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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Västerås, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Analysis of Breakdown Reports Using Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning2022In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. 40-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proactive maintenance management of world-class standard is close to impossible without the support of a computerized management system. In order to reduce failures, and failure recurrence, the key information to log are failure causes. However, Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) seems to be scarcely used for analysis for improvement initiatives. One part of this is due to the fact that many CMMS utilizes free-text fields which may be difficult to analyze statistically. The aim of this study is to apply Natural Language Processing (NPL), Ontology and Machine Learning (ML) as a means to analyze free-textual information from a CMMS. Through the initial steps of the study, it was concluded though that none of these methods were able to find any suitable hidden patterns with high-performance accuracy that could be related to recurring failures and their root causes. The main reason behind that was that the free-textual information was too unstructured, in terms of for instance: spelling- and grammar mistakes and use of slang. That is the quality of the data are not suitable for the analysis. However, several improvement potentials in reporting and to develop the CMMS further could be provided to the company so that they in the future more easily will be able to analyze its maintenance data.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Olsson, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Andersson, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Qureshi, Hassan
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Integrating Quality and Maintenance Development: Opportunities and Implications2010In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management (COMADEM 2010): Advances in Maintenance and Condition Diagnosis Technologies towards Sustainable Society / [ed] S. Okumura, T. Kawai, P. Chen, and R. B. K. N. Rao, 2010, p. 821-828Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the drive in many organizations is to focus on reducing production costs while increasing customer satisfaction. One key to succeed with these goals is to develop and improve both quality and maintenance in production as well as quality and maintenance in early phases of the development processes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how and motivate why research within quality and maintenance development may interact, in order to help companies meet customer demand while at the same time increase productivity. The paper is based on ideas and research perspectives of the newly formed competence group on ‘Quality- and Maintenance Development’ at the School of Innovation, Design and Engineering at the Malardalen University, Sweden. This paper elaborates on the concepts of Quality and Maintenance, its important integration, and provides some examples of ongoing research projects within the competence group.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Volvo Construction Equipment Operations Eskilstuna, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Giliyana, San
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Importance of Using Domain Knowledge When Designing and Implementing Data-Driven Decision Models for Maintenance: Insights from Industrial Cases2024In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 601-614Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advanced technologies available in the development of Smart Maintenance within Industry 4.0 have the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of industrial maintenance. However, it is important to be careful when deciding which technologies to implement for a given application and when evaluating the quality of the data generated. Otherwise, what should be cost-effective solutions may end up being cost-driving. The use of domain knowledge in selecting, developing, implementing, setting up, and utilizing these technologies is increasingly important for achieving success. In this paper, we will elaborate on this topic by presenting and analyzing insights from industrial cases, drawing on the authors’ extensive experience in the field.

  • 4.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    On the Need for Research on Holistic Maintenance2009In: CONDITION MONITORING AND DIAGNOSTIC ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT: Proceedings of the 22th international congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Manangement, Eibar: Fundacion Tekniker , 2009, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Traditionally, research within maintenance has been viewed from an operations research and maintenance optimization perspective, based on the mathematical theory of reliability. Utilizing an analytical approach with mostly quantitative methods, renewal theory, reliability tests, failure rate estimates, fatigue life in materials, and so on, have been researched and analyzed [1, 2]. However, Dekker [3], for instance, points out that there are, in many areas, complaints about the gap between theory and practice. Thus, in order to help companies realizing a more efficient maintenance execution and benefit from the performed research, other research perspectives might be important as well.

    This paper argues for the need of having an applied systems approach when performing research on maintenance design and development. The purpose of having such a research approach is to bridge some of the gap between theory and practice when it comes to development of new innovative philosophies/methodologies/techniques and the implementation of these in industrial contexts. The paper is divided in a Section on introduction and a background to the issue, a Section on the need for research on holistic maintenance, and end with a Section of discussion, presenting some ideas on how to perform research on holistic maintenance and an introduction to the research group on 'Maintenance Development' at Mälardalen University, Sweden.

  • 5.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construct Equipment, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Requirements and Needs-A Foundation for Reducing Maintenance-Related Waste2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10TH WORLD CONGRESS ON ENGINEERING ASSET MANAGEMENT (WCEAM 2015), 2016, p. 105-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to discuss and elaborate on requirements of maintenance and the resulting maintenance needs in order to maintain said requirements without introducing waste while doing so, taking into account both external and internal wastes. The paper will present, and elaborate on, conceptual models that can be utilized in maintenance operations in order to increase awareness of the importance of well-founded customer/stakeholder requirements in order to articulate appropriate maintenance needs in order to balance effectiveness and efficiency as well as to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste.

