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  • 1.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Rylander, Annelie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Experiences of surviving life-threatening illness: The meaning of recovery2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1160-1168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Recovery from life‐threatening illness may be experienced as more demanding and lasts longer than patients first expect. Many patients experience recovery after life‐threatening illness, as filled with complex problems. These problems are primarily physical and psychological, although also social, and adversely affect daily life as well as perceived quality of life. Patients experience uncertainty about living with the legacy of a life‐threatening illness and how it negatively limits their daily lives and experienced health.

    Aim

    The purpose is to illuminate experiences of the meaning of recovery from life‐threatening disease.

    Ethical approval

    Approval for the study was obtained through a Regional Research Ethics Committee.

    Methods

    This study was conducted as a qualitative narrative study. This means that written stories of human recovery beyond suffering from life‐threatening disease were collected and analysed with a phenomenological hermeneutic method.

     Results

    The findings reveal two major areas – intrapersonal meanings and relational meanings. Four themes were found in these areas, each of which was divided into subthemes as follows: obstacles, for example disappointment of life, alienation of self and opportunities/resources: for example balance, own knowledge, hope and gratitude; relational obstacles, for example a lack of care, stigmatisation and economic stress; and relational resources such as informal care and professional care.

    Study limitations

    The informants were predominantly women that may be explained by the fact that females seem to be more often engaged in social media and willing to participate in these kinds of studies. Another limitation is that we only reached out to Swedish speaking Facebook groups when recruiting our informants.

    Conclusions

    In the narratives of their recovery process, surprisingly few focused on professional health care as a resource. Experiences from the study may be used to further develop care, especially to support patient self‐care regarding intrapersonal and relational resources that promote patient recovery beyond suffering from life‐threatening disease.

  • 2.
    Rylander, Annelie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Fredriksson, Stina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Stenwall, Ewa
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Significant aspects of nursing within the process of end-of-life communication in an oncological context2019In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of end-of-life communications has previously been described and found to be given late in the patient’s palliative care. There is a need for earlier and more continuous end-of-life-communications throughout the patient’s care to reduce anxiety, confusion, and promote participation. Registered nurses (RNs) have a unique closeness to the patient and the ability to identify early the need for end-of-life communication. The aim of this study was to describe crucial aspects of nursing in end-of-life communication in an oncology context. The study was designed as a qualitative content analysis of in-depth interviews with RNs working in oncology in-patient care units. Two domains were identified: before, and after end-of-life communications, with the categories importance of being well prepared to identify both the patient’s and their family’s needs. Cooperation and interaction between physicians and RNs were crucial to be able to support patients and their relatives around the clock. The presence of RNs encouraged further conversations about the patients’ conditions to gain insight into the new situation. End-of-life communication should not only be medicine oriented and performed by physicians. Involvement of RNs’ expertise enables increased patient/relative participation as well as reduced anxiety and suffering, creating clarity and safety for all involved in care.

  • 3.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Rylander, Annelie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Brytpunktssamtal i hemmet2022In: Omvårdnad i hemmet vid komplexa vårdsituationer / [ed] Lena-Karin Gustafsson; Mirkka Söderman, Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 105-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Rylander, Annelie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Omvårdnad av personer med cancer2022In: Omvårdnad i hemmet vid komplexa vårdbehov / [ed] Lena-Karin Gustafsson; Mirkka Söderman, Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 207-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Rylander, Annelie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    The path of recovery towards a new way of living among cancer survivors2022Conference paper (Refereed)
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