owners, and explore how it can contribute to organisational ambidexterity and adaptability. Research should also determine how context influences the way QM is applied, and investigate how it can improve organisational learning and innovation. Finally, research should indicate how top managers can adopt the responsibilities of quality managers, and explore the ways the principal values of QM can be better integrated into organisations.

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  • 38.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Alstom Power, Sweden.
    Use customer feedback to choose six sigma projects2003In: Six Sigma Forum Magazine, Vol. 3, p. 17-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Volvo Construction Equipment.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Continuous learning using dissatisfaction feedback in new product development contexts2010In: International journal of quality and reliability management, ISSN 0265-671X, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 860-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how various dissatisfaction feedback transferrals contribute to the decision-making process in product development contexts. Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents the results from a qualitative interview-based study of 16 product development organizations and their customer dissatisfaction feedback systems; 84 percent of the companies within a machine industry segment in Sweden are covered. Findings – Based on the empirical investigation, a taxonomy of five decisions based upon dissatisfaction feedback is developed: reactive, preventive and developmental decisions are connected with exploitation of products, while future developmental and future preventive decisions are connected with exploration of future products. Originality/value – The project is essentially managerial, aiming to provide managers and other decision makers with a framework that displays how various dissatisfaction feedback transferrals contribute to various decisions in product development contexts. The paper highlights that despite costly investigations in customer feedback systems, very few customer dissatisfaction feedback transferrals are connected to explorative future developmental actions.

  • 40.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Sweden.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Learning from the dissatisfied customer2004In: Proceedings of, the 7th International Conference, Quality Management and Organizational Development (QMOD), 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Elgh, M
    Linköping University.
    Exploring routes of dissatisfaction feedback: a multiple case study within a machine industry segment2006In: International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, E-ISSN 1758-6682, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 986-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swedish Inst Qual, SIQ, Drakegatan 6, SE-41250 Gothenburg.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Qual Management & Mech Engn, Ostersund, Sweden..
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    Lulea Univ Technol, Business Adm & Ind Engn, Lulea, Sweden..
    Quality 2030: quality management for the futureIn: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality management (QM) has shown an impressive ability to update and evolve. The purpose of this paper is to highlight themes that have been identified as vital and important for research projects within QM during the coming decade. The paper is also an attempt to initiate research for the emerging 2030 agenda for QM, here referred to as 'Quality 2030'. This article is based on extensive data gathered during a workshop process conducted in two main steps: (1) a collaborative brainstorming workshop with 22 researchers and practitioners (spring 2019) and (2) an appreciative inquiry summit with 20 researchers and practitioners (autumn 2019). The process produced five collectively elaborated and designed future research themes for QM: (a) systems perspectives applied, (b) stability in change, (c) models for smart self-organising, (d) integrating sustainable development, and (e) higher purpose as QM booster. The process also identified a positive core of QM, defined as core values and aspects in the field and practice that need to be preserved and nurtured in the future.

  • 43.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Using Kano’s theory of attractive quality to better understand customer experiences with e- services2003In: The Asian Journal on Quality, ISSN 1598-2688, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 32-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping Univeristy.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology.
    Service transition: Finding the right position on the goods-to-services continuum2012In: International Journal of Modelling in Operations Management, ISSN 2042-4094, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 69-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe and further develop existing models of service transition; that is, how companies position and move on the goods-to-services continuum. This study concludes that service transition can be profitable for manufacturing firms as long as they do not become stuck in a mismatch between their organisational arrangements and their offerings. The paper contributes by: providing an overview of companies’ positions on the goods-to-services continuum, introducing movements on the continuum, suggesting service development as a possible engine of renewal and providing empirical evidence on the relationship between positions on the continuum and profit margins.

  • 45.
    Gremyr, I.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg,.
    Witell, L.
    Karlstad University.
    Löfberg, N.
    Karlstad University.
    Edvardsson, B.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Understanding new service development and service innovation through innovation modes2014In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of innovation modes in understanding challenges of integrated NSD and NPD, and the use of structured NSD processes in manufacturing firms. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a two-stage multiple case study. The first stage is an interview study of 17 key informants representing manufacturing firms in the machine industry. The second stage is an in-depth study of three service innovations at three manufacturing firms based on 16 interviews with key informants. Findings: The results of the study show that NSD processes are often more structured if the service is developed separately from the product. The fact that different innovation modes benefit from varying degrees of structure in the development process means that integrated service development can be challenging. Furthermore, service innovations often follow a trajectory of innovation modes before succeeding in the market. Some innovation modes occur within the NSD process, while others occur outside the process. One success factor for NSD is the fit between the innovation modes and the NSD process, rather than the NSD process per se. Originality/value: This research uses innovation modes to explain why NSD in manufacturing firms is often performed on an ad hoc basis, and how service innovations go through a trajectory of innovation modes. In this way, the study contributes to theory development of service innovation, and specifically service innovations in manufacturing firms. 

