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  • 1.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Innovative Technologies Shaping Lives of Men and Women in Nigeria2018In: Nordic African Days NAD, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global world over the years, witnessed significant transformations, where innovative technologies are shaping lifestyles, lifting millions from poverty, providing alternative and sustainable sources of income and stretching the reach of quality life to rural and remote areas. Africa is not an exception, and in this regard, Nigeria is witnessing a new page in its socioeconomic development, where the country is leveraging innovative technologies to unlock its technological potentials. Using desk and document reviews, coupled with online interviews with some young Nigerian innovators, the results showcase several Nigerian home-grown technology companies that have achieved global recognition. The companies include ccHub, Andela, PagaTech, BudgIT, Hotels.ng, Konga, Wakanow and MainOne among others as the country’s success stories, making immense opportunities for technological growth and job creation. The paper further sees the Facebook founder’s visit to Nigeria as validation for betting big on the countries innovative technology industry. The paper however found that the scientific narrative on Nigeria’s technology and innovative industry is under-appreciated across the world due to lack of information and support systems. This scientific contribution is a page turner to reposition Nigeria’s innovative technological ecosystem on the global map. The paper hereby recommends a public–private support to this young Nigeria’s innovative technological ecosystem to accelerate the socioeconomic development of the country.

  • 2.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Nurturing My Satisfaction: Social Entrepreneurs and Their Benefits as Role Models2019In: European Academy of Management EURAM, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By studying social entrepreneurs within an African context, this study explores how role models can benefit from role modeling activities and draws upon qualitative data. A total of 100 interviews conducted in two cycles were analyzed to develop a theoretical model that illustrates role model’s utmost satisfaction from their modeling and mentoring activities. Furthermore, the study illustrates that role models’ task performance and motivational drive feeds into the knowledge and skills they help their protégés build, which in turn develops their competence and increases their self-wellbeing. This study contributes both to the field of social entreprneurship and that of role model research.

  • 3.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Entrepreneur in Crisis: A Qualitative Lens on how Entrepreneurs Manage Failure2019In: European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship ECIE, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every entrepreneur faces barriers when they engage in entrepreneurial activities and for every entrepreneur, their utmost goal is to succeed in their endeavors. However, some entrepreneurial ventures fail due to several factors. After the failure, the entrepreneur either relapses or seeks for new entrepreneurial opportunities. The present study conducts a qualitative research synthesis to examine what happens after the occurrence of firm failure and how entrepreneurs manage the experiences from failure. In doing so, the present study analyses already published qualitative studies on failure by conducting a literature search from several electronic databases to capture the qualitative studies published under failure. After the elimination criteria, 19 relevant articles were identified. The identified articles were analyzed using meta ethnography and grounded formal theory to elaborate on three overarching concepts – the experience and cost of failure, the impact from failure and the outcome of failure. The findings from these analyzed qualitative research offers insight into the ongoing discussions on entrepreneurial failure by identifying recurrent themes and concepts as well as by presenting a conceptual model that describes the entrepreneur’s experiences from failure and how they manage these firm failures. The findings also provide avenues on how future research can contribute to the discussion on failure.

  • 4.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Migrant Entrepreneurs and Their Spark for Entrepreneurial Exploration2018In: International Journal of Law and Political SciencesArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The war and violence around the world today has brought a mass increase of forcibly displaced individuals to seek refuge in the European Union, where they have to leave their homes and restart a new life built on other cultural, social, economic and legal premises than they are used to. Since 2014, the EU have accepted such individuals to help deal with the crisis by providing protection and refuge. Countries like Germany, Hungary, Austria and Sweden accepted around two- third of EU’s asylum seekers. Statistics from the Swedish migrations agency shows that about 163, 000 people applied as asylum seekers in December 2015 as compared to the 20, 000 persons who applied in April of the same year. This dramatic rise in population brought an overwhelming shock to Sweden because they needed to find quick and suitable solutions to be able to accommodate the thousands of refugees. Due to this, it posed a challenge for the Sweden to immediately tackle the problem of integrating the new arrivals in the labor market. With less societal integration and little or no skills to connect to the workforce, these immigrants faced a shaky beginning, as they had to struggle with not just integrating into a new society but also to get suitable jobs. These uncertainties brought pressures to the immigrants which drove a certain number of them to move from city to city seeking for a place seek for alternatives not just to contribute to their own well-being but also to contribute to the environment which provided a safe haven for them. As a result, they brought in their own skills, experiences, and cultural orientation to exploring and exploiting new opportunities and filling the gaps in their new environment. Recently, immigrants contribute with multidisciplinary collaborations and insights, international relations and to national growth through the exploitation of entrepreneurial opportunities because they come with different backgrounds and see their new society with a different “lenses” from the locals in the country. Our study, seek to understand how these uncertainties led migrant entrepreneurs towards entrepreneurial activities. We seek to understand their processes towards exploring and exploiting opportunities for entrepreneurship as well as their role in contributing to the regional growth. To reach these aims, we conducted a qualitative study using open-ended interviews of several migrant entrepreneurs – both female and male – that took part in two different entrepreneurial projects in mid-Sweden. The first projects was a business program for African women, the other was an entrepreneurship hub for immigrants. Both were focused on inspiring and coaching immigrants during their entrepreneurial process. An integrated part was to work with the participants’ entrepreneurial skills and abilities. In addition, we also collected archival documents to support our data. We analyzed our data using content analysis for qualitative research. The study aims to contribute to the entrepreneurship literature by understanding the influences of cognitive and environmental factors towards entrepreneurial activities. This study also provides several suggestions for policy makers on how they can better integrate migrants into becoming contributors of the society.

