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  • 1.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. KTH, Sweden.
    Saffar Shamshirgar, Davoud
    KTH, Sweden.
    Tornberg, Anna-Karin
    KTH, Sweden.
    Fast Ewald summation for free-space Stokes potentials2017In: Research in the Mathematical Sciences, ISSN 2197-9847, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a spectrally accurate method for the rapid evaluation of free-space Stokes potentials, i.e., sums involving a large number of free space Green’s functions. We consider sums involving stokeslets, stresslets and rotlets that appear in boundary integral methods and potential methods for solving Stokes equations. The method combines the framework of the Spectral Ewald method for periodic problems (Lindbo and Tornberg in J Comput Phys 229(23):8994–9010, 2010. doi: 10.1016/j.jcp.2010.08.026 ), with a very recent approach to solving the free-space harmonic and biharmonic equations using fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) on a uniform grid (Vico et al. in J Comput Phys 323:191–203, 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.jcp.2016.07.028 ). Convolution with a truncated Gaussian function is used to place point sources on a grid. With precomputation of a scalar grid quantity that does not depend on these sources, the amount of oversampling of the grids with Gaussians can be kept at a factor of two, the minimum for aperiodic convolutions by FFTs. The resulting algorithm has a computational complexity of $$O(N \log N)$$ O ( N log N ) for problems with N sources and targets. Comparison is made with a fast multipole method to show that the performance of the new method is competitive.

  • 2.
    Albuhayri, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Engström, Christopher
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Malyarenko, Anatoliy
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ni, Ying
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    An Improved Asymptotics of Implied Volatility in the Gatheral Model2022In: Springer Proceedings in Mathematics and Statistics, Springer Nature, 2022, Vol. 408, p. 3-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the double-mean-reverting model by Gatheral. Our previous results concerning the asymptotic expansion of the implied volatility of a European call option, are improved up to order 3, that is, the error of the approximation is ultimately smaller that the 1.5th power of time to maturity plus the cube of the absolute value of the difference between the logarithmic security price and the logarithmic strike price.

  • 3.
    Albuhayri, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Malyarenko, Anatoliy
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ni, Ying
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Engström, Christopher
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Tewolde, Finnan
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Zhang, Jiahui
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Asymptotics of Implied Volatility in the Gatheral Double Stochastic Volatility Model2019In: Proceedings of 18th Applied Stochastic Models and Data Analysis International Conference with the Demographics 2019 Workshop, Florence, Italy: 11-14 June, 2019 / [ed] Christos H. Skiadas, ISAST: International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology , 2019, p. 81-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The double-mean-reverting model by Gatheral [1] is motivated by empirical dynamics of the variance of the stock price. No closed-form solution for European option exists in the above model. We study the behaviour of the implied volatility with respect to the logarithmic strike price and maturity near expiry and at-the- money. Using the method by Pagliarani and Pascucci [6], we calculate explicitly the first few terms of the asymptotic expansion of the implied volatility within a parabolic region.

  • 4.
    Albuhayri, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Malyarenko, Anatoliy
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ni, Ying
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Engström, Christopher
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Tewolde, Finnan
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Zhang, Jiahui
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Asymptotics of Implied Volatility in the Gatheral Double Stochastic Volatility Model2021In: Applied Modeling Techniques and Data Analysis 2: Financial, Demographic, Stochastic and Statistical Models and Methods / [ed] Dimotikalis, Yannis, Karagrigoriou, Alex, Parpoula, Christina, Skiadas, Christos H., Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2021, p. 27-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The double-mean-reverting model by Gatheral is motivated by empirical dynamics of the variance of the stock price. No closed-form solution for European option exists in the above model. We study the behaviour of the implied volatility with respect to the logarithmic strike price and maturity near expiry and at-the-money. Using the method by Pagliarani and Pascucci, we calculate explicitly the first few terms of the asymptotic expansion of the implied volatility within a parabolic region.

  • 5.
    Albuhayri, Mohammed
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Dimitrov, Marko
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ni, Ying
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Malyarenko, Anatoliy
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Numerical Studies of the Implied Volatility Expansions up to Third Order under the Gatheral Model2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gatheral double stochastic volatility model is a three-factor model with mean-reverting stochastic volatility that reverts to a stochastic long-run mean. Our previous paper investigated the performance of the first and second-order implied volatilities expansions under this model. Moreover, a simple partial calibration method has been proposed. This paper reviews and extends previous results to the third-order implied volatility expansions under the same model. Using Monte-Carlo simulation as the benchmark method, extensive numerical studies are conducted to investigate the accuracy and properties of the third-order expansion. 

  • 6.
    Alekseev, Aleksandr
    et al.
    Independent University of Moscow (IUM), Bolshoy Vlasyevskiy Pereulok 11, Moscow, 119002, Russian Federation.
    Arutyunov, Andronick
    V. A. Trapeznikov Institute of Control Sciences of Russian Academy of Sciences, 65 Profsoyuznaya Street, Moscow, 117997, Russian Federation.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    On (σ,τ)-Derivations of Group Algebra as Category Characters2023In: Non-commutative and Non-associative Algebra and Analysis Structures: SPAS 2019, Västerås, Sweden, September 30 - October 2 / [ed] Sergei Silvestrov, Anatoliy Malyarenko, Springer , 2023, p. 81-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the space of (σ,τ)-derivations of the group algebra C[G] of a discrete countable group G, the decomposition theorem for the space of (σ,τ)-derivations, generalising the corresponding theorem on ordinary derivations on group algebras, is established in an algebraic context using groupoids and characters. Several corollaries and examples describing when all (σ,τ)-derivations are inner are obtained. Considered in details are cases of (σ,τ)-nilpotent groups and (σ,τ)-FC groups.

  • 7.
    Al-Mashhadani, Layali
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ubaidy, Afrah L.
    Ministry of Science and Technology, Remote Sensing Center, Baghdad, Iraq.
    Detection of thermal anomalies signals and hotspots at oil wells and refineries using remote sensing satellite data and GIS techniques2023In: AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics Inc. , 2023, Vol. 2475, article id 060001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions from oil wells and refineries are sources of air pollutants depending on their composition and amounts. The current study focuses on investigation and detecting of thermal anomalies and active hotspots in oil pipelines and refineries locations in Iraq, along with the spatial distribution of the ultraviolet aerosol (UV Aerosol) index. The goal is to assign the most polluted cities that can assist in evaluating the consequences of the air pollution on human and the environmental risk as well. We carried out the analysis of the products obtained from Terra/ MODIS data derived from channels 21 (4 µm) and 31 (11 µm), and the Sentinel-5P products/ Level 2 for the UV Aerosol index in the atmosphere, and found a number of active thermal signals in different geographic areas in Iraq, especially in southeastern and northeastern parts of the country, where the most of Iraq's petroleum resources are located there. The study shows a good correlation between the observed thermal anomalies and the UV emissions, and the results proved that the aerosol emission changes is significantly affected by emissions from oil wells and refineries. We also used fires reports obtained from the department of safety and fires in Basra to validate the outcomes and to investigate the final interpretation of the obtained results that were consist with the documented reports. As well as the results also shows a significant spatio-temporal variations in values of UV index among different parts of Iraq, and the larger amount of UV index has been seen in southern Iraq in Basra.

