https://www.mdu.se/

mdu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 379
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Acinas, Inés
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Creation of a space for creativity and innovation within university: The experience of Creative Lab2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to stimulate innovation and sustainable development in a business environment that is always changing, it is important to support successful collaboration between academia, industry, and society. This project is focused on creating and implementing MDU's Creative Lab, an innovation lab based on the Quintuple Helix Model, in order to promote collaboration between students, academic institutions, and business partners and to meet the needs of all parties. The study was conducted utilizing a methodology that included a review of the literature, interviews, and data analysis. The primary issues that need to be resolved have been highlighted through the interviews as the absence of support systems, the requirement to create clear objectives at the outset of the project, and the significance of ensuring projects and authors maintain continuity.The results of the research have shown that better communication between parties, a clear connection between projects and courses, and opportunities for students to obtain knowledge and experience in the real world are all necessary. In addition, major motivators such as the desire for a social impact, interdisciplinary teamwork, and satisfaction in one's job have been highlighted. As a result, a business model has been developed that takes into account the information gleaned from the presentations and aims to facilitate collaboration and communication between academic institutions, students, and business partners, guarantee the quality of collaborations, offer mentoring and guidance to students, and plan workshops and events that encourage creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship.This project provides a thorough analysis of how to create and implement a student-driven innovation lab that adheres to the Quintuple Helix Model and is geared toward sustainable growth in the direction of Industry 5.0. By encouraging student cooperation and contentment, it fosters an environment that fosters the development of creative ideas and the development of a team-oriented workforce that will progress society and business.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Digital Technologies for Enabling Smart Production: Examining the Aspects of Selection and Integration2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development towards Industry 5.0, manufacturing companies are developing towards smart production. In smart production, data is used as a resource to interconnect different elements in the production system to learn and adapt to changing production conditions. Common objectives include human-centricity, resource-efficiency, and sustainable production. To enable these desired benefits of smart production, there is a need to use digital technologies to create and manage the entire flow of data. To enable smart production, it is essential to deploy digital technologies in a way so that collected raw data is converted into useful data that can be applied by equipment or humans to generate value or reduce waste in production. This requires consideration to the data flow within the production system, i.e., the entire process of converting raw data into useful data which includes data management aspects such as the collection, analysis, and visualization of data. To enable a good data flow, there is a need to combine several digital technologies. However, many manufacturing companies are facing challenges when selecting suitable digital technologies for their specific production system. Common challenges are related to the overwhelming number of advanced digital technologies available on the market, and the complexity of production system and digital technologies. This makes it a complex task to understand what digital technologies to select and the recourses and actions needed to integrate them in the production system.

    Against this background, the purpose of this licentiate thesis is to examine the selection and integration of digital technologies to enable smart production within manufacturing companies. More specifically, this licentiate thesis examines the challenges and critical factors of selecting and integrating digital technologies for smart production. This was accomplished by performing a qualitative-based multiple case study involving manufacturing companies within different industries and of different sizes. The findings show that identified challenges and critical factors are related to the different phases of the data value chain: data sources and collection, data communication, data processing and storage, and data visualisation and usage. General challenges and critical factors that were related to all phases of the data value chain were also identified. Moreover, the challenges and critical factors were related to people, process, and technology aspects. This shows that there is a need for holistic perspective on the entire data value chain and different production system elements when digital technologies are selected and integrated. Furthermore, there is a need to define a structured process for the selection and integration of digital technologies, where both management and operational level are involved. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ashjaei, Seyed Mohammad Hossein
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors for Selecting and Integrating Digital Technologies to Enable Smart Production: A Data Value Chain Perspective2023In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, p. 311-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development towards Industry 5.0, manufacturing companies are developing towards Smart Production, i.e., using data as a resource to interconnect the elements in the production system to learn and adapt accordingly for a more resource-efficient and sustainable production. This requires selecting and integrating digital technologies for the entire data lifecycle, also referred to as the data value chain. However, manufacturing companies are facing many challenges related to building data value chains to achieve the desired benefits of Smart Production. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze the critical factors of selecting and integrating digital technologies for efficiently benefiting data value chains for Smart Production. This paper employed a qualitative-based multiple case study design involving manufacturing companies within different industries and of different sizes. The paper also analyses two Smart Production cases in detail by mapping the data flow using a technology selection and integration framework to propose solutions to the existing challenges. By analyzing the two in-depth studies and additionally two reference cases, 13 themes of critical factors for selecting and integrating digital technologies were identified.

  • 4.
    Agerskans, Natalie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ashjaei, Mohammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Enabling Smart Production: The Role of Data Value Chain2022In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Smart Manufacturing and Logistics Systems: Turning Ideas into Action: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2022, Gyeongju, South Korea, September 25–29, 2022, Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Duck Young Kim; Gregor von Cieminski; David Romero, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, Vol. 664, p. 477-485Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To stay competitive, manufacturing companies are developing towards Smart Production which requires the use of digital technologies. However, there is a lack of guidance supporting manufacturing companies in selecting and integrating a combination of suitable digital technologies, which is required for Smart Production. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is twofold: (i) to identify the main challenges of selecting and integrating digital technologies for Smart Production, and (ii) to propose a holistic concept to support manufacturing companies in mitigating identified challenges in order to select and integrate a combination of digital technologies for Smart Production. This is accomplished by using a qualitative-based multiple case study design. This paper identifies current challenges related to selection and integration of digital technologies. To overcome these challenges and achieve Smart production, the concept of data value chain was proposed, i.e., a holistic approach to systematically map and improve data flows within the production system. © 2022, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing.

  • 5.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sauter, Barrett
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Differing Views of the Meaning of Digital Transformation in Manufacturing Industry2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2022, Vol. 21, p. 331-340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature there is no consensus regarding the meaning of the term digital transformation. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the differing views of the meaning of digital transformation. A case study has been conducted in collaboration with four Swedish manufacturing companies. The results shows that digital transformation can have different meaning within a company and the main challenge when performing digital transformation is knowledge. This study is the first investigation in a research project focusing on coordination of digital transformation. Therefore, is the underlaying goal to identify how the participating companies in the research project describe digital transformation in comparison with the literature. The research intention is not to define digital transformation rather to explore differing views of digital transformation and highlighting similarities and difference in comparison with the literature reviewed. The findings are practically relevant for manufacturing companies by highlighting differing views of digital transformation and in the creation of a common language within a company. 

  • 6.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Badasjane, Viktorija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sauter, Barrett
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Approaching digital transformation in the manufacturing industry challenges and differing views2023In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, no 4, p. 415-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to support manufacturing companies in their digital transformation, challenges and views of the term 'digital transformation' need to be identified since digital transformation is considered a source of competitive advantages. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the challenges and differing views of digital transformation in the manufacturing industry. A case study was conducted in collaboration with four Swedish manufacturing companies. The results were then mapped into categories of three dimensions (people, process and technology), indicating that digital transformation can have different meanings within a company. We conclude that the term 'digitalisation' is more frequently used in the manufacturing industry than 'digital transformation' and identified challenges relate to lack of best practice for digital transformation, degree of standardisation and therefore affects the workload and limits the possibilities of transferring technical solutions between factories. Our findings are relevant to operations managers and other interested in digital transformation. 

