https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carnesten, Hillewi
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. The Arctic University of Norway Narvik Norway.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences Linköping University Linköping Sweden;Julius Center University Medical Center Utrecht Utrecht Netherlands.
    Andreae, Christina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland Uppsala University Eskilstuna Sweden.
    Struggling in the dehumanized world of COVID—An exploratory mixed‐methods study of frontline healthcare workers' experiences2024In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore healthcare workers' experiences of the changed caring reality during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden.DesignAn online fully mixed-methods design.MethodsA web-based self-reported questionnaire with fixed and open-ended answers collected data from March to April 2021, analysed in three steps. First, free-text questions were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Then quantitative linear regression analyses using models covering stress and coping mechanisms were conducted. Finally, a meta-inference of qualitative and quantitative data emerged a new comprehensive understanding. The COREQ guidelines were used for reporting.

    Results

    Meta-inferenced results of quantitative and qualitative findings show the pandemic was a traumatic experience for healthcare workers. Main theme; When work became a frightening experience in a dehumanized reality, comprised four themes: Entering unprepared into a frightful, incomprehensible world; Sacrificing moral values and harbouring dilemmas in isolation; Lack of clear management; and Reorient in togetherness and find meaning in a changed reality. Qualitative results comprised four categories; Working in a dehumanized world; Living in betrayal of ones' own conscience; Lack of structure in a chaotic time and Regaining vitality together. Subdimensions comprehensibility and meaningfulness were associated significantly with post-traumatic stress disorder in multiple regression analysis. In multiple regression analysis, sense of coherence was the most prominent coping strategy.

    Conclusions

    Forcing oneself to perform beyond one's limit, sacrificing moral values and lacking management was a traumatic experience to healthcare workers during the pandemic. Reorienting as a way of coping was possible in togetherness with colleagues. There is an urgency of interventions to meet the needs among healthcare workers who took on a frontline role during the COVID-19 pandemic and to prevent mental health illness in future crisis.

  • 2.
    Carnesten, Hillewi
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    von Heideken Wågert, Petra
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Wiklund, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Andreae, Christina
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Struggling with frightening experiences in a transformed reality: A mixed methods study of healthcare workers’ experiences during the pandemic.2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact health care workers’ (HCWs’) mental health. Research show that psychological distress and hard challenges abide with strong commitment to contribute. Yet, in-depth understanding of HCWs’ experiences of the changed caring reality during the pandemic is missing. Mixed methods research (MMR) accommodates several features apart from employing either quantitative or qualitative methods. This presentation focuses on examples from the 13-step mixed method by Leech and Onwuegbuzie.

    Methods: 97 HCWs in one hard-hit region in Sweden answered a web-based questionnaire measuring symptoms of stress (using DSM-5 criteria for post-traumatic stress syndrome, PTSD) in relation to perceived sense of coherence (SOC-scale) and self-compassion (SCS) as well as HCWs’ experiences. First, qualitative data (experiences of the pandemic) was analyzed by qualitative content analysis, then quantitative data (associations between PTSD and SOC/SCS) were analyzed with linear regression adjusted for covariates. Thirdly, a synthesis, the meta-inference of qualitative and quantitative data, explained a new comprehensive understanding. 

    Results: By analyzing the categories and subcategories from the qualitative analysis in relation to symtoms of stress and SOC/SCS, a synthesis emerged. This was undertaken by merging and comparing the findings and discussing the new comprehensive understanding. Finally, to fully outline the mixed methods approach, qualitative and quantitative data were synthesized into a new comprehensive whole, a meta inference. 

    Conclusion: This study moves away from dichotomic traditions between qualitative or quantitative approaches. By broadening the methodological departure this study may provide a new comprehensive understanding and contribute to enhance quality in MMR. 

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf