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  • 1.
    Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Landström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 4.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Höckerdal, Karin
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green Performance Map: Handbok2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 6.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing location decision: a case study on process and criteria2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the production location decision: A case study on process and criteria2014In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 74-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the process and criteria used in production location decisions, based on a literature overview and a case study in a Swedish manufacturing company with a global production network. The data collection comprised interviews with top management and project management as well as a document analysis. The findings indicate that the production location decision process is facilitated by following a stepwise process with an initial strategic analysis with a broad scope including also the selection of the future production system concept.

  • 8.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    In search for improved decision making on manufacturing footprint: A conceptual model for information handling2011In: Proceedings of the 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, Lund, 2011, p. 63-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The footprint strategy of a manufacturing company is frequently highlighted as a key aspect to the company's competitive advantage. However, research concerning international location decisions is limited. A comprehensive strategy has to function in a world with limited resources and continuous change of values. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of the process for efficient production localisation decisions by integrating aspects influencing the design of the manufacturing footprint. Research on drivers for location of manufacturing emphasise input factors, market factors and technological knowhow as key factors. Looking at the entire industrial system, earlier research also illustrates the broad range of roles for the manufacturing plant within a company's industrial system. Based upon this discussion of the motive for manufacturing location and the strategic role of the manufacturing plant, a conceptual model is introduced emphasising different levels that should be considered during the process of preparing a localisation decision. It serves as a base for more detailed studies on specific aspects, models and factors for manufacturing footprint analysis.

  • 9.
    Denzler, Patrick
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Maximising Product Possibilities while Minimising Process Change: A Case of Introducing Light Weight Material in Automotive Manufacturing2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, Vol. 50, p. 270-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies are challenged to achieve maximised benefits in time, money and novelty when introducing new products or technologies into their existing manufacturing systems. This paper set the focus on the introduction of new materials into existing products and if the adverse effects on manufacturing will outweigh the benefits. An automotive case was studied where discrete event simulation was used as tool to evaluate process consequences when introducing new material and process technologies into the production system. The question concerned if discrete event simulation can verify production system capabilities even in early conceptual design stages. The case analysis is concluded by three challenge areas concerning early stages of production system design. The difficulties of evaluating operational key performance indicators early in design processes become evident and needed future research efforts within the area are pointed out. © 2016 The Authors.

  • 10.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Internal Materials Handling in a Lean Manufacturing Environment: Challenges and a Design Process from an Industrial Perspective2009In: Proceedings of The International 3'rd Swedish Production Symposium, SPS '09, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Farnoush, Alireza
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    POLCA and CONWIP performance in a divergent production line: An automotive case study2013In: Journal of Management Control, ISSN 2191-4761, E-ISSN 2191-477X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 159-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production control mechanisms have been broadly investigated by researchers, where each type of production control mechanism has different performance depending on the situation. However, the situation with high variety products in a divergent production line has been rarely studied. This paper presents a study on the applicability of four different production control mechanism; three different variants of POLCA as well as one type of CONWIP control in an automotive production company with high variety of products and divergent line. ExtendSim simulation software has been used for discrete event simulation in order to analyse the production line and compare strategies. The main criteria for comparing the performance were throughput, shop floor throughput time and level of work in process (WIP). The study shows that m-CONWIP (as a variant of CONWIP) is recommended in this situation, as it leads to more reduction in WIP amount and throughput time, while throughput value does not drop.

  • 12. Farnoush, Alireza
    et al.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Production control mechanisms and POLCA performance in a divergent production line2012In: Journal of Production Research & Management., ISSN 2249-4766, Vol. 2, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production control mechanism is a critical element in today’s production situation, where production systems compete on quick response and resource efficiency. The purpose of a production control mechanism is to define the best time to release material and orders. POLCA as a simple production control mechanism that in one hand tries to reduce throughput time and on the other hand helps manager to control work-in-process inventory. In addition to reviewing the history of the production control mechanism and looking into some of them, the paper classify production control mechanisms in different categories and studies more specifically a POLCA system performance in a divergent production line situation with long changeover time in the supplier cell (the shared cell which has to supply different routes). It is concluded that the best form of POLCA in a divergent production line is to push material in the first stage without any limit and then control and limit it in the second stage.