  • 8.
    Amri, Marwa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Establishing understanding during student-initiated between-desk instructions in project work2022In: Cambridge Journal of Education, ISSN 0305-764X, E-ISSN 1469-3577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how shared understanding is established during a rarely researched instructional and interactional context, namely teacher-student interactions during between-desk instructions (BDIs). Specifically, the authors focus on instructional interactions initiated by students during project-based language teaching in an upper-secondary Swedish classroom and probe into how students' formulations of understanding of a teacher's prior responses shape the subsequent interactional trajectories. Their conversation analytic investigation reveals that the teacher produces either confirming or disconfirming actions following students' formulations of understanding. These response types accomplish two distinct forms of interactional work: (a) when the teacher confirms the students' formulations, she expands the sequence with instruction-related elaborations; and (b) when the teacher does not confirm the formulations, she accounts for that, prompting students to reformulate their understanding. Overall, this study contributes to the body of research on BDIs as a recurring yet under-investigated lesson practice during project work.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Val av utbildningssammanhang för elever som har intellektuell funktionsnedsättning: En komplex situation för föräldrar och skolor.2023In: I väntan på inkludering: Vänbok till Kerstin Göransson / [ed] Karin Bengtsson; Åsa Olsson, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press , 2023, p. 95-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Looking through the kaleidoscope of inclusion in policy on students with intellectual disabilitiesIn: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the Compulsory School for Students with Intellectual Disabilites (CSSID) is currently experiencing political change, as this type of school is being renamed and is undergoing organisational changes. The inclusion of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) in schooling, and in general society, has been challenged and debated for decades; such debates are at the heart of some of these changes. In this study, we have systematically investigated the policy work (e.g. government reports and statements) preceding and governing the changes. Hence, the purpose of the study is to contribute knowledge on how policy documents inscribe meaning to the inclusion of children with ID. Results show that discourses on inclusion are connected to neoliberal values and practices, such as assessment, global comparison, and accountability. It has been suggested that this may have a profound and long-term effect on how children with ID are fabricated and hence, how the child with ID and their education can be understood in terms of being included in the idea of ‘all students’ in policy, and in addition, in practice.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Lillvist, Anne
    Bagger, Anette
    The stealth policy of inclusion of students with intellectual disability2022In: NERA 2022, Conference in Reykjavik, Iceland, June 1-3, 2022: Symposium - Network 12Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities J, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Bosse
    Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
    Lärande i arbetet – en hälsofråga2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Andrighetto, Giulia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome, Italy.
    Capraro, V.
    Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom.
    Guido, A.
    Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome, Italy.
    Szekely, A.
    Collegio Carlo Alberto, Turin, Italy.
    Cooperation, Response Time, and Social Value Orientation: A Meta-Analysis2020In: Proc. Annu. Meet. Cogn. Sci. Soc.: Dev. Mind: Learn. Hum., Anim., Mach., CogSci, The Cognitive Science Society , 2020, p. 2116-2122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research at the cross between cognitive and social sciences is investigating the cognitive mechanisms behind cooperative decisions. One debated question is whether cooperative decisions are made faster than non-cooperative ones. Yet empirical evidence is still mixed. In this paper we explore the implications of individual heterogeneity in social value orientation for the effect of response time on cooperation. We conduct a meta-analysis of available experimental studies (n=8; treatments=16; 5,232 subjects). We report two main results: (i) the relation between response time and cooperation is moderated by social value orientation, such that it is positive for individualist subjects and negative for prosocial subjects; (ii) the relation between response time and cooperation is partly mediated by extremity of choice. These results suggest that highly prosocial subjects are fast to cooperate, highly individualist subjects are fast to defect, and subjects with weaker preferences make slower and less extreme decisions. We explain these results in terms of decision-conflict theory.

  • 14.
    Andrighetto, Giulia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Cognit Sci & Technol, Via Palestro 32, I-00185 Rome, Italy.; Inst Future Studies, Hollandargatan 13, S-11136 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vriens, Eva
    Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Cognit Sci & Technol, Via Palestro 32, I-00185 Rome, Italy.;Inst Future Studies, Hollandargatan 13, S-11136 Stockholm, Sweden..
    A research agenda for the study of social norm change2022In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 380, no 2227, article id 20200411Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social norms have been investigated across many disciplines for many years, but until recently, studies mainly provided indirect, implicit and correlational support for the role of social norms in driving behaviour. To understand how social norms, and in particular social norm change, can generate a large-scale behavioural change to deal with some of the most pressing challenges of our current societies, such as climate change and vaccine hesitancy, we discuss and review several recent advances in social norm research that enable a more precise underpinning of the role of social norms: how to identify their existence, how to establish their causal effect on behaviour and when norm change may pass tipping points. We advocate future research on social norms to study norm change through a mechanism-based approach that integrates experimental and computational methods in theory-driven, empirically calibrated agent-based models. As such, social norm research may move beyond unequivocal praising of social norms as the missing link between self-interested behaviour and observed cooperation or as the explanation for (the lack of) social tipping. It provides the toolkit to understand explicitly where, when and how social norms can be a solution to solve large-scale problems, but also to recognize their limits.This article is part of the theme issue 'Emergent phenomena in complex physical and socio-technical systems: from cells to societies'.

  • 15.
    Anguzu, Collins
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, School of Physical Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
    Engström, Christopher
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Kasumba, Henry
    Department of Mathematics, School of Physical Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
    Mango, John Magero
    Department of Mathematics, School of Physical Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Algorithms for recalculating alpha and eigenvector centrality measures using graph partitioning techniques2022In: Springer Proceedings in Mathematics and Statistics, Springer Nature, 2022, Vol. 408, p. 541-562Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In graph theory, centrality measures are very crucial in ranking vertices of the graph in order of their importance. Alpha and eigenvector centralities are some of the highly placed centrality measures applied especially in social network analysis, disease diffusion networks and mechanical infrastructural developments. In this study we focus on recalculating alpha and eigenvector centralities using graph partitioning techniques. We write an algorithm for partitioning, sorting and efficiently computing these centralities for a graph. We then numerically demonstrate the technique on some sample small-sized networks to recalculate the two centrality measures

  • 16.
    Arfa, Anja
    et al.
    Jouf University, Saudi Arabia; University of Sfax, Tunisia.
    Saadaoui, Nejib
    Université de Gabès, Tunisia.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Classification, Centroids and Derivations of Two-Dimensional Hom-Leibniz Algebras2023In: Non-commutative and Non-associative Algebra and Analysis Structures: SPAS 2019, Västerås, Sweden, September 30 - October 2 / [ed] Sergei Silvestrov, Anatoliy Malyarenko, Springer , 2023, p. 33-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent results concerning Hom-Leibniz algebra are reviewed, the notion of symmetric Hom-Leibniz superalgebra is introduced and some properties are obtained. Classification of 2-dimensional Hom-Leibniz algebras is provided. Centroids and derivations of multiplicative Hom-Leibniz algebras are considered including the detailed study of 2-dimensional Hom-Leibniz algebras.

  • 17.
    Arjmand, Doghonay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Numerical Upscaling via the Wave Equation with Perfectly Matched Layers2022In: Springer Proc. Math. Stat., Springer , 2022, p. 689-702Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main ingredients of existing multiscale numerical methods for homogenization problems is an accurate description of the coarse scale quantities, e.g., the homogenized coefficient via local microscopic computations. Typical multiscale frameworks use local problems that suffer from the so-called resonance or cell-boundary error, dominating the all other errors in multiscale computations. Previously, the second order wave equation was used as a local problem to eliminate such an error. Although this approach eliminates the resonance error totally, the computational cost of the method is known to increase with increasing wave speed. In this paper, the possibility of integrating perfectly matched layers to the local wave equation is explored. In particular, questions in relation with accuracy and reduced computational costs are addressed. Numerical simulations are provided in a simplified one-dimensional setting to illustrate the ideas.

  • 18.
    Armakan, Abdoreza
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, P.O. Box 71457-44776, Shiraz, Iran.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Color Hom-Lie Algebras, Color Hom-Leibniz Algebras and Color Omni-Hom-Lie Algebras2023In: Non-commutative and Non-associative Algebra and Analysis Structures: SPAS 2019, Västerås, Sweden, September 30 - October 2 / [ed] Sergei Silvestrov, Anatoliy Malyarenko, Springer , 2023, p. 61-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the representations of color hom-Lie algebras have been reviewed and the existence of a series of coboundary operators is demonstrated. Moreover, the notion of a color omni-hom-Lie algebra associated to a linear space and an even invertible linear map have been introduced. In addition, characterization method for regular color hom-Lie algebra structures on a linear space is examined and it is shown that the underlying algebraic structure of the color omni-hom-Lie algebra is a color hom-Leibniz a algebra.

  • 19.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Centre for Research & Development, Region Gävleborg ,Sweden.
    Storfors, Tom
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Identification of Possible Learning Problems in Children with Intellectual Disabilities2023In: The Routledge Handbook of Inclusive Education for Teacher Educators: Issues, Considerations, and Strategies / [ed] Santoshi Halder; Shakila Dada; Rashida Banerjee, Routledge, 2023, p. 256-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All children have the right to become equal citizens of the society. Children with intellectual disabilities have difficulties in learning and may need support to reach that equality, and some extra resources may be needed. Compared to children with typical development, children with intellectual disabilities have problems in three cognitive areas that are essential for learning activities: Abstract thinking. Understanding/using abstract symbols (text, numbers, money, and time) and imagining non-experienced things and situations. Several-steps thinking. Understanding multiple-level instructions and connections between cause and effect. Simultaneous handling of information. Nuanced considerations/comparisons, risk considerations and problem solving that manifest in complex social situations.

    Endorsing an interactive bio-psycho-social understanding of intellectual disabilities implies that learning limitations are the discrepancy between abilities and the level and/or quality of support, and according to this an inclusive approach to learning should be based on knowledge about abilities rather than dis-abilities. Two inclusive classroom strategies for learning are presented and discussed in this chapter. These strategies seek ways of providing universal, inclusive learning situations where children with intellectual disability can interact with any children and the most important role for a teacher is to find ways to support the children in that interaction.

  • 20.
    Ashyraliyev, Maksat
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Ashyralyyeva, M.
    Department of Mathematics, Magtymguly Turkmen State University, Turkmenistan.
    Stable difference schemes for hyperbolic–parabolic equations with unknown parameter2024In: Boletín de la Sociedad Matematica Mexicana, ISSN 1405-213X, Vol. 30, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper, we study the first and second order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of the inverse problem for hyperbolic–parabolic equations with unknown time-independent source term. The unique solvability of constructed difference schemes and the stability estimates for their solutions are obtained. The proofs are based on the spectral representation of the self-adjoint positive definite operator in a Hilbert space.

  • 21.
    Attari Polsangi, Ahmad Reza
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, P.O. Box 71457-44776, Shiraz, Iran.
    Farhangdoost, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Mathematics, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, P.O. Box 71457-44776, Shiraz, Iran.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Decomposition of Complete Color Hom-Lie Algebras2023In: Non-commutative and Non-associative Algebra and Analysis Structures: SPAS 2019, Västerås, Sweden, September 30 - October 2 / [ed] Sergei Silvestrov, Anatoliy Malyarenko, Springer , 2023, p. 101-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study some equivalent conditions for a color hom-Lie algebra to be a complete color hom-Lie algebra. In particular, we discuss the relationship between decomposition and completness for a color hom-Lie algebra. Moreover, we check some conditions that the set of αs -derivations of a color hom-Lie algebra to be complete and simply complete. Finally, we find some conditions in which the decomposition into hom-ideals of the complete multiplicative color hom-Lie algebras is unique up to order of hom-algebra.

  • 22.
    Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Haglund, AnnaMälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.Hägglund, SaraMälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Developing Entrepreneurial Skills in Compulsory Education- Initial Challenges with Which, How and Progression2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The worldwide need and request for a workforce equipped with thorough high qualitativeknowledge but also a capability to use it in complex situations, has become the entrance ticketfor entrepreneurial skills entering the Swedish compulsory education. Thus, schools play an important role providing a space for individuals practicing these skills, being for instance able to see opportunities and make something from them, being initiative, self-confident, risktaking, creative and problem solving. With the aim to increase the knowledge of how entrepreneurial skills unfolds as part of the education at earlier ages, this mainly qualitative study follows a novel attempt to build a common thread of entrepreneurial skills from preschool to grade nine, in a small mid-Swedish municipality during 2018. Focusing on initial challenges, the findings show the teachers struggle with both content, methods and progression. Related to the curricula’s formulation arena, there is a discrepancy between this and the teachers’ transformation and realisation arena. This suggests theydo not always do what the curricula stipulate or they themselves classify as most important,they generally seem to struggle to link their subjects to entrepreneurial skills and there is a lack of progression between grades and in transitions between school levels.

  • 23.
    Aye, Tin Nwe
    et al.
    Kyaukse Univ, Dept Math, Kyaukse 05151, Myanmar..
    Brännström, Åke
    Umeå Univ, Dept Math & Math Stat, Linneaus Vag 49, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden.;Int Inst Appl Syst Anal IIASA, Adv Syst Anal Program, Schlosspl 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria..
    Carlsson, Linus
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Prediction of tree sapwood and heartwood profiles using pipe model and branch thinning theory2022In: Tree Physiology, ISSN 0829-318X, E-ISSN 1758-4469, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 2174-2185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimates of tree heartwood and sapwood profiles are important in the pulp industry and for dynamic vegetation models, in which they determine tree biomechanical stability and hydraulic conductivity. Several phenomenological models of stem profiles have been developed for this purpose, based on assumptions on how tree crown and foliage distributions change over time. Here, we derive estimates of tree profiles by synthesizing a simple pipe model theory of plant form with a recently developed theory of branch thinning that from simple assumptions quantifies discarded branches and leaves. This allows us to develop a new trunk model of tree profiles from breast height up to the top of the tree. We postulate that leaves that are currently on the tree are connected by sapwood pipes, while pipes that previously connected discarded leaves or branches form the heartwood. By assuming that a fixed fraction of all pipes remain on the trunk after a branching event, as the trunk is traversed from the root system to the tips, this allows us to quantify trunk heartwood and sapwood profiles. We test the trunk model performance on empirical data from five tree species across three continents. We find that the trunk model accurately describes heartwood and sapwood profiles of all tested tree species (calibration; R-2: 84-99%). Furthermore, once calibrated to a tree species, the trunk model predicts heartwood and sapwood profiles of conspecific trees in similar growing environments based only on the age and height of a tree (cross-validation/prediction; R-2: 68-98%). The fewer and often contrasting parameters needed for the trunk model make it a potentially useful complementary tool for biologists and foresters.

  • 24.
    Aye, Tin Nwe
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Carlsson, Linus
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Increasing Efficiency in the EBT Algorithm2020In: Demography of Population Health, Aging and Health Expenditures / [ed] Christos H Skiadas, Springer, 2020, p. 289-317Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Escalator Boxcar Train (EBT) is a commonly used method for solving physiologically structured population models. The main goal of this paper is to overcome computational disadvantages of the EBT method. We prove convergence, for a general class of EBT models in which we modify the original EBT formulation, allowing merging of cohorts. We show that this modified EBT method induces a bounded number of cohorts, independent of the number of time steps. This in turn, improves the numerical algorithm from polynomial to linear time. An EBT simulation of the Daphnia model is used as an illustration of these findings.

  • 25.
    Aye, Tin Nwe
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Carlsson, Linus
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Numerical stability of the escalator boxcar train under reducing system of ordinary differential equations.2017In: / [ed] Christos H Skiadas, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Escalator Boxcar Train (EBT) is one of the most popular numerical

    methods used to study the dynamics of physiologically structured population models.

    The original EBT model accumulates an increasing system of ODEs to solve for each

    time step. In this project, we propose a merging procedure to overcome computational

    disadvantageous of the EBT method, the merging is done as an automatic feature.

    In particular we apply the model including merging to a colony of Daphnia Pulex.

  • 26.
    Aye, Tin Nwe
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
    Carlsson, Linus
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Pipe Model Theory for Prediction Tree Sapwood and Heartwood ProfilesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical pipe model theory introduced by Shinozaki, Yoda, Hozumi,

    and Kira (1964a,b) is used to estimate tree sapwood area. It rests on the

    conceptual idea that leaves are supported by pipes, serving as vascular

    passages. The simple pipe model of plant form does not predict the heart

    wood area and is thus not suitable for stem diameter estimates below the

    tree crown. For this reason, Shinozaki, Yoda, Hozumi, and Kira (1964a)

    verbally described an extended pipe model theory of tree form that in

    principle accounts for the accumulation of disused pipes from discarded

    branches and leaves. However, this pipe model theory of tree form is difficult

    to apply in practice as lost branches and leaves are rarely known.

     Here, we synthesize the pipe model theory of plant form with a recently

    developed theory of branch thinning that quantify discarded branches and

    leaves. This allows us to develop a new stem model of tree profiles from

    breast height up to the top of the tree. We test the stem model perfor

    mance on empirical data from four tree species across three continents.

    We find that the stem model accurately describes heartwood and sapwood

    profiles of all tested tree species (calibration; R2: 84-99 %). Furthermore,

    once calibrated to a tree species, the stem model predicts heartwood and

    sapwood profiles of conspecific trees in similar growing environments based

    only on the age and height of a tree (cross-validation / prediction; R2:

    62-98 %).

  • 27.
    Aye, Tin Nwe
    et al.
    Kyaukse University, Myanmar.
    Carlsson, Linus
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Properties in Stage-Structured Population Models with Deterministic and Stochastic Resource Growth2022In: Journal of Applied Mathematics, ISSN 1110-757X, E-ISSN 1687-0042, Vol. 2022, article id 3535375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling population dynamics in ecological systems reveals properties that are difficult to find by empirical means, such as the probability that a population will go extinct when it is exposed to harvesting. To study these properties, we use an aquatic ecological system containing one fish species and an underlying resource as our models. In particular, we study a class of stage-structured population systems with and without starvation. In these models, we study the resilience, the recovery potential, and the probability of extinction and show how these properties are affected by different harvesting rates, both in a deterministic and stochastic setting. In the stochastic setting, we develop methods for deriving estimates of these properties. We estimate the expected outcome of emergent population properties in our models, as well as measures of dispersion. In particular, two different approaches for estimating the probability of extinction are developed. We also construct a method to determine the recovery potential of a species that is introduced in a virgin environment.

  • 28.
    Aşık, Asuman
    et al.
    Department of English Language Teaching, Gazi University, Ankara, Türkiye.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Miller, Paul
    School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    The affordances of a mobile video-tagging tool for evaluating presentation skills in a second language2024In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the affordances of a mobile video observation and tagging tool used to evaluate presentation skills in English language classrooms. The data consists of 35 video-recorded presentations in a higher education setting. Using a digital evaluation grid, the students received feedback based on visual analytics generated by the mobile app. The students then were asked to reflect on their performances, and were also asked to comment on the affordances and limitations of the method and the tool. Qualitative data that came from (1) students’ written self-evaluations and reflections and (2) their reported perceptions of the affordances of the tool were analyzed using the Constant Comparison Method. Analyses of reflective writings indicated the dominance of negative self-evaluations of language use, while affective factors were also a strong theme. The video-tagging tool was found to be very beneficial by the learners, mainly in enabling them to notice their strengths and weaknesses in presenting in English and facilitating effective feedback. The results show that this data-led reflective presentation model can be beneficial for learners as they can identify points of development.

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  • 29.
    Bader, Britt-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Att lyssna med hela kroppen: en studie om lärares ledarskap i utvecklingssamtal2023Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Keywords: Teachers´ leadership, parents-teachers ‘conference, primary school, didactic, hermeneutic, lifeworld phenomenology

    This thesis aims to explain what importance teachers´ leadership is given and how teachers' leadership appears in the parents-teacher conferences. The theoretical frame is lifeworld phenomenology, which means that the world is a social, intersubjective, and historical world where people experience, act, and intertwine in a private and a shared world. The study is inspired by a lifeworld approach and the data was analyzed to consider people's context, their experiences and the challenges involved in leading parent-teacher conferences. The empirical work is based on observations of parent-teacher conferences and interviews with teachers and students. The analyses are made with the support of the life-world phenomenological concepts of hållning, seeing-as and pedagogical tact. The concept hållning has a duality and loses its meaning in translation. Hållning means a bodily approach and is an intertwining between the teacher's attitude and her body posture. All three concepts include verbal and bodily communicative expressions and sensitive and intuitive actions, their meanings will be highlighted and explained. 

