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  • 1. Adolfsson, Petra
    et al.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Jonasson, Mikael
    Closing words!2009In: Guiding and guided tours / [ed] Adolfsson, P., Dobers, P. & Jonasson, M., Göteborg: BAS Publishers , 2009, p. 215-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Adolfsson, Petra
    et al.
    Dobers, PeterMälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.Jonasson, Mikael
    Guiding and guided tours2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3. Adolfsson, Petra
    et al.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Jonasson, Mikael
    Introduction – Guiding and guided tours2009In: Guiding and guided tours / [ed] Adolfsson, P., Dobers, P. & Jonasson, M., Göteborg: BAS Publishers , 2009, p. 15-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bergström, Ola
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Sweden .
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business. Gothenburg Research Institute, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Organizing sustainable development: From diffusion to translation2001In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 167-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy changes towards global sustainable development have important consequences for how these policies are organized. New and alternative models of organizing tend to emphasize indirect control rather than direct control and supervision. However, our understanding of their effects and consequences is not very well elaborated. The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of specific characteristics and effects of organizing alternative environmental policies towards sustainable development. The paper is based on a field study of the latest attempt in Sweden to work towards sustainable development. In 1998, the Swedish government formulated a programme for local investments aiming at positive environmental effects and increased employment rates. In this article, we have posed more general questions on how to understand and to theorize upon the organizing of sustainable development. We suggest a view of the implementation of environmental policies towards sustainable development as a chain of translation. These translations highlight unintended consequences of the policies, e.g. the creation of a temporary linguistic community allowing local and global 'time spaces' to merge.

  • 5.
    Cerin, Pontus
    et al.
    USBE - Umeå universitet.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    The contribution of sustainable investments to sustainable development2008In: Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal, ISSN 1476-8917, E-ISSN 1478-8764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 161-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cerin, Pontus
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobers, Peter
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Sweden.
    What does the performance of the Dow Jones Sustainability Group Index tell us?2001In: Eco-Management and Auditing, ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dow Jones Sustainability Group Index (DJSGI) is really a family of indexes used to identify and track the performance of sustainably run companies. When the DJSGI was introduced in September 1999, it was claimed to outperform the more generalized Dow Jones Global Index (DJGI) with respect to market capitalization growth. Corporations, NGOs and governmental agencies often refer to the DJSGI for illustrating that integrating economic, environmental and social factors into the operations and management of a company increases shareholder value and business activity transparency. The DJSGI is also used by global corporations to legitimize the efforts they put into sustainability. However, there have been no studies carried out to date that illuminate the business activity transparency of the DJSGI. This study investigates the structure and transparency of the DJSGI compared with the DJGI. The results of this study show that the DJSGI focuses more on the technology sector than the general DJGI does. The average market capitalization value of companies listed in the DJSGI was found to be two-and-a-half times the corresponding average for those listed in the DJGI. This raises some legitimate questions. Does the superior performance of the DJSGI reflect the greater efforts DJSGI companies put into sustainability, or a dependence on asymmetric distributions in company sectors, world regions or market capitalization? This paper therefore endeavours to illustrate the transparency of the DJSGI. 

  • 7.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Aesthetic consumption: A dilemma for sustainable development2010In: Corporate social responsibility: Challenges and practices / [ed] Dobers, P., Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press , 2010, p. 147-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Corporate social responsibility: Challenges and practices2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Management and Methods2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives an overview of recent Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) handbooks to illustrate that the fi eld is of immediate interest and relevance for scholars and practitio- ners. It gives a background to CSR and how the fi eld relates to management and methods and introduces the four articles of this special issue.

  • 10.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Miljömanagement. Guld och gröna skogar?1998Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Några reflektioner kring företags sociala ansvar2006In: Hälsans styrning av arbetet, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 223-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Organising strategies of environmental control. Towards a decentralisation of the Swedish environmental control repertoire1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 13.
    Dobers, Peter
    Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Organizing environmental control in temporary local organizations1999In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how environmental

    improvement work can be organized differently.

    The concept of temporary local organization is

    introduced to exemplify complementary

    strategies to centrally organized permanent

    organizations. By thorough empirical

    descriptions of four local reform projects in

    Sweden, and by analysing 39 interviews,

    characteristics of temporary local organizations,

    such as transience and vagueness, are discussed.

  • 14.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Stockholm as a Mobile Valley: Empty spaces or illusionary images?2004In: Journal of Urban Technology, ISSN 1063-0732, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's economy, the production and consumption of images rivals the production and consumption of products, challenging basic notions of economic practices, transforming what constitutes an economic system and shifting the appropriate sites of analysis: "Images are now as much amaterial force in and between societies as are economic and political forces". Constructing and using images related to information technology, silicon, and digital fabrics, has been one way of (re)presenting a city in the late twentieth century. Examples from the early 1990s are Osaka as a"city of intelligence," Barcelona as a "city of telematics," Amsterdam as a "city of information," and Manchester as a "wired city." More recent examples include Stockholm, of course, as an "IT City" or a "Mobile Valley," Boston as the "Cyber District," Colorado Springs as "the Silicon Mountains," and the beach area between Santa Barbara and San Diego as the "Digital Coast." How such images are created, how they are circulated, and whether they have any correspondence to the lived city, are beyond the scope of this paper-as is the question of whether the images of Stockholm as the Internet City or as the Mobile Valley are "true." The concern of this paper is to show the functions that these images perform-in a spatial sense. In other words, what does an image of Stockholm as an IT City do? What happens when Stockholm is mentioned as the "Internet Capital of Europe" on the cover of Newsweek? What are the results of Stockholm's being identified as the "most dynamic and attractive European region (in which) to work and live" by the German business magazine Wirtschaftswoche? These questions are answered by first offering atheo retical account, in spatial terms, of what images do and then studying the IT-related images of Stockholm presented in articles, reports, photographs, and Internet searches. 

  • 15.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Strategies for environmental control: a comparison between regulation and centralized control inGermany and reforms leading to decentralized control in Sweden1997In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 34-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A theoretical framework for analysing control implementation structures and processes is discussed. The framework is applied to a comparative study of a control strategy implemented in Germany and one implemented in Sweden. The differences between these control strategies are explained. In Germany, legislation was used to combat single-source, measurable emissions. Environmental problems that are identifiable and measurable lend themselves to such detailed legislation. However, this is not the case with newly defined environmental problems such as diffuse emissions. Thus, in Sweden, openly formulated directives were used to combat diffuse, hard-to-measure emissions. This illustrates the recent tendency in Swedish environmental control, which is a change from centralized control through regulation to decentralization of environmental control through reforms.

  • 16.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Styrning eller samarbete?: Kommunens förändrade roll vid kontroll av diffusa utsläpp1997In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 289-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the changing role of municipalities in the control of new environmental problems. The definition of environmental problems changes over time. It could be said that the change mirrors a learning pro¬cess, whereby the most prominent problems are solved first. Single source emissions have been dealt with and now diffuse emissions are increasingly becoming the environmental challenge.

    The results of an empirical study of four environmental projects concerning the control of diffuse emission are presented with regard to the new role of municipalities. This study shows how municipalities are moving from their traditional control and supervisory role to a cooperative and "joint-vision" role.

    The concept of joint vision involves a competence development of interest groups that are not fully informed and that partially have competitive roles. Joint vision demands a leadership that encourages open undertakings and personal responsibility not supervision and control by others.

  • 17.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    The many faces of corporate social responsibility2010In: Corporate social responsibility: Challenges and practices / [ed] Dobers, P., Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2010, p. 7-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cerin, Pontus
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Who is rating the raters?2001In: Corporate Environmental Strategy, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 95-97Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing interest in applying sustainability criteria to investment observed throughout the industrial world has resulted in the creation of numerous sustainability funds. The Dow Jones Sustainability Group Index DJSGI., which is probably the best-known sustainability index, was presented by Ivo Knoepfel in Issue 8/1 of Corporate Environmental Strategy. In his article, the methodology underlying the DJSGI is said to have had a consistent framework. However, in a recent study we have highlighted some of the major elements upon which the DJSGI is based1, and have found evidence to suggest that there might be other factors, unrelated to sustainability, contributing to the apparently superior market performance of the DJSGI, and which may bring its framework consistency into question 2. This , response attempts to illuminate some of these factors.

  • 19.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, Sweden.
    Slipping into Darkness: A Study of the Role of ICTs in the Making of Stockholm’s Image2006In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Hallin, Anette
    The use of internet in building the brand of 'Stockholm - the capital of Scandinavia'2009In: Information communication technologies and city marketing: Digital opportunities for cities around the world / [ed] Gascó-Hernández, M & Torres-Coronas, T., Hershey, USA: Idea Group Publishing, 2009, p. 264-293Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    The Use of Internet in Building the Brand of "Stockholm: The Capital of Scandinavia”2009In: Information Communication Technology and City Marketing: Digital Opportunities for Cities around the World / [ed] Gascó-Hernández, Mila & Torres-Coronas, Teresa, Idea Group Publishing, 2009, p. 265-294Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Halme, Minna
    Aalto Univ, Helsinki Sch Econ, Helsinki, Finland.
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Developing Countries2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws attention to several corporate social responsibility (CSR) questions in developing countries. (1) Illustrations from, for example, South America and Africa, includ- ing African voices critical to foreign aid, show that societies are different in many respects. This implies different capacities of organizations and their managers to understand and address pressing CSR issues in different cultural contexts. (2) Weak institutional environ- ments, such as in developing countries, often harbor illicit fi nancial outfl ow from poor countries to rich ones. This strips developing nations of critical resources and contributes to failed states, a point hardly ever discussed in the CSR literature. We argue for corporate actions in areas such as enhancing capacity in detecting tax fraud, antitrust and the unveil- ing of corruption cases. Obviously, legislation is a task of politicians, governments and international governmental bodies. However, if business enterprises can ‘legally misuse’ the system, then the matter should be seen as a CSR issue also. There is thus an urgency for concerted efforts by the private sector, public sector and non-governmental organiza- tions to develop structures and institutions that contribute to social justice, environmental protection and poverty eradication.

  • 23.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Linderström, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Mobjörk, Malin
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Institutional entrepreneurship in an academic organisation: sustainability at Malardalen University2008In: International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, ISSN 1740-8822, E-ISSN 1740-8830, Vol. 3, no 3/4, p. 201-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and elaborates on a case of institutional entrepreneurship for sustainable development in higher education and research collaboration in a Swedish academic milieu. We argue, much in line with the contemporary international policy debate about climate change, that universities can and should have a leading role in producing new knowledge and innovation for the promotion of sustainable development. We consider that higher education and the whole university organisation, rather than just research, should be analysed regarding institutionalising sustainable development, which is not emphasised in the policy debate. In our conceptualisation of sustainable development, we argue that entrepreneurship and, more specifically, institutional entrepreneurship, can be used as an interesting normative and theoretical model. By drawing upon the concept of institutional entrepreneurship, we try to open up for the reflective exploration of three projects that illustrate the institutionalisation of sustainable development. While doing so, we identify the critical areas for further theoretical and empirical research from the perspective of institutional entrepreneurship.

  • 24.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Rosenqvist, Christopher
    Gratis nyheter: Affärsidéer förverkligas2004Book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Schwartz, BirgittaMälardalen University, School of Business. KTH.
    13th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference: Critical Perspectives on Health, Climate Change and Corporate Responsibility2007Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Springett, Delyse
    Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Discourse, Narratives and Communication2010In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problematic and contestable nature of discourses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has driven the commissioning of this special issue on discourses, narratives, and communication about CSR. While CSR may be seen as sharing normative goals with the concept of sustainable development, there are fundamental questions to be asked about the nature and purpose of CSR, how it has been constructed and framed, and whether it promotes the normative goals of sustainable development in order to effect change to the business-as-usual model. The teasing out of the different discourses of CSR has become an important theme in academic research in recent years. In this issue, that discourse is developed. The authors discover gaps between CSR as understood by civil society groups and radical non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the CSR norms promoted at corporate level. The latter fail to impact on business-as-usual, even though the same lan- guage may be used. The link between Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reporting and market-value is explored; and CSR principles and actions promoted by business are cri- tiqued from the perspective of the norms of sustainable development, one conclusion being that the parameters of sustainable development as a concept need to be extended to include the dimension of culture.

  • 27.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Design for unsustainability2009In: Research Design Journal, ISSN 2000-3080, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Centre for Advanced Studies in Leadership, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Design, Lifestyles and Sustainability. Aesthetic Consumption in a World of Abundance2005In: Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 324-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper strives for a conceptualization of sustainability, design and contemporary consumption. By sketching out how effective production systems have created an abundance of products, the paper links this development to the aestheticization of society and an increased interest in design. In market economies characterized by profusion, corporations engage in activities filling their offerings with aura, aesthetics, symbols and meaning. In such lands of plenty, conspicuous consumption becomes a thoroughly expressive activity and highly problematic for actors with ambitions to design a sustainable future. Our conclusion is that sustainability must ultimately be seen as intertwined with social processes such as fashion, identity and identity construction.  

  • 29.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Uppsala universitet.
    Design, lifestyles and sustainability: Aesthetic consumption in a world of abundance2008In: Contemporary Research at Swedish Graduate School of Business: Business Change and Renewal / [ed] C. Hultman & J. Löwstedt, Västerås: Mälardalens högskola och Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 249-270Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper strives for a conceptualization of sustainability, design and contemporary consumption. By sketching out how effective production systems have created an abundance of products, the paper links this development to the aestheticization of society and an increased interest in design. In market economies characterized by profusion, corporations engage in activities filling their offerings with aura, aesthetics, symbols and meaning. In such lands of plenty, conspicuous consumption becomes a thoroughly expressive activity and highly problematic for actors with ambitions to design a sustainable future. Our conclusion is that sustainability must ultimately be seen as intertwined with social processes such as fashion, identity and identity construction.

  • 30.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loveable networks. A story of affection, attraction and treachery2001In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 28-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly connected age, information technology can be argued to have become more politicized. The attempts to establish network technologies to promote the development of an information society are tokens of an increasingly vested interest that politics has in information technologies. Recognition of the entanglement of politics and technology is crucial in understanding contemporary organizational change. Instead of taking organizational stability for granted, we assume organizational change to be the norm. In this paper, we point to the many organizing efforts needed to prevent technologies from drifting away into non-existence. We present two cases of IT ventures ± one seemingly failed and one seemingly successful. Together, they illustrate the point that technological networks, as stable as they may seem, can only survive as long as they permanently fascinate actors from other techno-economic networks and thereby attract their unconditional love, affection and commitment.

  • 31.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ohållbar design2009In: Research Design Journal, ISSN 2000-639X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Cocoon - A traveling space2004In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 825-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a graduation project at a design school in Stockholm, a piece of furniture to be used for retreats in the public space was exhibited. It was named ‘The Cocoon’ and was a reclining chair covered with a bubble-like construction made out of cloth and steel. The exhibition was a starting point for a number of journeys. In the years to come, the Cocoon reached museums, exhibition halls, newspapers and magazines throughout the world. In this article, we track the travels and illustrate the transformations of the Cocoon. We seek to understand spacing activities behind the travels and view the travels from a spatial perspective focusing on the relation between transportation and transformation, of emptiness, form and content.

  • 33.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden .
    Wolff, Rolf
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Knowledge Interests in Corporate Environmental Management2001In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We know from earlier studies that corporate environmental management is a young discipline, not yet integrated in general management and organization studies, but that researchers take an increasing part in the ongoing scientific conversation. However, the underlying knowledge interests characterizing the field of corporate environmental management is yet empirically unsubstantiated. One way to find out what elements make up the field is to analyse the contents of the most influential writings in the field. The present article identifies the 10 most cited works in Business Strategy and the Environment in 1992–2000 and explores the content of these texts. We conceptualise a typology for analysing corporate environmental management theory and formulate a characterization of the dominating knowledge interests. Our findings show that the theoretical fundament of corporate environmental management lacks a hermeneutic knowledge interest.

  • 34.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Sweden.
    Strannegård, Lars
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Wolff, Rolf
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Union-Jacking the research agenda. A study of the frontstage and backstage of Business Strategy and the Environment 1992-19982000In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this discussion article is to show some descriptive characteristics of research carried out in environmental management. Thus, it is an invitation for reflection on environment-related research in management. To start this reflection, we use data from Business Strategy and the Environment (BSE) in the years from 1992 to 1998. BSE is a journal that is to a great extent dedicated to research on environment-related management issues. To identify characteristics of environment-related research in management, we utilize data from the frontstage of the journal (published articles and their authors) and from the backstage (references used in these articles). The database includes the titles and authors of 150 articles and their 4297 references. We present descriptive data on key terminology, country origins of the articles, number of references used per article over time, age changes of the stock of references, most cited authors and most cited works. Based on these observations we draw conclusions concerning power structures and formulate research questions that will contribute to a better understanding of the research in strategic environmental management.

  • 35.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Translation and inscription in development projects: Understanding environmental and health care-related organizational change2009In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 480-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to argue that the interface between projects is of particular interest when organizing development projects. It offers a theoretical discussion of translation and inscription phases, not only because they are important to the understanding of mobilizing action in development projects, but also because they are crucial in a chain of sequential projects that are organized as responses to new situations. Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses illustrations of development projects in public management in Sweden to discuss a fundamental organizing problem of projects: how project delimitation and formation take place. Findings – The paper has focused on organizational change and development projects regarding environmental and health care organization renewal projects. It has analyzed how such projects are organized and linked to context. Development problems and their solutions cannot be divided into a functional structure since they overlap and demand attention by a multitude of perspectives during translation. Research limitations/implications – It is theoretically interesting to highlight certain slices of the organizational reality in projects. The paper has chosen a project perspective and focus at the beginning and end of projects. In theoretical terms, it has chosen to call these phases translation and inscription. Practical implications – Projects are different compared with permanent organizations due to the existence of beginnings and endings. On the one hand, permanent organizations are normally “going concerns” where the start is back in history and the end is clouded in a distant future. On the other hand, in a project, translation and inscription phases are unavoidable as they are triggered by the specific conditions underlying beginnings and endings. Originality/value – Projects with clear boundary-overlapping character cannot be judged with concepts stemming from the methods of construction project management. In contrary, the paper argues that there are two other concepts that can better explain the special organizing problems invoked by the cases cited here: translation and inscription.

  • 36.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    Handelshögskolan i Göteborg, Sweden.
    Metaforer som verktyg för ideologisk styrning. Fågel, fisk eller mittemellan?2002In: Nordiske Organisasjonsstudier, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 60-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metaforer som verktyg för ideologisk styrning. Fågel, fisk eller mittemellan? Forskare och praktiker har sedan slutet av 1980-talet med växande intresse studerat och använt metaforer som ett redskap för att förstå eller kontrollera organisationer. I den teoretiska diskussionen återfinns argument allt från en optimistisk till en pessimistisk inställning till metaforanvändning. Den förstnämnda inställningen utgår från en humanistisk ansats medan den andra ofta intar en mera kritisk och emancipatorisk hållning. Föreliggande uppsats vill bidra till diskussionen genom att presentera och analysera två fall där metaforer har använts för att påverka uppfattningar och föreställningar hos anställda. I synnerhet är artikeln en analys av hur metaforiska budskap har använts i broschyrer inom två olika personalutbildningar i svensk detaljhandelsverksamhet. Vår huvudsakliga slutsats pekar mot att metaforisk kontroll inte gör ledningen av organisationer mer mänsklig utan bidrar till att bekräfta och befästa befintliga strukturer och att objektifiera personalen. Men samtidigt förefaller den ideologiska styrningen knappast vara speciellt slagkraftig.

  • 37.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Wikander, Sten
    BioNova: Building a Biotech company2004Book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Wolff, R.
    Handelshögskolan, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Managing ecological competence - Empirical evidence and theoretical challenges1995In: Greener Management International, ISSN 0966-9671, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 32-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on the problem of managing the ecological challenge from a competence point of view. The aim of this paper is to discuss a set of competence areas from a management perspective, which together form the concept of ecological competence. Conceptual reflections about ecological competences establish a first step in specifying descriptions of an ecological learning process and may contribute as an analytical tool for researchers interested in exploring this subject more. Empirical data from Sweden demonstrates learning elements of emerging "ecological spaces".

  • 39.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Sweden .
    Wolff, Rolf
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Sweden .
    Competing with 'soft' issues - from managing the environment to sustainable business strategies2000In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last 15 years, important elements to achieve sustainability have been governmental regulation, increasing consumer awareness, implementation of end-of-pipe technologies in industry and the development of 'green' products. Although many improvements have followed since, some would say that current dominating demands regarding shareholder value (SHV) and claims regarding sustainability are two global discourses in conflict. We argue that the financial sector can influence eco-efficiency and other environmental improvements. The role of the financial sector, although strategically important, is generally neglected in discourses on sustainability. In this article, we illustrate that financial institutions are crucial facilitators for sustainability. Financial actors' demands regarding business' transparency about management systems and objectives for sustainability will play an important role in the near future. One current example for this emerging trend is the recently introduced Dow JonesSustainable Group Index. Narrowing in on this special issue on 'Contemporary Nordic research on corporate environmental management' we have gone through the 25 articles by Nordic authors previously published in Business Strategy and the Environment (BSE). We have identified three theme clusters, which support the observation that Nordic research in corporate environmental management, as published and illustrated in BSE has developed issues from 'hard' such as pollution, environmental technology and compliance, to 'soft' issues, such as research on the development and implementation of corporate environmental management and alternative projects for environmental improvements. This special issue presents a selection of papers discussed at the Fifth Workshop of the Nordic Business Environmental Management Network in Gothenburg, Sweden, in January 1999. 