  • 13. Farnoush, Alireza
    et al.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production control mechanisms in a convergent production line2013In: Hamburg International Conference of Logistics 2013, Lohmar , 2013, p. 319-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the critical elements that managers face in manufacturing companies is to find an appropriate Production Control Mechanism (PCM) for their shop floor. There are many different PCMs and each of them has different performance depending on the situation. A convergent production line is a situation that rarely has been studied from this perspective. This study compares three kind of PCM that are identified as suitable for such a complex production line: POLCA, CONWIP and m-CONWIP. Extendsim simulation software was employed for discrete event simulation in order to compare performance of the considered PCMs in a convergent production line producing one type of product. The results indicate that the studied PCMs show distinct different performance in the various configurations of the convergent production line. The simulation shows (a bit surprisingly) that POLCA has the best performance in the considered situation and m-CONWIP has the worst performance. However, in an even more complex situation with more product types, the performance of POLCA would be under question. The study complements previous studies on PCM applicability and configuration, and has a strong industrial implication for the increased emphasis on decision support for operations management in a resource efficient production setting.

  • 14.
    Flores Garcia, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards a Reduction of Uncertainty in Production System Design Decisions2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tenet of production system design is to increase a manufacturing company’s competitiveness by introducing novel processes, technologies, and products. However, uncertainties exist regarding the actual benefits that can be attained when novelty and change are introduced into a production system. Addressing this issue, this paper explores how manufacturing companies can reduce uncertainties that challenge production system design decisions when significant changes are introduced into the production system. A real-time case study at a Swedish manufacturing company that decided to change its existing product specific assembly system to a multi-product assembly one was performed. Empirical results identify uncertainties challenging production system design configuration, and the activities targeting reduction of uncertainty. To extend current theory, empirical case study data is synthesized with current findings in production system design decisions, and uncertainty reduction in product design decisions. The paper concludes that information acquisition, uncertainty prioritization, project member background, and complexity of change influence uncertainty reduction in production system design decisions. Managerial implications highlight the importance of information acquisition and a structured approach when reducing uncertainties necessary to achieve an efficient and effective production system design. Thus, academic approaches to uncertainty reduction could benefit manufacturing practice.

  • 15.
    Flores Garcia, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Volvo construction equipment, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A Virtual Verification Approach Towards Evaluating a Multi-Product Assembly Systems2014In: Swedish Production Symposium 2014 SPS 2014, Göteborg, Sweden, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing operational complexity and higher variety of products require flexibility in assembly. Despite its many benefits flexibility is a complex concept that requires evaluation to harness its full potential. This study uses virtual verification tools as enablers of the decision making process for production system design of a flexible multi-product assembly system. A case study approach analyses a flexible assembly concept for the earth moving equipment industry through a visual and a discrete event simulation model. The paper also discusses the challenges faced by virtual verification tools when applied to the evaluation of flexible assembly systems.

  • 16.
    Flores Garcia, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Simulation in the Production System Design Process of Assembly Systems2015In: Winter Simulation Conference 2015 WSC15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective production systems are necessary for companies to achieve competitiveness in manufacturing, and the production system design process is fundamental to meet this goal. Discrete event simulation is a tool that can support the production system design process. However, few empirical studies have shown the use of this tool prior to the verification of an already chosen alternative, or an implemented production system solution. There is a need to explore how discrete event simulation can be used in the production system design process. A case study at a global manufacturing company, that used this tool in the design of its assembly system, is presented. The results of this study show where and for what purpose were the DES models used for in the production system design process. This study concludes that DES can support this activity and suggestions for future research are made.

  • 17.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    What guides information consensus? Approaching the reduction of equivocality in process innovationsIn: International Journal of Manufacturing Research IJMR, ISSN 1750-0591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the achievement of information consensus and the reduction of equivocality in process innovations. Drawing on the operations management literature, a new framework to guide information consensus in the reduction of equivocality in process innovations is proposed. The analysis is based on a real-time case study in the heavy vehicle industry. The results show that information consensus is not achieved by a single event, but active work towards this goal is necessary, and a clear set of pre-requisites is needed for achieving information consensus. The concepts of strategic objective, decision areas, and external and internal fit are identified as pre-requisites for achieving information consensus about the purpose, characteristics, and functionalities of process innovations.