  • 7.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Axelsson, Jakob
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Hatvani, Leo
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Olsson, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schwede, Sebastian
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Sjödin, Carina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Skvaril, Jan
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Zaccaria, Valentina
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Dilemmas in designing e-learning experiences for professionals2021In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Learning, ECEL, 2021, p. 10-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this research are to enhance industry-university collaboration and to design learning experiences connecting the research front to practitioners. We present an empirical study with a qualitative approach involving teachers who gathered data from newly developed advanced level courses in artificial intelligence, energy, environmental, and systems engineering. The study is part of FutureE, an academic development project over 3 years involving 12 courses. The project, as well as this study, is part of a cross-disciplinary collaboration effort. Empirical data comes from course evaluations, course analysis, teacher workshops, and semi-structured interviews with selected students, who are also professionals. This paper will discuss course design and course implementation by presenting dilemmas and paradoxes. Flexibility is key for the completion of studies while working. Academia needs to develop new ways to offer flexible education for students from a professional context, but still fulfil high quality standards and regulations as an academic institution. Student-to-student interactions are often suggested as necessary for qualified learning, and students support this idea but will often not commit to it during courses. Other dilemmas are micro-sized learning versus vast knowledge, flexibility versus deadlines as motivating factors, and feedback hunger versus hesitation to share work. Furthermore, we present the challenges of providing equivalent online experience to practical in-person labs. On a structural level, dilemmas appear in the communication between university management and teachers. These dilemmas are often the result of a culture designed for traditional campus education. We suggest a user-oriented approach to solve these dilemmas, which involves changes in teacher roles, culture, and processes. The findings will be relevant for teachers designing and running courses aiming to attract professionals. They will also be relevant for university management, building a strategy for lifelong e-learning based on co-creation with industry.

  • 8.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Islam, Mir Riyanul
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Weber, R. O.
    Drexel University, Philadelphia, 19802, PA, United States.
    When a CBR in Hand is Better than Twins in the Bush2022In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, vol. 3389 / [ed] Reuss P.; Schonborn J, CEUR-WS , 2022, p. 141-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AI methods referred to as interpretable are often discredited as inaccurate by supporters of the existence of a trade-off between interpretability and accuracy. In many problem contexts however this trade-off does not hold. This paper discusses a regression problem context to predict flight take-off delays where the most accurate data regression model was trained via the XGBoost implementation of gradient boosted decision trees. While building an XGB-CBR Twin and converting the XGBoost feature importance into global weights in the CBR model, the resultant CBR model alone provides the most accurate local prediction, maintains the global importance to provide a global explanation of the model, and offers the most interpretable representation for local explanations. This resultant CBR model becomes a benchmark of accuracy and interpretability for this problem context, and hence it is used to evaluate the two additive feature attribute methods SHAP and LIME to explain the XGBoost regression model. The results with respect to local accuracy and feature attribution lead to potentially valuable future work. © 2022 Copyright for this paper by its authors. Use permitted under Creative Commons License Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). CEUR Workshop Proceedings (CEUR-WS.org)

  • 9.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Västerås, Sweden.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Funk, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Analysis of Breakdown Reports Using Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning2022In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. 40-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proactive maintenance management of world-class standard is close to impossible without the support of a computerized management system. In order to reduce failures, and failure recurrence, the key information to log are failure causes. However, Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) seems to be scarcely used for analysis for improvement initiatives. One part of this is due to the fact that many CMMS utilizes free-text fields which may be difficult to analyze statistically. The aim of this study is to apply Natural Language Processing (NPL), Ontology and Machine Learning (ML) as a means to analyze free-textual information from a CMMS. Through the initial steps of the study, it was concluded though that none of these methods were able to find any suitable hidden patterns with high-performance accuracy that could be related to recurring failures and their root causes. The main reason behind that was that the free-textual information was too unstructured, in terms of for instance: spelling- and grammar mistakes and use of slang. That is the quality of the data are not suitable for the analysis. However, several improvement potentials in reporting and to develop the CMMS further could be provided to the company so that they in the future more easily will be able to analyze its maintenance data.

  • 10.
    Alayón, C. L.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Säfsten, K.
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, 551 11, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Barriers and Enablers for the Adoption of Sustainable Manufacturing by Manufacturing SMEs2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have inherent characteristics, which require specific solutions for improving the sustainability performance of their operations. The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge on barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs and to provide insights into what enablers can be used to overcome existing barriers. Taking, as a starting point, a systematic literature review, this paper presents a categorization of barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing by manufacturing SMEs. In total, seven categories for classifying the barriers and enablers for the adoption of sustainable manufacturing within SMEs were identified: organizational, managerial and attitudinal; informational; governmental; financial; training and skills development; market and business context; and technological. Additionally, this study elaborates on what barriers could be mitigated through the enablers. This study found specific enablers with the potential to mitigate a significantly higher number of barriers and referred to them as ‘critical enablers’. SMEs aiming to adopt sustainable manufacturing practices or improve their sustainability performance are encouraged to focus on the enablers in these categories. This paper synthesizes and facilitates interpretation of the existing body of evidence on barriers and enablers for adopting sustainable manufacturing in SMEs. 

  • 11.
    Alvarez Vadillo, Ines
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bujosa Mateu, Daniel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Johansson, B.
    ABB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ashjaei, Seyed Mohammad Hossein
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Centralised Architecture for the Automatic Self-Configuration of Industrial Networks2023In: IEEE Int. Conf. Emerging Technol. Factory Autom., ETFA, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel production paradigms aim at increasing the efficiency and flexibility of production systems. Nonetheless, traditional industrial infrastructures lack the mechanisms needed to support these new paradigms. One of the main limiting factors is the architecture, which follows the automation pyramid in which subsystems are divided in layers depending on their functionalities. This allowed to meet the timing and dependability requirements of the production subsystems, however at the cost of limiting the exchange of information required to provide increased flexibility to the system. For this reason, in this paper we propose a new industrial architecture with a single network infrastructure to connect all the devices that conform to the industrial systems. On top of that, we design an Automatic Network Configurator to support the automatic configuration of the system. To assess the feasibility of our design and evaluate its performance, we implement the first instance of the architecture capable of supporting changes in the traffic requirements during run-time, i.e., without stopping or disrupting the system's operation. Furthermore, we use the implemented instance to measure the time required for reconfigurations.

  • 12.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Västmanlands County Museum, Sweden.
    Komazec, Ksenija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Vaara, Elsa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Strineholm, Andreea
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Whose place is it?: Enacted territories in the museum2022In: DRS2022, DRS Conference Proceedings, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     There is a growing trend to embrace the idea of public participation in the work of museums, from exhibition design to collections. To further develop participatory cultures in museums, these negotiations and emerging practices should be examined more closely. This paper explores a museum’s whole-hearted attempt to engage with the societal issue of climate change and work with a high degree of participationfrom civic society when staging a temporary exhibition. We investigate experiences inthe process of building, measuring, separating and transgressing during the collaboration. Based on these explorations the paper presents three emerging and interconnected territories in the staging of participatory temporary exhibitions, the territory of aesthetics, the territory of action (autonomy), and the territory of unpredictability. The result contributes to research on public participatory practices mainly in museum context

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13. Andersson, Staffan Karl Lennart
    et al.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Critical Factors Supporting the Implementation of Collaborative Robot Applications2021In: IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, ETFA, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The industrial collaborative robot (ICR) is a promising technology for automating assembly systems in manufacturing industries. Yet, ICRs are not widely implemented in the manufacturing industry as there are challenges during its implementation. Furthermore, current research lacks real-world case studies on ICR implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical factors supporting the implementation of ICR applications in assembly systems. A multiple-case study with eight case companies is presented in this paper, consisting of thirteen interviews. Moreover, critical factors were identified that could mitigate challenges in the ICR implementation process. By this, the study contributes to the current body of research by identifying and structuring the critical factors using a newness perspective. These factors can support the mitigation of potential challenges when manufacturers implement technology with a high novelty into their assembly systems. Specifically, this paper suggests that manufacturing companies focus on relieving operators from unergonomic tasks rather than focusing on high financial and efficiency gains. This finding contradicts previous research suggesting that financial gains are the main goal for manufacturing companies when implementing ICR applications. Moreover, how manufacturers work with external actors might change when implementing ICR applications, compared to traditional robots. Finally, we suggest testing the critical factors in a real-world case study investigating the whole implementing process to see if these factors, in fact, mitigate challenges. 

  • 14.
    Andersson, Tim
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Olsson, T.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Västerås, 72212, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Markus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sample size prediction for anomaly detection in locks2023In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2023, p. 870-874Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial intelligence in manufacturing systems is currently most used for quality control and predictive maintenance. In the lock industry, quality control of final assembled cylinder lock is still done by hand, wearing out the operators' wrists and introducing subjectivity which negatively affects reliability. Studies have shown that quality control can be automated using machine-learning to analyse torque measurements from the locks. The resulting performance of the approach depends on the dimensionality and size of the training dataset but unfortunately, the process of gathering data can be expensive so the amount collected data should therefore be minimized with respect to an acceptable performance measure. The dimensionality can be reduced with a method called Principal Component Analysis and the training dataset size can be estimated by repeated testing of the algorithms with smaller datasets of different sizes, which then can be used to extrapolate the expected performance for larger datasets. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art methods to predict and minimize the needed sample size for commonly used machine-learning algorithms to reach an acceptable anomaly detection accuracy using torque measurements from locks. The results show that the learning curve with the best fit to the training data does not always give the best predictions. Instead, performance depends on the amount of data used to create the curve and the particular machine-learning algorithm used. Overall, the exponential and power-law functions gave the most reliable predictions and the use of principal component analysis greatly reduced the learning effort for the machine-learning algorithms. With torque measurements from 50-150 locks, we predicted a detection accuracy of over 95% while the current method of using the human tactile sense gives only 16% accuracy.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Tim
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bohlin, Markus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Comparison of Machine Learning’s- and Humans’- Ability to Consistently Classify Anomalies in Cylinder Locks2022In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology: WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2022, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. 27-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, cylinder locks’ quality has been tested manually by human operators after full assembly. The frequency and the characteristics of the testing procedure for these locks wear the operators’ wrists and lead to varying results of the quality control. The consistency in the quality control is an important factor for the expected lifetime of the locks which is why the industry seeks an automated solution. This study evaluates how consistently the operators can classify a collection of locks, using their tactile sense, compared to a more objective approach, using torque measurements and Machine Learning (ML). These locks were deliberately chosen because they are prone to get inconsistent classifications, which means that there is no ground truth of how to classify them. The ML algorithms were therefore evaluated with two different labeling approaches, one based on the results from the operators, using their tactile sense to classify into ‘working’ or ‘faulty’ locks, and a second approach by letting an unsupervised learner create two clusters of the data which were then labeled by an expert using visual inspection of the torque diagrams. The results show that an ML-solution, trained with the second approach, can classify mechanical anomalies, based on torque data, more consistently compared to operators, using their tactile sense. These findings are a crucial milestone for the further development of a fully automated test procedure that has the potential to increase the reliability of the quality control and remove an injury-prone task from the operators.

  • 16.
    Antony, Jiju
    et al.
    Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates.
    Bhat, Shreeranga
    St Joseph Engineering College, India.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ – the Swedish Institute for Quality, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sony, Michael
    Oxford Brookes Business School, United Kingdom.
    Sorqvist, Lars
    International Academy for Quality, Sweden.
    Bader, Mariam
    Khalifa University, United Arab Emirates.
    Quality management as a means for micro-level sustainability development in organizations2023In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The use of quality management (QM) to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) is a topic of growing interest in academia and industry. The IAQ (International Academy for Quality) established Quality Sustainability Award in 2020, a testament to this growing interest. This study aims to investigate how QM philosophies, methodologies and tools can be used to achieve sustainable development in organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five large manufacturing organizations – three from India and two from China – who reported their achievements about using QM in achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were studied using multiple sources of data collection. A detailed within-case and cross-case analysis were conducted to unearth this linkage's practical and theoretical aspects. Findings: The study finds that QM methodologies effectively met the five organizations' UNSDGs. These organizations successfully used OPEX (Operational Excellence) methodologies such as Lean, Kaizen and Six Sigma to meet UNSDGs 7, 11, 12 and 13. Moreover, UNSG 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production) is the most targeted goal across the case studies. A cross-case analysis revealed that the most frequently used quality tools were Design of Experiments (DoE), Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA), C&E analysis and Inferential statistics, among other essential tools. Research limitations/implications: The study's sample size was limited to large-scale manufacturing organizations in the two most populous countries in the world. This may limit the study's generalizability to other countries, continents, or micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Additionally, the study's conclusions would be strengthened if tested as hypotheses in a follow-up survey. Practical implications: This practical paper provides case studies on how to use QM to impact SDGs. It offers both descriptive and prescriptive solutions for practitioners. The study highlights the importance of using essential QM tools in a structured and systematic manner, with effective teams, to meet the SDGs of organizations. Social implications: The study shows how QM can be used to impact UNSDGs, and this is very important because the UNSDGs are a set of global objectives that aim to address a wide range of social and environmental issues. This study could motivate organizations to achieve the UNSDGs using essential QM tools and make the world a better place for the present and future generations. Originality/value: This case study is the first to investigate at a micro-level how QM can impact UNSDGs using live examples. It uses data from the IAQ to demonstrate how QM can be integrated into UNSDGs to ensure sustainable manufacturing.

  • 17.
    Antony, Jiju
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Fac Business & Law, Newcastle Business Sch, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England..
    Bhat, Shreeranga
    St Joseph Engn Coll, Dept Mech Engn, Mangalore, India..
    Sony, Michael
    Oxford Brookes Univ, Oxford Brookes Business Sch, Oxford, England..
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. SIQ Swedish Inst Qual, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sorqvist, Lars
    Int Acad Qual, Greater Stockholm, Sweden..
    Molteni, Raul
    Molteni Consulting, Buenos Aires, Argentina..
    Sustainable development through quality management: a multiple-case study analysis of triumphs, trials and tribulations2024In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeIn a highly competitive and globalised era, agile organisations proactively steer towards sustainability. This situation persuaded the organisations to align Quality Management (QM) initiatives to achieve sustainable outcomes. This study aims to explore quality-sustainability linkage, explicitly focusing on attaining the prestigious IAQ Quality Sustainability Award. Further it investigates, the impact of QM as a strategy for promoting sustainability to meet sustainable development goals (SDGs).Design/methodology/approachDue to the lack of substantial literature connecting QM to sustainability, the current research adopted an explanatory multiple-case study. Six cases were purposively chosen for the study. Three cases of those who have achieved the prestigious IAQ Quality Sustainability Award and remaining have been selected that have fallen short of receiving the award. A detailed within-case and cross-case examinations involving six cases that reported their QM achievements aligned with SDGs.FindingsThe findings demonstrate the significant role of QM adoption in achieving positive results from the perspective of SDGs, such as reduced environmental impacts, improved operational efficiency and enhanced quality of life. Effective stakeholder collaboration, proficiency in analytical tools and strategic alignment with SDGs emerged as critical success factors. Conversely, weak linkage with sustainability and unclear approaches were crucial challenges in attaining the IAQ Quality Sustainability Award.Research limitations/implicationsThis paper outlines essential commandments for organisations actively seeking to promote sustainability. It offers valuable insights for decision-makers, facilitating a profound understanding of the challenges and opportunities in pursuing sustainable performance.Originality/valueThe distinctive nature of this study lies in its dedicated exploration of the intricate relationship between QM deployment and its true impact on the achievement of the SDGs.