    The results show that teachers' leadership in parent-teacher conferences includes both preparatory and subsequent work and forms part of the teaching. Leadership both shapes the parent-teacher conference and is shaped in the same and given importance when teachers show consideration for the student, the relationship between teacher and student and the situation, balance challenges with time and sensitive topics, choose to take notes in the parent-teacher conferences in favor of presence in the conversation itself and document afterwards. Teachers' leadership in parent-teacher conferences shape the conversation through teachers' willingness to involve the students, flexibility, and ability to structure. Teachers' leadership in parent-teacher conferences are shaped by teachers' responsiveness, compliance, presence, attention, ability to improvise and playfulness.

    The study's life-world phenomenological approach has made it possible to see that the parent-teacher conference requires a didactic knowledge related to the student as a person, to the content and to the structure that surrounds the conversation. This has been made visible in teachers' intuitive actions and bodily expressions as well as unreflected and reflected experiences. The study's starting points have made it possible to broaden the didactic understanding of the teachers' leadership in parent-teacher conferences by highlighting the clear intertwining of these conferences with other teaching

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  • 30.
    Bakayoko, Ibrahima
    et al.
    Département de Mathématiques, Université de N’Zérékoré, BP 50, N’Zérékoré, Guinea.
    Silvestrov, Sergei
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hom-Prealternative Superalgebras2023In: Non-commutative and Non-associative Algebra and Analysis Structures: SPAS 2019, Västerås, Sweden, September 30 - October 2 / [ed] Sergei Silvestrov, Anatoliy Malyarenko, Springer , 2023, p. 121-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Hom-prealternative superalgebras and their bimodules. Some constructions of Hom-prealternative superalgebras and Hom-alternative superalgebras are given, and their connection with Hom-alternative superalgebras are studied. Bimodules over Hom-prealternative superalgebras are introduced, relations between bimodules over Hom-prealternative superalgebras and the bimodules of the corresponding Hom-alternative superalgebras are considered, and construction of bimodules over Hom-prealternative superalgebras by twisting is described.

  • 31.
    Baric, V. B.
    et al.
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Yngve, M.
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holmefur, M.
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Feldman, I.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wilder, J.
    Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansen, K.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klang, Nina
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lidström, H.
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Borgestig, M.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Partnering for change (P4C) in Sweden- a study protocol of a collaborative school-based service delivery model to create inclusive learning environments2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 2219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inclusive learning environments are considered as crucial for children’s engagement with learning and participation in school. Partnering for change (P4C) is a collaborative school-based service delivery model where services are provided at three levels of intensity based on children’s needs (class, group-, individual interventions). Interventions in P4C are provided universally to support all children with learning, not only children with special education needs (SEN), and as such are expected to be health-promoting. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of P4C as well as school staff members’ and children’s experiences after P4C. Methods: In a parallel, non-randomised controlled intervention design, 400 children, aged 6–12 years, and their teachers, will be recruited to either intervention classes, working according to the P4C, or to control classes (allocation ratio 1:1). Data will be collected at baseline, post-intervention (4 months), and 11 months follow-up post baseline. The primary outcome is children’s engagement with learning in school. Secondary outcomes include for example children’s health-related quality of life and wellbeing, occupational performance in school, attendance, and special educational needs. The difference-in-differences method using regression modelling will be applied to evaluate any potential changes following P4C. Focus group interviews focusing on children, and professionals’ experiences will be performed after P4C. A health economic evaluation of P4C will be performed, both in the short term (post intervention) and the long term (11-month follow-up). This study will provide knowledge about the effectiveness of P4C on children’s engagement with learning, mental health, and wellbeing, when creating inclusive learning environments using a combination of class-, group- and individual-level interventions. Trial registration number: NCT05435937. 

  • 32.
    Berg, Benita
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    REFORMERS PÅVERKAN PÅ LÄRARES UNDERVISNING I GRUNDSKOLAN OCH FÖRSKOLAN: En läroplansteoretisk studie om undervisningsuppdraget och lärarrollen i förändring2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis is to use a curriculum theoretical perspective to contrib­ute knowledge about the impact of recent reforms on teachers’/preschool teachers’ teaching, with a special focus on mathematics. The thesis takes its starting point in a licentiate thesis that was completed in 2014. The further doctoral studies are based on two articles. These articles answer specific research questions. Substudy 1 was a systematic literature review that focused on the role of the preschool teacher in teaching mathematics in preschool. Substudy 2 explored how preschool teachers in­terpret their teaching mission based on the curriculum’s directives and how they describe the meaning of the concept of preschool teaching. The data from Substudy 1 consisted of 68 research articles, and Substudy 2 was based on 50 preschool teachers’ reflection texts. The theoretical underpinnings of the thesis are two theoretical perspec­tives: curriculum theory and Bernstein’s theory of pedagogic practice. The results from the two substudies show the importance of preschool teachers having both sub­ject knowledge and didactic competence to carry out teaching in spontaneous situa­tions and planned activities. The results from Substudy 1 show two different roles that pre­school teachers adopt when teaching mathematics in preschool education guided by social pedagogical or pre-primary curriculum traditions; these are the role of instructor and the role of an interactor. In the research studies, preschool teachers provide instruction with planned subject content or interact with the children’s play and other everyday situations to promote children’s mathematics learning. The results from Substudy 2 show an education that is guided by invisible pedagogy within the social pedagogical curriculum tradition. The preschool teachers describe teaching taking place spontaneously in play and other everyday situations based on children’s own interests and needs. The preschool teachers also have a purpose with the teaching, and they plan activities together with the children. These reveal teaching governed by visible pedagogy, which is characteristic of the pre-primary curriculum tradition. Further­more, there are indications that a new curriculum tradition is emerging bearing some sim­ilarities to previous traditions, an approach that is both play-based and goal-oriented. Children’s participation and influence are central in the teaching, which means that the teaching conforms to the children’s interests, and that goals from the curriculum are woven into the everyday work. The preschool teacher consciously shapes the envi­ronment in the preschool and uses materials to promote children’s learning, and the teaching has more distinct subject content. Together with the licentiate study, the two substudies show that teachers and preschool teachers have difficulty transforming a new curriculum text into practically applicable form. The curricula leave room for interpretation, and the uncertainty that arises in the transformation arena shows that they need support to realize the curriculum’s new guidelines.

     

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  • 33.
    Berg, Benita
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Undervisningsbegreppets innebörd i förskolan utifrån ett läroplansteoretiskt perspektiv2022In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 75-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to contribute knowledge about how teaching in preschool can be understood in relation to how teaching is described by preschool teachers. The following research questions were posed:How do preschool teachers describe teaching and its meaning in preschool? and What didactic questions appear in preschool teachers’ descriptions of teaching in preschool? The empirical data consist of reflective texts that were analysed through content analysis with the help of Bernstein’s concepts: classification and framing, and visible and invisible pedagogy. The results show that the preschool teachers in the study perceived the introduction of the concept of teaching in preschool as an opportunity, which allowed them to become more aware of their actions in different learning situations. That the preschool teachers described teaching taking place through play and in everyday situations based on children's interests and needs hints at an organization with invisible pedagogy, weak classification and weak framing. Strong classification and strong framing, on the other hand, became manifest when the preschool teachers described that they plan what they do with the children and use materials, organize children’s groups and design environments to promote children’s learning. Furthermore, the preschool teachers focused mainly on the didactic questions of how and why, while the what-question received less attention.