  • 18.
    Flores-García, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. KTH, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Revisiting challenges in using Discrete Event Simulation in early stages of Production System Design2018In: International conference of advances in production management systems APMS, Springer, 2018, Vol. 535, p. 534-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents challenges of using discrete event simulation when supporting decision in early stages of production system design, when significant changes are introduced. It was based on three real-time case studies performed at one manufacturing company during 2014-2016. Challenges in the cases were mapped to previous literature, pointing out discrepancies and highlighting three additional challenges, specifically related to issues in the early stages of the pro-duction system design process. The significant change introduced to the assembly system, and the early phases of evaluation put significant challenges to the use of discrete event simulation and the study points out further efforts needed to support manufacturing companies under change, with an established industrial structure and legacy systems to consider.

  • 19.
    Grahn, Sten
    et al.
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Friedler, Niklas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Defining 'benefit' when making production investments - an inquiry of current standards2014In: Swedish Production Symposium 2014 SPS 2014, Göteborg, Sweden, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in production equipment are made to generate desired production benefit. This work examines how benefit generally is defined and to what extent the benefit is well defined when equipment investments are made. The study revealed that benefit from investments often is unclearly or inconsistently defined, with a narrow system view and often has a weak correlation with benefit for a production system with broader boundaries. This could hamper the possibility to capitalize on industrial trends that indicate a shift in focus, from products, to the benefit utilization of the products can deliver.

  • 20.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Hällkvist, Annica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Realizing a Factory-in-a-Box Solution in a Local Manufacturing Environment2009In: 42nd CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Grenoble, France, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting customer demands require manufacturing systems with a high degree of flexibility in the same time as the use of automation is becoming critical for competition. This is challenging, especially for SMEs with their inferior economical and competence conditions. This paper presents a new set up where the Factory-in-a-Box concept has been realized for a small manufacturing company with a profile of craftsmanship and small volumes. The objective of this paper is to discuss the possibility for SMEs to use automation and the Factory-in-a-box-concept to stay competitive and also the Factory-in-a-Box concept as means for realizing a Product-Service System.

  • 21.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Friedler, Niklas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Grahn, Sten
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lean Automationsutveckling - Handbok2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Trender mot mer automatiserad produktion och allt snabbare förändringstakt av produktionssystem ställer krav på snabba, effektiva och verksamhetsanpassade utvecklingsprocesser av automationslösningar. Denna handbok beskriver centrala delar i en automationsstrategi, som stöd för utveckling av automationslösningar till produktionssystem. Den är relevant för alla typer av tillverkande verksamheter och leverantörer som vill effektivisera anskaffandet och införandet av ny automationsteknik. Handboken beskriver en automationsstrategi uppdelad i fyra huvudområden: Del 1 – Ekonomi Del 2 – Organisation Del 3 – Process Del 4 – Teknik Stort fokus ligger på att engagera olika kompetenser och aktörer, liksom att betrakta automationsstrategin som en del av en helhet tillsammans med övriga delar i och utanför verksamheten. Automationsstrategin lyfter vilka faktorer inom de olika huvudområdena som påverkar vid utveckling av automationslösningar. Den gör det möjligt att analysera vilken affärsmodell som passar verksamhetens förutsättningar bäst och vilka organisatoriska strukturer som är viktiga för verksamhetens automationskompetens. Den innehåller också en stegmall för effektiv anskaffning av automationsutrustning och tre viktiga kategorier av teknik som kan stötta utvecklingsprocessen. Handboken har tagits fram i projektet lean automationsutveckling, eller LEAD, som har finansierats av Vinnovas program FFI Hållbar produktion under 2013-2015. Grundidén var att underlätta både planering, utveckling och anskaffning av automationslösningar genom att förse de utvecklingsprocesser som idag är etablerade med verktyg från lean produktutveckling. På så vis säkerställs att verksamheter kan dra nytta av ny automationsteknik med så effektivt utnyttjande av resurser, hög hållbarhet och hög lönsamhet som möjligt.

  • 22.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Automation in internal logistics: strategic and operational challenges2014In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, E-ISSN 1742-7975, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 538-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automation in internal logistics is an enabler to increase overall competitiveness in an organisation. However, its use is currently limited. The main objective of this paper is to highlight the existing strategic and operational challenges to using and developing automation in internal logistics. A three-phased empirical study has been conducted, including case studies and a survey. The findings reveal a lack of responsibility for, and insight in current state of logistics operations as well as a lack of vision and strategy giving directions for desired future state of operations. In addition, the actual automation projects are hindered by poorly defined and supported processes. It is concluded that functional strategies for internal logistics and automation can give the support needed along with process models for automation projects. The content and application of these strategies and models are suggested. 

