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  • 1.
    An, Lin
    et al.
    E China Univ Sci & Technol, Peoples R China.
    Yu, Xinhai
    E China Univ Sci & Technol, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Jie
    Univ Shanghai Sci & Technol, Shanghai, Peoples R China.
    Tu, Shan-Tung
    E China Univ Sci & Technol, Peoples R China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CO2 capture using a superhydrophobic ceramic membrane contactor2015In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 75, p. 2287-2292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetting and fouling of membrane contactor result in performance deterioration of membrane gas absorption system for CO2 post-combustion capture of coal-fired power plants. To solve these problems, in this study, a superhydrophobic ceramic (SC) membrane contactor was fabricated by chemically modification using 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctylethoxysilane (FAS) solution. The membrane contactor fabrication costs for both SC membrane and PP (polypropylene) membrane contactors per unit mass absorbed CO2 were roughly the same. However, by using the SC membrane, the detrimental effects of wetting can be alleviated by periodic drying to ensure a high CO2 removal efficiency (>90%), whereas the drying does not work for the PP membrane. The SC membrane contactor exhibited a better anti-fouling ability than the PP membrane contactor because the superhydrophobic surface featured a self-cleaning function. To ensure continuous CO2 removal with high efficiency, a method that two SC membrane contactors alternatively operate combined with periodic drying was proposed.

  • 2.
    Bai, Q.
    et al.
    School of Human Settlements and Civil Engineering, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.
    Guo, Z.
    School of Human Settlements and Civil Engineering, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yang, Xiaohu
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jin, L.
    School of Human Settlements and Civil Engineering, Xi'An Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Experimental investigation on the solidification behavior of phase change materials in open-cell metal foams2017In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 142, p. 3703-3708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presented an experimental investigation on solidification behavior of fluid saturated in highly porous open-cell copper foams. Particular attention has been made on the effect of pore parameters (pore density and porosity) on the solidification behavior. A purposely-designed apparatus was built for experimental observations. Results showed that the copper foam had a great effect on solidification and the full solidification time can be saved up to 50%, especially preventing the decrease in solidification rate during the later stage of phase change. The smaller the porosity is, the faster the solidification rate will be. Pore density was found to have little influence upon the solidification rate. In addition, the local natural convection does exist but it has a slight effect on solidification, leading to the slant of the solid-liquid interface. 

  • 3.
    Budt, M.
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental Safety, Germany.
    Wolf, D.
    Heliocentris Industry GmbH, Germany.
    Span, R.
    Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    A review on compressed air energy storage: Basic principles, past milestones and recent developments2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 170, p. 250-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decades a variety of different approaches to realize Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) have been undertaken. This article gives an overview of present and past approaches by classifying and comparing CAES processes. This classification and comparison is substantiated by a broad historical background on how CAES has evolved over time from its very beginning until its most recent advancements. A broad review on the variety of CAES concepts and compressed air storage (CAS) options is given, evaluating their individual strengths and weaknesses. The concept of exergy is applied to CAES in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of CAES. Furthermore, the importance of accurate fluid property data for the calculation and design of CAES processes is discussed. In a final outlook upcoming R&D challenges are addressed. 

  • 4.
    Budt, M.
    et al.
    Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety, and Energy Technology UMSICHT, Germany.
    Wolf, D.
    Heliocentris Industry GmbH, R and D Clean Energy Solutions, Germany.
    Span, R.
    Thermodynamics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Compressed air energy storage - An option for medium to large scale electricalenergy storage2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, p. 698-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution presents the theoretical background of compressed air energy storage, examples for large scale application of this technology, chances and obstacles for its future development, and areas of research aiming at the development of commercially viable plants in the medium to large scale range.

  • 5.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    et al.
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia; Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chen, Guangnan
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
    Yusaf, Talal
    Univ So Queensland, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
    Chen, Shulin
    Washington State Univ, Pullman, WA 99164 USA.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sustainable energy and climate protection solutions in agriculture2014In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 114, p. 735-736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cabeza, Luisa F.
    et al.
    GREA Innovació Concurrent, Universitat de Lleida, Edifici CREA, Pere de Cabrera s/n, 25001 Lleida, Spain.
    Martin, Viktoria
    Royal Institute of Technology,.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Advances in energy storage research and development: The 12th International Conference on Energy Storage Innostock 20122013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 109, p. 291-292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Daianova, L.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Desideri, U.
    Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass, Evaluation of the Potential Bioethanol Production in Three Swedish Regions2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Holmberg, Aksel
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Pettersson, Oscar
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Klintenberg, Patrik
    Hangula, A.
    Namibia Energy Institute, Namibia University of Science and Technology, Windhoek, Namibia.
    Araoz, F. B.
    School of Chemical Science & Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 42, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Y.
    School of Chemical Science & Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 42, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stridh, Bengt
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. ABB AB, Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. School of Chemical Science & Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 42, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An open-source optimization tool for solar home systems: A case study in Namibia2016In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 130, no 15, p. 106-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar home systems (SHSs) represent a viable technical solution for providing electricity to households and improving standard of living conditions in areas not reached by the national grid or local grids. For this reason, several rural electrification programmes in developing countries, including Namibia, have been relying on SHSs to electrify rural off-grid communities. However, the limited technical know-how of service providers, often resulting in over- or under-sized SHSs, is an issue that has to be solved to avoid dissatisfaction of SHSs’ users. The solution presented here is to develop an open-source software that service providers can use to optimally design SHSs components based on the specific electricity requirements of the end-user. The aim of this study is to develop and validate an optimization model written in MS Excel-VBA which calculates the optimal SHSs components capacities guaranteeing the minimum costs and the maximum system reliability. The results obtained with the developed tool showed good agreement with a commercial software and a computational code used in research activities. When applying the developed optimization tool to existing systems, the results identified that several components were incorrectly sized. The tool has thus the potentials of improving future SHSs installations, contributing to increasing satisfaction of end-users.