  • 18.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Rise - Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Bozic Yams, N.
    Rise - Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Carlgren, L.
    Rise - Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    CO-DESIGNING TECHNOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS IN DEVELOPING FUTURES LITERACY THROUGH SPECULATIVE DESIGN AND AN ARTISTIC INTERVENTION2023In: Proceedings of the Design Society, Vol. 3, Cambridge University Press , 2023, p. 957-966Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Futures Literacy is the capability to imagine and understand potential futures to prepare ourselves to act and innovate in the present. This pilot study aims to understand how artistic methodologies and speculative design can support the collaborative exploration of futures in the context of work and contribute to developing peoples' capability of futures literacy. Our premise is that technologies such as Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of things can augment people and support their needs at work. To illustrate this process, we have presented a collaborative method that integrates an artistic intervention with speculative design activities. We tested the method in a full-day workshop with seventeen (17) participants from a Swedish academy responsible for enabling learning and competence development at work in the healthcare sector. The results indicate that the artistic intervention, combined with the speculative design activities, can challenge current participants' perspectives and offer them new ways of seeing futures with technologies. These new ways of seeing reveal underlying premises crucial in developing the capability of futures literacy. 

  • 19.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. RISE, Västerås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Florin, Ulrika
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, Kristian
    RISE, Västerås, Sweden.
    TO SUPPORT IOT COLLABORATIVE EXPRESSIVENESS ON THE SHOP FLOOR2021In: Proceedings of the Design Society, E-ISSN 2732-527X, Vol. 1, p. 3149-3158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of new research for IoT support and the human-centric perspective of industry 4.0 opens a gap to support operators in unleashing their creativity so they can provide improvements opportunities with IoT technology. This paper presents a case-study carried out in four Swedish manufacturing companies, where four different workshops were facilitated to support operators in the conceptualization of manufacturing improvements with IoT technologies. The empirical material gathered during these workshops has been analyzed in five different reflective sessions and discussed in light of previous research from industry 4.0, operators, and IoT support. Results indicate that operators can collaboratively create conceptual IoT solutions and that expressiveness in communicating their ideas and needs using IoT technology is more relevant than technical aspects and details of their proposed IoT solutions. This technological expressiveness is identified as a necessary skill to be cultivated on the shop floor and can potentially contribute to making a more effective and socially sustainable industrial landscape in the future.

  • 20.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Florin, Ulrika
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sandström, Kristian
    Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Co-Designing with AI in Sight2022In: Proceedings of the Design Society, E-ISSN 2732-527X, Vol. 2, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial Intelligence offers a wide variety of capabilities that can potentially address people's needs and desires in their specific contexts. This pilot study presents a collaborative method using a deck of AI cards tested with 58 production, AI, and information science students, and experts from an accessible media agency. The results suggest that, with the support of the method and AI cards, participants can ideate and reach conceptual AI solutions. Such conceptualisations can contribute to a more inclusive integration of AI solutions in society.

  • 21.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Micro Gas Turbines - Trends and Opportunities2022In: Mechanical engineering (New York, N.Y. 1919), ISSN 0025-6501, E-ISSN 1943-5649, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 58-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Aslanidou, Ioanna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Soibam, Jerol
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
    Comparison of machine learning approaches for spectroscopy applications2022In: Proceedings of the 63rd International Conference of Scandinavian Simulation Society / [ed] Lars O. Nord; Tiina Komulainen; Corinna Netzer; Gaurav Mirlekar; Berthe Dongmo-Engeland; Lars Eriksson, 2022, p. 80-85Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In energy production the characterization of the fuel is a key aspect for modelling and optimizing the operation of a power plant. Near-infrared spectroscopy is a wellestablished method for characterization of different fuels and is widely used both in laboratory environments and in power plants for real-time results. It can provide a fast and accurate estimate of key parameters of the fuel, which for the case of biomass can include moisture content, heating value, and ash content. These instruments provide a chemical fingerprint of the samples and require a calibration model to relate that to the parameters of interest.

    A near-infrared spectrometer can provide point data whereas a hyperspectral imaging camera allows the simultaneous acquisition of spatial and spectral information from an object. As a result, an installation above a conveyor belt can provide a distribution of the spectral data on a plane. This results in a large amount of data that is difficult to handle with traditional statistical analysis. Furthermore, storage of the data becomes a key issue, therefore a model to predict the parameters of interest should be able to be updated continuously in an automated way. This makes hyperspectral imaging data a prime candidate for the application of machine learning techniques. This paper discusses the modelling approach for hyperspectral imaging, focusing on data analysis and assessment of machine learning approaches for the development of calibration models.

  • 23.
    Avgerinou, M. D.
    et al.
    American Community Schools Athens, Greece.
    Pettersson, Rune
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Visual literacy theory: Moving forward2020In: Handbook of Visual Communication: Theory, Methods, and Media, Västerås: Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2020, p. 433-464Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Creating safety and counteracting segregation through collaboration between the civil society and municipalities. Possibilities and challenges in successful co-creating processes.2023In: Paper presented at the IRSPM (International Research Society for Public Management) Conference.  April 3-5 2023, Budapest, Hungary  Panel 33: SIG Civil society and community self-organisations., 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a new emerging public administration approach, Public Value Governance, the local public authorities struggle with reinventing and developing their organization to become more innovative and collaborative. In trying to solve increasingly more complex challenges, while at best keeping their resources and budget constant or declining, they are turning to civil actors to involve them in different arenas of innovative co-creation. However, this collaboration is complex and challenging. Both the public authorities and civil society are struggling to find a prosperous and professional collaboration. This empirical paper, based on interactive qualitative research, position itself within public innovation and due to its context and focus contributes to the development of knowledge on social and collaborative innovation. In trying to understand how the innovation system works on a micro-level the case study follows a one-year project focusing on working against segregation and creating safety among children and youth in a socio-economic vulnerable area in a Mid-Swedish municipality. The research focuses on challenges with collaboration when a municipality and civil society actors are working together trying to solve a societal challenge. The results are presented through eight themes, including challenges regarding; the concept collaboration, who is collaborating with whom, a poor understanding of and knowledge about each other’s entities, organization and leadership, power relationships and competition, who is included, confusions on direction and who is doing what, as well as collaborative formats. In addition, the paper presents five overriding suggestions on what needs to be strengthened to achieve collaborative agency.

  • 25.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Skapa trygghet genom samverkan mellan civilsamhälle och kommunal verksamhet: Rapport från ett Delmosfinansierat projekt i Årby, Eskilstuna kommun 2021/20222022Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna forskningsstudie har skett inom ramen för ett projekt finansierat av Delegationen mot segregation (Delmos) under år 2021/2022 för att främja samverkan kring frågan om segregation och trygghet i stadsdelen Årby i Eskilstuna. Projektet har initierats och drivits av civilsamhällets (CS) aktörer, nämligen Studiefrämjandet i Sörmland, Sisters in business och Årbyföreningen, Årby M. Dessutom är Eskilstuna kommun en samverkanspart som stått bakom ansökan och deltagit i projektet. Eskilstuna är en av de 32 kommuner som lyfts fram som ett socioekonomiskt eftersatt område där särskilt stöd kan sökas för att minska och motverka social och ekonomisk segregation (Studiefrämjandet i Sörmland, 2021). Årby är en stadsdel i Eskilstuna med ca 4800 invånare av kommunens drygt 100 000. Området byggdes i samband med miljonprogrammet under 1960-talet och är ett av de områden som Eskilstuna kommun valt ut som strategiskt viktigt att fokusera på när det gäller inkludering, trygghetsskapande aktiviteter och att skapa levande mötesplatser i tillsammans med boende i området. Dessa mötesplatser finns även i några andra stadsdelar, och där finns en uttalad vilja och påbörjat samarbete med civilsamhället.

    För att kunna möta upp, och börja skapa lösningar på, komplexa samhällsutmaningar, såsom social och ekonomisk segregation, krävs ett stort mått av nytänkande och samverkan. Enligt regeringens långsiktiga strategi för att minska och motverka segregation (Regeringskansliet, 2018), har civilsamhället en viktig roll i detta arbete. Detta som komplementär aktör, brobyggare mellan invånare och kommunen och som en friare form av, och plattform för, samverkan och aktiviteter.