  • 23.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Automation in Healthcare Internal Logistics: A Case Study on Practice and Potential2013In: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current demographic development puts even greater demands on the healthcare sector which already struggle with scarce resources and constant pressure of cost reductions. This paper aims at through a multiple case study describe how automation of hospital internal logistics can be a tool in improving the efficiency. The results include several potential implementations for patient transports, waste handling and small goods transports. However, organizational issues as lack of ownership and a strategic view render difficulties and needs to be dealt with. The authors conclude that transfer of knowledge and technology used in manufacturing industry would be beneficial. 

  • 24.
    Hanson, Lars
    et al.
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Ore, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Virtual Verification of Human-Industrial robot Collaboration in Truck Tyre Assembly2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-industrial robot collaboration has been introduced as the ultimate combination for industry. The endurance and strength of a robot is combined with a human’s flexibility, precision and quality skills. One challenge in the implementation of human-industrial robot collaboration is to create a safe working station for the operators, therefore most of the research focuses on these safety aspects. Industrial designers and engineers verify and optimise workstations in different simulation and visualisation tools in order to improve competitiveness, reduce late changes and reduce cost. Several robot tools and digital human modelling tools are available, but there are no or few simulation and visualisation tools that include both humans and robots. The aim of the proposed paper is to illustrate how unique software can be used to verify human-industrial robot collaboration. This software is a combination of the robot simulation tool IPS and the digital human modelling tool IMMA. The software demonstration is promising, covering the gap between digital human modelling tools and robot simulation tools. The simulation and visualisation tools generate pictures and animations, as well as quantified numbers to aid well-founded decision-making. The demonstration software was used to analyse a truck tyre assembly station. Fully manual, fully automated and human-industrial robot collaboration were compared.

    Practitioner Summary: The presented paper illustrates simulation and visualisation software for the virtual verification of Human - Industrial Robot collaboration. The software demonstration is a combination of the robot simulation tool IPS and the digital human modelling tool IMMA. The software demonstration is promising, covering the gap between digital human modelling tools and robot simulation tools.

    Keywords: ergonomics, digital human modelling, robot simulation, simulation and visualisation

  • 25.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Factory-in-a-box - Demonstrating the next generation manufacturing provider2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda and Fumihiko Kimura, Springer London, 2008, p. 341-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Meeting customer demands require manufacturing systems with a high degree of flexibility, low-cost/low-volume manufacturing skills, as well as short delivery times. On top of these challenges, there is a gigantic need within industry for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO(2) emissions globally. In this challenging environment there is a need to identify and develop new and improved manufacturing capabilities within the manufacturing industry. The Factory-in-a-Box concept consists of standardized production modules that are e.g. installed in a container and transported by truck or by train. The concept has been developed, exemplified and realized in five industrial demonstrators developed by researchers together with competitive manufacturing companies in Sweden such as ABB Robotics, Bombardier and Pharmadule. The objective of this paper is to discuss the possibility of realizing a Product Service System (PSS) using the results from the Factory-in-a-Box project.

  • 26.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ekman, Sten
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wikström, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Innovation and Design Inspired Product Realization2009In: DS 58-3: Proceedings of ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, Stanford, 2009, p. 263-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Long term growth and future jobs in society rely on that industry is able to realize new sustainable product ideas and develop these to profitable products in the market. This encompasses both short time-to-market and continuous development and adaption of existing products and processes to improve productivity. Innovative skills are required in both product/service development and in product/service introduction. Thus, there is a need for new innovative methods and models that supports and strengthens industry in generating new ideas and realizing these into successful products and improved processes. This paper discusses and compares engineering design, innovation, and design. The paper argues that there is a need to integrate the disciplines and work practices of innovation and design in the engineering design field and to build multi-disciplinary environments to be successful in research, education and in industry. A conceptual framework for innovation and design inspired product realization is presented in the paper. 

  • 27.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Ekman, Sten
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Innovation Advising in practice: Four cases where the RAFT model has been used in environmental innovations, and how twenty-one STPs offers Innovation Advising.2010In: XXVII IASP World Conference on Science and Technology Parks, 2010, Daejeon Convention Center, Korea, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science and Technology Park's (STP) often offers business incubators to Idea owners where they can develop ideas into companies. The scope of this paper is a study in how the RAFT-model, a “How to”-model based innovation process, affected four Idea owners with environmental innovations in different business areas. This paper also shows how twenty-one Swedish STPs offer Innovation Advice (IA) to Idea owners and think of IA as a competitive offer. All Idea owners found the RAFT-model useful and consider using the RAFT-model again. Two ideas were still in a developing progress and the other two were shut down. Five of the STPs thought IA as a competitive offer to Idea owners, the others found IA proper to be offered by other organizations. Conclusions from this study are that the RAFT-model was appropriate to environmental innovations and STPs found IA valuable for Idea owners but not as a competitive motive.