  • 34.
    Berg, Benita
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Franzén, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Teaching mathematics in early childhood education -a systematic literature review2019In: 29th EECERA ANNUAL CONFERENCE, Early Years: Making it Count, Thessaloniki, Greece 20th – 23rd August 2019, Abstract book, 2019, p. 112-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to find similarities and differences concerning the new formulations on teaching in revised curriculum in Swedish preschool and international research in early childhood education, Teaching is more clarified in the revised curriculum. Swedish preschool education is moving towards a more formalized approach where teaching is more visible (Helenius, 2018). There is a consensus that early mathematics is important in policy and research but there is no agreement on how mathematics education should be implemented. There are differences between and within countries, a clear difference is the relation between play and teaching (Palmér & Björklund, 2016). The concepts of classification and framing are used to discuss the visibility of pedagogics in the formalization of teaching mathematics in preschool (Bernstein, 2000). This is a literature review regarding research on teaching mathematics in early childhood education. It draws from a number of scholarly research article conducted between 2014 and 2019. The data collection is in progress. Qualitative and quantitative content analysis will compare emerged codes. The expected results will consist of empirical research. Ethical consideration is met by showing respect and responsiveness to other researchers work. This literature review is based on peer-reviewed articles. Preliminary findings indicate differences in how teaching mathematics in preschool is described. Preschool in Sweden has a tradition of a play-based pedagogy and no formal assessment of children as many other countries. Perhaps, the change may push teaching to become more visible and formal (Helenius, 2018). Implications for policy and practice will be discussed.

  • 35.
    Bergman, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Primary students’ perceptions of history and timeIn: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As phenomena, time, and history, particularly the nature of the two and how to tell them apart, are not easily defined. In the tradition of historical consciousness, time, and the human understanding of the nature of time are defined as a part of a historical consciousness, where this may more or less evolved. In this study, students aged 11 were interviewed and asked what history and time are. Their answers consisted in three different ways of describing the nature of time: time as events, time as a continuous now, and time as continuous progress. How students described time was then compared to Rüsen’s (Rüsen, Retzlaff, & Wiklund, 2004; Rüsen, 2005) definitions of historical consciousness. The ability of younger children to under-stand time has been an issue debated in previous research. This study concludes that time and concept of time is understood by eleven- year-olds but in various forms. These various forms are essential knowledge for history teachers at all levels. There is evidence for historical consciousness, as described by Rüsen, however, in forms appropriate for their age.

  • 36.
    Bergvall, Olof
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Arithmetic and topology of classical structures associated with plane quartics2023In: European Journal of Mathematics, ISSN 2199-675X, E-ISSN 2199-6768, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider moduli spaces of plane quartics marked with various structures such as Cayley octads, Aronhold heptads, Steiner complexes and Göpel subsets and determine their cohomology. This answers a series of questions of Jesse Wolfson. We also count points of these moduli spaces over finite fields of odd characteristic.

  • 37.
    Bergvall, Olof
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Division of Mathematics and Physics, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Relations in the tautological ring of the universal curve2022In: Communications in analysis and geometry, ISSN 1019-8385, E-ISSN 1944-9992, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 501-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We bound the dimensions of the graded pieces of the tautological ring of the universal curve from below for genus up to 27 and from above for genus up to 9. As a consequence we obtain the precise structure of the tautological ring of the universal curve for genus up to 9. In particular, we see that it is Gorenstein for these genera.

  • 38.
    Bergvall, Olof
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Department of Mathematics and Physics Mälardalen University Västerås Sweden.
    Gounelas, Frank
    Georg‐August‐Universität Göttingen Fakultät für Mathematik und Informatik Göttingen Germany.
    Cohomology of moduli spaces of Del Pezzo surfaces2022In: Mathematische Nachrichten, ISSN 0025-584X, E-ISSN 1522-2616, Vol. 295, no 12, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compute the rational Betti cohomology groups of the coarse moduli spaces of geometrically marked Del Pezzo surfaces of degree 3 and 4 as representations of the Weyl groups of the corresponding root systems. The proof uses a blend of methods from point counting over finite fields and techniques from arrangement complements.

  • 39.
    Biesta, Gert
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Stirling Institute of Education, University of Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Five theses on complexity reduction and its politics2010In: Complexity theory and the politics of education / [ed] D.C. Osberg & G.J.J. Biesta, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2010, p. pp 5-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In his monumental study The mechanization of the world picture (Dijksterhuis, 1961), Eduard Dijksterhuis has documented how, in the 16th and 17th century, a mechanistic worldview emerged in modern science through developments in astronomy, mechanics, physics, chemistry and natural philosophy. Dijksterhuis marks the start of this process with the publication of Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium in 1543 and sees its culmination point in the publication of Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Math matica in 1687. In the worldview of modern science physical reality is depicted as a deterministic mechanism operating according to causal laws. Many have taken the success of modern technology as evidence of the truth of the mechanistic worldview of modern science (see, for example, Gellner, 1992 and, for a critical discussion, Latour, 1987), on the assumption that it is the knowledge about the laws that govern the causal connections within the clockwork universe that makes prediction and control of physical reality possible. Some have even gone so far as to argue that the mechanistic worldview of modern science sets the standard for what is real and what is rational (on this way of thinking and the problems it has caused see Dewey, 1980; Biesta, 2009). Developments in such interrelated fields as complexity theory, dynamic systems theory and chaos theory have challenged both the accuracy and dominance of the mechanistic worldview. They have done this first of all by highlighting phenomena that cannot be captured as deterministic, linear processes, and secondly by developing vocabularies and ways of thinking that are able to make sense of such phenomena and talk about them in more productive ways.

  • 40.
    Biesta, Gert
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. University of Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Osberg, D.
    University of Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Complexity, Education and Politics from the Inside-Out and the Outside-In: An introduction2010In: Complexity Theory and the Politics of Education, Brill , 2010, p. 1-4Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The essays in this book all deal with a question which, in our view, has so far received insufficient attention in work that aims to explore the significance of complexity theory for education. 1 This is the question of the politics of complexity. Whereas a lot has been written about curriculum, pedagogy and learning, relatively little has been said directly about the ways in which complexity theory might help us to engage with questions concerning the politics of education and about how we might account for the politics of this engagement itself. We take “politics” here in the broad sense of having to do with questions of value andpower. For us it is obvious that value and power play a central role in all educational endeavours. In so far as we can see education as havingto do with ways of directing, structuring and evaluating human learning— bearing in mind that human learning is not a natural phenomenon but itself has to be understood as a construct—and in so far as we can see education as having to do with ways in which we direct, structure and evaluate the learning of others, questions of value and power are simply inevitable. Education opens uppathways and opportunities but also, and often at the very same time, limits, reduces and even closes down ways of doing and being (see Mollenhauer, 1983). Education, after all, always involves choices. Those who engage in the justification of educational choices often do so using a language of values, whereas those who engage in research on the ways in which education actually opens up and closes down often do so using a language of power. We see these as two sides of the same coin, as we do not think that “opening up” isnecessarily good or educationally desirable or that “narrowing down” is necessarily bad or educationally undesirable. What is far more important is to acknowledge that in education both “opening up” and “narrowing down” involve the exertion of power and in this sense can be said to be political. 

  • 41.
    Bjursten, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Assessment Practices in Computer Programming2022In: 11th Biennial International Design and Technology Teacher’s Association Research Conference (DATTArc). 7-10 Dec.2022. In collaboration with the International Conference on Technology Education (ICTE) – Asia Pacific, Technology Education New Zealand (TENZ), International Technology Engineering Education Association (ITEEA), and 2022 Venue Host, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus, QLD.  / [ed] Kurt Seemann and P John Williams. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer programming education in schools has increased in recent years. It has been implemented in schools in different ways and contexts. Programming was embedded in the Swedish national curriculum in 2018, with a particular focus on the following compulsory subjects: mathematics, social sciences and technology. Teachers therefore face teaching completely new content within the current content domain in an already crowded curriculum. This is a major challenge, particularly in technology, due to the lack of Swedish and international research on how teachers can understand, implement and assess programming in schools. Nevertheless, collaborative assessment can lead to an increased understanding of teaching objectives and knowledge requirements. This study explored teachers’ assessment practices in programming in technology. Based on a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews (n = 14), the results show that teachers lack professional dialogues and are left alone to sort assessment out. Teachers also find it difficult to assess different levels and have low expectations. Suggestions are made for further research on which programming solutions should correspond to which assessment level.

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  • 42.
    Bjursten, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Tor
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer programming in primary schools: swedish technology teachers’ pedagogical strategies2023In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, p. 1345-1368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a recognized need for research on how to teach computer programming in primary schools in Sweden grades 4–6 (10–12-year-old pupils). Studies of teaching show the importance of teachers’ knowledge of content and pedagogy and how these two parts affect each other (i.e. pedagogical content knowledge [PCK]). Most teachers in Sweden have little or no formal education in computer programming, the revised Swedish curriculum requires them to teach it. The aim of this study is to explore the pedagogical strategies teachers use when they teach computer programming. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 participants, comprising 12 teachers and 2 teacher trainers. The data were analysed deductively with themes from previous research. The results show that teachers use eight pedagogical strategies, including three new strategies that have been constructed inductively: do-it-yourself, gamification and progression. These eight pedagogical strategies are mostly general, and teachers may be considered regressed experts, as they lack formal training in computer programming. They facilitate learning in a general sense, but, compared to other subjects, their PCK in computer programming is problematized. In-service teacher training is needed to increase content knowledge, thus enabling to develop PCK in computer programming. It would also be fruitful to deepen our knowledge regarding pedagogical strategies in the PCK domain of computer programming.

  • 43.
    Bjursten, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Nilsson, Tor
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Factors influencing Swedish grades 4–6 technology teachers’ choice of teaching and learning material in programming education2023In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a recognized need to understand the current state of programming implementation in the Swedish compulsory school system. This study focused specifically on the implementation of programming in the school subject of technology for grades 4–6. In Sweden, the responsibility for choosing teaching and learning material lies with individual teachers. Recent studies have indicated the prevalence of visual programming languages (VPLs) in classrooms. However, no empirical research has specifically investigated why teachers select particular programming learning environments (PLEs) and the challenges they have overcome in this process. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the PLEs used by teachers and the factors influencing their choices. In addition, this study explored the role of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and the influence of systemic and situational amplifiers and filters in shaping the programming education landscape, highlighting the importance of understanding these factors for effective implementation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 experienced programming teachers in grades 4–6 to gather insights. The results revealed that VPLs, particularly Scratch, have been widely adopted, but the study also identified three textual programming languages being utilized. Furthermore, the findings indicate that teachers’ previous education plays a significant role in shaping their PLE preferences. This suggests that programming education in both professional development and preservice teacher training is crucial for effective implementation. By investigating PLE choices and the factors influencing them, this study contributes to a better understanding of the current landscape of programming education in Sweden’s compulsory school system. 

  • 44.
    Boksjö, Olga
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    ”Ska vi googla, fröken?”: Några förskollärares uppfattningar om undervisning relaterad till digitala tekniker i förskolan2023Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to gain deeper insights in digital technology supported teaching in Swedish early childhood education (ECE) settings. Introduction of digital goals in Swedish ECE curriculum obliges preschool teachers to integrate digital technologies into educational practices and calls for a relevant definition and a defined content for this teaching area. By examining teachers’ perspectives, this thesis contributes to obtaining valuable experience-based knowledge that can eventually fill the existing research gap.  

    In a curriculum context, digital technologies have traditionally been associated with technology as a teaching tool, while digital goals (i.e., training children’s digital competence) redefine technology as a teaching content. However, integrating digital technologies in educational practices is still reported to be a challenge, and preschool teachers demonstrate ambivalent attitudes towards use of digital technologies in play-based pedagogy. Previous research has shown that to embed technologies in preschool practices, teachers need to enhance their technological knowledge, which involves a complex coupling between technical knowledge and pedagogical expertise.

    In the study, eleven preschool teachers were interviewed. A phenomenographic approach was used to identify and analyze the teachers’ conceptions. As a result, several categories related to digital technology use were discerned in teachers’ descriptions. Teaching situations were identified within both planned and spontaneous activities whilst activities for entertainment, relaxation and staff relief were referred to as mere “media consumption”. Paradoxically, nearly all teachers define digital technology supported teaching as a goal-directed, planned and adult-led activity. However, plenty of examples given by the teachers show that situations originating from spontaneous use of digital technology, particularly tablets, play an essential role in everyday teaching practices. Such a rigid understanding of the teaching concept on a definition level may have a counterproductive effect on ECE task with a traditional focus on child-initiated, spontaneous activities. 

    Other findings show that various combinations of hard- and software (apps) may offer teachers multiple teaching options. However, lack of time and technical knowledge in one group of teachers is reported to lead to a scarce use of technologies. In most examples, digital technology is described as a teaching tool for training language, science, mathematics, or arts, while technology as a content is seen as a challenging task and focuses mainly on introducing programmable toys. The teachers describe several examples where technology does not align with their didactic intentions. However, tablet with Google Search is the technology that demonstrates both frequent and organic use. Providing immediate answers on the screen, tablets enable to capture children’s spontaneous questions and, at the same time, support teachers’ educational goals. The preschool teachers’ critical observations and didactic value judgements can contribute with a more nuanced view on what a particular digital technology makes possible in a certain teaching situation.  

    Key words: early childhood education (ECE), preschool, digital technology supported teaching, digital competence, tablet, phenomenography, teachers’ beliefs. 