    I ansökan om statsbidrag från Delegationen mot segregation (Studiefrämjandet, 2021) beskrivs syftet med arbetet inom ramen för projektet som tredelat: (1) kunskaps- och metodutveckling, (2) gemensamt agerande och strategisk samverkan kring segregation, samt (3) direkta insatser som tar utgångspunkt i lokala och regionala behov. Inom ramen för den första delen så lyfts behov om kunskap om dels segregationens nuläge, dels om vilka åtgärder som kan leda till att minska och motverka segregation. Inom ramen för del två så pekas på vikten att samverka mellan och inom aktörerna för att åstadkomma en förändring.

    I skärningspunkten för dessa finns behov av att undersöka på vilket sätt samverkan sker idag, hur olika aktörer och individer ser på behov av samverkan, hur detta ska organiseras samt utmaningar och möjligheter med densamma. Allt i en framåtsyftande anda för att skapa en så god grund och plattform för att tillsammans åstadkomma en fortsatt positiv utveckling i Årby, Eskilstuna.

    Därför har studien genomfört en avgränsad analys av utvecklingen gällande samverkan i projektet. Syftet var att undersöka samverkan mellan civilsamhällets aktörer och kommunen, men i undersökning och analys framkom även kunskap om samverkan mellan civilsamhällets aktörer samt internt mellan kommunala verksamheter. Studien är en empirisk undersökning på mikronivå. Mot denna bakgrund formulerades följande övergripande forskningsfrågor; 

    RQ1: Vilka utmaningar och möjligheter finns när det gäller samverkan mellan offentliga och privata aktörer och civilsamhället för att utveckla mötesplatser för att bryta segregation och utanförskap? 

    RQ2: Vad behöver förstärkas för att åstadkomma en mer utvecklad samverkan mellan offentliga aktörer och civilsamhället? 

    I denna rapport kommer även respondenternas uppfattning av resultatet av projektet och forskarens analys av detta lyftas fram. 

    Studiens resultat bidrar inte bara till kunskap hos de aktörer som var delaktiga i projektet utan har även relevans för andra aktörer och initiativ som arbetar mot samma mål och som söker utveckla former för samverkan mellan CS och kommunala verksamheter. Idén om civilsamhällets viktiga roll, och frågor kring dess samverkan med kommuner, lyfts även i andra sammanhang.  Eskilstuna kommun har exempelvis en långsiktig satsning som heter Trygga unga, där fokus ligger på främjande och förebyggande arbete för ungdomar i åldern 13–20 år, som befinner sig i riskzonen för kriminalitet och missbruk. I detta arbete uttrycks likaledes att man vill åstadkomma en ökad samverkan med civilsamhället och föreningslivet (Eskilstuna kommun, 2022). Frågan kring trygghet, minskad segregation och samhällsutveckling är även ett fokus för Samhällskontraktet, en gemensam samverkansarena där Mälardalens universitet, Eskilstuna kommun och Västerås stad arbetar för att utforska och hitta lösningar på komplexa samhällsutmaningar tillsammans med andra samhällsaktörer. För denna arena är studien och rapportens innehåll relevant, då ett av de fokusområden man arbetar med är något man benämner skolresultat, men detta ska ses i vid bemärkelse. Skolresultat ska inte enbart kopplas till klassrummet, utan man diskuterar det även som en del av samhällsutveckling, demokrati, integration och trygghet samt skärningspunkter som ligger utanför skolmiljön. Därför utifrån workshops med Eskilstuna kommun och Västerås stad intresserar man sig exempelvis för frågor som ’Hur motverkar vi effekter av segregation?’ samt ’Hur kan vi genom stärkt samverkan mellan myndigheter öka tryggheten som ytterst hjälper barn och ungdomar att gå ut skolan med godkända betyg?’ Här vill man undersöka detta ur ett trygghetsperspektiv (Samhällskontraktet, 2022). Forskaren i denna studie är en del av detta arbete. Studien är också ett bidrag till arbetet inom MDU Living Lab, inom vilket man fokuserar på metoder och modeller för samverkan och samproduktion

     

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Höglund, Linda
    Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Strategic management in the public sector - the case of the Swedish transport administration2024In: International Public Management Journal, ISSN 1096-7494, E-ISSN 1559-3169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic management in the public sector has become quite popular in practice and several studies have shown that it has an impact on organizational performance. However, we still know little of how strategic management unfolds in practice. Overall, our message is that there are specific challenges that appear when applying strategic management in a public sector context that need to be handled to enhance the possibility of succeeding with strategy work. We present these challenges in terms of four tensions emerging in strategy work: planned versus emergent strategies, legitimacy versus practicality, administrative management versus innovative approach, and accessibility versus security. Based on these identified tensions, we suggest four propositions that not only have implications for further research, but also practical implications.

  • 27.
    Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Westerberg, M.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurship in teacher education: Conceptualisation and tensions2018In: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Education: Frontiers in European Entrepreneurship Research, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2018, p. 123-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Azamfirei, Victor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lessons from adopting robotic in-line quality inspection in the Swedish manufacturing industry2022In: Procedia Computer Science, Elsevier B.V. , 2022, p. 386-394Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Zero-Defect Manufacturing (ZDM) movement has received increasing interest from practitioners and academics. However, despite the academic development of the field, the adoption of ZDM enablers such as robotic in-line quality inspection applications has not increased as expected. This article explores the state of adoption of robotic in-line quality inspection at five global Swedish manufacturing companies. Results show that contrary to the case companies' beliefs, more people- and process-oriented challenges have been encountered compared with technological ones. Future work will focus on developing system design guidelines for robotic in-line quality inspection systems in the realm of ZDM.

  • 29.
    Azamfirei, Victor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Harmonising design and manufacturing: a quality inspection perspective2021In: 2021 26th IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation (ETFA), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As manufacturing companies are becoming more global, dynamic, and competitive, contradictory demands intensify. Flexibility is a key enabler for meeting the challenges of a global market if offered at mass production price and quality. Many companies have adopted Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) together with new technologies. Nevertheless, despite the drastic increase in industrial robots adoption, industrial robot applications continue today as they were designed 50 years ago. To obtain a flexible and reliable production system, it takes more than technology as quality depends on equipment and manufacturing processes. Non-adaptive industrial robots autonomy may be disrupted by the geometrical deformations of the fixtures. This paper presents a comprehensive case study of adopting a robotic in-line quality inspection in an automotive Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) to aid the robot-fixture collision problem. The purpose is to examine errors that occur in production processes and how quality inspection can mitigate such errors. Empirical data collection was carried out in the form of (i) interviews, (ii) participant observations, (iii) documents, and (iv) video recording of robot cells. Results show that contrary to the case company beliefs, the manufacturing system does not follow the FMS standards; thus, to harmonise resources design and manufacturing processes, adding a robotic in-line quality inspection station is not enough. First, the robotic in-line quality inspection should follow a “preventive” control strategy to avoid deviated fixturing from entering the robot line. Second, the managers should address the beliefs of operators and their activities in solving the robot-fixture collision problem. Moreover third, the robot gripper design needs to be updated to an appropriate one.

  • 30.
    Azamfirei, Victor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Psarommatis, F.
    Oslo University, SIRIUS, Centre for Scalable Data Access, Gaustadalleen 23B, Oslo, 0373, Norway.
    Science and technology roadmap towards robotic in-line quality inspection for implementing zero-defect manufacturing2023In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2023, p. 99-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current manufacturing climate is characterised by the offering of customisable or one-of-a-kind products at mass production prices while complying with sustainability demands. Consequently, modern manufacturing companies are employing more and more industrial robots to increase flexibility and productivity. Nonetheless, for manufacturing companies to achieve true sustainability, a Zero-Defect Manufacturing (ZDM) approach is needed. Such an approach implies applying emerging technologies for quality inspection and improvement, as no system is perfect or free from deviations. Science and Technology (S&T) roadmaps are employed as decision aids to improve the coordination of activities and resources in increasingly complex and uncertain environments. This paper presents a S&T roadmap to guide all-size companies towards ZDM through advanced robotics for in-line quality inspection. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and progress metrics for robotic in-line quality inspection towards ZDM are outlined.