  • 28.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Volvo Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Waste flow mapping to improve sustainability of waste management: A case study approach2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative, resource-efficient solutions and effective waste management systems capture value in business and contribute to sustainability. However, due to scattered waste management responsibilities in the vehicle industry and the orientation of operations management and lean tools, which mostly focus on lead-time and labour-time improvements, the requirement of a collaborative method to include material waste efficiency in operational development is identified. The main purpose of this research is to study how operations management and environmental management can be integrated on an operational level and include the waste management supply chain. Based on a literature review of environmental and operational improvement tools and principles, the gaps and needs in current practice were identified. A large case study implementing a waste flow mapping (WFM) method on a set of manufacturing sites revealed potentials in terms of reducing material losses and inefficiencies in the handling of materials and waste. Finally, the integrated WFM method was analysed with respect to the gaps and needs identified in the existing body of tools for operational and environmental improvement. The method combines lean manufacturing tools, such as value stream mapping with cleaner production and material flow cost accounting strategies. The empirical data showed that the WFM method is adequate for current state analysis of waste material efficiency potentials, especially when multiple organisations are involved. However, further development and specific methods are needed such as, for example, logistics inefficiencies, root cause analysis, implementation guidelines for best practice and systems for performance monitoring of actors.

  • 29.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Amprazis, Pernilla
    Waste flow mapping: Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Sjögren, P.
    ABB Offshore Wind Connections, Gårdatorget 1, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Widfeldt, M.
    Swerea IVF, Box 104, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production System Change Strategy in Lightweight Manufacturing2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 160-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two change management strategies: a minimum change, exploitation strategy (kaizen) and a maximum output, exploration strategy (kaikaku) have been applied in a manufacturing case study. Value stream mapping and discrete event simulation were used to analyse the production system changes, with regards to robustness and total lead-time, to increase knowledge of how to choose change management strategy. The results point out that available time is crucial. It is important to consider not only product specification and return of investment, but also the change and risk management. Future research should develop engineering change management further.

  • 31.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Environmental Consultants,.
    Bengtsson, Catarina
    Volvo Group, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Waste Flow Mapping: Improve sustainability and realize waste management values2012In: Greening of Industry Network (GIN2012), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient Waste Management System creates increased business value contributing to manufacturing industry sustainability and realizes economic opportunities. Previous studies have shown the economic potential of improving material efficiency by climbing the waste hierarchy and turning waste liabilities into assets. World economic forum also identifies innovation for resource efficient solutions and business models as the most strategic option to capture value in industry. The main responsibility for waste lies with the operations owner but since waste management usually is operated by other functions or companies, supportive methods to include material waste in operational development are needed. The main purpose of the research has therefore been to develop a method framework for identifying and analysing potentials for waste management in manufacturing industry, including residual material values of metals, combustible and inert waste, process fluids and other hazardous waste. Case studies were conducted to find economically competitive environmental improvements on team, site and multisite level and to define suitable performance indicators for continuous improvements. A novel approach: waste flow mapping (WFM), combining Value Stream Mapping (VSM), Eco mapping and a waste composition analysis with basic lean principles is used. The material’s value flow and the information flow is analysed in a VSM. Eco-mapping is used to give a graphical structure for the analysis of labour and equipment, with subsequent costs. Finally the waste hierarchy and composition analysis is used to imply the potential for business improvements and best practice examples are used. The developed method reveals the potential in an easy way and support integration of waste management in operations and continuous improvement work.

    Empirical data from a full scale multi-site study of waste management of material residuals at a global manufacturing company’s operations in Sweden are used to exemplify that with the WFM approach the mapping can be done in an efficient and consistent manner, revealing value losses and improvement potentials. Fraction definitions and operational practice standards were essential to realise cost efficiency and reach a more sustainable footprint. Comparisons between sites show that with simple actions, substantial improvements in recycling efficiency can be made, leading to proposed performance indicators and highlighting the need for established standardized implementation solutions. The results further point out the importance of avoiding mixing material with lower quality grade of that material. The experiences prove that Waste Flow Mapping is a suitable method to efficiently identify sustainability improvement potentials.