  • 9.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Jige Quan, S.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, US.
    Robbio, F.I.
    ABB AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lundblad, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Zhang, Y.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ma, Tao
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Optimization of a residential district with special consideration on energy and water reliability2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 194, p. 751-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities around the world have reached a critical situation when it comes to energy and water supply, threatening the urban sustainable development. From an engineering and architecture perspective it is mandatory to design cities taking into account energy and water issues to achieve high living and sustainability standards. The aim of this paper is to develop an optimization model for the planning of residential urban districts with special consideration of renewables and water harvesting integration. The optimization model is multi-objective which uses a genetic algorithm to minimize the system life cycle costs, and maximize renewables and water harvesting reliability through dynamic simulations. The developed model can be used for spatial optimization design of new urban districts. It can also be employed for analyzing the performances of existing urban districts under an energy-water-economic viewpoint.

    The optimization results show that the reliability of the hybrid renewables based power system can vary between 40 and 95% depending on the scenarios considered regarding the built environment area and on the cases concerning the overall electric load. The levelized cost of electricity vary between 0.096 and 0.212 $/kW h. The maximum water harvesting system reliability vary between 30% and 100% depending on the built environment area distribution. For reliabilities below 20% the levelized cost of water is kept below 1 $/m3 making competitive with the network water tariff.

  • 10.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Leduc, S.
    IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Kim, M
    Korea Univ., Seul, Korea.
    Liu, J.
    Beijing Forestry Univ, Peoples R China.
    Kraxner, F.
    IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria.
    McCallum, I.
    IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm.
    Optimal grassland locations for sustainable photovoltaic water pumping systems in China2015In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 75, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grassland is of strategic importance for food security of China because of the high number of livestock raised in those areas. Grassland degradation due to climate change and overgrazing is thus regarded as severe environmental and economic threat for a sustainable future development of China. Photovoltaic water pumping (PVWP) systems for irrigation can play an important role for the conservation of grassland areas, halting degradation, improving its productivity and farmers' income and living conditions. The aim of this paper is to identify the technically suitable grassland areas for the implementation of PVWP systems by assessing spatial data on land cover and slope, precipitation, potential evapotranspiration and water stress index. Furthermore, the optimal locations for installing PVWP systems have been assessed using a spatially explicit renewable energy systems optimization model based on the minimization of the cost of the whole supply chain. The results indicate that the PVWP-supported grassland areas show high potential in terms of improving forage productivity to contribute to supplying the local demand. Nevertheless, the optimal areas are highly sensitive to several environmental and economic parameters such as ground water depth, forage water requirements, forage price and CO2 emission costs. These parameters need to be carefully considered in the planning process to meet the forage yield potentials.

  • 11.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Leduc, S.
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, Laxenburg, Austria..
    Kim, M.
    Korea Univ, South Korea..
    Olsson, A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhang, J.
    Univ Maryland, USA..
    Liu, J.
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, Laxenburg, Austria.; South Univ Sci & Technol China, Sch Environm Sci & Engn, Shenzhen 518055, Peoples R China.;Beijing Forestry Univ, Sch Nat Conservat, Peoples R China..
    Kraxner, F.
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, Laxenburg, Austria..
    McCallum, I.
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, Laxenburg, Austria..
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Suitable and optimal locations for implementing photovoltaic water pumping systems for grassland irrigation in China2017In: APPLIED ENERGY, ISSN 0306-2619, Vol. 185, p. 1879-1889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grassland plays a key role for the food security of China because of the large number of livestock raised in those areas. Thus, grassland degradation due to climate change and overgrazing is considered as one of the most severe environmental and economic threat for the future sustainable development of China. Photovoltaic water pumping systems for irrigation can play a fundamental role for the conservation of grassland areas. This paper investigates the geospatial distribution of the technically suitable grassland locations for the implementation of photovoltaic water pumping systems. The technically suitable grassland areas were taken as starting point to assess the optimal locations. The assessment of the optimal locations was conducted using a spatially explicit optimization model of renewable energy systems based on the cost minimization of the whole forage supply chain. The results indicate that the photovoltaic water pumping systems provide high potential for improving forage productivity, contributing to meet the local demand. The optimal areas are highly sensitive to several environmental and economic parameters such as increased forage potential yield, forage management costs, forage water requirements, ground water depth, forage price and CO2 price. Most of the optimal areas are selected when the market forage price ranges from 300 to 500 $/tonne DM, indicating that the forage produced using PVWP technology for irrigation is already competitive compared to the imported forage.

  • 12.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dynamic modelling of a pv pumping system with special consideration on water demandIn: Proceedings of ICAE2012 / [ed] Applied EnergyConference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dynamic modelling of a PV pumping system with special consideration on water demand2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 112, p. 635-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exploitation of solar energy in remote areas through photovoltaic (PV) systems is an attractive solution for water pumping for irrigation systems. The design of a photovoltaic water pumping system (PVWPS) strictly depends on the estimation of the crop water requirements and land use since the water demand varies during the watering season and the solar irradiation changes time by time. It is of significance to conduct dynamic simulations in order to achieve the successful and optimal design. The aim of this paper is to develop a dynamic modelling tool for the design of a of photovoltaic water pumping system by combining the models of the water demand, the solar PV power and the pumping system, which can be used to validate the design procedure in terms of matching between water demand and water supply. Both alternate current (AC) and direct current (DC) pumps and both fixed and two-axis tracking PV array were analyzed. The tool has been applied in a case study. Results show that it has the ability to do rapid design and optimization of PV water pumping system by reducing the power peak and selecting the proper devices from both technical and economic viewpoints. Among the different alternatives considered in this study, the AC fixed system represented the best cost effective solution.