  • 31.
    Azamfirei, Victor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Psarommatis, F.
    University of Oslo, SIRIUS, Centre for Scalable Data Access, Gaustadalleen 23B, 0373, Oslo, Norway.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Application of automation for in-line quality inspection, a zero-defect manufacturing approach2023In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 67, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary manufacturing must prioritise the sustainability of its manufacturing processes and systems. Zero Defect Manufacturing (ZDM) focusses on minimising waste of any kind using data-driven technology, hence enhancing the quality of all manufacturing aspects (product, process, service, etc.). Making things right on the first try is the central tenet of ZDM. In recent years, the application of automation for in-line quality inspection systems has begun to attract the interest of both practitioners and academics because of its capability to detect defects in real-time, and thus adapt the system to disturbances. In this work, we provide a systematic review of the literature on current trends in the application of automation for in-line quality inspection with the ultimate objective of achieving ZDM. Additionally, bibliometric and performance analyses have been performed to gain a complete picture of the field. In this work, we have collected bibliometric data from the most widely referred search engines for academic engineering papers, i.e. Scopus, Web of Science, and IEEE Explorer, involving a total of 145 academic publications from 2011 to 2021. Uniquely for this study, we used three research attributes for the analysis of the selected articles, that is, the level of automation, the condition for quality inspection, and the contribution to ZDM dimensions. The literature suggests that there is a lack of research on the use of in-line detection data for the prediction of defects or repair. Based on the results and our interpretation of the literature, an adapted framework of ZDM (Psarommatis et al., 2020a) and multi-layer quality inspection (Azamfirei et al., 2021a) is presented.

  • 32.
    Azamfirei, Victor
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Psarommatis, F.
    SIRIUS, Centre for Scalable Data Access, University of Oslo, Gaustadalleen 23B, Oslo, 0373, Norway.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Human Factors in the Design of Advanced Quality Inspection Systems in the Era of Zero-Defect Manufacturing2024In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 797-804Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies around the world are under constant pressure to perform effectively and sustainably. Incidental processes, such as Quality Inspection (QI), are needed to achieve Zero-Defects Manufacturing (ZDM). This study aimed to identify the Human Factors and Ergonomics (HF&E) in the design of advanced automation, QI systems, and ZDM through selected papers and empirical observations. Our presented model is built around the six main dimensions, i.e., top management, manager (project owner), designers, engineers (internal and suppliers), and operators. The commitment of top management, the openness of the manager, the design-friendly nature of the technological system, and the constant updating of knowledge by engineers are important for the success of ZDM. Researchers need to be familiar with cognitive and organisational human factors to align theory with specific cases. Operators face physical and cognitive challenges, and their environment and health must be considered for their successful contribution to the design of advanced QI systems.

  • 33.
    Azari, Mehdi Saman
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Comp Sci & Media Technol, Växjö, Sweden.
    Flammini, Francesco
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Santini, Stefania
    Univ Naples Federico II, Dept Elect Engn & Informat Technol, Naples, Italy.
    Improving Resilience in Cyber-Physical Systems based on Transfer Learning2022In: 2022 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CYBER SECURITY AND RESILIENCE (IEEE CSR), IEEE , 2022, p. 203-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An essential aspect of resilience within Cyber-Physical Systems stands in their capacity of early detection of faults before they generate failures. Faults can be of any origin, either natural or intentional. Detection of faults enables predictive maintenance, where faults are managed through diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper we focus on intelligent predictive maintenance based on a class of machine learning techniques, namely transfer learning, which overcomes some limitations of traditional approaches in terms of availability of appropriate training datasets and discrepancy of data distribution. We provide a conceptual approach and a reference architecture supporting transfer learning within intelligent predictive maintenance applications for cyber-physical systems. The approach is based on the emerging paradigms of Industry 4.0, the industrial Internet of Things, and Digital Twins hosting run-time models for providing the training data set for the target domain. Although we mainly focus on health monitoring and prognostics of industrial machinery as a reference application, the general approach is suitable to both physical- and cyber-threat detection, and to any combination of them within the same system, or even in complex systems-of-systems such as critical infrastructures. We show how transfer learning can aid predictive maintenance with intelligent fault detection, diagnosis and prognosis, and describe some the challenges that need to be addressed for its effective adoption in real industrial applications.

  • 34.
    Azari, Mehdi Saman
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Comp Sci & Media Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Flammini, Francesco
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Linnaeus Univ, Dept Comp Sci & Media Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden.
    Santini, Stefania
    Univ Naples Federico II, Dept Elect Engn & Informat Technol, I-80125 Naples, Italy..
    Caporuscio, Mauro
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Comp Sci & Media Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    A Systematic Literature Review on Transfer Learning for Predictive Maintenance in Industry 4.02023In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 11, p. 12887-12910Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of Industry 4.0 has resulted in the widespread usage of novel paradigms and digital technologies within industrial production and manufacturing systems. The objective of making industrial operations monitoring easier also implied the usage of more effective data-driven predictive maintenance approaches, including those based on machine learning. Although those approaches are becoming increasingly popular, most of the traditional machine learning and deep learning algorithms experience the following three major challenges: 1) lack of training data (especially faulty data), 2) incompatible computation power, and 3) discrepancy in data distribution. A new data-driven technique, such as transfer learning, can be developed to overcome the issues related to traditional machine learning and deep learning for predictive maintenance. Motivated by the recent big interest towards transfer learning within computer science and artificial intelligence, in this paper we provide a systematic literature review addressing related research with a focus on predictive maintenance. The review aims to define transfer learning in the context of predictive maintenance by introducing a specific taxonomy based on relevant perspectives. We also discuss current advances, challenges, open-source datasets, and future directions of transfer learning applications in predictive maintenance from both theoretical and practical viewpoints.

  • 35.
    Backeman, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Synthesizing Understandable Strategies2024In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 201-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The result of reinforcement learning is often obtained in the form of a q-table mapping actions to future rewards. We propose to use SMT solvers and strategy trees to generate a representation of a learned strategy in a format which is understandable for a human. We present the methodology and demonstrate it on a small game. 

  • 36.
    Backeman, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Kunnappilly, A.
    Alstom, Västerås, Sweden.
    Seceleanu, Cristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Supporting 5G Service Orchestration with Formal Verification2023In: Computer Science and Information Systems, ISSN 1820-0214, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 329-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 5G communication technology has the ability to create logical net-works, called network slices, which are specifically carved to serve particular application domains. Due to the mix of different application criticality, it becomes crucial to verify if the applications’ service level agreements are met. In this pa-per, we propose a novel framework for modeling and verifying 5G orchestration, considering simultaneous access and admission of new requests to slices as well as virtual network function scheduling and routing. By combining modeling in user-friendly UML, with UPPAAL model checking and satisfiability-modulo-theories-based model finding, our framework supports both modeling and formal verification of service orchestration. We demonstrate our approach on a e-health case study showing how a user, with no knowledge of formal methods, can model a system in UML and verify that the application meets its requirements. © 2023, ComSIS Consortium. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Berglund, Rachael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Omorede, Adesuwa
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Creativity at a distance2022In: Event Proceedings: LUT Scientific and Expertise Publications, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     More and more meetings in working life are conducted remotely via digital media. How are creative meetings affected by participants being at a distance? Some experiment suggests group creativity to improve with remote work, other show challenges. How is it in real practice? Ten well performing leaders working from home have been interviewed. They reported several challenges. Some have been found in earlier research, the preparation phase is harder and the tools for remote communication aren’t yet good and simple enough for practitioners. But some might be new discoveries, the long time needed for creative meetings being too tiresome for the remote situation, and participants becoming disturbed by irrelevant activities in the home context.Most of the interviewed managers see a hybrid as the future, where some work will be performed from home and some at a shared workplace. Creative meetings are suggested to be performed with physical closeness.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tripney Berglund, Rachael
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Interaction training – an enabler for improvement measures within the psychosocial risk assessment process2022In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 553-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The study objectives were to (1) identify if providing solution-focused interaction training enables managers and employees to develop and implement actions to improve their psychosocial work environment and (2) test a recontextualization of the psychosocial work environment as social structures affecting members of the workplace and verify if social interactions effectively change the local psychosocial work environment.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The intervention involved training managers, supervisors and employees in solution-focused interaction. This study used a controlled interrupted time-series design, with an intervention and control group (CG) and pre- and post-measurements.