  • 32.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green performance map: visualizing environmental KPI’s2013In: EurOMA conference: At the Heart of Recovery, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyse the current practice in environmental key performance indicator (KPI) allocation and presents an industrially applicable tool, focusing on the link between KPIs and environmental sustainability. The empirical base for the paper is a study of operational KPIs and environmental performance control within two Swedish manufacturing companies, on corporate, plant, and workstation level. It is concluded that the presented Green Performance Map gives managers, environmental specialists and improvement teams a common but comprehensive view of the manufacturing’s environmental performance and a method to collect, visualize and prioritize improvement efforts.

  • 33.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Lean and green integration into production system models – experiences from Swedish industry2014In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 85, p. 180-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on integration of operations management, specifically production system models with environmental management and related issues such as quality and safety. Based on knowledge concerning lean-based improvement programmes for company-specific production systems (XPS) and integration between formal management systems, such as ISO 9001 and 14001, industrial practices from integrating management systems with the XPS were studied. A literature-based comparison between formal management systems and XPS is made, indicating integration potentials. The empirical research is an analysis of five vehicle and automotive companies in which various efforts have been made to integrate their management systems with their XPS. The results show that although conscious steps have been taken since the introduction of ISO 14001 in integrating environmental management into everyday operations, there are still obstacles to overcome. To fully include sustainability aspects, the characteristics of the improvement systems have to be adapted and extended. One barrier to extended integration is the lack of integration strategy. There is further a lack of sustainability metrics and adaptation of improvement methods to push companies' operational performance. In addition, organisational issues still arise concerning the responsibility and ownership of environmental management in relation to operations. Based on these results it is concluded that processes for integration are recommended; however, each organisation needs to consider its operations, corporate culture and business opportunities of its environmental management. Still, incorporating environmental management systems into XPS is seen as an effective way of establishing company commonality in continuous improvement, resulting in holistic understanding and improved organisation performance.

  • 34.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Lean and Green integration into production system models – Experiences from Swedish industry2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Landström, A.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Winroth, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Andersson, C.
    Lund University.
    Öberg, A.E.
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Arvika.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Shahbazi, S.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, C.
    Lund University.
    Zackrisson, M.
    Swerea IVF AB, Mölndal.
    A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 126-133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtually every company has implemented a Business Performance Measurement System (BPMS) with the purpose of monitoring production and business performance and to execute the corporate strategy at all levels in a company. The purpose of this article is to shed light on common pitfalls related to the practical use of BPMS and further to present a life cycle model with the purpose of introducing structured approach to avoiding the pitfalls. The article contributes to further development of the BPMS life cycle concept and practical examples of how it can be used.

  • 36.
    Landström, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology , Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF AB , Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB , Sweden.
    Myrelid, Andreas
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB , Sweden.
    Present state analysis of business performance measurement systems in large manufacturing companies2016In: PMA Conference 2016 PMA2016, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to empirically investigate the present state of the performance measurement systems (PMS) at 7 sites of 6 different large Swedish manufacturing companies. The methodology has both a bottom-up and a top-down perspective. Important findings are that the PMSs are very similar in how they function but differ a lot in what is measured.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Örjan
    et al.
    Blue Institute, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Cedergren, Stefan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. (SICS Swedish ICT), Sweden.
    The Third Wave of Automation: Critical Factors for Industrial Digitization2014In: Swedish Production Symposium 2014 SPS 2014, Göteborg, Sweden, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of industrial automation is shifting into a third wave of automation based on extreme information availability, cyber-physical systems and data analytics. This paper present critical factors and way forward for the development of the Swedish industrial automation sector, both users and suppliers. Based on literature and practice studies, and a survey including some 40 respondents, ten factors for realising the third wave of automation was identified with four key factors: Technology, Processes, Business models and Competence. Finally, initial steps on a way forward are proposed for the development of Swedish automation industry and research.

  • 38.
    Marcus, Bjelkemyr
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sasha, Shahbazi
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    C., Jönsson
    Swerea IVF, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnus, Wiktorsson
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Individuals’ perception of which materials are most important to recycle2015In: ADVANCES IN PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS: INNOVATIVE PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE GROWTH (AMPS 2015), PT I, 2015, Vol. 459, p. 723-729Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have asked respondents to rank ten different waste fractions that are both common in manufacturing industry and easily recognizable. The purpose of the study has been to clarify to what extent individuals are able to identify the waste fractions that are most important to recycle from an environmental perspective. The individuals’ perception has then been correlated with a life cycle assessment of the ten materials. In addition, the respondents were also asked to rank the fractions according to cost. The results show that metals are consistently considered most important to recycle, and plastics are commonly among the top five amongst the ten waste fractions together with glass. The cellulose based fractions, cotton, and compost are commonly rated low. In addition, there is a perceived correlation between the environmental and economic impact.

