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  • 1.
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjolander, Arvid
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stattin, Par
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Oncol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Physical Activity and Survival among Men Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have investigated the association between post-diagnosis physical activity and mortality among men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis on both overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality in a large cohort. Methods: Data from 4,623 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer 1997-2002 and followed-up until 2012 were analyzed. HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association between post-diagnosis recreational MET-h/d, time spent walking/bicycling, performing household work or exercising, and time to overall and prostate cancer-specific death. All models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: During the follow-up, 561 deaths of any cause and 194 deaths from prostate cancer occurred. Statistically significantly lower overall mortality rates were found among men engaged in 5 recreationalMET-h/d (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.52-0.77), walking/ bicycling 20 min/d (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57-0.86), performing householdwork > 1 h/d (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.59-0.86), or exercising > 1 h/wk (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61-0.90), compared with less active men within each activity type. For prostate cancer-specific mortality, statistically significantly lower mortality rates were seen among men walking/bicycling >= 20 min/d (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.87) or exercising 1 h/wk (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.94). Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity were associated with reduced rates of overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Impact: Our study further strengthens previous results indicating beneficial effects of physical activity on survival among men with prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(1); 57-64. (C) 2014 AACR.

  • 2.
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjolander, Arvid
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Szulkin, Robert
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stattin, Par
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oncol, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Body mass index and weight change in men with prostate cancer: progression and mortality2014In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 933-943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body mass index (BMI) is a modifiable lifestyle factor that has been associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer and biochemical recurrence. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the exposure BMI at the time of a prostate cancer diagnosis and weight change after diagnosis, and the outcomes of prostate cancer progression and mortality in a large cohort study. Data from 4,376 men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer between 1997 and 2002 were analyzed. BMI and weight change were self-reported in 2007. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in complete-case analysis (n = 3,214) using Cox proportional hazards models. Progression was experienced among 639 (14.6 %) of the study participants, and in total, 450 (10.3 %) deaths of any cause and 134 (3.1 %) prostate cancer-specific deaths were recorded during follow-up. Obese men had a 47 % increased rate of overall mortality compared to normal weight men (HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.03-2.10). No statistically significant associations were found for BMI and prostate cancer progression or prostate cancer-specific mortality. A weight loss > 5 % after diagnosis almost doubled the rate of overall mortality compared to maintaining a stable weight (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.41-2.66), while a weight gain > 5 % was associated with an almost doubled increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality (HR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.18-3.16). Being obese was associated with an increased rate of overall mortality, and gaining weight after a prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with an increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality.

  • 3.
    Jan, Michael
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Temple Univ Hosp & Med Sch, Dept Internal Med, Philadelphia, PA 19140 USA..
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjolander, Arvid
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stattin, Par
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Preoperat Sci, Urol, Umea, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bälter, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The roles of stress and social support in prostate cancer mortality2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the association between perceived stress, social support, disease progression and mortality in a nationwide population-based cohort of men with prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The study surveyed 4105 Swedish men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer regarding stress, grief, sleep habits and social support. Associations between these factors and mortality were assessed using multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: Men with the highest levels of perceived stress had a statistically significantly increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared with men with low stress levels (hazard ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.63). Men with high stress levels also had a high frequency of grieving and sleep loss. They also had fewer people with whom to share their emotional problems and felt an inability to share most of their problems with partners, friends and family. Conclusions: This study contributes to the growing field of psychosocial quality of life research in men with prostate cancer. The findings show a significant association between prostate cancer-specific mortality and perceived stress in patients initially diagnosed with localized, non-metastatic prostate cancer. Significant associations between perceived stress and various psychosocial factors were also seen. The findings of this study could prove useful to target interventions to improve quality of life in men with prostate cancer.

1 - 3 of 3
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  • nn-NO
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