    Findings

    The psychosocial work environment improved, indicating that the training led to better social interactions, contributing to changes in the social structures within the intervention group (IG). Collective reflection between participants in the take action phase was the key to success. The recontextualization uncovered these mechanisms.

    Research limitations/implications

    The present study supports a recontextualization of the psychosocial work environment as primarily decided by social structures that emerge in recurrent interactions within work teams. The same social structures also seem to be important for other features of the production system, like job performance.

    Practical implications

    Training designed to enable high-quality social interactions, like dialogue and collective reflection, has proven to be effective in changing social structures. Moreover, managers may need training in facilitating the collective reflection between participants. Increased focus on social interactions within work teams is suggested for future study of organizational change processes, psychosocial work environment and practical psychosocial work environment management.

    Originality/value

    The intervention was delivered in the preparation phase to enable an effective take action phase. Both phases are less studied in psychosocial risk assessments research. The recontextualization has never been fully used in psychosocial research.

  • 39.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Enablers for coordination of digital transformation in international manufacturing networks2021In: 28th EurOMA Conference EurOMA, 2021, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital transformation of International Manufacturing Networks (IMNs) has been identified as a complex undertaking that requires coordination. However, knowledge about coordination in this context is lacking.  The purpose of this paper is to explore enablers for the coordination of digital transformation in IMNs. To this effect, a case study was conducted with a manufacturing company in the heavy vehicle industry. The most prominent enabler is identified as establishing an organisational structure around the digital transformation that ensures coordination and promotes collaboration across the IMN. Future research could moreover compare enablers across multiple cases.

  • 40.
    Badasjane, Viktoria
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Coordination of Digital Transformation in International Manufacturing Networks—Challenges and Coping Mechanisms from an Organizational Perspective2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 2204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coordinating the digital transformation of globally dispersed factories within international manufacturing networks has become a critical issue for competitiveness, yet there has been limited attention paid to this issue in previous research. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to, from an organizational perspective, explore the challenges in coordinating the digital transformation in an international manufacturing network and the coping mechanisms to overcome those challenges. A case study is conducted in a manufacturing company within the heavy vehicle industry, thus contributing to the limited empirical research covering coordination of digital transformation. The data is analyzed through organizational structure and design theory, and the findings are mapped into four core dimensions: differentiation, integration, centralization, and formalization. The results show 15 challenges and 11 coping mechanisms for coordination of digital transformation in international manufacturing networks, identifying the significance of the coordination uncertainty within the formalization dimension that is particularly exposed to the changes induced by digital transformation. The findings include the need for a coordination-oriented organizational structure that incorporates how and where coordination can be actualized. The research implications contribute with new insights by providing a detailed description of the created organizational structure and, in contrast to previous research, focuses specifically on the coordination aspect of digital transformation in an international manufacturing network. 

  • 41.
    Badasjane, Viktorija
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Coordinating Digital Transformation in International Manufacturing Networks2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies have adapted to globalisation and collected their globally dispersed factories into factory networks, known as international manufacturing networks (IMNs). This requires coordination to access the associated competitive advantages, synchronise the factories, and exploit the capabilities inherent in those individual factories. However, when IMNs introduce digital transformation into the factories, the coordination is often hindered by uncertainty and complexity, as digital transformation requires an extensive adjustment that affects everything from the organisational structure to ways of working. Different parts of the network that are dependent on one another, for example, may be difficult to track and foresee the consequences of digital transformation. Hence, due to the respective challenges, complexities, and uncertainties, the coordination of digital transformation in IMN is paramount to examine. 

    This licentiate thesis begins with exploring coordination mechanisms to increase the understanding of existing research and shape it into a comprehensive overview. Moreover, through case studies, this thesis explores the challenges in and enablers for coordinating digital transformation in IMNs. Altogether, the challenges and enablers are analysed within the dimensions and categories of coordination mechanisms, i.e., they are collected into an overview and described within the case study context. The most significant findings of this thesis are related to the organisational structure, which enables the coordination of digital transformation. However, plenty of challenges remain, foremost connected to the formalisation of the organisational structure, e.g., balancing the rules and guidelines for digital transformation but providing space for people performing the activities to explore and investigate digital technologies. 

    This thesis further contributes to the existing body of research by untangling the complexity of coordination itself and, specifically, the coordination of digital transformation in IMNs, explicitly adding to the operations management field and the management of global operations. Practical contributions are also made, i.e., this thesis promotes practitioners’ increased understanding by providing specific examples and descriptions of the findings within their context. Based on the findings, this thesis offers multiple paths for future research, keeping in mind that coordination is not static but evolving, depending on the context in which it is performed. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Badasjane, Viktorija
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Sauter, Barrett
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Adapting the organisational structure for coordinating the digital transformation2023In: 30th EurOMA conference, EurOMA23, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factories within International Manufacturing Networks (IMNs) need coordination to harness globalization’s potential. Simultaneously, adding additional complexity, they seek to coordinate digital transformation across the IMNs, requiring a holistic view encompassing the organizational structure. The purpose of this paper is to identify how manufacturing companies adapt the organizational structures of their IMNs to coordinate digital transformation. Through a multiple case study of four manufacturing companies, the results show new or adapted functional units, roles and interfaces. The findings describe and exemplify global and local functional units, boundary spanner roles, and formal and informal interfaces created for coordinating digital transformation in IMNs.

  • 43.
    Bajceta, Aleksandar
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Leon, Miguel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Afzal, Wasif
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lindberg, P.
    Alstom Sweden, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Markus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using NLP Tools to Detect Ambiguities in System Requirements - A Comparison Study2022In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, CEUR-WS , 2022, Vol. 3122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements engineering is a time-consuming process, and it can benefit significantly from automated tool support. Ambiguity detection in natural language requirements is a challenging problem in the requirements engineering community. Several Natural Language Processing tools and techniques have been developed to improve and solve the problem of ambiguity detection in natural language requirements. However, there is a lack of empirical evaluation of these tools. We aim to contribute the understanding of the empirical performance of such solutions by evaluating four tools using the dataset of 180 system requirements from the electric train propulsion system provided to us by our industrial partner Alstom. The tools that were selected for this study are Automated Requirements Measurement (ARM), Quality Analyzer for Requirement Specifications (QuARS), REquirements Template Analyzer (RETA), and Requirements Complexity Measurement (RCM). Our analysis showed that selected tools could achieve high recall. Two of them had the recall of 0.85 and 0.98. But they struggled to achieve high precision. The RCM, an in-house developed tool by our industrial partner Alstom, achieved the highest precision in our study of 0.68. 