  • 14.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Techno-economic feasibility of the irrigation system for the grassland and farmland conservation in China: photovoltaic vs. wind power water pumping2015In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, Vol. 103, no 6, p. 311-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photovoltaic water pumping (PVWP) and wind power water pumping (WPWP) systems for irrigation represent innovative solutions for the restoration of degraded grassland and the conservation of farmland in remote areas of China. The present work systematically compares the technical and economic suitability of such systems, providing a general approach for the design and selection of the suitable technology for irrigation purposes. The model calculates the PVWP and WPWP systems sizes based on irrigation water requirement (IWR), solar irradiation and wind speed. Based on the lowest PVWP and WPWP systems components costs, WPWP systems can compete with PVWP systems only at high wind speed and low solar irradiation values. Nevertheless, taking into account the average specific costs both for PVWP and WPWP systems, it can be concluded that the most cost-effective solution for irrigation is site specific. According to the dynamic simulations, it has also been found that the PVWP systems present better performances in terms of matching between IWR and water supply compared to the WPWP systems. The mismatch between IWR and pumped water resulted in a reduction of crop yield. Therefore, the dynamic simulations of the crop yield are essential for economic assessment and technology selection.

  • 15.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Zhang, J.
    Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing, China .
    Liu, J.
    Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing, China .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Economic optimization of photovoltaic water pumping systems for irrigation2015In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 95, p. 32-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photovoltaic water pumping technology is considered as a sustainable and economical solution to provide water for irrigation, which can halt grassland degradation and promote farmland conservation in China. The appropriate design and operation significantly depend on the available solar irradiation, crop water demand, water resources and the corresponding benefit from the crop sale. In this work, a novel optimization procedure is proposed, which takes into consideration not only the availability of groundwater resources and the effect of water supply on crop yield, but also the investment cost of photovoltaic water pumping system and the revenue from crop sale. A simulation model, which combines the dynamics of photovoltaic water pumping system, groundwater level, water supply, crop water demand and crop yield, is employed during the optimization. To prove the effectiveness of the new optimization approach, it has been applied to an existing photovoltaic water pumping system. Results show that the optimal configuration can guarantee continuous operations and lead to a substantial reduction of photovoltaic array size and consequently of the investment capital cost and the payback period. Sensitivity studies have been conducted to investigate the impacts of the prices of photovoltaic modules and forage on the optimization. Results show that the water resource is a determinant factor.

  • 16.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Olsson, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    An economic analysis of photovoltaic water pumping irrigation systems2016In: International Journal of Green Energy, ISSN 1543-5075, E-ISSN 1543-5083, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 831-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: Irrigation using the photovoltaic water pumping (PVWP) systems represents a sustainable and attractive solution, which can combat Chinese grassland desertification and promote a sustainable development of the agricultural sector. This paper investigates the economics of PVWP systems taking into consideration the effects of the key components on the initial capital cost (ICC), life cycle cost (LCC), and revenues. Sensitivity analyses are conducted regarding the crop yield and price, cost of photovoltaic modules, and system components included in the ICC. Results show that the cost of the PVWP system is the most sensitive parameter affecting the ICC under the assumptions made, especially the cost of the PV modules; whereas, the crop production and price affect the net present value (NPV) and payback period (PBP) clearly. The PVWP has surplus power output when the crop water demand is low or it is non-irrigation season. The potential benefit from selling the surplus electricity is also discussed. In addition, the indirect benefits of carbon sequestration and CO2 emission reduction by applying PVWP systems are addressed in this paper.

  • 17.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Olsson, Alexander
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Economic analysis of photovoltaic water pumping irrigation systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irrigation through photovoltaic water pumping (PVWP) system represents one of sustainable and attractivesolutions regarding the problems related to the Chinese grassland desertification. This paper is to investigatethe economics of PVWP systems taking in consideration of the key parameters affecting the sizing, and furtherthe initial capital cost (ICC), the life cycle cost (LCC) and revenues. In particular photovoltaic (PV) modules cost,availability of the well and of the irrigation system, designing water-head, irrigated area and related waterdemand, fuel price and grass production are investigated for the sensitivity analysis. The possibility ofcombining water pumping with electricity production for maximizing benefits is also discussed. Both PVWP anddiesel water pumping (DWP) systems are compared in terms of ICC and LCC. LCC, sensitivity, break-even point(BEP), net present value (NPV) and payback period (PBP) analyses are used to compare and evaluate theeconomic feasibility of the different alternatives investigated. The results show that the availability of the welland the depth of the ground water resources are the most sensitive parameters affecting the initial capitalcosts whereas the grass production and incentives affect mainly the NPV and PBP. The co-benefits for carbonmitigation and carbon credit trading through implementing photovoltaic water pumping system for the Chinesegrassland are also addressed in this paper.

  • 18.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Olsson, Alexander
    Zhang, Chi
    Berretta, Sara
    Hailong, Li
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    On-grid photovoltaic water pumping systems for agricultural purposes: Comparison of the potential benefits under three different incentive schemes2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Quan, S. J.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.
    Robbio, F. I.
    ABB AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lundblad, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Zhang, Y.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ma, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Spatial optimization of residential urban district - Energy and water perspectives2016In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 88, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities around the world have reached a critical situation when it comes to energy and water supply, threatening the urban sustainable development. The aim of this paper is to develop a spatial optimization model for the planning of residential urban districts with special consideration of renewables and water harvesting integration. In particular, the paper analyses the optimal configuration of built environment area, PV area, wind turbines number and relative occupation area, battery and water harvester storage capacities, as a function of electricity and water prices. The optimization model is multi-objective which uses a genetic algorithm to minimize the system life cycle costs, and maximize renewables and water harvesting reliability. The developed model can be used for spatial optimization design of new urban districts. It can also be employed for analyzing the performances of existing urban districts under an energy-water-economic viewpoint. Assuming a built environment area equal to 75% of the total available area, the results show that the reliability of the renewables and water harvesting system cannot exceed the 6475 and 2500 hours/year, respectively. The life cycle costs of integrating renewables and water harvesting into residential districts are mainly sensitive to the battery system specific costs since most of the highest renewables reliabilities are guaranteed through the energy storage system.

  • 20.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yang, Z.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Anders, Lundblad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    An Open-source Platform for Simulation and Optimization of Clean Energy Technologies2017In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 105, p. 946-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is to describe an open-source code for optimization of clean energy technologies. The model covers the whole chain of energy systems including mainly 6 areas: renewable energies, clean energy conversion technologies, mitigation technologies, intelligent energy uses, energy storage, and sustainability. Originally developed for optimization of renewable water pumping systems for irrigation, the open-source model is written in Matlab® and performs simulation, optimization, and design of hybrid power systems for off-grid and on-grid applications. The model uses genetic algorithm (GA) as optimization technique to find the best mix among power sources, storage systems, and back-up sources to minimize life cycle cost, and renewable power system reliability. 

  • 21.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem Engn, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhang, J.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Geog Sci, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Yao, T.
    Sci Syst & Applicat Inc SSAI, Lanham, MD 20706 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Andersson, S.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Landelius, T.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Melton, F.
    NASA ARC CREST, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA.;Calif State Univ Monterey Bay, Sch Nat Sci, Seaside, CA 93955 USA..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem Engn, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Managing agricultural drought in Sweden using a novel spatially-explicit model from the perspective of water-food-energy nexus2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 197, p. 1382-1393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a multi-disciplinary approach, this paper integrated spatial analysis with agricultural and energy system modelling to assess the impacts of drought on crop water demand, water availability, crop yield, and electricity requirements for irrigation. This was done by a novel spatially-explicit and integrated water-food-energy nexus model, using the spatial climatic data generated by the mesoscale MESAN and STRANG models. In this study, the model was applied to quantify the effects of drought on the Swedish irrigation sector in 2013, a typical drought year, for a specific crop. The results show that drought can severely affect the crop yield if irrigation is not applied, with a peak yield reduction of 18 t/ha, about 50 % loss as compared to the potential yield in irrigated conditions. Accordingly, the water and energy requirements for irrigation to halt the negative drought effects and maintain high yields are significant, with the peaks up to 350 mm and 700 kWh per hectare. The developed model can be used to provide near real-time guidelines for a comprehensive drought management system. The model also has significant potentials for applications in precision agriculture, especially using high-resolution satellite data.

  • 22.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Zhu, Y.
    Chengdu University, China.
    Brugiati, Elena
    Università Degli Studi di Perugia, Italy.
    Li, Hailong
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    PV water pumping for irrigation equipped with a novel control system for water savings2014In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 61, p. 949-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Typically, PV water pumping (PVWP) systems for irrigation are normally designed based on the worst conditions, such as high water demand and low solar irradiation. Therefore, the installed PVWP systems become oversized in most of time. Since the conventional control systems don't optimize the water supply, the water losses are increased. To remedy the problems related to the operation of the oversized systems, a novel control system is proposed. The control unit interacts between water demand and water supply in order to pump only the amount required by crops. Moreover, the novel control system substitutes the conventional protection approach with a method based on the ground water resources availability and response. The novel control system represents an innovative solution for water savings in PV watering applications.

