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  • 1.
    Finnman, Johannes
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    ETHNICITY, STAFF RESPONSIVENESS AND CHILD ENGAGEMENT IN THE SWEDISH PRESCHOOL CONTEXT ACCORDING TO CHILD CHARACTERISTICS AND STAFFING: A PATH ANALYSIS WITH A MULTIGROUP ANALYSIS2019In: FORTE TALKS 2019: VÄLFÄRD FÖR FRAMTIDEN, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on childrenofethnicminoritiesin Swedish preschoolsand theirengagementhas beena mainfocus area for research, eventhoughEuropeis facinga migration crisis. Child engagement predicts, amongotheroutcomes, futureacademicperformanceand mental well-being. Child engagementshouldbe promotedby the staff accordingto the curriculum for preschool. More research on ethnicity, engagementand staffingis needed.

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  • 2.
    Finnman, Johannes
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Söderbäck, Maja
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    School Development and Leadership, Malmö University.
    Welander, Jonas
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University College.
    Challenges to Relational Commitments of Preschool Staff in Supporting Children in Contexts with a High Proportion of Early Second Language Learners in Sweden2023In: Early Education and Development, ISSN 1040-9289, E-ISSN 1556-6935, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeUsing COR theory to study developments of health and other key resources in self-employed workers in Sweden over 6 years, this study: (1) explored whether the heterogenous group of self-employed workers contained subgroups with different health trajectories, (2) investigated whether these were more typical for certain individuals (with respect to age, gender, sector, education, employment status), and (3) compared the different health trajectories regarding resource development in mental well-being, business resources, employment status, work ability.

    MethodThe study used data from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health (SLOSH) and included participants working as self-employed or combiner (N = 2642).

    ResultFive trajectories were identified with latent class growth curve model analysis (LCGM). Two health trajectories with (1) very good, respective (2) good stable health (together comprising 78.5% of the participants), (3) one with moderate stable health (14.8%), (4) one with a U-shaped form (1.9%), and (5) one with low, slightly increasing health (4.7%). The first two trajectories flourish: they maintained or increased in all key resources and were more likely to remain self-employed. Trajectories three and five consist of those who fight to maintain or increase their resources. Workers in the U-shaped health trajectory show signs of fight and flight after loss in health and other key resources.

    ConclusionsStudying subgroups with different resource developments over time was suitable to understand heterogeneity in self-employed workers. It also helped to identify vulnerable groups that may benefit from interventions to preserve their resources.

  • 3.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    et al.
    Malmö university, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Anna-Karin
    Jönköping university, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Social interaction and gender as factors affecting the trajectories of children’s engagement and hyperactive behaviour in preschool2021In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0007-0998, E-ISSN 2044-8279, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 617-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social interactions in preschool and a child’s gender are, incross-sectional studies, related to the child’s overall levels of hyperactive behaviour andengagement in preschool activities. However, whether social interaction and gender canpredict children’s engagement and hyperactivity is not thoroughly investigated. This studyaims to investigate the longitudinal influence of gender, child-to-child interaction, andteacher responsiveness on the association between trajectories of children’s levels ofcore engagement and hyperactive behaviour. It was hypothesized that peer-to-childinteraction and teacher responsiveness in preschool settings are related to positivechange in engagement among children with hyperactive behaviour, especially for boys.Sample and methods. Swedish preschool staff completed questionnaires assessingthe variables of interest for children aged 1–5(N = 203). Data were collected on threeoccasions over a two-year period. Latent growth curve (LGC) models were used toexplore whether teacher responsiveness, peer-to-child interaction, and gender predicttrajectories of engagement and hyperactivity.Results. The results revealed that high levels of hyperactivity were associated withlower levels of engagement on the first occasion. Positive peer-to-child interactions andresponsive teachers were significant predictors of an increased level of engagement anddecreased level of hyperactive behaviour, especially for boys.Conclusions. The findings underscore the need to improve social interactions,especially peer-to-child interactions, to improve engagement in children with hyperactivebehaviour, especially boys. Implications for practices and research are discussed.

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