  • 39.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ensuring manufacturability in early stages of new product development: a study of two practices2017In: 24th EurOMA conference EurOMA17, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates upon how early manufacturing involvement in new product development (NPD) can be realised to safeguard that manufacturing system requirements are communicated to product development teams. Two industrial practices have been studied in companies within the automotive sector. The forms of manufacturing involvement are presented for the two NPD cases during early phases of concept and product development (when the design has a considerable impact on production). Forms of involvement are separated according to the areas of process, organisation and mechanisms. The results can provide insight to manufacturing about how to proactively participate in NPD activities.

  • 40.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Manufacturing Involvement in New Product Development: An Explorative Case Study in Heavy Automotive Component Assembly2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 65-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clear and well-defined new product development (NPD) process, cross-functional development teams and project fit with manufacturing resources and skills, are three areas critical to achieve lower cost, high quality and short time to market in NPD. However it is not clear who from manufacturing function should be involved and in which phase during the NPD project. In order to address this issue, the purpose of this paper is to identify how and when manufacturing functions such as engineers and operators are involved in a NPD project. Results from a conducted case study in heavy automotive component assembly show that manufacturing engineers have been more actively involved compared to manufacturing operators during the early phases of the studies NPD. It confirms earlier results that it is not easy to involve operators in the early phases of project due to abstraction and ambiguity associated with early design.

  • 41.
    Nafisi, Mariam
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Manufacturing Engineering Requirements in the Early Stages of New Product Development: A Case Study in Two Assembly Plants2018In: Advanced Applications in Manufacturing Engineering, Elsevier, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Netz, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Enabling effective Production System Redesign – complementing Investment and Design processes2009In: Swedish Production Symposium 2009, Goteborg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Norouzilame, Farhad
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Grönberg, F.
    LEAX Group Sweden, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    AN INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVE ON FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING: A FRAMEWORK FOR NEEDS AND ENABLERS2013In: International Conference on Production Research, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexibility of manufacturing systems, as a key factor of survival in the market, is regarded as the ability of handling changes in variants and volume governed by different capabilities depending on system level and manufacturing process. Research on flexibility has been of interest over years, resulting in a vast field of organizational, technical, and process-based enablers. The practical review in terms of needs, enablers and implementations of changeable production systems is however scarce. The objective of this paper is to present an initial review of industrial practice regarding flexibility in manufacturing systems, based on the current frame of reference and empirical study of two manufacturing companies in Sweden which helps industrial companies to identify their flexibility needs and the required enablers to achieve them.

  • 44.
    Norouzilame, Farhad
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. LEAX Group, Köping, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Coordination practices within international manufacturing networks: A comparative study of three industrial practices2018In: American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, ISSN 2164-5167, E-ISSN 2164-5175, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1603-1623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The globalisation of manufacturing activities has led to the emergence of internationally dispersed manufacturing plants. Coordination of such networks is a complex task and entails several management challenges. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding regarding the coordination issues and how they could be managed in IMN environment. Using a multiple case study approach, data from three multi–plant manufacturing businesses were collected and analysed. The results include discussions on coordination aspects such as autonomy and mechanisms to conduct coordination. Furthermore, a model for assigning autonomy level to the plant in an IMN is suggested as well as mechanisms to conduct the coordination work.

  • 45.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Delfs, Niclas
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human Industrial Robot Collaboration – development and application of simulation software2015In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5557, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 164-185Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human industrial robot collaboration (HIRC) aims to combine the benefits of industrial robots with humans in production environments. This is a growing research field where most work focuses on the safety aspects, while little research is performed on simulation and visualisation. The aim of this paper is to present a demonstrator software for simulation, visualisation and evaluation of human industrial robot collaboration.

    Two simulation software products were combined to reach this goal. The new tool was then applied to two industrial assembly cases where productivity and biomechanical loads on humans were calculated. The resulting demonstrator software simulates and visualises human industrial robot collaboration. The quantitative output from the simulation makes it possible to compare HIRC, manual and robotic assembly stations in terms of productivity and ergonomics.