  • 6.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Söderlund, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rastegari, Ali
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Handbok för att minska underhållsrelaterade slöserier2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ENLIGT HEMSIDAN ”www.phrases.org.uk”(2016-02-25) myntade författaren Daniel Defoe frasen ’döden och skatter’ år 1726 och fler har sedan följt i hans fotspår. En av de kanske mest kända formuleringarna kom till i ett samtal mellan Benjamin Franklin och Jean-Baptiste Leroy (1789): ”I denna värld kan ingenting sägas vara säkert, utom döden och skatterna.” (fritt översatt från engelska). Vi har även funnit en person som använt det här uttrycket kopplat till underhåll, nämligen Kevin Marshall som diskuterar underhåll av hyreshus: ”...döden, skatter och underhåll.” (”www.flat-living.co.uk”, 2016-02-25). Underhåll i någon av alla dess former är någonting alla människor på jorden upplever nästan dagligen, medvetet eller omedvetet. Det finns egentligen bara ett sätt att tackla detta – med ett leende på läpparna. Man behöver dock inte vara slösaktig. På samma sätt som väldigt få vill betala mer i skatt än vad lagen kräver så vill sällan någon betala mer för underhåll än vad nöden kräver. Det är vad denna handbok handlar om. Den vänder sig till tillverkande företag som önskar minska sina underhållsrelaterade slöserier, och därför har behov av att se över sin verksamhet. Boken vänder sig i första hand till ledningsgrupper för underhåll, underhållschefer och underhållsutvecklare/ingenjörer. Dock, för att citera en av våra samarbetspartners: ”Det är ett slöseri om bara anställda inom underhållsavdelningen läser boken.” För att nå ett hållbart resultat är vi övertygade om att medvetenheten om slöserier och underhållsrelaterade slöserier behöver höjas bland samtliga anställda i en verksamhet. Detta är anledningen till att vi vill att du använder handboken. Vi uppmanar till att du läser exemplen och diskuterar frågorna med medarbetare inom hela underhållsavdelningen, och gärna tvärfunktionellt med produktion och övriga stödfunktioner. Vårt mål är att ge vägledning för hur tillverkande företag kan arbeta med underhållsrelaterade slöserier. Boken klargör vad sådana slöserier är, samt tips och idéer på hur man kan identifiera, klassificera och kvantifiera dem. Handboken presenterar även en arbetsprocess för att minska eller ta bort underhållsrelaterade slöserier så kostnadseffektivt som möjligt. Den innehåller också korta teoriavsnitt med exempel från praktiken och frågor som ledningsgrupper och anställda inom verksamheten kan diskutera. Genom att följa arbetsprocessen kan du och ditt företag få ökad medvetenhet och förståelse för underhållsrelaterade slöserier inom er egen verksamhet. Handboken fokuserar främst på de tidiga stegen i processen eftersom de är mest avgörande för ett lyckat resultat. Underhållsrelaterade slöserier är delvis unika för varje företag. Tyvärr finns inga genvägar eller standarder för att minska eller ta bort dem. Att endast läsa handboken kommer inte att ge något resultat. Den här boken bygger på att du och ditt företag aktivt finner er egen väg för att minska eller ta bort de underhållsrelaterade slöserier ni upptäcker i er verksamhet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Campos, J.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö , Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Kans, M.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö , Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalens högskola , Vasteras, Sweden.
    A Project Management Methodology for the Digitalisation of the Industrial Maintenance Domain2020In: Smart Innov. Syst. Technol., Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2020, p. 621-629Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient management of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) projects is a crucial factor since on many occasions they fail to meet the expected demands and requirements of the different stakeholders. It is well known that poor project management, like inadequate risk management and inadequate project planning, is one of the main reasons for ICT project failure. In addition, with the emergence of the new ICTs such as the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and big data the digitalisation of the maintenance domain has become even more complex. It is, therefore, essential to revisit standard processes when carrying out software development projects for the domain of interest. A broad selection of software development methodologies exists today. However, these are general-purpose development approaches, and it is, therefore, crucial to have an understanding of the best options and best practices of the existent methodologies for context-specific development projects. Thus, the authors present a literature review of ICT project methodologies and later discuss these findings taking into consideration the characteristics of the domain of interest. Based on this, an ICT project management methodology suitable for the Industrial maintenance domain is suggested. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 8.
    Friedler, Niklas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The automation equipment acquisition process – experienced users’ perspective2013In: International Conference on Production Research: 22nd International Conference on Production Research, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automation technology can increase company’s competiveness if it is used correctly. One step on the way to achieve this is to acquire proper automation technology. This paper describes how nine manufacturing companies in Sweden work when they acquire advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) with automation investments in focus. These nine companies are located all over Sweden and they are considered to be amongst the most experienced in Sweden, running automation investments. The respectively companies way of working is described and analyzed. Most of the companies had a quite extensive model for their acquisition process. Main reason for investing in automation, key factors for successful implementation of automation equipment and suggested improvements to the described acquisition models, are discussed in the paper.

  • 9.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center AB, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Perspectives on Smart Maintenance Technologies – A Case Study in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) Within Manufacturing Industry2023In: 16th WCEAM Proceedings, Springer Nature , 2023, p. 571-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 consists of nine technological pillars: IIoT, Cloud Computing, Big Data and Analytics, AR, etc. Some of the pillars play an essential role in maintenance development. Previous research presents many technologies for smart maintenance, but one prevailing problem is that there are still challenges to implementing smart maintenance technologies cost-effectively in the manufacturing industry. Therefore, we explore perspectives on smart maintenance technologies from respondents within 15 manufacturing SMEs. We start by investigating whether the companies had implemented smart maintenance technologies, if so, in what context. Then, we explore perspectives from the manufacturing SMEs on added values, challenges, opportunities, advantages, and disadvantages of smart maintenance technologies. However, as none of the case companies had implemented any Smart Maintenance Technologies, only implementation challenges could be investigated.

  • 10.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Karlsson, Joakim
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Adoue, Vincent
    Hedelind, Mikael
    A Testbed for Smart Maintenance TechnologiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 presents nine technologies including Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Big Data and Analytics, Augmented Reality (AR), etc. Some of the technologies play an important role in the development of smart maintenance technologies. Previous research presents several technologies for smart maintenance. However, one problem is that the manufacturing industry still finds it challenging to implement smart maintenance technologies in a value-adding way. Open questionnaires and interviews have been used to collect information about the current needs of the manufacturing industry. Both the empirical findings of this paper, as well as previous research, show that knowledge is the most common challenge when implementing new technologies. Therefore, in this paper, we develop and present a testbed for how to approach smart maintenance technologies and to share technical knowledge to the manufacturing industry.

  • 11.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, John Engellaus Gata 1, Eskilstuna, 633 61, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Joakim
    Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, John Engellaus Gata 1, Eskilstuna, 633 61, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo CE, Bolindervägen 100, 635 10, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Adoue, Vincent
    Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, John Engellaus Gata 1, Eskilstuna, 633 61, Sweden.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, John Engellaus Gata 1, Eskilstuna, 633 61, Sweden.
    A Testbed for Smart Maintenance Technologies2024In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 437-450Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 presents nine technologies including Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Big Data and Analytics, Augmented Reality (AR), etc. Some of the technologies play an important role in the development of smart maintenance technologies. Previous research presents several technologies for smart maintenance. However, one problem is that the manufacturing industry still finds it challenging to implement smart maintenance technologies in a value-adding way. Open questionnaires and interviews have been used to collect information about the current needs of the manufacturing industry. Both the empirical findings of this paper, as well as previous research, show that knowledge is the most common challenge when implementing new technologies. Therefore, in this paper, we develop and present a testbed for how to approach smart maintenance technologies and to share technical knowledge to the manufacturing industry.

  • 12.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A Conceptual Implementation Process for Smart Maintenance TechnologiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 is usually presented as usage of technologies. Some of these play an important role in the development of smart maintenance technologies. How-ever, although the subject of smart maintenance has been discussed for more than ten years, the manufacturing industry still finds it challenging to implement smart maintenance technologies to add benefits to maintenance organizations in line with company’s goals. This study presents a conceptual process for implementing smart maintenance technologies, challenges and enablers to consider when implementing, and benefits. This article is based on an analysis of empirical findings from seven large manufacturing companies in Sweden, previous maintenance research, and au-thors’ three previous smart maintenance research articles. In the first article, the authors explored perspectives on smart maintenance technologies from eleven large companies within the manufacturing industry, while in the second one, perspectives on smart maintenance technologies from fifteen manufacturing Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) were presented. In the third and final one, the authors de-veloped and presented a testbed for smart maintenance technologies.

  • 13.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment Operations, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    A Conceptual Implementation Process for Smart Maintenance Technologies2024In: Engineering Asset Management Review, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, Vol. 3, p. 61-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry 4.0 is usually presented as usage of technologies. Some of these play an important role in the development of smart maintenance technologies. However, although the subject of smart maintenance has been discussed for more than 10 years, the manufacturing industry still finds it challenging to implement smart maintenance technologies to add benefits to maintenance organizations in line with company’s goals. This study presents a conceptual process for implementing smart maintenance technologies, challenges and enablers to consider when implementing, and benefits. This article is based on an analysis of empirical findings from seven large manufacturing companies in Sweden, previous maintenance research, and authors’ three previous smart maintenance research articles. In the first article, the authors explored perspectives on smart maintenance technologies from 11 large companies within the manufacturing industry, while in the second one, perspectives on smart maintenance technologies from 15 manufacturing Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) were presented. In the third and final one, the authors developed and presented a testbed for smart maintenance technologies.

  • 14.
    Giliyana, San
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center AB, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Perspectives on Smart Maintenance Technologies – A Case Study in Large Manufacturing Companies2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering / [ed] Amos H.C. Ng, Anna Syberfeldt, Dan Högberg, Magnus Holm, IOS Press, 2022, Vol. 21, p. 255-266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry faces significant technical challenges due to the industry 4.0 technologies, which play an essential role in maintenance development. Maintenance in industry 4.0, also named smart maintenance, maintenance 4.0, predictive maintenance, etc., is boosted using industry 4.0 technologies, such as Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Big Data and Analytics, Cloud Computing, Augmented Reality (AR), Additive Manufacturing (AM), etc. Previous research presents several smart maintenance technologies, but the manufacturing industry still finds it challenging to implement the technologies cost-effectively. One problem is that there is insufficient research on how smart maintenance technologies can be implemented cost-effectively and add value to the manufacturing industry. Therefore, this paper aims to explore perspectives on smart maintenance technologies: 1) if there are any implemented smart maintenance technologies, 2) in what context, 3) added values, 4) challenges, 5) opportunities, 6) advantages, and 7) disadvantages with the technologies. This paper presents the results of a case study based on an online open questionnaire with respondents working in maintenance organizations in large manufacturing companies. 

  • 15.
    Gopalakrishnan, Maheshwaran
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Skoogh, Anders
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Asp, Martin
    Volvo Grp Truck Operat, Skövde, Sweden..
    Machine criticality assessment for productivity improvement Smart maintenance decision support2019In: International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, ISSN 1741-0401, E-ISSN 1758-6658, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 858-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to increase productivity through smart maintenance planning by including productivity as one of the objectives of the maintenance organization. Therefore, the goals of the paper are to investigate existing machine criticality assessment and identify components of the criticality assessment tool to increase productivity. Design/methodology/approach An embedded multiple case study research design was adopted in this paper. Six different cases were chosen from six different production sites operated by three multi-national manufacturing companies. Data collection was carried out in the form of interviews, focus groups and archival records. More than one source of data was collected in each of the cases. The cases included different production layouts such as machining, assembly and foundry, which ensured data variety. Findings The main finding of the paper is a deeper understanding of how manufacturing companies assess machine criticality and plan maintenance activities. The empirical findings showed that there is a lack of trust regarding existing criticality assessment tools. As a result, necessary changes within the maintenance organizations in order to increase productivity were identified. These are technological advancements, i.e. a dynamic and data-driven approach and organizational changes, i.e. approaching with a systems perspective when performing maintenance prioritization. Originality/value Machine criticality assessment studies are rare, especially empirical research. The originality of this paper lies in the empirical research conducted on smart maintenance planning for productivity improvement. In addition, identifying the components for machine criticality assessment is equally important for research and industries to efficient planning of maintenance activities.

  • 16.
    Norouzilame, Farhad
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Grönberg, F.
    LEAX Group Sweden, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    AN INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVE ON FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING: A FRAMEWORK FOR NEEDS AND ENABLERS2013In: International Conference on Production Research, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexibility of manufacturing systems, as a key factor of survival in the market, is regarded as the ability of handling changes in variants and volume governed by different capabilities depending on system level and manufacturing process. Research on flexibility has been of interest over years, resulting in a vast field of organizational, technical, and process-based enablers. The practical review in terms of needs, enablers and implementations of changeable production systems is however scarce. The objective of this paper is to present an initial review of industrial practice regarding flexibility in manufacturing systems, based on the current frame of reference and empirical study of two manufacturing companies in Sweden which helps industrial companies to identify their flexibility needs and the required enablers to achieve them.

  • 17.
    Rastegari, Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Strategic maintenance management: Formulating maintenance strategy2013In: International Congress Condition monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, by introducing lean manufacturing the vulnerability to system disturbances has increased and so, the demand for dependable production equipment. The need for having high production equipment availability causes companies to need a more effective and efficient maintenance strategy in order to stay competitive. Despite the increasing demand on reliable production equipment, few manufacturing companies work with strategic maintenance development and a large part of the manufacturing industry lack clear maintenance strategies. It is therefore difficult to develop the maintenance work in accordance with the strategic goals of the manufacturing companies. The main objective of this paper is to define a process for formulating maintenance strategy in order to facilitate further development in a strategic way. The problem has been studied by literature review and through case study at one major manufacturing site in Sweden to investigate the company’s view on strategic maintenance development. Hence, a formulated maintenance strategy has been provided and presented. The company’s overall goals considered and translated to the strategic objective of maintenance. Moreover, balanced score card is used as a tool to make a framework of the maintenance strategy. As a result of this study, the company could easily formulate a maintenance strategy by using a simple process based on the tools that they have already used. In addition to this, the result indicated how maintenance strategy can contribute to the company’s business goals.

  • 18.
    Rastegari, Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo GTO, Köping, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo GTO, Köping, Sweden.
    Strategic maintenance management: Formulating maintenance strategy2015In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, by introducing lean manufacturing the vulnerability to system disturbances has increased and so, the demand for dependable production equipment. The need for having high production equipment availability causes companies to need a more effective and efficient maintenance strategy in order to stay competitive. Despite the increasing demand on reliable production equipment, few manufacturing companies work with strategic maintenance development and a large part of the manufacturing industry lack clear maintenance strategies. It is therefore difficult to develop the maintenance work in accordance with the strategic goals of the manufacturing companies.

    The main objective of this paper is to define a process for formulating maintenance strategy in order to facilitate further development in a strategic way. The problem has been studied by literature review and through case study at one major manufacturing site in Sweden to investigate the company’s view on strategic maintenance development. Hence, a formulated maintenance strategy has been provided and presented. The company’s overall goals considered and translated to the strategic objective of maintenance. Moreover, balanced score card is used as a tool to make a framework of the maintenance strategy. As a result of this study, the company could easily formulate a maintenance strategy by using a simple process based on the tools that they have already used. In addition to this, the result indicated how maintenance strategy can contribute to the company’s business goals.

  • 19.
    Rastegari, Ali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    CONDITION BASED MAINTENANCE IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES: INTRODUCING CURRENT INDUSTRIAL PRACTICE AND CHALLENGES2013In: 22nd International Conference on Production Research, ICPR 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an introductory review of CBM practice applied in manufacturing industry, focusing the technical constituents within condition monitoring. The empirical base for the study is a case study of two major manufacturing sites in Sweden, complemented with a brief benchmark of data from two reference manufacturing sites from France and Brazil. The data from the main studies were collected by interviews and document analysis. The result indicates that there is a wide range within current practice of applying CBM. The implementations are dependent on process type (machining, assembly or heat treatment) and product type. By analysing the empirical data, gaps and challenges for implementing CBM in industry are presented, primarily focusing condition monitoring within manufacturing industry. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future trends and research areas, needed to increase the industrial use of CBM.

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  • 20.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    A Work Process for Formulation of Maintenance StrategiesManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Abstract

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a work-process for formulation of maintenance strategies within manufacturing industry.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature studies and an industrial case study are combined to develop the proposed work-process.

    Findings – A process for formulation of maintenance strategies is proposed. The process is developed through a combination of previous research results, and a case study, in which three industrial organizations, participating in collaboration with researchers, have formulated maintenance strategies for their companies.

    Practical implications – Formulated maintenance strategies are the very foundation for maintenance excellence. However, many manufacturing companies lack maintenance strategies, partly due to lack of competence in how to formulate functional strategies. This paper gives example of how such maintenance strategies may be formulated requiring a low level of resource.

    Originality/value – The paper presents a work-process for formulation of maintenance strategies. The formulation process is easy to use and does not demand any larger amount of resources. Hence, it should be possible to use also at smaller companies who lack both manpower and specialist competence in maintenance strategies.

    Keywords – Maintenance, Strategy

    Paper type – Research paper

     

  • 21.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Formulation of Maintenance Strategies2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In industry, there is a constant demand for increased productivity in order to stay competitive. Still, Swedish industry has an average utilization of about 60% in its production systems. One important factor for increasing the equipment utilization is effective maintenance of production assets.

    Within process industry a strategic view on maintenance activities is common and most companies regard maintenance as a profit centre. Meanwhile, the discrete units manufacturing industry still in many cases view maintenance as a cost driver. However, with the spread of Toyota-inspired production concepts, the manufacturing industry is beginning to view maintenance as a strategic asset. Still, though, many companies have no formulated maintenance strategy.

    The main purpose of the research, presented in this thesis, has been to develop a work-process for formulation of effective maintenance strategies for enterprises in the manufacturing industry.

    Through one descriptive and two prescriptive case studies a work-process for formulation of maintenance strategies has been developed. The descriptive study revealed some of the differences between companies with and without maintenance strategies. It also showed how some companies view the strategic contributions of maintenance. The first prescriptive study showed how stakeholder involvement may contribute to the identification of relevant performance measures for the maintenance activities. Stakeholder involvement also contributes to the organizational acceptance of the maintenance strategy. Last, the second prescriptive case study led to the development of a work-process for formulation of maintenance strategies. The work-process was tested and verified in three companies, handling different challenges for their maintenance activities. All three companies intend to use the formulated maintenance strategy as a road map for the development of their production maintenance.

     

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  • 22. Salonen, Antti
    Formulation of maintenance strategies: A simplified process2012In: International Journal of COMADEM, ISSN 1363-7681, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is large financial potential in optimum production maintenance. Research has indicated that as much as one third of the maintenance cost is unnecessarily spent due to bad planning, overtime costs, bad use of preventive maintenance etc. However, studies have shown that few manufacturing companies consider maintenance to be a strategic area. Even among those firms that do have a maintenance strategy it is not evident that their strategies are clearly linked to the business strategies. Many companies in the manufacturing industry seem to find formulation of maintenance strategies to be difficult. To some extent this is due to lack of formal competence in maintenance management. Also companies often find the formulation process too resource demanding. Therefore, maintenance strategies are not widely used in manufacturing industry today. In addition, there seems to be no clear picture of what components a maintenance strategy could or should include. With this in mind, this paper aims at presenting a process for the formulation of maintenance strategies in discrete item manufacturing organizations. Important criteria for the formulation process are that it is easy to follow and that it does not require vast amount of resources.

    The results show that the formulation process, developed and tested in this study, has been easy to use and understand. The three case companies have found that their new maintenance strategies have given them a good picture of the present situation, as well as good guidance in their necessary improvement work.

  • 23.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human errors in Industry 4.0: Opportunities and challenges from a dependability perspective2019In: Proceedings of 4th International Conference on Maintenance Engineering, Manchester, 2019, p. 69-78Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In manufacturing industry, more than 20% of the breakdowns are caused by human errors, either by operators or by the maintenance staff. With the introduction of new ICT, the industry 4.0 may very well help reducing some of these errors, but may very well introduce new causes of human errors as well. This paper discusses some of the opportunities and challenges that the industry 4.0, may arise in the human error aspect of dependability in discrete manufacturing systems.

  • 24.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Maintenance Strategy - An Enabler for Improved Competitiveness2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2008, p. 333-339Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to keep production in Sweden the industry has to stay competitive on a global market. This fact increases the demand of high utilisation of automated production equipment. However, research has indicated that the average utilisation of production equipment in Sweden is about 60%. One key factor for increasing the utilisation is effective maintenance of the production equipment. Still, within the manufacturing industry, maintenance is often regarded as a cost driving necessity rather than a competitive resource. In a survey, published 2004, about 70 % of the respondents consider maintenance a pure cost centre. The same survey also revealed that 28 % of the respondents have no maintenance strategy or policy at all. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of maintenance strategies as a means of making maintenance contribute to competitiveness. The paper is based on a theoretical overview and a case study in which six companies have been studied regarding the perceived quality of their maintenance, the challenges they face, and their view on the strategic impact of production maintenance. In the case study, four companies, which are dissatisfied with their current maintenance, are compared with two reference companies, well reputed for their maintenance excellence. The findings indicate that a strategic view of maintenance is essential for achieving the desired level of maintenance performance. This strategic view has to be held, not only by the production and maintenance management, but by the company management group. While the two reference companies have well formulated maintenance strategies, including aligned measures, acting as roadmaps for their continuous improvement of their maintenance, the four studied companies lack both strategic goals and relevant measures for their maintenance activities. The reasons for this are individual for each company but they share an insight that they need to develop their maintenance in order to stay competitive in their business areas.

  • 25.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the Need for Human Centric Maintenance Technologies2024In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 465-475Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalization of manufacturing industry, known as e.g., Industry 4.0 or smart production, has opened new opportunities for real-time optimization of production systems. Also, this technological leap has provided new possibilities for the maintenance of production equipment to become data driven and in many cases predictive. This fourth industrial revolution is changing the role of humans at the shop floor. Visions of the dark factory arises, meaning fully automated factories where humans are redundant, both for physical processing and for decision making. The research on Smart maintenance shows great advances in predictive diagnostics and prognostic techniques. However, in manufacturing industry, studies have shown that up to 50–60% of equipment breakdowns are due to human errors. Some of these errors are partly addressed through the development of improved information aid, such as e.g., instructions through Augmented Reality and training in Virtual Reality. Still, the root cause of human errors in manufacturing industry haven’t been properly categorized in terms of e.g., neglect, lack of competence, unclear processes, or poor leadership. In this paper the potential of data driven maintenance is discussed from a human centric perspective. Considering the large part of failures being due to human factors and the possibilities of improvement through implementation of smart technologies, this paper argues for exploring the root causes of human errors in discrete item manufacturing systems and address the proper human centric technologies as a means of reducing these failures.

