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  • 1.
    Andrews, Paul
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Sayers, J.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    PISA, TIMSS and Finnish mathematics teaching: an enigma in search of an explanation2014In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finnish students' success on all three content domains of each of the four cycles of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) has created much international interest. It has also prompted Finnish academics to offer systemic explanations typically linked to the structural qualities of Finnish schooling and teacher education. Less well-known has been the modest mathematics performance of Finnish grade 8 students on the two Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) in which Finland has participated, which, when compared with its PISA successes, has created something of an enigma. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on this enigma through analyses of Finnish mathematics classroom practice that draw on two extant data sets-interviews with Finnish teacher educators and video-recordings of sequences of lessons taught on standard topics. Due to the international interest in Finnish PISA success, the analyses focus primarily on the resonance between classroom practice and the mathematical literacy component of the PISA assessment framework. The analyses indicate that Finnish mathematics didactics are more likely to explain the modest TIMSS achievements than PISA successes and allude to several factors thought to be unique to the Finns, which, unrelated to mathematics teaching practices, may be contributory to the repeated Finnish PISA successes. Some implications for policy-borrowing are discussed. 

  • 2.
    Brehmer, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Towards an organizing frame for mapping teachers' learning in professional development2018In: Nordic Research in Mathematics Education: Papers of NORMA17 / [ed] Eva Norén, Hanna Palmér, Audrey Cooke, Göteborg, 2018, p. 229-237Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In their claim that teachers’ learning is treated as a “black box” in research on

    professional development programs for mathematics teachers, Goldsmith, Doerr,

    & Lewis (2014) call for “an organizing framework that clearly distinguishes

    dimensions of teachers’ learning and identifies catalysts of teachers’ learning…”

    (p. 23). The aim of this study is to present initial efforts to construct a framework

    for categorizing descriptions of activities designed to support teachers’ learning

    as presented in research articles within mathematics education. Based on existing

    literature on professional development and examination of research articles, an

    organizing frame is constructed.

  • 3.
    Brehmer, Daniel
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Problem solving in Swedish mathematics textbooks for upper secondary school2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 577-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyse how mathematical problem solving is represented in mathematical textbooks for Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis comprises dominating Swedish textbook series, and relates to uncovering (a) the quantity of tasks that are actually mathematical problems, (b) their location in the chapter, (c) their difficulty level, and (d) their context. Based on an analysis of 5,722 tasks from the area of calculus, it is concluded that the textbooks themselves contain very few tasks that can be defined as mathematical problems, and that those that are mathematical problems are found at the end of a chapter at the most difficult level, and are presented in a pure mathematical context. Implications are discussed.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Helenius, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Natl Ctr Math Educ, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Ostfold Univ Coll, Fac Educ, Halden, Norway..
    Using TIMSS items to evaluate the effectiveness of different instructional practices2019In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can instructional quality be measured using TIMSS items on how often certain instructional practices are used in the mathematics classroom? We focused on three instructional practices that have been the topics of longstanding debates in the educational literature: memorizing formulas, listening to the teacher, and relating mathematics to daily life. In a multi-level multiple regression analysis, we examined how class-level responses to these items predicted mathematics achievement. In Sweden, across four waves of TIMSS, relating to daily life was a negative predictor of achievement, whereas memorizing formulas and listening to the teacher were positive predictors. This was also the typical pattern of results across all countries participating in two waves of the international TIMSS. Our findings are in line with certain positions on the abovementioned debates. Although conclusions are limited by the correlational nature of the data, we argue that TIMSS is a promising tool for evaluating the effectiveness of different instructional practices. We also suggest several improvements.

  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Developing design principles and task types for classroom response system tasks in mathematics: engineering mathematical classroom discussionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on results from a design research project that implements a formative assessment practice with support from a classroom response system (CRS). Cumulatively building on earlier research and drawing on iteratively generated data from secondary schools in Sweden, the article elaborates on design principles and task types for constructing CRS tasks aimed at engineering mathematical classroom discussions. The study generated three design principles, six task types and 31 empirically evaluated tasks useful for developing and using CRS tasks in classroom practices. The results are discussed in relation to earlier research, methodological considerations and the cultural context of Sweden.