  • 23.
    Chen, Yushun
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Zhang, Shuanghu
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing, China .
    Huang, Desheng
    Ministry of Environmental Protection of People's Republic of China, Policy Research Center for Environment and Economy, Beijing, China .
    Li, Bailian
    University of California, Riverside, Riverside, United States .
    Liu, Junguo
    South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, China .
    Liu, Wenjin
    Orient Landscape Industry Group Ltd., Beijing, China.
    Ma, Jing
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Fang
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Yong
    Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, United States .
    Wu, Shengjun
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wu, Yegang
    Shanghai BoDa Development Corporation, Shanghai, China .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Guo, Chuanbo
    Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China .
    Xin, Wei
    Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China .
    Wang, Hao
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, Beijing, China .
    The development of China's Yangtze River Economic Belt: how to make it in a green way?2017In: Science Bulletin, ISSN 2095-9273, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 648-651Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Chiaramonti, D.
    et al.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Liden, G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Advances in sustainable biofuel production and use: The XIX international symposium on alcohol fuels2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 102, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Chiaramonti, D.
    et al.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Maniatis, K.
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Tredici, M.R
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Verdelho, V.
    EABA, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Life Cycle Assessment of Algae Biofuels: Needs and challenges2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 154, p. 1049-1051Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Chisti, Yusuf
    et al.
    Massey University.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Energy from algae: Current status and future trends: Algal biofuels – A status report2011In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 3277-3279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Choi, Byungchul
    et al.
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Su Han
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Chiarmonti, David
    RE CORD Renewable Energy COnsortium R&D, Garbagnate Monastero, LC, Ital.
    Bae, Hyeun-Jong
    Chonnam Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sustainable alcohol fuels promoting mobility and climate stabilization: The 21st International Symposium on Alcohol Fuels2015In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 160, p. 561-565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Chua, K. J.
    et al.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore.
    Chou, S. K.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore .
    Yang, W. M.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Mech Engn, Singapore .
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Achieving better energy-efficient air conditioning - A review of technologies and strategies2013In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 104, p. 87-104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air conditioning is essential for maintaining thermal comfort in indoor environments, particularly for hot and humid climates. Today, air conditioning, comprising cooling and dehumidification, has become a necessity in commercial and residential buildings and industrial processes. It accounts for a major share of the energy consumption of a building or facility. In tropical climates, the energy consumed by heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) can exceed 50% of the total energy consumption of a building. This significant figure is primarily due to the heavy duty placed on cooling technologies to remove both sensible and latent heat loads. Therefore, there is tremendous potential to improve the overall efficiency of the air-conditioning systems in buildings. Based on today's practical technology for cooling, the major components of a chiller plant are (I) compressors, (2) cooling towers, (3) pumps (chilled and cooling water) and (4) fans in air handling units. They all consume mainly electricity to operate. When specifying the kW/R ton of a plant, there are two levels of monitoring cooling efficiency: (1) at the efficiency of the chiller machines or the compressors which consume a major amount of electricity; and (2) at the overall efficiency of cooling plants which include the cooling towers, pumps for moving coolant (chilled and cooling water) to all air-handling units. Pragmatically, a holistic approach is necessary towards achieving a low energy input per cooling achieved such as 0.6 kW/R ton cooling or lower by considering all aspects of the cooling plant. In this paper, we present a review of recent innovative cooling technology and strategies that could potentially lower the kW/R ton of cooling systems - from the existing mean of 0.9 kW/R ton towards 0.6 kW/R ton or lower. The paper, broadly divided into three key sections (see Fig. 2), begins with a review of the recent novel devices that enhances the energy efficiency of cooling systems at the component level. This is followed by a review of innovative cooling systems designs that reduces energy use for air conditioning. Lastly, the paper presents recent developments in intelligent air-control strategies and smart chiller sequencing methodologies that reduce the primary energy utilization for cooling. The energy efficient cooling technology, innovative systems designs, and intelligent control strategies described in the paper have been recently researched or are on-going studies. Several have been implemented on a larger scale and, therefore, are examples of practical solutions that can be readily applied to suit specific needs. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Avelin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Black liquor gasification in a CFB gasifier – system solutions2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new type of black liquor gasification is presented and discussed. It is a CirculatingFluidized Bed process with the addition of TiO2 to the bed material. This gives a directcaustization of Na2CO3 to Na2O.TiO2 which forms NaOH by leaking with water. Thus a lime kilnis not needed. Simultaneously also SO4 is reduced to S2- and stripped off as H2S to a major extent,absorbed in a selective scrubber, giving a separation of OH- and S2- .This makes modifiedcooking possible. The produced synthetic gas can be used to run an efficient Integrated Gas-Combi Cycle (IGCC), up to 37 % electric efficiency, or use the gas for production of differentchemicals like NH3, DME pr Methanol. These aspects are discussed as well in the paper.

  • 30.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Avelin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    CFB Black liquor gasification – Discussions of gasification and system solutions2009In: Proceedings of first International Conference on Applied Energy / [ed] Jinyue Yan, Hong-Kong University , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new type of black liquor gasification process is presented and analyzed. It is a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) process with the addition of TiO

    2 to the bed material. This gives a direct caustization of Na2CO3 to Na2O.TiO2 which forms NaOH by leaking with water. Thus a lime kiln is not needed in the process. Simultaneously SO4 is also reduced to S2- and stripped off as H2S to a major extent, absorbed in a selective scrubber, giving a separation of OH- and S2- , which makes modified cooking possible. Performance of integrating black liquor gasification has also been analyzed and discussed for electricity production in an efficient Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and/or different chemicals such as NH3, DME or methanol in a polygeneration sytem.

  • 31.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Mirmoshtaghi, Guilnaz
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Larsson, Eva K.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Engvall, K.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Liliedahl, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Dong, C.
    North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China.
    Hu, X.
    North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China.
    Lu, Q.
    North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China.
    Modelling and Simulation of Biomass Conversion Processes2013In: Proceedings - 8th EUROSIM Congress on Modelling and Simulation, EUROSIM 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By utilizing biomass gasification, the energy contentof the biomass can be utilized to produce gas to be used forcogeneration of heat and power as well as other energy carrierssuch as fuels for vehicles. The concept is suitable forapplication to existing CHP plants as well as for utilizing spentliqour in small scale pulp and paper mills. The introductionwould enable flexible energy utilization, use of problematicfuels as well as protects the environment by e.g. avoiding therelease of toxic substances. In this paper, the possibilities todevelop this concept is discussed. In this paper we comparedifferent gasification processes with respect to what gas qualitywe get, and how the gasification can be modelled usingdifferent modelling approaches, and how these can becombined. Results from simulations are compared toexperimental results from pilot plant operations in differentscales and with different processes like CFB and BFBTechnologies, athmospheric and pressurized, and using steam,air and oxygen as oxidizing media.

  • 32.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Comparison of Gas Quality from Black Liquor and Wood Pellet Gasification Using Modelica Simulation and Pilot Plant Results2017In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 105, p. 992-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a potential to integrate biomass gasification with pulp & paper and CHP plants in order to complement the existing systems with production of chemicals, such as methane, hydrogen, and methanol etc. To perform system analysis of such integration, it is important to gain knowledge of relevant input data on expected synthesis gas composition by gasifying different types of feed stock. In this paper, the synthesis gas quality from wood pellets gasification (WPG) has been compared with black liquor gasification (BLG) through modeling and experimental results at pilot scale. In addition, the study develops regression models like Partial Least Squares (PLS) made from the experimental data. The regression models are then combined with dynamic models developed in Modelica for the investigation of dynamic energy and material balances for integrated plants. The data presented in this study could be used as input to relevant analysis using e.g. ASPEN plus and similar system analysis tools. 

  • 33.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hartwell, Philip
    BioRegional MiniMills Ltd, UK.
    Experimental and numerical investigation of pellet and black liquor gasification for polygeneration plant2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 204, p. 1066-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is vital to perform system analysis on integrated biomass gasification in chemical recovery systems in pulp and paper and heat and power plants for polygeneration applications. The proposed integration complements existing pulp and paper and heat and power production systems with production of chemicals such as methane and hydrogen. The potential to introduce gasification-based combined cycles comprising gas turbines and steam turbines to utilize black liquors and wood pellets also merits investigation. To perform such analysis, it is important to first build knowledge on expected synthesis gas composition by gasifying at smaller scale different types of feed stock. In the present paper, the synthesis gas quality from wood pellets gasification has been compared with black liquor gasification by means of numerical simulation as well as through pilot-scale experimental investigations. The experimental results have been correlated into partial least squares models to predict the composition of the synthesis gas produced under different operating conditions. The gas quality prediction models are combined with physical models using a generic open-source modelling language for investigating the dynamic performance of large-scale integrated polygeneration plants. The analysis is further complemented by considering potential gas separation using modern membrane technology for upgrading the synthesis gas with respect to hydrogen content. The experimental data and statistical models presented in this study form an important literature source for future use by the gasification and polygeneration research community on further integrated system analysis.

  • 34.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Energiprocesser.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Energiprocesser.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hartwell, Philip
    BioRegional MiniMills Ltd., United Kingdom.
    Modeling of Black Liquor Gasification2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Naqvi, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Energiprocesser.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. KTH, Energiprocesser.
    Kyprianidis, Konstantinos
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Hartwell, Philip
    BioRegional MiniMills Ltd., United Kingdom.
    Modeling of Wood Gasification in an Atmospheric CFB Plant2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, Department of Public Technology.
    Alternative Pathways to a fossil-fuel free energy system in the Mälardalen region of Sweden2006In: Proceedings of the Second International Green Energy Conference, 2006, 2006, p. 822-830Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study on alternative pathways to a fossil-fuel free regional energy system in the Mälardalen region of Sweden with a population of 3 million inhabitants. We describe and address how the region can be made independent of fossil fuels by integration of resource management, technology advances, and behavior change in energy use. First we investigate the consumption pattern of the inhabitants. Then we study what resources are available, and how these can be used to fulfill the different demands. If we just use the resources in a pattern of business as usual today without changing the behavior, the balance between demands and resources is difficult to reach. By combining a slightly different behavior and a change of crops it could be possible to fulfill the needs. Some advanced technological solutions have also been proposed. For example, dedicated biomass energy plants such as fodder sugar beats can be used for ethanol production. Also Salix, straw, hemp and some cereals can be used and the residues can be gasified to produce dimethylether (DME), which is good as a replacement for diesel fuel. Still the fuel demand for transport is high, and the vehicle weight could be further reduced. For example, by going back to the car size we had only ten years ago the weight would be 25-30 % less, and fuel consumption would be at least 15 % lower. With diesel engines instead of Otto-engines the fuel consumption could be reduced by 35 %, and with hybrid technology additional 20% fuel reduction could be gained. Improved public transportation will also give a positive effect especially for those commuting between the larger cities and between the cities and the suburbs. The results of our calculations show that it would be possible to accomplish a fossil-free energy system in the Mälardalen region. The results of this study are important since it shows that an energy balance without fossil fuels could be possible for an area with a population in the order of 3 million people, which would also be valuable in studies of other areas in the world.

  • 37.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Alternative Pathways to a Fossil-Fuel Free Energy System in the Mälardalen region of Sweden2007In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1226-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study on alternative pathways to a fossil-fuel free regional energy system in the Mälardalen region of Sweden with a population of 3 million inhabitants. We describe and address how the region can be made independent of fossil fuels by integration of resource management, technology advances, and behaviour change in energy use. First we investigate the consumption pattern of the inhabitants. Then we study what resources are available, and how these can be used to fulfil the different demands. If we just use the resources in a pattern of business as usual today without changing the behaviour, the balance between demands and resources is difficult to reach. By combining a slightly different behaviour and a change of crops we can fulfil the needs and it might even be possible to have a surplus of resources. Some advanced technological solutions have also been proposed. For example, dedicated biomass energy plants such as Salix, straw, hemp and some cereals can be used for ethanol production and the residues can be gasified to produce dimethylether (DME), which is good as a replacement for diesel fuel. Still the fueldemand for transport is high, and the vehicle weight could be further reduced. For example, by going back to the car size we had only 10 years ago the weight would be 25-30% less, and fuelconsumption would be at least 15% lower. With diesel engines instead of Otto engines the fuel consumption could be reduced by 35%, and with hybrid technology additional 20% fuel reduction could be gained. Improved public transportation will also give a positive effect especially for those commuting between the larger cities and between the cities and the suburbs. The results of our calculations show that it would be possible to accomplish a fossil-free energy system in the Mälardalen region. The results of this study are important since it shows that an energy balance without fossil fuels could be possible for an area with a population in the order of 3 million people, which would also be valuable in studies of other areas in the world.

  • 38.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Combined Solar Power, Hydrogen, TPV and Cyanobacter Production2010In: Proceedings of the International Conference of Applied Energy / [ed] Jinyue Yan, 2010, p. 179-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss design for a combined TPV and solar power system with production of biomass. During the passage through the solar collector cyanobacters or algae are getting sunshine to drive the photo synthesis. An algae suspension is circulated through a solar panel to drive photo synthesis. The flow rate is varying with solar intensity to balance the temperature increase. This is to avoid inhibition of the cyanobacters/algae growth rate due to too high temperature. PV cells are producing electricity when there is light, while TPV cells are used when it is dark. The biomass produced then is utilized for production of photons for the TPV system. As an alternative a system producing Hydrogen and electricity produced in a fuel cell system is discussed. Design criteria for the systems are discussed in this paper for a house that is principally self sufficient on energy. Both theoretical and practical obstacles are discussed, as there are a number of issues to solve before the technique can be used in ”real life”

  • 39.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Mårtensson, Kenneth
    Enander, Måns
    How to develop a fossil fuel free Malardalen Region2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Vassileva, Iana
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    OPTIMIZATION OF THE ENERGY SYSTEM TO ACHIEVE A NATIONAL BALANCE WITHOUT FOSSIL FUELS2011In: International Journal of Green Energy, ISSN 1543-5075, E-ISSN 1543-5083, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 684-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the overall energy balance for Sweden and to some extent EU27 is discussed. It deals with the reduction of the total consumption in industrial, transport, and domestic sectors through more efficient vehicles, industrial processes, and buildings and individual behavior. The conclusion is that it should be relatively easy for Sweden to reach a sustainable society if the political will, in the form of policies and incentives, is present. It would also be possible for the EU27 to reach a sustainable society, although it would be more demanding (challenging?).

  • 41.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Vassileva, Iana
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Wallin, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Optimization of the energy system to achieve a national balance without fossil fuels2010In: International Green Energy Conference, IGEC-V June 1-3, 2010, Waterlo, Ontario, Canada / [ed] Xianguo Li, Waterloo,Canda: University publications , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the overall balance for Sweden and to some extent EU27 with respect to both power and heat production in relation to how the energy is utilized. This includes transportation, where we compare the system of today with a possible future system with hybrid-electric vehicles, renewable fuels and reductions of total consumption, through both better vehicles, as well as better logistics for transportation of goods. Concerning industry use energy improvements through more efficient industrial processes is discussed. For households, offices and manufacturing industries energy efficient buildings and individual behavior with respect to energy use is discussed. New sources for power will be less stable, like wind and solar power. A special focus is on biomass utilization and production. This also includes food. The situation today is compared to the potential balance after implementation of the actions discussed in the paper. The overall conclusion is that it should be relatively easy for Sweden to reach a sustainable society, if just the political will is present. It is also shown that there is a good potential also for the complete EU 27, but the actions are significantly more demanding to reach the balance, although in no way impossible.

  • 42.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, inyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    How to become independent of fossil fuels in Sweden2008In: quist / [ed] Lui Ronghou, Shanghai: SJTU press , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has got the toughest demand in the whole of Europe recently. In 2020 minimum 49 % of the energy should be renewable energy. To achieve the goal biogas production is being optimized, utilizing organic wastes and crops, to produce methane for cars and buses. In Vasteras a 200 MW waste gasification plant will be built to replace coal in an existing 600 MW PC-boiler with biogas. The plant will start up 2011. There will be co-firing with also peat, aside of the biogas. In Sweden 120 TWh/y of biomass is consumed, which is almost 1/3 of the total 400 TWh energy utilized annually. Most of it is used in co-generation (CHP) or pulp and paper industry. Now the plan is to increase production of liquid fuels for vehicles. Energy balances for production of bio ethanol in Sweden will be discussed. This can be an interesting part of poly-generation systems. Plug-in hybrid car are foreseen to be introduced on a large scale within the next 10 years. Here liquid fuels are used in a combustor with e.g. a turbine and generator primarily to produce electricity, while electric engines fed by electricity from batteries drive the vehicle. Today 60 % of the new cars are "environmental", that is low consuming diesel, ethanol or biogas. Seven years ago it was only 5 % of the new cars! Cities, county authorities and government are working together with companies and universities to drive the transfer away from fossil fuels.

  • 43.
    Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Norstrom, Christer
    Lundin, Sune
    Entrepreneurship and sustainability perspective in engineering education2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Daianova, Lilia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Evaluation of a regional bioenergy system with local production of biofuel for transportation, integrated with a CHP plant2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 92, p. 739-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The share of renewable liquid fuels (ethanol, fatty acid methyl ester, biogas, and renewable electricity) in the total transportation fuel in Sweden, has increased by the end of 2009 to such level that e.g. domestic bioethanol production is unable to satisfy current ethanol fuel demand. Regional small-scale ethanol production can assist the region in covering the regional needs in transport fuel supply.

    Current case study system includes the production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from locally available cereals straw. A mixed integer programming (MIP) model is developed for cost optimization of regional transport fuel supply (ethanol, biogas and petrol). The model is applied for two cases, one when ethanol production plant is integrated with an existing CHP plant (polygeneration), and one with a standalone ethanol production plant.

    The optimization results show that for both cases the changes in ethanol production costs have the biggest influence on the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel. Petrol fuel price and straw production costs have also a significant effect on costs for supplying cars with transport fuel for both standalone ethanol production and integrated production system.

    By integrating the ethanol production process with a CHP plant, the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel can be cut by 31%, from 150 to 104 €/MW h fuel, which should be compared with E5 costs of 115 €/MW h (excl VAT).

  • 45.
    Daianova, Lilia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Local production of bioethanol to meet the growing demands of a regional transport system2011In: Proceedings of World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, May 2011, Linköping, Sweden, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    : Energy security and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) are the driving forces behind the development of renewable fuel sources worldwide. In Sweden, a relatively rapid development in bioethanol usage in transportation has been driven by the implementation of national taxation regulations on carbon neutral transport fuels. The demand for bioethanol to fuel transportation is growing and cannot be met through current domestic production alone. Lignocellulosic ethanol derived from agricultural crop residues may be a feasible alternative source of ethanol to secure a consistent regional fuel supply in Swedish climatic conditions. This paper analyzes how the regional energy system can contribute to reducing CO2 emissions by realizing local small scale bioethanol production and substituting petrol fuel with high blend ethanol mixtures for private road transport. The results show that about 13 000 m3 of bioethanol can be produced from the straw available in the studied region and that this amount can meet the current regional ethanol fuel demand. Replacing the current demand for petrol fuel for passenger cars with ethanol fuel can potentially reduce CO2 emissions from transportation by 48%.

  • 46.
    Daianova, Lilia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Thorin, Eva
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dotzauer, Erik
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Locally produced bioethanol for a regional self-sufficient transport fuel system2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Desideri, U
    et al.
    Univ Perugia, Italy.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Clean energy technologies and systems for a sustainable world2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 97, no SI, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Ding, J.
    et al.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Pan, G.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Du, L.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Lu, J.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Wei, X.
    South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.
    Li, J.
    National Supercomputer Center in Guangzhou, Guangzhou, China.
    Wang, W.
    Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theoretical prediction of the local structures and transport properties of binary alkali chloride salts for concentrating solar power2017In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 39, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive molecular simulations have been carried out to compute local structures and transport properties of different components of binary NaCl-KCl over a wide operating temperature range. The partial radial distribution functions, coordination number curves and angular distribution functions were calculated to analyze the influence of temperature and component on local structures of molten Alkali Chlorides. Transport properties were calculated by using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) simulations including densities, shear viscosity and thermal conductivity. The results show that ion clusters are considered to be formed and the distance of ion clusters become larger with increasing temperature which has great influence on macro-properties. The calculated properties have a good agreement with the experimental data, and similar method could be used to computationally calculate the properties of various molten salts and their mixtures.

  • 49.
    Ding, Jing
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Du, Lichan
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Pan, Gechuanqi
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Jianfeng
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wei, Xiaolan
    South China Univ Technol, Sch Chem & Chem Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jiang
    Natl Supercomp Ctr Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Weilong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Royal Inst Technol, Energy Proc Div, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molecular dynamics simulations of the local structures and thermodynamic properties on molten alkali carbonate K2CO32018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 220, p. 536-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molten carbonate salts have received particular attention for high-temperature thermal energy storage and heat Molecular dynamics simulation transfer applications due to desirable thermal characteristics, such as wide operating temperature range, low Molten alkali carbonates causticity and excellent thermal stability. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed Local structures on molten alkali carbonate K2CO3 based on an effective pair potential model, a Born-Mayer type combined with Thermodynamic properties a Coulomb term. The radial distribution functions (RDF) and coordination number curves of the molten salt were characterized to explore the temperature dependences of macroscopic properties from microscopic view. The results suggest that the distance between K2CO3 particles is getting larger with temperature increasing, resulting in the increase of molar volume and the diminished ability of resistance to shear deformation and heat transfer by vibration between ions. Besides, it can be concluded that the structure of CO32- is inferred reasonably to be ortho-triangular pyramid from the comprehensive analysis of local structures including the angular distribution functions (ADF). Moreover, the thermodynamic properties were simulated in detail from 1200 to 1600 K including the density, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat capacity, sheer viscosity, thermal conductivity and ion self-diffusion coefficient, which was hard to be measured from experiments under high-temperature extreme conditions, All the simulation results are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data with high accuracy, and the minimum simulation error is as low as 1.42%.

  • 50.
    Ding, Y.
    et al.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaCollege of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Shao, C.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. Division of Energy Processes, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Song, Y.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Zhang, C.
    Division of Energy Processes, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guo, C.
    College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Economical flexibility options for integrating fluctuating wind energy in power systems: The case of China2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 228, p. 426-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inherent stochastic nature of wind power requires additional flexibility during power system operation. Traditionally, conventional generation is the only option to provide the required flexibility. However, the provision of the flexibility from the conventional generation such as coal-fired generating units comes at the cost of significantly additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. Fortunately, with the development of the technologies, energy storage and customer demand response would be able to compete with the conventional generation in providing the flexibility. Give that power systems should deploy the most economic resources for provision of the required operational flexibility, this paper presents a detailed analysis of the economic characteristics of these key flexibility options. The concept of “balancing cost” is proposed to represent the cost of utilizing the flexible resources to integrate the variable wind power. The key indicators are proposed respectively for the different flexible resources to measure the balancing cost. Moreover, the optimization models are developed to evaluate the indicators to find out the balancing costs when utilizing different flexible resources. The results illustrate that exploiting the potential of flexibility from demand side management is the preferred option for integrating variable wind power when the penetration level is below 10%, preventing additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. However, it may require 8% of the customer demand to be flexible and available. Moreover, although energy storage is currently relatively expensive, it is likely to prevail over conventional generation by 2025 to 2030, when the capital cost of energy storage is projected to drop to approximately $ 400/kWh or lower.

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