  • 26.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    STRATEGIC FACTORS FOR MAINTENANCE IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY2008In: Proceedings of the 21th international congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Manangement, Brno: Czech Society for Non-Destructive Testing , 2008, p. 405-413Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the process industry has developed a strategic view of its maintenance activities and regards maintenance as a profit centre, the discrete units manufacturing industry still in many cases view maintenance as a cost driver. However, with the automotive industry as a driving force, the manufacturing industry is beginning to view maintenance as a strategic asset. Still, though, many companies have no formulated maintenance strategy. The aim of this paper is to exemplify what factors manufacturing companies consider important when formulating their maintenance strategies. As a base for this, a case study has been performed in which interviews have been conducted in six companies to find out what factors they consider to be of strategic importance for their maintenance. The results from the interviews are then analyzed and discussed in the light of some previously presented studies on the topic of maintenance strategies. The findings of the study indicate that some factors, e.g., financial considerations and spare parts handling are common for the studied companies, while others, e.g., workforce and technological level are company specific. The company specific factors may depend on contextual factors such as branch and/or company size. But which factors the companies regard as strategically important seems to depend also on the managers’ knowledge in maintenance management and maintenance technology.

  • 27.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Strategic Maintenance Development in Manufacturing Industry2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial maintenance is a substantial financial post. The total value of maintenance budgets in Europe has been estimated to be approximately 1500 billion € per year. At the same time, there are indications that about a third of these costs are wasted due to poor planning, overtime costs, inferior use of preventive maintenance and so forth. However, the diversity between different types of industry is substantial.

    While the process industry, which is rather vulnerable to disturbances, has a tradition of viewing its maintenance as a strategic resource, the picture is quite different in discrete item manufacturing industry. Historically, manufacturing industry has had a surplus of finished goods and Work-In-Progress buffers between machinery. Therefore, the manufacturing industry has been able to fulfil its production demand despite unreliable production equipment. In the last few decades, the concept of lean production has started to spread within the manufacturing industry as a means to improve competitiveness. Manufacturing companies apply lean tools such as flow oriented production layout, Just-In-Time production and Demand-Flow-Technology. As a consequence, the vulnerability to system disturbances increases and hence, the demand for dependable production equipment increases. Despite this increasing demand on reliable production equipment, few manufacturing companies work with strategic maintenance development. One reason for this may be that the existing methods and concepts for maintenance development are quite resource demanding.

    The main objective with this research is to develop a simple and cost effective approach aimed to formulate, implement, and evaluate maintenance strategies for the manufacturing industry. In five case studies the following has been studied: (1) The industry’s view on strategic maintenance development, (2) Formulation of maintenance strategies, (3) Implementation of maintenance strategies, (4) Cost of Poor Maintenance, and (5) Results from strategic maintenance development.

    As a result from this research, a process for the formulation of maintenance strategies has been developed. Further, a number of driving forces and obstacles, that influence the implementation of maintenance strategies, have been identified. The concept of Cost of Poor Maintenance has been introduced as a means for evaluating the financial contribution of maintenance. Finally, three years of studies in three companies has shown substantial benefits from strategic maintenance development.

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    FULLTEXT02
  • 28.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Strategic maintenance improvement: Driving forces and obstacles2010In: Engineering Asset Management and Infrastructure Sustainability: Proceedings of the 5th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM 2010), Springer , 2010, p. 789-801Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global trade, increased levels of automation and ambitions to apply lean production increases the demand for effective maintenance of production equipment. Still, the maintenance function is often regarded as having mainly a tactical role for the assets. The fact that many companies have no clear goals for their maintenance activities is serious since goals and strategies are driving forces for increasing the maintenance effectiveness. Several studies have recognized that the absence of clear strategies obstruct maintenance development initiatives. Also, maintenance strategies should support the corporate strategy and business drivers considered critical success factors of the company. Maintenance development is the discipline of development of strategies, methods, and tools to be applied in any organization. However, well defined maintenance strategies have to be well implemented in order to contribute to the competitiveness of the company.

    The aim of this paper is to identify some of the driving forces and obstacles that have to be dealt with when implementing maintenance strategies. In the paper, three industrial cases are presented to exemplify which implications to be dealt with when implementing maintenance strategies.

    The paper is based on interviews and direct observations in three manufacturing companies in Sweden. All three companies have used the same method, within the same time frame to formulate maintenance strategies, fully aligned with their overall strategic goals. All three companies have their own specific challenges, but share the ambition to improve their maintenance programs.

    The case studies show that implementation of maintenance strategies to a large amount resembles a typical change project with all its challenges. However some of the obstacles, and also some of the driving forces are more likely to appear in the maintenance context such as the organizational and cultural barriers between the maintenance and production departments.

  • 29.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The need for a holistic view on dependable production systems2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier B.V. , 2018, p. 17-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When discussing dependability of mechanized, discrete item production, the focus tends to be on maintenance. By studying experiences and breakdown data from eight automotive manufacturing sites in Sweden, a new view on the problem arises. It seems that on average, 40% of the breakdowns are related to poor maintenance practices. This indicates that maintenance management is not the dominant cause of breakdowns. Rather, companies should focus on human factors, e.g. skills, routines, and workload, among operators, as well as maintenance staff. Also, the Early Equipment Management process requires more attention in order to increase the dependability in the production system.