  • 46.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stålberg, Lina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploration and Exploitation within Operations2015In: International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, E-ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 9, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploration and exploitation capabilities are both important within Operations as means for improvement when managed separately, and for establishing dynamic improvement capabilities when combined in balance. However, it is unclear what exploration and exploitation capabilities imply in improvement and development work within an Operations context. So, in order to better understand how to develop exploration and exploitation capabilities within Operations, the main characteristics of these constructs needs to be identified and further understood. Thus, the objective of this research is to increase the understanding about exploitation and exploration characteristics, to concretize what they translates to within the context of improvement and development work in an Operations unit, and to identify practical challenges. A literature review and a case study are presented. In the literature review, different interpretations of exploration and exploitation are portrayed, key characteristics have been identified, and a deepened understanding of exploration and exploitation characteristics is described. The case in the study is an Operations unit, and the aim is to explore to what extent and in what ways exploration and exploitation activities are part of the improvement structures and processes. The contribution includes an identification of key characteristics of exploitation and exploration, as well as an interpretation of the constructs. Further, some practical challenges are identified. For instance, exploration activities tend to be given low priority, both in daily work as in the manufacturing strategy. Also, the overall understanding about the concepts of exploitation and exploration (or any similar aspect of dynamic improvement capabilities) is very low.

  • 47.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    et al.
    EPSI Rating Grp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Decoding sustainable successIn: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of sustainable development has become widely accepted among nations, organisations and individuals (Ranangen, H., Coster, M., Isaksson, R., & Garvare, R. [(2018]. From global goals and planetary boundaries to public governance - -aA framework for prioritizing organizational sustainability activities. Sustainability, 10(8), 2741-2726. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082741). According to the Bruntland Commission, Sustainable Development is defined as a development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability for future generations to meet their needs (WCED. [1987]. Our common future: The Brundtland report. Oxford University Press). In this conceptual study, we outline a simplistic framework of aspects, variables, and relations constituting a workable definition of 'sustainable success' inspired by previous theoretical models. The aim is to contribute to a pragmatic clarification of how the concept of sustainable development could be more understandable, measurable, and manageable during global uncertainty and rapid change. A theoretical background is presented, followed by an overview of the method of investigation with a subsequent presentation of the results and a reasoning that frames the conceptual framework on critical constructs for measuring sustainable success based on stakeholder perceptions.

  • 48.
    Lager, Thomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ - The Swedish Institute for Quality, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deployment Of Innovation Methodologies As Supporting Instruments For The Product Innovation Process In The Process Industries2022In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, article id 2250057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous empirical research on the industrial use and usability of methodologies and tools for product innovation is often based on national samples, and generally focuses on a few select industry sectors and typically lacks a perspective on methodologies as supportive instruments for the product innovation work process. Moreover, even if some studies recognise the problems with low company methodology awareness and use, the underlying causes remain unexplained. In a survey mode of inquiry involving informants in 19 global manufacturing companies in six sectors of the process industries, this study explores use and usability of methodologies in the development of non-assembled products in the process industries. While the findings demonstrate a rather scarce use of innovation methodologies, when they are used case-company informants not only report a high degree of usability but also recommend that all introduced methodologies should be included in an enhanced product innovation work process. The discussion advocates that an overarching strategy for methodology use should be institutionalised by company R&D management, including a "methodology tool-box"of select methodologies, and further facilitated by trained methodology experts as "ambassadors".

  • 49.
    Lager, Thomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    The Swedish Institute for Quality, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Innovation methodologies and Design Thinking as supporting instruments in the development of non-assembled products2023In: Journal of Business Chemistry, ISSN 1613-9615, E-ISSN 1613-9623, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 9-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a review and theoretical analysis, Quality Function Deployment, Design Thinking and complementary methodologies have been assessed as supporting instruments in the development of non-assembled products. The findings demonstrate that QFD and DT characteristics substantially differ and that DT lacks many aspects of importance for process-industrial application. However, the results show that the methodologies are complementary in use; thus, an indepth knowledge of both methodologies could create a company competitive advantage in product innovation. Companies in the process industries are thus advised to use the results as a guiding framework for methodology selection and use in the different parts of the product innovation work process.

  • 50.
    Nilsson-Witell, L
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Fundin, Anders
    Chalmers.
    Dynamics of service attributes: a test of Kano’s theory of attractive quality2005In: International Journal of Service Industry Management, ISSN 0956-4233, E-ISSN 1758-6704, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 152-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of the paper is to contribute to a better understanding of the theory of attractive quality through an empirical investigation of an e-service. Our focus is on the consistency of different levels of service attributes and their dynamics. Our empirical investigation aims to increase both the validity of the theory of attractive quality and the use of technology readiness as a means to understand the variation of customer perceptions of service attributes. Design/methodology/approach - A survey of customers' technology readiness, usage and perceptions of an e-service was conducted. Four propositions concerning the consistency and dynamics of Kano's theory of attractive quality are tested, mainly using general linear models. Findings - Our results show that by investigating customers at different stages of the service adoption curve, a better understanding of certain dynamics of service attributes can be achieved. When the e-service was introduced, it was perceived as indifferent; at present it is seen as an attractive service by the market. But the early adopters of e-services already regard it as a one-dimensional or a must-be service. Originality/value - The study provides a new framework and methodology for how to investigate the dynamics of service attributes, not only between individuals within different market segments, but also at different service attribute levels. From a managerial standpoint, our results suggest consequential insight about the life cycle of the services that an organization provides to its customers.

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