  • 6.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hoelgaard, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Teaching by the book2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Koljonen, Tuula
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hoelgaard, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ahl, Linda
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Analyzing mathematics curriculum materials in Sweden and in Finland: Developing an analytical tool2013In: The Eighth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. Feb 6th - Feb 10th, 2013., Antalya, Turkey, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Effective mathematics teaching in Finnish and Swedish teacher education discourses2015In: Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, ISSN 1386-4416, E-ISSN 1573-1820, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 501-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnishand Swedish teacher educators’ discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educatorsas well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospectiveteachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recentinternational reform movements are visible in the discourses in both countries. However,the Swedish teacher educators tend to conceptualize effective teaching as interactions withindividual children, building on students’ ideas and emanating mathematics from everydaysituations, while the Finnish teacher educators stress the importance of a clear presentationof mathematics, routines and homework as well as specific goals for every lesson. Theresults of this cross-cultural study cannot be generalized to the two countries but rathershow interesting conceptualizations of effective teaching, adding to international theorybuilding.

  • 9.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    The culture of the mathematics classroom during the first school years in Finland and Sweden2014In: Mathematics and Transition to School - International Perspectives / [ed] B. Perry, A. Gervasoni and A. MacDonald, Singapore: Springer , 2014, p. 185-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter elaborates findings from a longitudinal ongoing cross-cultural study comparing the teacher education and classroom practices in Finland and Sweden. The focus is on the cultural scripts of mathematics instruction during the first school years (ages 6-8). Firstly, we present a description of the contexts of each country concerning primary teacher education and the transition from pre-school to school. We then characterize the dominating conceptualizations of the mathematics classroom practices for the early years in both countries, building on several analyses of different data sources. We focus especially on the intricate balance between flexibly building mathematics on pupils’ ideas of familiar everyday phenomena within a thematic teaching style on the one hand, and on the other, the organization of learning environments strictly based on a predetermined hypothetical learning trajectory (Clements & Sarama, 2007). Finally, we discuss our findings in light of the international literature on early mathematics education and transition from pre-school to school.

  • 10.
    Insulander, E.
    et al.
    Stockholm University,.
    Brehmer, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Østfold University College, Norway.
    Teacher agency in professional development programmes – A case study of professional development material and collegial discussion2019In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 23, article id 100330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers insight into teacher agency in professional development programmes, focusing on a national policy initiative in Sweden aiming to provide in-depth professional development for mathematics teachers. Data was produced from video observations from two collegial discussions with one group of teachers, during the professional development programme. We closely analyse forms of agency in the collegial discussions in relation to the affordances of the professional development materials. The analysis shows a complex relationship between possibilities for independent judgement as constructed in curriculum materials, teachers' agency, and the coach's role in collegial discussions. Contrary to previous research, the findings indicate that opportunities for facilitating enactment in professional development materials do not necessarily lead to teacher agency. The results of the study are discussed in relation to the Swedish educational context. ©

  • 11.
    Knutsson, Malin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Bergwall, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Umeå university, Sweden.
    School-based mathematics teacher education in Sweden and Finland: characterizing mentor – prospective teacher discourse2013In: The Eighth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many similarities between the neighbouring countries Sweden and Finland,prior studies indicate that conceptualizations and discourses about school-basedteacher education are very different. In this paper we add to this picture ofdifferences, and contribute to the research discourse about school-based teachereducation, by identifying and characterizing aspects of mathematics teaching maderelevant in review meetings between mentors and prospective primary teachers.While the Swedish discourse typically focuses on the students’ individual work withtextbooks, connections to everyday experiences and teaching as individualsupervision, the Finnish discourse emphasizes lesson aims, learning and progressionin mathematics through formative assessment and differentiation according to pupils’ abilities.