  • 46.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Delfs, Niclas
    Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Virtual evaluation of industrial human-robot cooperation: An automotive case study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industries in the developed countries face challenges in terms of increased competition that puts demands on productivity, and a demographic change leading to an older population. One way of managing these challenges is through closer cooperation between human operators and robots. The robots can perform heavy, repetitive and hazardous tasks in a workstation, while the human operator does the more complex and flexible operations.

    Most industrial human-robot interaction research focuses on the safety aspects, often performed and presented in the form of physical demonstrators, while little research is made on virtual simulations. Several simulation and visualisation tools for robot evaluation exist, as well as tools for digital human modelling. However, few tools can be found that virtually combines human and robot.

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to narrowing that gap by presenting a method for virtual evaluation and optimisation of industrial human-robot cooperation. The new software demonstrator developed for this is based on the DHM tool IMMA. The presented method was implemented in a truck industry case comparing three assembly scenarios; fully manual, fully robotised or human-robot cooperation assembly. The method considers three dimensions which are compared and optimised for the human and robot; reach, operation time and biomechanical load.

    The software demonstrator presents a virtual simulation of industrial human-robot cooperation. The result from this simulation can be used to find the optimal ergonomic manufacturing system based on biomechanical loads as well as finding the system with shortest operation time. The specific industrial case verifies the statement that a human-robot collaborative assembly system gives a less physically demanding workstation compared to a manual system, and thus is better adapted to an elderly workforce. This is achieved at the same time as the operation time decreases and productivity increases, which is necessary to meet the global competition. There are though safety issues to be solved and safety standards to be changed before these benefits can be applied in practise in industry. However, the software can be used to analyse different kind of human-robot interactions that are less cooperative and can be implemented within current regulations.

  • 47.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Automation constraints in human–industrial robot collaborative workstation design2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human–industrial robot collaboration (HIRC) aims to combine desired characteristics of humans and industrial robots – the flexibility, intelligence and tactile sense of humans, and the strength, repeatability and accuracy of robots. A newly developed demonstration software enables simulation, design, verification, optimisation and visualisation of HIRC workstations. Two parameters, operation time and biomechanical load, are measured as quantitative outputs. These parameters favour fully automatic workstations since industrial robots move faster than humans without biomechanical restrictions. However, there exist limitations in the automation possibilities in workstation design. The aim of this paper is to define automation constraints and include them in the task allocation process of HIRC workstations. This will give a more accurate process in task allocation between humans and industrial robots in a HIRC workstation design problem. Three previously performed simulations of industrial HIRC cases from a heavy vehicle manufacturer are used as a basis in order to identify automation constraints in the task allocation process. Four criteria that limit automation possibilities are identified, human cooperation, dual operation, manual quality control and inaccurate positioning of objects. These constraints are included in the work method of task allocations in HIRC workstation design.

  • 48.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Implementing Virtual Assembly and Disassembly into the Product Development Process2013In: Enabling Manufacturing Competitiveness and Economic Sustainability: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production (CARV 2013), Munich, Germany, October 6th-9th, 2013, Springer International Publishing , 2013, p. 111-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual assembly and disassembly (VA&D) usage enables knowledge exchange between design department and assembly production and aftermarket in the product development (PD) process. Utilisation of VA&D tools must be connected to the PD process in robust methods to fully employ this potential. A case study was performed at a manufacturing company to identify virtual activities and their position in the PD process. Assembly production and aftermarket departments have common demands on the utilisation of the VA&D tools in the PD process. Milestones that demands VA&D simulations shall be included in both concept phase and development phase in the PD process.

  • 49.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Global Industrial Development, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hansson, L.
    Scania CV AB, Global Industrial Development, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Method for Design of Human-industrial Robot Collaboration Workstations2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to fully utilise a 3D simulation software capable of evaluating hand-guided human-industrial robot collaborative (HIRC) work tasks, there is a need of a HIRC design process for early production development stages. This paper proposes a HIRC design method that uses the possibilities of the demonstrator software in the HIRC workstation design process. The method is based on Pahl and Beitz's engineering design method; it interprets all their phases and activities into HIRC design-specific ones.

  • 50.
    Ore, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Reddy Vemula, Bhanoday
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hanson, Lars
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human - Industrial Robot Collaboration: Application of Simulation Software for Workstation Optimisation2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 89
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