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  • 45.
    Bonner, Richard
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Freivalds, RusinsUniversity of Latvia, Latvia.
    Quantum Computation and Learning: Proc. Int. Workshop, September 1999, Riga1999Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Bozbıyık, Merve
    et al.
    Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
    Sert, Olcay
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Dilek Bacanak, Kadriye
    Gazi University, Turkey.
    VEO-integrated IMDAT in pre-service language teacher education: A focus on change in teacher questioning practices2021In: Video Enhanced Observation for Language Teaching: Reflection and Professional Development / [ed] Paul Seedhouse, Bloomsbury Academic, 2021, 1, p. 97-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What counts as evidence of development in (language) teacher education research is not an easy question to tackle. Researchers who follow a qualitative paradigm use data collection tools like interviews and observations (e.g. Appleton and Kindt 2002), and focus on a variety of objects of development, for example, development in the practicalknowledge of designing and using tasks and activities (Wyatt and Borg 2011). Looking into the reflective practices of teachers and what teachers think they do in classrooms has been one of the common ways to investigate teacher development (e.g. Wyatt 2010). There may, however, be a gap between what teachers think they do and what they actually do in classrooms (Li 2017, 2020). Therefore, combining (1) analyses of actual teaching practices (e.g. by using discursive methods like conversation analysis) and (2) reflection and feedback practices that are stimulated by recorded videos can bring databased evidence to development, and at the same time be the drive behind development. Such an approach to investigating teacher development (over time) has recently been undertaken using reflective and evidence-based teacher education frameworks like IMDAT (Sert 2015, 2019). IMDAT initially (2015) combined video-recordings and teachers’ reflections to document change in teaching practices that are locally situated in classroom interactions. Integrating a mobile video-tagging tool like VEO (see Chapter 3) into the IMDAT teacher education framework can create affordances for evidence-based reflections and feedback that draw on tagged lesson videos. In this chapter, we draw on data collected as part of the VEO Europa project. VEO has been integrated into a pre-service language (i.e. English) teacher education programme that follows the IMDAT teacher education framework. IMDAT includes an initial training on classroom interaction practices, followed by lessons taught by candidate teachers. Post-observation feedback sessions between experts and novices (e.g. trainer-trainee, mentor-student teacher) are conducted after these lessons, which are then followed by written reflections of the student teachers (STs). The framework includes another round of teaching, this time observed by another peer – which is then followed by another post-observation feedback session and a process of critical reflective writing. This chapter reports findings based on one pre-service teacher’s video-recorded lessons that are analysed using conversation analysis (CA) methodology. Conversation analytic findings from classroom videos are complemented with audio-recorded feedback sessions as well as written reflections. By focusing on one interactional phenomenon, namely teacher questioning practices, we demonstrate how the focal teacher changes her questioning practices in the classroom over time, as she teaches, gets feedback from an expert and a peer, and reflects on her teaching practices. The findings have implications for (mobile) teacher education, as well as for situated and longitudinal research on classroom discourse that employs conversation analysis and other discursive methodologies.

  • 47.
    Brehmer, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Lärare lär av läromedel: Att förstå, utvärdera och utvecklas av läromedel i matematik2023 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Buckley, J.
    et al.
    Technological University of the Shannon: Midlands Midwest, Westmeath, Ireland.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyangweso, M.
    Strathmore University Business School, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Hyland, T.
    Technological University of the Shannon: Midlands Midwest, Westmeath, Ireland.
    Seery, N.
    Technological University of the Shannon: Midlands Midwest, Westmeath, Ireland.
    Pears, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The impact of country of schooling and gender on secondary school students’ conceptions of and interest in becoming an engineer in Ireland, Kenya and Sweden2023In: International Journal of STEM education, E-ISSN 2196-7822, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Given the disparities in gender representation, efforts are needed to make engineering education more inclusive and attractive to young people. It is important that those entering engineering education are making this decision with sufficient understanding of what it means to be an engineer. This study explored how lower secondary education students from Ireland (n = 435), Kenya (n = 436), and Sweden (n = 361) stereotyped engineers, and their interest in becoming an engineer was examined. The Draw an Engineer Test was used to achieve this, and ordinal and logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare the effects of students’ genders and country of schooling on the genders and concepts of their drawn engineers, and on their interest in becoming an engineer in the future. Results: A Sankey diagram illustrated significant complexity in the interaction between conceptions of engineering work and fields of engineering. Chi-square tests of association were used to examine the association between students depicting an engineer as either the same or a different gender to themselves and their interest in becoming an engineer. The results of these and the regression analyses indicate that young people’s gender explains more variance in the gender of drawn engineers and the country they are studying in explains more variance in their conception of engineers. However, most variance was explained when both students’ gender and country of study were considered together. Further, particularly for young females, drawing a female engineer as opposed to a male engineer was positively associated with increased interest in becoming an engineer. Conclusions: There is a need to develop a greater understanding of engineering in young people to ensure they have sufficient information to make decisions regarding related educational pursuits. National-level attempts are needed to present accurate depictions of engineering, and effort needs to be invested in ensuring that young females can identify as engineers. Higher educational access needs to be considered in future work examining future career interests. 

  • 49.
    Bäck, Per
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    On Hom-associative Ore Extensions2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, we introduce and study hom-associative Ore extensions. These are non-unital, non-associative, non-commutative polynomial rings in which the associativity condition is “twisted” by an additive group homomorphism. In particular, they are examples of hom-associative algebras, and they generalize the classical non-commutative polynomial rings introduced by Ore known as Ore extensions to the non-unital, hom-associative setting. At the same time, when the twisted associativity condition is null, they also generalize to the general non-unital, non-associative setting. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for hom-associative Ore extensions to exist, and construct concrete examples thereof. These include hom-associative generalizations of the quantum plane, the universal enveloping algebra of the two-dimensional non-abelian Lie algebra, and the first Weyl algebra, to name a few. The aforementioned algebras turn out to be formal hom-associative deformations of their associative counterparts, the latter two which cannot be formally deformed in the associative setting. Moreover, these are all weakly unital algebras, and we provide a way of embedding any multiplicative, non-unital hom-associative algebra into a multiplicative, weakly unital hom-associative algebra. This generalizes the classical unitalization of non-unital, associative algebras. We then study the hom-associative Weyl algebras in arbitrary characteristic, classify them up to isomorphism, and in the zero characteristic case, we prove that an analogue of the Dixmier conjecture is true. We also study hom-modules over hom-associative rings, and by doing so, we are able to prove a Hilbert's basis theorem for hom-associative Ore extensions. Our theorem includes as special cases both the classical Hilbert's basis theorem for Ore extensions and a Hilbert's basis theorem for unital, non-associative Ore extensions. Last, we construct examples of both hom-associative and non-associative Ore extensions which are all Noetherian by our theorem.

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  • 50.
    Bäck, Per
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
    Richter, Johan
    Blekinge tekniska högskola, Sweden.
    Hilbert's basis theorem and simplicity for non-associative skew Laurent polynomial rings and related ringsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce non-associative skew Laurent polynomial rings over unital, non-associative rings and prove simplicity results for these. We also generalize an already existing Hilbert’s basis theorem for non-associative Ore extensions and show that it implies a Hilbert’s basis theorem for non-associative skew Laurent polynomial rings. Moreover, we show that the above theorem can be extended to non-associative generalizations of both skew power series rings and skew Laurent series rings. We provide several examples to illustrate the applications of our results.

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