  • 30.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    THE ROLE OF MAINTENANCE STRATEGY WHEN MAKING CORRECT SOURCING DECISIONS2007In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostics Engineering Management, IT - Instituto de Telecomunicacoes , 2007, p. 687-695Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many manufacturing companies have chosen to outsource the maintenance function, often as part of a cost reduction program. The result of the outsourcing has been successful in some cases and unsatisfactory in others. In order to make a sound sourcing decision the company needs to be fully aware of the strategic importance of the maintenance activities. Such awareness will also have an impact on the result of the chosen sourcing strategy. To assess the strategic impact of maintenance, it is essential to find relevant measurements in order to evaluate the performance and quality, as well as the profitability of the investments that maintenance activities are supposed to be. In order to be relevant, the measurements should be well aligned with the company’s vision and mission for the maintenance, which in turn should be supporting the company’s over-all business strategy.

     

    The objective with this paper is to discuss and exemplify the importance of assessing the strategic impact of the production maintenance when evaluating maintenance related sourcing decisions.  Together with a theoretical overview, this paper will present a case study performed at three companies with different sourcing solutions.

     

    The findings of the study indicate a relationship between the alignment of the over-all company strategy, the used maintenance performance measurements, and the perceived contribution of maintenance for fulfilling the competitiveness of the company. Regardless of how companies choose to source its maintenance it is obvious that a strategic view of the maintenance function will support the sourcing process by setting relevant measurements and target values for the expected performance and development of the maintenance function. One way of achieving this might be to use a model for alignment of maintenance performance indicators and business strategy.

  • 31.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    What is Smart Maintenance in Manufacturing Industry?2023In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, p. 366-374Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing transformation of manufacturing industry into digitalized production, Industry 4.0, has put new perspectives on the maintenance of production systems. The technologies offer an array of new possibilities in optimization of maintenance and data driven decision making. On the other hand, these new technologies offer a lot of challenges in form of investment costs, need for new competences, and how to handle the equipment legacy, i.e. upgrading old equipment. Many researchers associate data driven decision making with intelligent sensors, cloud computing and cyber physical systems, but are these technologies the most cost-effective way of achieving data driven maintenance? The aim of this paper is to discuss how manufacturing industry should approach smart maintenance in order to improve the industry’s competitiveness, rather than spending money on technology that doesn’t contribute. The basis for the discussion will mainly be a literature study but additional empirical data may be included.

  • 32.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Identification of Maintenance Performance Indicators through consensus investigation2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimum maintenance may be expressed as: “to achieve the agreed plant operating pattern, availability and product quality within the accepted plant condition (for longevity)and safety standards, and at minimum resource cost.” But in order to achieve this, the use of performance indicators is necessary in order to evaluate both the efficiency and the effectiveness of the maintenance activities. There are numerous measures to be used for this and not always easy to select which ones to use. Several authors have expressed the need for alignment with the main organizational goals, and also the need for stakeholder involvement when identifying feasible measures. In this paper a case study is presented, in which an attempt to identify suitable maintenance performance indicators through stakeholder involvement has been performed. Except for the maintenance department, external customer, that is, the production department has been involved in expressing their expectations on the use of maintenance performance indicators. The result from the investigation, together with the expressed vision and mission of the maintenance and production department, has formed a solid foundation for establishing a feasible set of maintenance performance indicators.

  • 33.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Identification of Maintenance Performance Indicators through stakeholder involvement2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimum maintenance may be expressed as: “to achieve the agreed plant operating pattern, availability and product quality within the accepted plant condition (for longevity) and safety standards, and at minimum resource cost.” But in order to achieve this, the use of performance indicators is necessary in order to evaluate both the efficiency and the effectiveness of the maintenance activities. There are numerous measures to be used for this and not always easy to select which ones to use. Several authors have expressed the need for alignment with the main organizational goals, and also the need for stakeholder involvement when identifying feasible measures. In this paper a case study is presented, in which an attempt to identify suitable maintenance performance indicators through stakeholder involvement has been performed. Except for the maintenance department, external customer, that is, the production department has been involved in expressing their expectations on the use of maintenance performance indicators. The result from the investigation, together with the expressed vision and mission of the maintenance and production department, has formed a solid foundation for establishing a feasible set of maintenance performance indicators.

  • 34.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The potential in strategic maintenance developmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to exemplify and discuss the potential in strategic maintenance development.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on a three year industrial case study, conducted in three different companies within manufacturing industry.

    Findings – All three companies have showed substantial improvements in the chosen KPIs. Further, the management has increased the insight on maintenance as a contributor to company competitiveness.

    Research limitations/implications – None of the companies has used any financial KPI for their strategic maintenance development. It would be of future interest to study the concept Cost of Poor Maintenance as an evaluation tool for strategic maintenance development.

    Practical implications – This study exemplifies the potential of strategic maintenance development in manufacturing industry.

    Originality/value – This paper show the results from three years of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of maintenance strategies.