  • 40.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Wolff, RolfHandelshögskolan i Göteborg.
    Contemporary Nordic Research in Corporate Environmental Management1999Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Wolff, Rolf
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Eco-efficiency and dematerialization: Scenarios for new industrial logics in recycling industries, automobile and household appliances1999In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental field has been continuously overloaded with new concepts in the area of environmental impact such as environmental space, ecological backpack, carrying capacity, ecological footprint, dematerialization and eco-efficiency. The latter two concepts have a particular relevance to corporate environmental management. This article discusses the concepts of dematerialization and eco-efficiency with respect to their implications for industry logics. It is based on a project that was initiated by the Swedish EPA. Within the project we used the scenario technique to explore the future industry logics of recycling industries related to the automobile industry and household appliances. One scenario, 'business as usual', indicates a focus on products with incremental improvements and a stepwise departure from today's practices. The other scenario, 'dematerialization', indicates a focus on functions and needs, and a significant departure from today's practices. Concluding from the empirical analysis of present industry logics, based on interviews and data analysis in specific industries, we realized that changes in industry logics and business systems are inevitable, if industry takes a responsibility for the whole life cycle seriously. Accordingly, we propose the transformation of business systems as a research agenda for the future. Such-an agenda follows ecologically motivated transformation andtranslation processes throughout the whole system of actor networks and action nets of society and creates an enhanced understanding of the emerging processes of corporate environmental management. It also considers different institutional arrangements between those actors that constitute the system as a whole.

  • 42.
    Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business.
    Wolff, RolfHandelshögskolan i Göteborg.
    Miljöstrategier - Ett företagsekonomiskt perspektiv1995Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Guziana, Bozena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    How Sustainability Leaders Communicate Corporate Activities of Sustainable Development.2013In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the corporate quest for sustainable development, production- and product-related environmental impacts of a company can form a basis for de fining the corporate environmental profile, as well as for de fining environmental leaders. Awareness of the production- and productrelated dimensions of the environmental profile varied among companies. This paper studied descriptions and reporting of environmental issues among 19 companies ranked as Global Supersector Leaders in 2009/2010 by the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI). The results show that all of these companies are aware of production- and product-related environmental aspects. There are also examples, both as headings on websites and as sections in sustainability reports, where companies structure their environmental initiatives separately with respect to production (or their own operations) and the product. The paper ends with a proposed modelof corporate environmental profile.

  • 44.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Adolfsson, P.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Competition, Cooperation or Coopetition: Municpal Darwinism in the 21st century2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Dobers, Peter
    Materiality and children’s performative understanding of the city in a guided tour2013In: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS of the 3rd International Research Forum on Guided Tours, 4-6 April 2013, The Netherlands, NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, The Netherlands , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Producing Stockholm through guided tours2009In: Guiding and guided tours / [ed] Adolfsson, P., Dobers, P. & Jonasson, M., Göteborg: BAS Publishers , 2009, p. 147-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Representing place: Uncovering the Political Dimension of Guided Tours2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 8-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the relation between place and its representations through a comparative discourse analysis of two different guided tours of Stockholm. The comparison sheds light on what may otherwise remain blind spots of mainstream guided tours. Applying Lefebvre's notion of representations of space and Bourdieu's ideas on symbolic power the contribution of this article is to show how all guided tours, regardless of their intention, create political, conceived spaces. Hence this article opens up for a debate on a critically aware reading of the verbal (re) presentation of the particular character of sites in and through guided tours.

  • 48.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Stockholm in music: An exploration into the relations between Lyrics and Place2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering.
    The Commodification of the City2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation.
    Dobers, Peter
    Södertörns högskola.
    The mutual constituting of organizations – the case of NK department store and Stockholm2015Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 58
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