  • 12.
    Koljonen, Tuula
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Faculty of Education, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Hemmi, K.
    Mathematics and science education, Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland.
    Analysing the nature of potentially constructed mathematics classrooms in Finnish teacher guides–the case of Finland2018In: Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 1479-4802, E-ISSN 1754-0178, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 295-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that curriculum materials serve as cultural artefacts, this study addresses the need for more research on curriculum materials in different contexts. Most studies concerning curriculum materials have been conducted in US and, therefore little is known about the nature of materials in other cultural-educational contexts. The aim of this paper is to identify the underlying cultural norms of potentially constructed classrooms, by analysing recurrent activities in the most commonly used Finnish teacher guides at primary-school level. We identified three norms embedded in them: (1) creating opportunities for learning through a variety of activities and communication; (2) keeping the class gathered around a specific mathematical topic; and (3) concurrent active involvement of teachers and students. The results add to knowledge about both teacher guides and the Finnish educational context. Moreover, it adds to the growing body of methodologies, as our analytical approach is novel in the context of textual analysis.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Balancing on the edge of competency-oriented versus procedural-oriented practices: orchestrating whole-class discussions of complex mathematical problems2012In: Mathematics Education Research Journal, ISSN 1033-2170, E-ISSN 2211-050X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 447-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing and maintaining key mathematical practices in wholeclass discussions, such as justifying claims, representing mathematical objects and making connections between the representations, is crucial to the development of students' mathematical competencies. The aim of this article is to investigate how and why the establishment of key mathematical practices in whole-class discussions varies in a teaching mathematics through problemsolving project. Analyses of transcribed video-recorded whole-class discussions result in the suggestion that the complexity of the mathematical problem itself as well as the complexity related to teaching the problem may contribute to more procedure-oriented practices instead of competency-oriented practices that create opportunities for the students to develop their mathematical competencies on a broad front. However, the results also suggest that the teaching of complex mathematical problems might develop the teacher's establishment and maintenance of key mathematical practices. Researchers initiating an intervention project hence have to consider both the students' and the teacher's learning trajectories, which might not always coincide. Other important aspects for the researcher to consider are discussed and pointed out as important areas for future research, such as how explicit introduction of appropriate frameworks may support teachers in learning to teach mathematics through problem solving.

  • 14.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    EFFECTIVE TEACHING THROUGH PROBLEM-SOLVING BY SEQUENCING AND CONNECTING STUDENT SOLUTIONS2011In: Proceedings of NORMA11: The sixth Nordic conference on mathematics education in Reykjavik, May 11-14 2011 / [ed] G. H. Gunnarsdóttir, F. Hreinsdóttir, G. Pálsdóttir, M. Hannula, M. Hannula-Sormunen, E. Jablonka, U. T. Jankvist, A. Ryve, P. Valero, & K. Waege, Reykjavik: University of Iceland Press , 2011, p. 425-434Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can researchers support teachers in the complexity of orchestrating productive mathematical whole-class discussions based on students’ solutions to challenging problems? This study has two aims: Firstly, to study how the teacher can select, sequence and connect different student solutions in order to effectively orchestrate mathematical whole-class discussions. Secondly, to critically reflect on the role of the researchers in this intervention project. Analyses of audio recorded interviews and video recorded whole-class discussions result in suggestions for how student solutions can be sequenced in this particular case to set the scene for connecting them with each other and with key mathematical ideas. We further critically reflect on how we as researchers can improve our work in supporting practicing teachers.

  • 15.
    Lindvall, Jannika
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Coherence and the Positioning of Teachers in Professional Development Programs: A Systematic Review2019In: Educational Research Review, ISSN 1747-938X, Vol. 27, p. 140-154Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, scholars have argued that there is a consensus on a number of critical features of effective teacher professional development (PD). This study presents the results of a systematic review of one of these features: coherence. The analysis and synthesis of 95 papers show that coherence in PD is conceptualized in various ways, and thus that the aforementioned consensus can be questioned. For example, should PD (1) be coherent with external factors, such as standards and assessments; (2) be internally coherent, for example that activities within PD programs should be aligned; or (3) create coherence between goals that are either predetermined or negotiated together with teachers? The different conceptualizations of coherence all implicate how teachers are positioned in relation to PD programs and, in the light of our results, we argue that teachers are primarily seen as implementers expected to align their instruction with external and predetermined goals and practices. 

  • 16.
    Nardi, E.
    et al.
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Stadler, E.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Viirman, O.
    University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Commognitive analyses of the learning and teaching of mathematics at university level: The case of discursive shifts in the study of Calculus2014In: Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 1479-4802, E-ISSN 1754-0178, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 182-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we outline the main tenets of the commognitive approach and we exemplify its application in studies that investigate the learning and teaching of mathematics at university level. Following an overview of such applications, we focus on three studies that explore fundamental discursive shifts often occurring in the early stages of studying Calculus. These shifts concern the lecturers' and students' communicative practices, routines of constructing mathematical objects and ways of resolving commognitive conflicts. We then propose that commognitive constructs such as subjectification can be deployed towards 'scaling-up' the hitherto fine-grained focus of commognitive analyses. Finally, we conclude with observing how the commognitive approach relates to constructs from other sociocultural approaches to research in university mathematics education, such as "legitimate peripheral participation" from the theory of Communities of Practice and "didactic contract" from the Theory of Didactic Situations. © 2014 © 2014 British Society for Research into Learning Mathematics.

  • 17.
    Neuman (Lindvall), Jannika
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Wiberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    MATHEMATICS TEXTBOOKS’ IMPACT ON CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION: EXAMINING THE VIEWS OF 278 SWEDISH TEACHERS2015In: Studies in Subject Didactics 10. Nordic Research in Mathematics Education - Proceedings of NORMA14, 2015, p. 215-225Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For mathematics teachers to achieve an instruction where students have the opportunity to develop different mathematical competencies is difficult without access to adequate support. The most commonly used supportive tools are by far mathematics textbooks. However, in Sweden, there is very little research available on the characteristics of these materials. In this paper we aim to examine the relationship between teachers’ (K–6) perceived support from the curriculum materials and their mathematics instruction, looking for patterns associated with commonly used textbooks. Our analysis of teachers’ responses to a questionnaire (n=278) showed major differences regarding perceived support for teachers using different textbooks. This pattern was also evident when the teachers were to report about their mathematics instruction.

  • 18.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Focal event, Contextualization, and Effective Communication in the Mathematics Classroom2010In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 241-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of diversity in collaborative activities as it emphasizes how students may struggle differently with a learning activity. The interaction of students (12 to 13 years old), playing a specifically designed dice game, is used as an example for illustration. The article shows how accounting for the focal events of the interlocutors, and the contexts in which they contextualize these events, help in organizing our thinking about mathematically effective communication in collaborative activities.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Linneaus University, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    The nature and role of common ground in the learning of mathematics in small-group discussions2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 609-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the nature and role of common ground in group learning of mathematics by means of the analytical construct of focal projects and contextualization. The analysis investigates two students (12-13 years old) playing a dice game, where they are to distribute a set of markers based on the totals of two dice. The analysis shows how the consistency between the students’ focal projects became critical to their progression from a uniform to a non-uniform distribution of the markers. The task system and concrete manipulatives became crucial in furthering the students’ explorations. In the frame of a frequency context, we also discuss how a contextualization may restrict certain aspects of probability from coming into play during such explorations.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Larsson, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Characterizing theories aimed at supporting teachers' mathematical classroom practices2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH CONGRESS OF THE EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (CERME10) / [ed] Dooley, T Gueudet, G, DUBLIN CITY UNIV GLASNEVIN CAMPUS, INST EDUCATION , 2017, p. 3865-3872Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we draw upon examples from a recently published systematic literature review (Ryve et al., 2015) on productive classroom practice to contribute to the research on the nature of theories for action in mathematics education. By relating the results from the review to theories and literature on educational policy research, professional development research and implementation research we construct a framework for categorizing theories aiming at supporting teachers' actions in mathematical classroom practices.

  • 21.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Analyzing mathematical classroom discourse: Initiating elaborations on the usefulness of the dialogical approach2008In: Nomad, ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 7-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dialogical approach has been introduced for studying mathematical classroom discourse in a growing body of studies conducted by researchers from the Nordic countries. However, since it is developed for analyzing human action, communication, and cognition in general, it is important to explicitly discuss how it could be developed and complemented for serving the purposes of mathematics education research. In this article I initiate such a discussion by drawing on theoretical analysis as well as my own experiences of using the dialogical approach. By relating it to a framework of criteria for research in mathematics education it is shown that the dialogical approach could be a useful tool for fulfilling several aspects of relevance for mathematics education research. The article concludes by suggesting further aspects that need to be discussed and elaborated on in the project of making it even more useful for understanding mathematical teaching and learning.

  • 22.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Approaching Mathematical Discourse: Two analytical frameworks and their relation to problem solving interactions2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The driving force of conducting the two studies presented in this thesis is to examine ways that conceptual understanding and problem solving could be part of mathematics teaching, and through that, part of students' mathematical knowledge. The specific aims of the thesis are: 1) to characterize the classroom discourse of two, apparently similar, problem solving courses in teacher education and 2) to discuss the possibilities of developing two analytical approaches - the communicational approach to cognition and the dialogical approach - used for studying mathematical discourse. The two aims are elaborated on by means of data collected through audiotaped recordings and field notes from observations of problem-solving activities in engineering and teacher education. In relation to the first aim, the analysis of the classroom discourse within the two courses makes it clear that both courses displayed different kinds of discourse that could be broadly categorized in terms of: subject-oriented, didactically oriented, and problem solving oriented discourses. However, the comparisons between the two courses reveal a marked difference in the distribution of these categories of discourse. It is suggested that the introduction of explicit conceptual frameworks in teaching is of crucial importance for the topical focus of the classroom discourse, and for prospective teachers' opportunity to engage in mathematical productive discourse. The analyses of the two approaches for studying mathematical discourse reveal that the two frameworks can be further developed and the study also indicates ways in which such development can be achieved using a theory of contextualization and theories of mathematical learning. Finally, the thesis discusses theoretical and practical implications of the results, foregrounding issues of importance for the research on mathematical discourse, and for teachers and teacher educators involved in designing instructions for mathematical problem solving.

  • 23.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Can collaborative concept mapping create mathematically productive discoursesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Can collaborative concept mapping create mathematically productive discourses?2004In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, Vol. 56, no 2-3, p. 157-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four groups (three engineering students in each group) were videotaped while constructing concept maps in Linear Algebra. There are two aims of this study. The first is to characterize the discourse in the groups by addressing the following research questions: Do the students communicate in an effective way? Do the students' communications contain the elements typical for a mathematically productive discourse? The analysis indicates that the communication among the students is effective and contains the elements that are characteristic for a mathematicallyproductive interaction. The two types of methods used to analyze the data were focal and preoccupational analysis. The mathematical content and the coherence of the conversations were examined through focal analysis. The participants' engagement in the discourse was examined by preoccupational analysis, carried out by means of interactive flowchart. The second aim of this study is to evaluate the newly developed methodological framework used to characterize the discourses. The study shows that several aspects of the methodological framework need to be developed.

  • 25.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Collaborative concept mapping in linear algebra2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 26.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Discourse research in mathematics education: A critical evaluation of 108 journal articles2011In: Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, ISSN 0021-8251, E-ISSN 1945-2306, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 167-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increased engagement in studying discourse in the field of mathematics education. But what exactly is a discourse, and how do researchers go about analyzing discourses? This study examines 108 articles from 6 international journals in mathematics education by asking questions such as: In which traditions and in relation to which kinds of epistemological assumptions are the articles situated? How is the concept of discourse used and defined? How are mathematical aspects of the discourse accentuated? The results of this study show that a variety of conceptualizations are used for analyzing discourses but also that many articles would benefit from strengthening those conceptualizations by explicitly defining the concept of discourse, situating the article in relation to epistemological assumptions, and relating the work to other discourse studies in mathematics education.

  • 27.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Making explicit the analysis of students' mathematical discourses: Revisiting a newly developed methodological framework2006In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 191-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sfard and Kieran [Kieran, C., Educational Studies in Mathematics 46, 2001, 187-228; Sfard, A., Educational Studies in Mathematics 46, 2001, 13-57; Sfard, A. and Kieran, C., Mind, Culture, and Activity 8, 2001, 42-76] have developed a methodological framework, which aims at characterizing the students' mathematical discourses while they are working in groups. In this study, I focus on an important aspect of this methodological framework, namely the interactive flowcharts. The aim of this study is to suggest two complementary analyses for the construction of the interactive flowcharts: an additional analysis by means of the analytical construct of contextualization as well as an analysis of types ofmathematical discourses. Based on data from a study of how four groups of Swedish engineering students collaboratively construct concept maps in linear algebra. I show that the two complementary analyses make the construction of the interactive flowcharts more coherent and transparent, and hence, more reliable. Furthermore, the two complementary analyses dramatically changed the picture as to whether the studied discourseswere to be seen as mathematically productive or not. In the end of the article, I discuss the possibilities of performing the suggested additionalanalyses within the original methodological framework.

  • 28.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Making explicit the construction of interactive flowcharts by means of intentional analysisManuscript (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Matematikutbildning i Sverige och Finland: Att förstå och förbättra klassrumsundervisning2012In: Resultatdialog 2012, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2012, p. 148-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    Vad är kunskap i matematik [What is mathematical knowledge]?2006In: Nämnaren, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 7-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Department of Mathematics and Physics.
    What is actually discussed in problem solving courses for prospecitve teachers2007In: Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, ISSN 1386-4416, E-ISSN 1573-1820, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to characterize the discourse of two problem-solving courses for prospective teachers. The data, consisting of audio recordings and field notes, were examined from a dialogical approach combined with the theory of contextualization. I show not only the substantial differences between the two classroom discourses but also elaborate on plausible reasons for the divergency found. The findings then serve as a basis for a discussion of how to develop a problem-solving course within the mathematics teacher program.

  • 32.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Discourses about school-based mathematics teacher education in Finland and Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 132-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this cross-case study we focus on school-based teacher education in Sweden and Finland. Through the use of focus-group interviews with mathematics teacher educators in Finland and Sweden, the study shows that there are substantial differences in how school-based teacher education is introduced and portrayed in the discourse about teacher education and prospective teachers' learning. The school-based teacher education among the Finnish groups is made relevant in relation to several aspects of prospective teachers' learning. In the Swedish groups, school-based teacher education is portrayed as an organizational problem and few aspects of prospective teachers' learning are brought into the discourse. The results cannot be generalized to the two countries but show interesting conceptualizations of school-based education potentially useful for teacher educators and scholars

  • 33.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Larsson, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Analyzing Content and Participation in Classroom Discourse: Dimensions of Variation, Mediating Tools, and Conceptual Accountability2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 101-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing content and students' participation in the mathematics classroom is an area of both practical and theoretical interest. In this article we relate and contribute to these two interests by analyzing classroom data from an intervention project aiming at teaching mathematics through problem solving. The study shows that several aspects such as mediating tools, the teacher's conceptual accountability and interactional moves play important roles in the nature of the co-construction of critical dimensions of variation. We therefore suggest that an analysis of content and participation in the mathematics classroom would benefit from drawing on several theoretical sources. As such, the study could be seen as a contribution to recent elaborations on developing variation theory for analyzing the enacted object of learning.

  • 34.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnaeus Univ.
    Mason, John
    Open Univ, Milton Keynes.
    Establishing mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions in teacher education2012In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teacher educators’ processes of establishing ‘mathematics for teaching’ in teacher education programs have been recognized as an important area for further research. In this study we examine how two teacher educators establish and make explicit features of mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions. The study shows how the establishment of mathematics for teaching is dependent on the use of keywords from the mathematics education domain, the introduction of variation, and the use of generic communicative strategies. As such, the study could be seen as a contribution to ongoing research on how mathematics teacher educators interactively deal with mathematics for teaching.

  • 35.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Per
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Pettersson, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Analyzing effective communication in mathematics group work: the role of visual mediators and technical terms.2013In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 497-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing and designing productive group work and effective communication constitute ongoing research interests in mathematics education. In this article we contribute to this research by using and developing a newly introduced analytical approach for examining effective communication within group work in mathematics education. By using data from 12-13-year old students playing a dice game as well as from a group of university students working with a proof by induction, the article shows how the link between visual mediators and technical terms are crucial in students’ attempts to communicate effectively. The critical evaluation of visual mediators and technical terms, and of links between them, is useful for researchers interested in analyzing effective communication and designing environments providing opportunities for students to learn mathematics.

  • 36.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Wistedt, Inger
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Contextualizing mathematical teaching and learning2010In: The first sourcebook on Nordic research in mathematics education: Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark, and contributions from Finland / [ed] Sriraman, Bharath; Bergsten, Christer; Goodchild, Simon; Pálsdóttir, Gudbjörg; Dahl, Bettina; Haapasalo, Lenni, Charlotte: Information Age Publishing, 2010, p. 319-332Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social turn in mathematics education has implied that researchers wish to include collaborative and social aspects when accounting for students’ learning in mathematics. To accomplish this task many theoretical frameworks have been introduced, some of these also used in the field of mathematics education.  Several publications produced by Swedish researchers in mathematics education have used the theory of contextualization and the related analytical principles of Intentional analysis to conceptualize and analyze mathematical teaching and learning. The theory of contextualization is situated in constructivist ontological and epistemological principles and is operationalized to include conceptual, situational, and cultural aspects of students’ conceptions of a given task. In this chapter we elaborate on the theory of contextualization and how it may be used to study mathematics learning and teaching by bringing together five examples of students´ learning of mathematics in compulsory school and higher education previously separately presented in international publications in mathematics education.

  • 37.
    Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Larsson, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Insulander, Eva
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Curriculum support for teachers' negotiation of meaning: a collective perspective2018In: Research on Mathematics Textbooks and Teachers’ Resources: Advances and issues. / [ed] Fan L., Trouche L., Qi C., Rezat S., Visnovska J., Springer Publishing Company, 2018, p. 167-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging the central role of teachers in curriculum implementation, a growing body of research has analyzed how curriculum resources can support teachers to learn using these resources well. This has been done mainly with a focus on individual teachers’ learning. Teachers’ daily work encompasses many collaborative aspects around curriculum resources as well, an area too often overlooked. We address this issue by describing and discussing our initial steps in developing an approach to analyze curriculum resources from this collective perspective. The approach combines a social semiotic framework to analyze the meaning potential of curriculum resources and the communities of practice framework to analyze a group of teachers’ negotiation of meaning around these resources.

  • 38.
    Van Steenbrugge, Hendrik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Developing a reform mathematics curriculum program in Sweden: relating international research and the local context2018In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 801-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a research-based mathematics curriculum program development project in Sweden, whose educational context is currently characterized by multiple reform initiatives. Current reforms include a repositioning of the teacher as central for students’ learning, but also a trend toward initiatives and teacher resources that are more directive than has been the case in the past 30 years. Collecting data from multiple sources, such as teacher log books, lesson observations and feedback meetings, we build on input from 11 elementary school teachers trying out our materials, including student texts and a teachers’ guide, during four trial rounds. We analyze how international research about curriculum programs and teachers’ use of these programs are interpreted and operationalized within the Swedish context. In particular, the two research questions guiding the study are: (1) “How do Swedish teachers interact with and reason about the reform-based classroom practices promoted by the curriculum program?” and (2) “How do Swedish teachers interact with and reason about their use of a teachers’ guide?” From our experiences in the Swedish educational context, we suggest the following contextual aspects to take into account when designing a curriculum program whose design is grounded in international research literature: characteristics of current classroom practices, teachers’ role in classrooms, the level of explicit/implicit support teachers are used to receiving, and teachers’ experiences using a teachers’ guide.

  • 39. Van Stenbrugge, H.
    et al.
    Lindvall, Jannika
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Remillard, J.
    Bergqvist, T.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Designing elementary mathematics curriculum programs to accommodate a flexible use by a range of teachersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Ärlemalm- Hagser, Eva
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Berg, Benita
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Sandberg, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Praxisnära kunskapsutbildning: Förskolebarns matematiska förståelse och bekantskap med hållbar finansiell utveckling2017Report (Other academic)
1 - 40 of 40
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