  • 5.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    To Exist Or To Persist: Exploring The Entrepreneurial Phases For Immigrant Entrepreneurs2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study looks into the immigrant entrepreneurial self and their opportunity identification strategies along the entrepreneurial phases. It addresses the recent surge in entrepreneurship literature that has attracted more attention due to the inflated level of immigrations especially in the European countries. The study draws samples from immigrants who have the intentions of starting a venture (the pre-start-up phase), those who have already started their venture (start-up/early phase), those who have nurtured their ventures to maturity (growth/development phase) and those who are in the process of exit (exit phase). Findings suggest that immigrant entrepreneurs adopt several strategies for capturing opportunity during the early phase which, in turn, influence their self-image. Additionally, for the immigrant entrepreneurs included in this study, the identifying and capturing of these opportunities becomes as important as how they perceive themselves. This study shows that the immigrant entrepreneurs’ affective motivation served as an essential mechanism leading their strong selfimage towards their aspirational goals

  • 6.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    The Affective Motivation of Women Miners in Ghana2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective motivation (motivation that is emotionally laden usually related to affect, passion, emotions, moods) in the workplace stimulates individuals to reinforce, persist and commit to their task, which leads to the individual and organizational performance. This leads individuals to reach goals especially in situations where task are highly challenging and hostile. In such situations, individuals are more disposed to be more creative, innovative and see new opportunities from the loopholes in their workplace. However, when individuals feel displaced and less important, an adverse reaction may suffice which may be detrimental to the organization and its performance. One sector where affective motivation is eminently present and relevant, is the mining industry. Due to its intense work environment; mostly dominated by men and masculinity cultures; and deliberate exclusion of women in this environment which, makes the women working in these environments to feel marginalized and. The mining industry in Ghana has mostly been seen as a very physical environment especially underground and mostly considerd as “no place for a woman”. Despite the fact that these women feel less “needed” or “appreciated” in such environments, they still have to juggle between intense work shifts; face violence and other health risks with their families, which put a strain on their affective motivational reaction. Beyond these challenges however, several mining companies in Ghana today are working towards providing a fair and equal working situation for both men and women miners, by recognizing them as key stakeholders, as well as including them in the stages of mining projects from the planning and designing phase to the evaluation and implementation stage. Drawing from the psychology and gender literature, this study takes a narrative approach to identify and understand the shifting gender dynamics within the mine works in Ghana, occasioning a change in background disposition of miners, which leads to more women taking up mine jobs in the country. In doing so, a qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews from Ghana. Several women working within the mining industries in Ghana shared their experiences and how they felt and still feel in their workplace. In addition, archival documents were gathered to support the findings. The results suggest a change in enrolment regimes in a mining and technology university in Ghana, making room for a more gender equal enrolments in the university. A renowned university that train and feed mine work professional into the industry. The results further acknowledge gender equal and diversity recruitment policies and initiatives among the mining companies of Ghana. Lastly, the women miners were seen in an organized, solidarized moves, judging the time ripped to step forward for a change in the statues quo. This study contributes to the psychology and Gender literature by highlighting the hindrances women face in the mining industry as well as highlighting several of their affective reactions towards gender inequality. Furthermore, the study elaborates on how these emotional reactions may be detrimental or beneficial to the success of the industry. The study also provides several suggestions for decision makers in the mining industry of what can be done in the future to reduce the gender inequality gap within the industry.

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