    Key words Strategic maintenance development, maintenance key performance indicators

    Paper type Research paper

  • 35.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The Potential in Strategic Maintenance Management2011In: Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, ISSN 1355-2511, E-ISSN 1758-7832, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 337-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to exemplify and discuss the potential in strategic maintenance development. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is based on a three-year industrial case study, conducted in three different companies within manufacturing industry. Findings - All three companies have showed substantial improvements in the chosen maintenance related KPIs. Further, the management has increased the insight on maintenance as a contributor to company competitiveness. Research limitations/implications - None of the companies has used any financial KPI for their strategic maintenance development. It would be of future interest to study the concept Cost of Poor Maintenance as an evaluation tool for strategic maintenance development. Practical implications - This study exemplifies the potential of strategic maintenance development in manufacturing industry. Originality/value - This paper shows the results from three years of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of maintenance strategies. Keywords Strategic maintenance development, Maintenance key performance indicators, Companies, Implementation, Maintenance Paper type Research paper

  • 36.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fridholm, V.
    Abb Control Products, Sweden.
    The Possibilities of Improving Maintenance through CMMS Data Analysis2020In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, Volume 13, IOS Press BV , 2020, p. 249-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintenance of production equipment is one of the most critical support actions in manufacturing companies for staying competitive. More recently, with the introduction of Industry 4.0, academia, as well as industry, put a lot of effort into condition monitoring in order to implement predictive maintenance. Most stakeholders agree that maintenance need to be more data-driven. However, in order to draw true advantage of data-driven decisions, it is necessary for manufacturing companies to have implemented basic maintenance to a high standard in order to reduce for example: recurring failures, human errors, unsafe machines, etc. The real-Time data can then be used to improve efficiency of maintenance tasks and schedule that adds value to the processes. In manufacturing industry, maintenance actions are commonly administered in a Computerized Maintenance Management System, CMMS, still, rather few companies analyze their maintenance records. Behind these data there is often a treasure of improvement opportunities that could be used to improve basic maintenance. The purpose of this paper is to explore how historical data from a CMMS can be used in order to improve maintenance effectiveness and efficiency of activities. In order to exemplify the possibilities of analyzing CMMS records, a case study has been performed in a plant, manufacturing driveline components for heavy construction vehicles. The study shows that one major obstacle for utilizing the CMMS data is poor description of faults and failures when it comes to work order requests, mostly performed by operators and assemblers, as well as work order reporting, mostly performed by repairmen and maintenance technicians. However, by thorough analysis of well described corrective maintenance, it is possible for industry to understand the nature of the occurring breakdowns and thus, refine the preventive maintenance program in order to further increase the dependability of the production system. .

  • 37.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Deleryd, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Cost of Poor Maintenance: A concept for maintenance performance improvement2011In: Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, ISSN 1355-2511, E-ISSN 1758-7832, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 63-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose and discuss cost of poor maintenance (CoPM), as a concept for managing the improvement of maintenance performance within manufacturing industry.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on literature studies and two workshops

    with representatives from industry and academia.

    Findings – CoPM is proposed as a new concept for maintenance performance improvement. The concept is derived from established practices in quality costing and hence it should be easily accepted in industry.

    Practical implications – By using CoPM as a concept for maintenance performance development, manufacturing companies may identify the potential financial impact of the development work. The CoPM concept should provide a good viewpoint for identification of deficiencies in the maintenance performance within a given manufacturing system.

    Originality/value – By adopting a well-known measure from the research area of quality development, a financial measure for maintenance is proposed in this paper. The measure shows which parts of the maintenance costs are justified and which costs relate to poorly performed maintenance. In this way a more balanced view of the financial contribution of maintenance activities may be achieved, even at board level of the company.

    Keywords Maintenance, Direct costs, Performance levels, Production improvement

    Paper type Conceptual paper

  • 38.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Gopalakrishnan, Maheshwaran
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Goteborg.
    Practices of preventive maintenance planningin discrete manufacturing industry2021In: Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, ISSN 1355-2511, E-ISSN 1758-7832, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 331-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Purpose – The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of the Swedish manufacturing industry to implement dynamic, data-driven preventive maintenance (PM) by identifying the gap between the state of the art and the state of practice.

    Design/methodology/approach – An embedded multiple case study was performed in which some of the largest companies in the discrete manufacturing industry, that is, mechanical engineering, were surveyed regarding the design of their PM programmes.

    Findings – The studied manufacturing companies make limited use of the existing scientific state of the art when designing their PM programmes. They seem to be aware of the possibilities for improvement, but they also see obstacles to changing their practices according to future requirements.

    Practical implications – The results of this study will benefit both industry professionals and academicians, setting the initial stage for the development of data-driven, diversified and dynamic PM programmes.

    Originality/Value – First and foremost, this study maps the current state and practice in PM planning among some of the larger automotive manufacturing industries in Sweden. This work reveals a gap between the stateof the art and the state of practice in the design of PM programmes. Insights regarding this gap show large improvement potentials which may prove important for academics as well as practitioners."

  • 39.
    Salonen, Antti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tabikh, Mohamad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Downtime Costing-Attitudes in Swedish Manufacturing Industry2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10TH WORLD CONGRESS ON ENGINEERING ASSET MANAGEMENT (WCEAM 2015), 2016, p. 539-544Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the process industry, generally shows a high awareness on the financial implications of low availability, the manufacturing industry is still quite ignorant. The traditional setup of discrete item manufacturing systems has been fairly forgiving of low availability. However, by applying lean principles, the discrete item production system resembles process industry, regarding sensitivity to disturbances. Still, the awareness of the financial impact of downtime seems to be low in manufacturing industry. This is a problem since it makes it harder to justify costs for investments in increased availability. This paper presents a study of the view and attitudes towards the cost of downtime in Swedish manufacturing industry. The answers indicate that the respondents have rather vague ideas of the costs associated with downtime. Further, they rarely quantify the downtime costs that often associated with maintenance of production equipment. However, without any proper financial measures for downtime costs, the companies lack proper incentives for investing time and resources on the necessary optimization of their maintenance programs.

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