  • 44.
    Bashir, Sarmad
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Västerås, Sweden.
    Abbas, Muhammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Västerås, Sweden.
    Saadatmand, Mehrdad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Enoiu, Eduard Paul
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Bohlin, Markus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindberg, Pernilla
    Alstom, Västerås, Sweden.
    Requirement or Not, That is the Question: A Case from the Railway Industry2023In: Lecture Notes In Computer Science, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, p. 105-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [Context and Motivation] Requirements in tender documents are often mixed with other supporting information. Identifying requirements in large tender documents could aid the bidding process and help estimate the risk associated with the project. [Question/problem] Manual identification of requirements in large documents is a resource-intensive activity that is prone to human error and limits scalability. This study compares various state-of-the-art approaches for requirements identification in an industrial context. For generalizability, we also present an evaluation on a real-world public dataset. [Principal ideas/results] We formulate the requirement identification problem as a binary text classification problem. Various state-of-the-art classifiers based on traditional machine learning, deep learning, and few-shot learning are evaluated for requirements identification based on accuracy, precision, recall, and F1 score. Results from the evaluation show that the transformer-based BERT classifier performs the best, with an average F1 score of 0.82 and 0.87 on industrial and public datasets, respectively. Our results also confirm that few-shot classifiers can achieve comparable results with an average F1 score of 0.76 on significantly lower samples, i.e., only 20% of the data. [Contribution] There is little empirical evidence on the use of large language models and few-shots classifiers for requirements identification. This paper fills this gap by presenting an industrial empirical evaluation of the state-of-the-art approaches for requirements identification in large tender documents. We also provide a running tool and a replication package for further experimentation to support future research in this area.

  • 45.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Operations, Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Alm, P.
    Operations, Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Tjulin, B.
    Operations, Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Visualizing the Effects of Chronic Versus Sporadic Losses in Manufacturing Industries: A Case Study2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2022, p. 3-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring overall equipment effectiveness can be rather difficult. Particularly to capture all chronic losses, those losses that occur frequently, often on a daily basis, and often with a rather quick and easy fix without involvement of other support functions. Sporadic losses, on the other hand, such as breakdowns, lack of material or manpower is quite easily logged as it gets noticed. This issue is clearly a bigger one when discussing manual or semi-automatic OEE measurement systems. As a complement to this and as a way of visualizing effects of chronic versus sporadic losses a tool has been developed and tested in a case study in an industrial setting. 

  • 46.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Volvo Construction Equipment Operations Eskilstuna, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Giliyana, San
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Importance of Using Domain Knowledge When Designing and Implementing Data-Driven Decision Models for Maintenance: Insights from Industrial Cases2024In: Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. 601-614Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advanced technologies available in the development of Smart Maintenance within Industry 4.0 have the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of industrial maintenance. However, it is important to be careful when deciding which technologies to implement for a given application and when evaluating the quality of the data generated. Otherwise, what should be cost-effective solutions may end up being cost-driving. The use of domain knowledge in selecting, developing, implementing, setting up, and utilizing these technologies is increasingly important for achieving success. In this paper, we will elaborate on this topic by presenting and analyzing insights from industrial cases, drawing on the authors’ extensive experience in the field.

  • 47.
    Bergelin, Johan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards Continuous Modelling to Enable DevOps: A Preliminary Study with Practitioners2022In: Proceedings - ACM/IEEE 25th International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems, MODELS 2022: Companion Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2022, p. 774-783Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Model-based methods and techniques continuously evolve to meet the increasing challenges of modern-day technical landscapes. Parallel to Model-based methods, other paradigms are similarly maturing and being integrated, and one such paradigm is DevOps. Model-based methods and DevOps are perceived to provide benefits when viewed in isolation. Recently, there has been an increased interest in matching the two paradigms, with various proposals and early adoption results. However, little focus is put on the practitioners' view. In this paper, we propose a methodology that aims to utilise Model-driven engineering and DevOps practices in conjunction. Together with the methodology, we present an early evaluation of it from a practitioner's perspective. In particular, we study a large and long-running student project aiming to build a solar vehicle, by presenting the current integration and potential future directions. In this paper we limit the observation to the development phase. Early feedback from the case study indicates significant benefits for several identified project pain points, and it's expected that more benefits will emerge when more advanced DevOps aspects are integrated with model-based methods, and the project matures. © 2022 Owner/Author.

  • 48.
    Bergelin, Johan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Cicchetti, Antonio
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Lundin, E.
    Embedded Systems Inission, Västeras, Sweden.
    Early validation of heterogeneous battery systems in the railway domain2022In: SysCon 2022 - 16th Annual IEEE International Systems Conference, Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, trains are referred to as environment-friendly transportation means when compared e.g. to cars, busses, or aircraft, being modern trains electrified systems. Unfortunately, the costs due to creation and maintenance of railway infrastructures, notably the overhead lines to power the trains, impose boundaries to their expansion potentials. In this respect, the advances in battery technologies are disclosing new opportunities, like serving partially electrified tracks. In particular, on board batteries can be used as backup energy where overhead lines are not available. In such scenarios, analysing battery requirements and evaluating possible solutions is of critical importance.This paper proposes a model-based systems engineering methodology for evaluating the feasibility of heterogeneous battery systems in the railway domain. The methodology leverages separation of concerns to reduce the complexity of the problem and abstracts the different railway system components by means of corresponding simulation models. The methodology is illustrated through a study performed at an industrial partner; in particular, the paper discusses how simulation models have been conceived, refined, validated, and integrated to analyse the properties of various battery configurations for several passenger trains operating on commercial lines in France. Interestingly, the results demonstrate that heterogeneous battery systems provide a suitable trade-off alternative when compared to homogeneous batteries.

  • 49.
    Bergelin, Johan
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Strandberg, P. E.
    Westermo Network Technologies Ab, Västerås, Sweden.
    Industrial requirements for supporting AI-enhanced model-driven engineering2022In: Proceedings - ACM/IEEE 25th International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems, MODELS 2022: Companion Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2022, p. 375-379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing interest in research on the combination of AI techniques and methods with MDE. However, there is a gap between AI and MDE practices, as well as between researchers and practitioners. This paper tackles this gap by reporting on industrial requirements in this field. In the AIDOaRt research project, practitioners and researchers collaborate on AI-Augmented automation supporting modeling, coding, testing, monitoring, and continuous development in cyber-physical systems. The project specifically lies at the intersection of industry and academia collaboration with several industrial use cases. Through a process of elicitation and refinement, 78 high-level requirements were defined, and generalized into 30 generic requirements by the AIDOaRt partners. The main contribution of this paper is the set of generic requirements from the project for enhancing the development of cyber-physical systems with artificial intelligence, DevOps, and model-driven engineering, identifying the hot spots of industry needs in the interactions of MDE and AI. Future work will refine, implement and evaluate solutions toward these requirements in industry contexts. 

  • 50.
    Berglund, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    DESIGN FOR EXTENDED REALITY (DFXR) – EXPLORING ENGINEERING AND PRODUCT DESIGN EDUCATION IN XR2023In: DS 123: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE 2023) / [ed] Buck, Lyndon; Grierson, Hilary; Bohemia, Erik, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rapid development and increasing utilisation of eXtended Reality (XR), sustainability considerations have become an important factor in the design process. Despite the many advantages of XR, existing studies covering design education research show a fragmented early phase application use primarily focusing on local use-cases rather than global interconnected alternatives. While many universities are developing their digital capabilities using XR for various educational purposes, fewexamples exist of interceded activities using multiple variations of XR (i.e., VR, AR, or MR).Establishing a more interconnected set of use-cases is important to fully realise the potential of this technology. Past methodological considerations have been presented through guided design steps when working with elements of XR. However, to position early attempts to work on design imperatives using XR this paper presents a literature review and content analysis to examine the current state of design principles for XR. By utilizing the Design Society's knowledge repository, it employs a categorization process and charts valuable insights of existing XR pedagogical practices. Ultimately, this paper highlights the importance of considering sustainability in digitally enabled prototyping steps and practices using XR and its relevance for the E&PDE community. It also emphasises the need for more research and attention on how XR is practised and how it can be used to advance sustainability efforts.

1234567 1 - 50 of 379
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf