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  • 1.
    Dag, Munir
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Svanelöv, Eric
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Experiences of using Bestic, an eating aid for people with intellectual disabilities2017In: Journal of Intellectual Disability, ISSN 1744-6295, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the results of a pilot study exploring whether and how the meal situations of persons with intellectual disabilities (PWIDs) in need of help and support during meal situations were affected by an eating aid. This article also analyzes how PWIDs and their assistants perceived their experiences of using an eating aid during meal situations. Data for the study were collected in interviews with PWIDs and their assistants. The results are presented in five themes: independence in the meal situation, motivation to use the eating aid, functions of the eating aid, social aspects of using the eating aid, and design corresponding to intellectual disability. The eating aid’s function, user-friendliness, and the assistants’ attitudes appear to be crucial for using the eating aid. Another important aspect is the introductory and training phase, which must be fundamentally adapted to suit the PWIDs ability to learn and understand. When these aspects are controlled, the eating aid can be a tool for increased independence during meal situations for PWIDs who are unable to move their arms or hands.

  • 2.
    Damir, Isovic
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    THE COPRODUCTIVE UNIVERSITY: Education and research in coproduction with the wider community2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mälardalen University has a long history of a successful cooperation and coproduction with the industry and public sector in Sweden. This has eventually led it to become one of the leading higher education institutes in Sweden for excellent coproduction with different societal actors, both internationally and nationally. The university has through its coproduction activities become convinced of its value and of the wide range of opportunities it can bring to all parties involved. In this paper, we share our experience through some good examples both from research and education and discuss what is needed for successful and sustainable coproduction with industry and public sector.

  • 3.
    Darbyshire, Philip
    et al.
    Monash University Victoria Australia.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    External scrutiny, faculty research culture and the changing university2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2571-2575Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    En forskare berättar: Nattsjuksköterskors vårdande i kommunal äldreomsorg2014In: Äldrevård och Äldreomsorg / [ed] Ann-Marie Hedman och Wallis Jansson, Harlow: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2014, 1, p. 92-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Later Life Security: Gero(n)technology for security, health and quality in later life2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    Municipal Night Duty RN's perception of reflection.2006In: INSCOA network conference, Mälardalen university, Västerås, Sweden. May 09-11, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Karolinska institutet.
    Närhet på distans: Nattsjuksköterskors vårdande i kommunal äldreomsorg2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses’ [RNs] experiences of caring in nursing, working  conditions for caring and reflection in municipal night care was explored to create expanded knowledge and understanding of care for older people. As a consequence of the Ädelreform and development in hospital health care a displacement from clinical health care to municipal care of older people has taken place. Night RNs’ work in the complex municipal care of older people implies single handed work in a consultative function. The RNs are distanced from the care receivers; it is care staff who mainly perform bed side caring. Municipal RNs’ care for older people during nights means trusting their own knowledge and reflective ability, in having nursing responsibility for large groups of old care recipients.   

     

    This thesis takes point of departure in a qualitative research approach, with four empirical studies. These have been accomplished in a medium sized municipality in the middle parts of Sweden. The aims of the part studies were: to elucidate municipal night nurses’ experiences of the meaning of caring in nursing (I), to explore Swedish municipal night nurses’ experiences of their working conditions for caring in nursing (II), to examine the caring for care staff offered by municipal night nurses, in the setting of old care recipients people enrolled in the municipal social care system (III) and to describe nurses’ conception of reflection in their working situation (IV). Data were collected with interviews (I, II, IV), diary notes (II) and participative observations (III). The data were analyzed with phenomenological hermeneutics (I), thematic content analysis (II, III) and phenomenography (IV).

     

    The results reveal that night RNs caring in nursing means the paradoxes: being close at a distance, being responsible without control and being independently dependent. Caring in nursing means a caring stance in prioritizing and taking responsibility for care recipients and care of care staff (I). Night RNs’ caring is dependent on the organization and care staff, and is complex by the fact that the RNs are not care staff leaders. The RNs’ autonomy prerequisite the ability to handle their work, which mainly means mediated caring communicated by telephone (II). The night RNs’ care of care staff means an informal nursing leadership. With their medical competence and authority the RNs occupy a superior caring leader function in nursing (III). Reflection is conceptualized as an instrument to handle the working situation and requires capacity of presence, flexibility and courage. To reflect is experienced to use knowledge, ethics and also personal values, in considering, estimating and assessing caring situations and actions (IV).

     

    The conclusion of the studies (I-V) is that the night RNs’ caring is dependent on the prerequisites described in the dimensions of the organization, self-understanding and vocational and professional relations. The RNs must be able to reflect and handle the situation of caring at a distance, without loosing the vocational fundamental condition of caring, though the consultant function implies that they seldom encounter the care recipients. Increased quality, development and creating possibilities for dignity in care for older people means the RNs must participate more in bed side caring. The RNs should also be caring leaders and be given the opportunity for adequate specialist training in gerontology nursing.

  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Robotkatt i vård av personer med långt framskriden demens2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: I dag finns ingen behandling som botar demens och SBU betonar att forskningen om demenssjukdomar bör fokusera på vård och omvårdnad för att förbättra välbefinnande för personer som på olika sätt påverkas av sjukdomen såsom den sjuke, anhöriga och vårdpersonal. Samvaro med sällskapsdjur kan ses som ett sådant alternativ. Sällskapsdjur kräver skötsel och omhändertagande och det finns även risker för skador och smittspridning. Ett alternativ kan vara interaktiva robotar. Flera studier, främst japanska, har visat positiva resultat när robotsälen Paro har använts i vården av äldre med demens. Studierna visar att samvaron med robotsälen ger ett förbättrat humör och de äldre blir mer aktiva. Kommunikationen förbättras, stressnivåerna sänks och ökad  EEG har påvisats hos äldre personer med demens i samvaro med Paro. De flesta studierna är gjorda i Japan och det är troligt att det finns skillnader mellan olika kulturer.  Syfte:Med utgångspunkt att robotsälen Paro indikerar goda resultat har ett alternativt robotdjur -- Robotkatten -- utvecklats. Den är billigare och har mindre avancerad robotik än den tidigare nämnda robotsälen. Sälen kostar idag drygt 60 000 kr och är dessutom så tekniskt avancerad att skinnbyte (byte av syntetpäls) inte är möjligt, vilket gör att gällande smittskyddsregler inte kan efterföljas. I ett svenskt perspektiv antas att en robotsäl inte anspelar på samma sätt till personers minne som en robotkatt förmodas kunna göra (reminiscens). Robotkatten är dessutom konstruerad för att vårdhygieniska principer ska kunna efterföljas för att undvika smittspridning. Utifrån tidigare forskning och samarbete med vårdpersonal vid ett boende för personer med demens har följande funktioner utvecklats hos robotkatten: rörelser som påminner om andning, katten jamar, den avger värme, har ett spinnliknande ljud som uppstår efter cirka tio strykningar/klappningar. Katten har också ett utseende och vikt likande en riktig sovande katt och kostnaden är 12 000 kr. Metod: och resultat:En pilotstudie med prototyper av robotkatten indikerar nytta och värde för personen med demens, anhöriga och vårdpersonal. Pilotstudien visar tendenser att personer med demens som har robotkatten i sin vardag blir lugnare, med minskade agitativa beteenden. Mätningar av livskvalitet visar tendenser till förbättrad livskvalitet. Analys av intervjuer genomförda med vårdarna och anhöriga visar att användning av robotkatten ger ökad livskvalitet, skapar lugn och utgör ett verktyg till anhöriga och vårdaren i interaktionen med personen med svår demens.

  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Tillämpning av pedagogiskt förhållningsoch arbetsätt (PFA) i teorin om Salutogenes2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Utveckling och implementering av välfärdsteknologi inom demensvård2015In: OMSORG Nordisk tidskrift för palliativ medisin, ISSN 0800-7489, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 26-30-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    We are facing a rapidly expanding market offering welfare technology to health and social care. It is important that users (patients, relatives, professional caregivers) and researchers are active and involved in both development and implementation. This text addresses important aspects of this work: Welfare technology corresponding to real needs, Ethical considerations and Scientific evaluations, which are exemplified in a project where researchers developed an interactive robotic cat; JustoCat www.justocat.se.

  • 11.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Municipal Night Nurses’ Experience of the Meaning of Caring2009In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 599-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate municipal night registered nurses’ (RNs) experiences of the meaning of caring in nursing. The research context involved all night duty RNs working in municipal care of older people in a medium-sized municipality located in central Sweden. The meaning of caring in nursing was experienced as: caring for by advocacy, superior responsibility in caring, and consultative nursing service. The municipal night RNs’ experience of caring is interpreted as meanings in paradoxes: ‘being close at distance’, the condition of ‘being responsible with insignificant control’, and ‘being interdependently independent’. The RNs’ experience of the meaning of caring involves focusing on the care recipient by advocating their perspectives. The meaning of caring in this context is an endeavour to grasp an overall caring responsibility by responding tovocational and personal demands regarding the issue of being a RN, in guaranteeing ethical, qualitative and competent care for older people.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reflection in night nursing: a phenomenographic study of municipal night duty registered nurses' conceptions of reflection2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 1460-1469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' conception of reflection in their working situation. Background. To be a municipal night duty registered nurse in Sweden means to shoulder nursing care responsibility for numerous units with older people in need of care. Two night nurses share nursing care responsibility for up to 1300 people. In nursing research, reflection is an often-mentioned phenomenon discussed with advantages and benefits within the 'traditional fields' of nursing (hospital context). A question to ask is, how do night nurses having an untraditional amount of nursing care responsibility conceptualise and experience reflection in their working situation? Design. A phenomenographic methodology was used. Methods. Data were collected by interviewing all nurses (n = 7) in a medium-sized municipality bordering a metropolitan area of Sweden. Results. The nurses' conceptions of reflection are categorised as 'Field of applications' (an instrument for interpreting, a strategy for handling the working situation and an approach to learning) and 'Field of prerequisites' (presence facilitates reflection; flexibility implies reflection; courage in thought and activity increases reflection). Conclusion. The findings reveal that reflection in the nurses' working situation is more than an instrument for learning, understanding and encouragement for change and improvement. Reflection is conceptualised as an instrument for interpreting nursing care situations, which requires courage and is facilitated by presence and flexibility. Reflection is also conceptualised as an approach to handling, managing and coping with a sometimes impossible working situation that includes nursing responsibility for hundreds of older people and can sometimes entail difficulties and stress. Relevance to clinical practice. The findings showed that reflection has a broader use than had earlier been described. Deliberate use of reflection could mean improved nursing practice. This guides nursing managers to pay attention to the phenomenon as an instrument for nursing care improvement.

  • 13.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Reflective Practice in Nursing Care: embedded assumptions in qualitative studies2007In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative nursing researchers have long recognized that reflective practice (RP) seems to be a valuable tool in nursing care. The aim of the present meta-study was to analyse current qualitative research on RP in nursing care, in order to create and synthesize the knowledge and the understanding of registered nurses' RP. Using a meta-study synthesis approach, embedded assumptions were identified in qualitative studies that have influenced the way researchers have interpreted and made sense of RP in nursing care. Despite empirical focus in research on RP in nursing care, it was found that assumptions about RP were predominantly based on theory. The reflective movement within the practice of nursing care has mainly a constructivist epistemology, based on learning from experience. The individual nurse's RP capability is essential in providing and improving ethical and holistic nursing care

  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
    Reflection, the way to professional development?2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 271-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Many studies have focused on reflection and the advantages that can be gained from the practice of reflection among Registered Nurses (RNs) but, what are the implications of the nurses' reflections, what do they reflect about, and how do they deal with their reflections? AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the RNs' experiences of reflection in relation to nursing care situations, and to understand how RNs use reflection in their daily work. What are the implications of the nursing care situations that the RNs' reflect upon? What consequences did the practice of reflection have in nursing care situations in relation to the RNs professional development? DESIGN AND METHOD: The study was carried out with interviews and the phenomenographic method. Interviews were carried out with four RNs. The choice of informants was made with purposive sampling with the aim of finding informants who could bring the kind of knowledge that was necessary for the study. RESULTS: The qualitative differences regarding the RNs' experiences of reflection were categorized as follows: to reflect (to think back--consider, mirroring, to reflect before and reflect after, to use experiences), nursing care situations (ethical considerations, to have courage, to use one's imagination, empathy) and consequences (to meet the unique, empathy, development). Finally, the findings were implicated in the model of professional development. CONCLUSION: By using reflection as a tool, many advantages can be gained in the development of nursing care. Encouraging RNs to reflect upon nursing situations, in order to promote the nurse's professional development, will imply better nursing care for the patients. The model for professional development implies a simplified representation of the thoughts pertaining to professional nursing development. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The relevance for clinical practice will be to understand the contents of the RNs reflections, to recognize the advantages of reflective practice and how and when to use such measures. Furthermore, to show how the model for professional development can be used in order to create a framework for evaluating these observations and consequently, for expressing tacit knowledge.

  • 15.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Dependency in autonomous caring: – night nurses’ working conditions for caring in nursing2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 312-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few research studies have focused on nurses' working conditions for caring provided at night, and these studies have mainly described nurses' work in hospital settings, not in a municipal, social-care context. In Swedish municipal care, nurses have responsibility for hundreds of older people in need of care. This working condition compromises caring encounters; instead the nurses' caring is mainly mediated through care staff (or relatives). In considering that caring based on caring encounters is fundamental to ethical nursing practice questions leads to the aim: to explore Swedish municipal night nurses' experiences of their working conditions for caring in nursing. All municipal night-duty nurses (n = 7) in a medium-sized community in Sweden participated in interviews, while six of them also wrote diaries. Thematic content analysis has been used in analysing the data. The findings revealed that the nurses experienced their working conditions for caring in nursing in the themes of Dependency in the Organisation and Other Staff, Vocational Responsibility, Deficiency in Conditions for Caring and Autonomous Caring. The findings illustrate privileged, as well as, poor working conditions for caring in nursing. The nurses' role as consultants emerge as their main function. The consultant function implies that nurses do not participate in ordinary bed-side caring, which makes it easier for them to find time for caring in situations that arise when nurses' skills, expertise and authority are called upon. Conversely the consultancy function entails short-term solution of complex caring problems, which can signify deficient caring due to prevailing working conditions. The findings also point to nurses' possible problems in fulfilling their own and vocational demands for ethics in the practice of caring in nursing related to existing working conditions.

  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. Ersta Sköndal University, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asp, Margareta
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Supportive leadership in Swedish community night nursing2010In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 822-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses’ give to staff in community night nursing.

    Background  Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses’ (RNs’) experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described.

    Methods  All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations.

    Results  The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership.

    Conclusions  Out of ‘concern for the staff’ the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs’ awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs’ caring for older people.

    Implications for nursing management  The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome.

    The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses give to staff in community night nursing. Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses (RNs) experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described.

    All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations. The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership.Conclusions Out of concern for the staff  the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs caring for older people. Implications for nursing management The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome.

  • 17.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Trust leading to hope - the signification of meaningful encounters in Swedish healthcare. The narratives of patients, relatives and healthcare staff2013In: International Practice Development Journal, ISSN 2046-9292, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The fact that patients and relatives experience poor healthcare encounters is evident in the number of complaints to patients’ advisory committees, and from studies and statistics. Looking at ‘the other side of the coin’, research into good caring encounters experienced as meaningful encounters in healthcare is scarce.

    Aim: To illuminate the signification of meaningful encounters in healthcare. 124 narratives from patients, relatives and healthcare staff regarding experiences of meaningful encounters in Swedish healthcare were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic research method.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that a meaningful encounter means gratefulness, is founded on trust, cooperation and courage, and results in self-trust through wellbeing, increased understanding and life-changing insights. The encounters have given insight into, and increased understanding of, the patient’s own life, the families’ lives, and/or healthcare professionals’ lives. With this, and awareness of the importance and power of meaningful encounters, healthcare staff might use a meaningful encounter as a powerful instrument in caring.

    Implications for practice:

    • For patients and relatives, trust derived from meaningful encounters in healthcare leads to self-trust
    • Caring within healthcare consisting of meaningful encounters, ‘the other side of the coin’ gives important knowledge that could facilitate improvements in healthcare staff’s encounters with patients and relatives, and also enrichment in their own professional development
    • Increased understanding and awareness of the power of meaningful encounters can be discussed in terms of patient safety

  • 18.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Lindström, Anders
    Eskilstuna kommun, Sweden.
    Löwenborg, Karin
    Eskilstuna kommun, Sweden.
    Pedagogiskt förhållnings- och arbetssätt i omsorg för personer som har intellektuell funktionsnedsättning2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Löwenborg, Karin
    Vuxenförvaltningen Eskilstuna kommun.
    Lindström, Anders
    Vuxenförvaltningen Eskilstuna kommun.
    Pedagogiskt förhållnings-och arbetssätt i omsorg om vuxna personer med måttlig till grav utvecklingsstörning2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Runkawatt, Viliporn
    Borommarajonnani Nakhon-Ratchasima Nursing College, Thailand.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Different Cultures but Similar Positive Attitudes: A Comparison between Thai and Swedish Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Older People2013In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 92-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of elderly people in the world’s population is growing. Thailand and Sweden have disparate cultural traditions of caring for older people, though both countries are facing a larger population of older people. Sweden and Thailand are involved in several cooperative projects and exchange programs for nursing students in this area, raising the questions of if and how the different cultures of gerontological care influence students’ attitudes in the issue. The aim of the study was to compare Swedish and Thai nursing students’ attitudes towards older people. A convenience sample of 241 Thai nursing students and 299 Swedish nursing students participated in the study. The Kogan’s Old People Scale, a 34-item questionnaire, was used in this research. The questionnaire consists of 17 positive (OP+) statements and 17 negative (OP-) statements and uses a Likert scale. Concerning attitudes towards older people, there was no significant difference in Swedish and Thai students’ positive scores in the distribution across the groups. In contrast, these students did differ on negative scores across countries (p.001). This was understood to  be related to age; the Swedish students’ higher age was positively associated with their positive attitudes; as the age increased, the students’ scores were also higher. Attitudes towards older people are not only influenced by cultural values, norms, and social structures, they also have a foundation in gerontological knowledge and experiences. Education addressing cultural awareness of negative ageism should be incorporated into all aspects of education, not just gerontological courses.

  • 21.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Betydelsefulla möten i vården: Du kan göra skillnad2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Svanberg, Camilla
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    A robotic cat in dementia care - a pilot study2016In: Gerontechnology The one-page paper collection of the 10th World Conference of Gerontechnology. / [ed] Johanna EMH van Bronswijk, 2016, Vol. 15, p. 151-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the pilot study was to explore the re­actions of individuals with dementia to an interactive robotic cat and their relatives’ and professional caregivers’ experiences regarding its usability, function, and effects. Method The pilot study had an inter­vention, mixed-methods designand was conduct­ed in two stages. A quantitative single-case study2 including individuals with demen­tia, and a qualitative interview study3, including rela­tives and professional caregivers, were conducted. JustoCat® is an inter­active robotic pet developed using reminiscence therapy as a frame­work4. The development of JustoCat is based on promising work with the robotic seal, PARO5,6. However, the inventors of JustoCat assumed that a seal would not appeal in reminiscence therapy, a robotic cat was supposed appeal to individuals’ memories of cats. There was also the idea of downscaled, advanced tech­nology based on the hypothesis of a robotic cat’s functional reliability and lower cost. The construction of JustoCat (e.g., easy-to-change fur facilitating personalized use, wash­able fur) was developed following Swedish hygiene routines required in nursing homes and hospital set­tings. Results & Discussion In the Western world, the majority of individuals with dementia spend the last part of their lives in nursing homes or dementia care homes. Some individuals with dementia could increase their well-being with different thera­pies, for example massage, singing, music or by the company of pets. The current pilot study of four individuals with dementia and their relatives and professional caregivers showed interesting results. First, living with severe dementia is a situa­tion with ups and downs concerning quality of life and agitated behavior, as presented in the single-case study design. Second, the analysis of the interviews shows the positive effects of the robotic cat providing stimu­lation, comfort, and peace to indi­viduals living with dementia. Third, professional caregivers and relatives found the robotic cat to be a useful, reliable, and multifunctional tool in their relationships with the partici­pants6.

  • 23.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Svanberg, Camilla
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Müllersdorf, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Using a Robotic Cat in Dementia Care: A Pilot Study2015In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 0098-9134, E-ISSN 1938-243X, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 46-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aimed to explore (a) reactions of individuals with dementia to an interactive robotic cat and their relatives’ and professional caregivers’ experiences, and (b) to measure usability in developing the care/treatment of individuals with dementia using interactive robotic pets. An intervention design in a pilot study using mixed methods was conducted in two stages: a quantitative single-case study (n = 4) and a qualitative interview study (n = 14). Results indicated less agitated behavior and better quality of life for individuals with dementia. Interviews showed positive effects by providing increased interaction, communication, stimulation, relaxation, peace, and comfort to individuals with dementia. The tested interactive robotic cat was also considered easy to use. There is an increased need for alternative/complementary forms of care to meet an increasing number of individuals with dementia. For some individuals with dementia, an interactive robot, such as a robotic cat, can increase well-being and quality of life.

  • 24.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Åkerberg, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Folke, Mia
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Therese, Bjurquist
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lindén, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    A method to create interdisciplinary health and welfare technology research projects: collaboration between academia and care providers2016In: The one-page paper collection of the 10th World Conference of Gerontechnology / [ed] Johanna EMH van Bunswijk, 2016, Vol. 15, p. 29-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are facing an aging population1 and the need for health and welfare technology to meet the users’ ‘need is a fact. To meet this challenge, the Arena for Health and Welfare Technology (the Arena) was initiated at Mälardalen University in 2014, as a multi-professional and interdisciplinary research initiative2. The aim of the Arena is to increase the collaboration of the researchers from the University and the external actors to create benefit and value for the future health and welfare. The Arena organizes events promoting interaction and interdisciplinary research projects. At a thematic day in May 2016, a working process to effectively initiate interdisciplinary research based on the users ‘needs, was introduced. Method To increase the participation for the thematic day and for future research projects within health and welfare technology, a call offering a grand from the Arena fond was created for participants that attended the thematic day. This call was aimed at stimulate the creation of interdisciplinary research projects within health and welfare technology, with the purpose to write proposals for external research funding. Speakers from the region were invited, representing health and social care, companies within the health and welfare technology field and regional R&D units. The speakers were presenting real needs based from the view of the clients, patients, relatives, staffs and organizations, which possibly could be solved by using health and welfare technology. After the user need presentations, a working process was followed, led by the company Konkret Utveckling AB. The goal of the working process was to identify prioritized needs for the day, and in the continuation create project groups to be the basis for future interdisciplinary research projects. After identifying the prioritized user needs, project groups started work to specify the framework for the planned research project, and then make a short oral presentation to share and discuss their research ideas. Results & Discussion The theme day attracted more than 50 interested participants. At the end of the thematic day, four interdisciplinary groups, including new constellations of researchers exists. The aims of the four groups were based on prioritized user needs, presented by regional health and welfare representatives. Involved group participants, researchers and company representatives, represented different disciplines, for example engineering, sensor technology, robotics, pedagogics, physiotherapy, nursing, social work and economy. The working method used during the thematic day was successful, and can be used in developing initiatives for interdisciplinary health and welfare technology research projects based on the needs of the end users.

  • 25.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    The meaningful encounter: Patient and next of kin stories about their experience of meaningful encounters in health care2013In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 363-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the meaningful encounters of patients and next of kin, seen from their perspective. Identifying the attributes within meaningful encounters is important for increased understanding of caring and to expand and develop earlier formulated knowledge about caring relationships. Caring theory about the caring relationship and provided a point of departure for the study. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaningful encounter in health care contexts narrated by patients and next of kin. A qualitative explorative design with a hermeneutic narrative approach was used to analyze and interpret the written narratives. Phases were: Naïve interpretation, structure analysis on two different levels a) analysis of narrative structure b) analysis of deep structure through metaphors and finally a dialectic interpretation. In the narratives the meaning of the meaningful encounter was sharing, a nourishing fellowship, common responsibility and coming together experienced as safety and warmth and gives, by extension, life changing moments, a healing force and dissipated insight. The meaningful encounter can be seen as a complex phenomenon that has different attributes. Understanding the meaningful encounter will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science focusing on patient and next of kin experience.

  • 26.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Patients' and Caregivers' Attributes in a Meaningful Care Encounter: Similarities and Notable Differences2012In: ISRN Nursing, ISSN 2090-5483, Vol. 2012, no Article ID 320145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's healthcare system, there is an imbalance between what patients expect of caregivers' care and their perception of the care they get. How is it possible to reduce this imbalance? The aim of this paper was to describe attributes associated with meaningful encounters in the Swedish healthcare system based on patients' and caregivers' written narratives and to note the differences and similarities between the attributes identified by the two groups. This paper is a qualitative descriptive study. The analysis was guided by qualitative content analyses. Based on patients' narratives, attributes associated with a meaningful encounter fell into four categories: the kind-hearted caregiver, the thoughtful caregiver, the mutually oriented caregiver, and the helpful caregiver. Based on caregivers' narratives, the attributes were categorized as being humane, caring through physical contact, caring by nurturing communication, joy and laughter in care, and a sense of mutuality. The results show that there are both similarities and differences in patients' and caregivers' opinions about the attributes of a meaningful encounter. Knowing more about the attributes associated with meaningful encounters makes it possible for caregivers to individualize care for patients and makes it easier to help and support patients in what they most need support with.

  • 27.
    Snellman, Ingrid
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Patients’ and Caregivers’ Attributes in a Meaningful Care Encounter: Similarities and Notable Differences2012In: Aging in a Changing World, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s healthcare system, there is an imbalance between what patients expect of caregivers’ care and their perception of the care they get. How is it possible to reduce this imbalance? The aim of this paper was to describe attributes associated with meaningful encounters in the Swedish healthcare system based on patients’ and caregivers’ written narratives and to note the differences and similarities between the attributes identified by the two groups. This paper is a qualitative descriptive study. The analysis was guided by qualitative content analyses. Based on patients’ narratives, attributes associated with a meaningful encounter fell into four categories: the kind-hearted caregiver, the thoughtful caregiver, the mutually oriented caregiver, and the helpful caregiver. Based on caregivers’ narratives, the attributes were categorized as being humane, caring through physical contact, caring by nurturing communication, joy and laughter in care, and a sense of mutuality. The results show that there are both similarities and differences in patients’ and caregivers’ opinions about the attributes of ameaningful encounter. Knowing more about the attributes associated with meaningful encounters makes it possible for caregivers to individualize care for patients and makes it easier to help and support patients in what they most need support with.

  • 28.
    Talman, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Insufficient documentation of participation: A study of contents in implementation plans for adults with profound intellectual disabilities2016In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 60, no 7-8, p. 747-747Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Talman, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Staffs’ documentation of participation for adults with profound intellectualdisability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 2527-2437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigated what areas of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health were documented in implementation plans for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities with focus on participation.

    Methods: A document analysis of 17 implementation plans was performed and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as an analytic tool.

    Results: One hundred and sixty-three different codes were identified, especially in the components Activities and participation and Environmental factors. Participation was most frequently coded in the chapters Community, social and civic life and Self-care. Overall, the results showed that focus in the implementation plans concerned Self-care and Community, social and civic life. The other life areas in Activities and participation were seldom, or not at all, documented.

    Conclusions: A deeper focus on participation in the implementation plans and all life areas in the component Activities and participation is needed. It is important that the documentation clearly shows what the adult wants, wishes, and likes in everyday life. It is also important to ensure that the job description for staff contains both life areas and individual preferences so that staff have the possibility to work to fulfill social and individual participation for the target group.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • There is a need for functioning working models to increase participation significantly for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    • For these adults, participation is achieved through the assistance of others and support and services carried out must be documented in an implementation plan.

    • The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can be used to support staff and ensure that information about the most important factors in an individual’s functioning in their environment is not omitted in documentation.

  • 30.
    Talman, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Stier, Jonas
    Dalarna university, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Stockholm university, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Participation in daily life for adults with profound intellectual (and multiple) disabilities: How high do they climb on Shier’s ladder of participation?In: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1744-6295, E-ISSN 1744-6309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Talman, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wilder, jenny
    Stockholm university, Sweden.
    Stier, Jonas
    Dalarna university, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Staff and managers’ conceptions of participation for adults with profound intellectual disabilities or profound intellectual and multiple disabilitiesIn: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Talman, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stockholm university, Sweden.
    Stier, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Dalarna university, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Staff members and managers’ views of the conditions for the participation of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilitiesIn: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Participation is a central aspect of quality of life, and it is indicative of high‐quality outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities. However, participation is difficult to achieve for adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Aim

    To describe staff members’ perceptions of what participation means for adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Method

    Using a phenomenographic approach, 27 interviews were analysed resulting in variations in the conditions for participation.

    Results

    The interviews revealed conditions for participation at individual, staff and organisational levels.

    Conclusion

    Participation appears to be an un‐reflected phenomenon, and several conditions must be met to achieve it. The conditions are experienced being fundamental for adults within the target group to achieve any kind of participation. The staff members and managers’ perceptions of participation as conditional can make it more difficult for adults within the target group to achieve the Swedish disability policy goal of participation.

  • 33.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Care managers' expected and experienced hindrances and preconditions when eHomecare is implemented: A Qualitative Focus Group Study.In: Journal of gerontological social work, ISSN 0163-4372, E-ISSN 1540-4048Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, information and communication technology has been introduced into home care services for older people, i.e., eHomecare. In this study, we explore social workers’ (care managers, [CM]) expected orexperienced hindrances and preconditions affecting their role and missionin eHomecare implementation. Four focus group interviews were conducted with participants from four municipalities in central Sweden during thespring of 2015. One focus group consisted of CMs with experiences of eHomecare and the other three groups of CMs without eHomecare experience. The study found that several hindrances may occur when eHomecare is implemented as part of home care, which in turn affect CMs´mission. CMs need a society that is well-informed in general aboute Homecare and requires relevant stakeholders to participate in the implementation process. CMs need an organization that is clear about their mission and a work situation that gives them the right circumstances for professionally managing eHomecare. It is also understood that older people must be given the right circumstances to adopt the technology, thus facilitating the CMs’ mission. Knowledge and time are assumed to be preconditions for CMs when managing eHomecare.

  • 34.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Care managers’ perceptions of eHomecare: a qualitative interview studyIn: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To implement information and communication technology (ICT) in elderlycare can be a challenge for healthcare organisations. In Sweden, caremanagers (CMs) are responsible for offering ICT as a new part ofhomecare, i.e. eHomecare. The aim of this study was to focus on CMs’perspectives and describe their perceptions of eHomecare. The studyhas a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews based onvignettes were conducted with 12 CMs in a medium-sized municipalityin central Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis. Thefindings showed that CMs are influenced by surrounding organisationsand relatives in their decision to grant eHomecare. There were alsodifficulties in CMs’ management of eHomecare. Furthermore, eHomecarewas perceived to improve the quality of everyday life for older. It isunderstood that the management of eHomecare is a challenging taskfor CMs and a complex mission. Interactions among CMs, relatives, careproviders, and other factors as for example CMs’ own attitudes have animpact on CMs’ decisions.

  • 35.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    eHomecare – experiences of communicationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Åkerlind, Charlotta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. School of Health Sciences, City University London, UK.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    eHomecare and safety: The experiences of older patients and their relativesIn: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 36 of 36
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