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  • 1.
    Abedini, M.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Noorossana, R.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Customer credit scoring using a hybrid data mining approach2016In: Kybernetes, ISSN 0368-492X, E-ISSN 1758-7883, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1576-1588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A crucial decision in financial services is how to classify credit or loan applicants into good and bad applicants. The purpose of this paper is to propose a four-stage hybrid data mining approach to support the decision-making process. Design/methodology/approach: The approach is inspired by the bagging ensemble learning method and proposes a new voting method, namely two-level majority voting in the last stage. First some training subsets are generated. Then some different base classifiers are tuned and afterward some ensemble methods are applied to strengthen tuned classifiers. Finally, two-level majority voting schemes help the approach to achieve more accuracy. Findings: A comparison of results shows the proposed model outperforms powerful single classifiers such as multilayer perceptron (MLP), support vector machine, logistic regression (LR). In addition, it is more accurate than ensemble learning methods such as bagging-LR or rotation forest (RF)-MLP. The model outperforms single classifiers in terms of type I and II errors; it is close to some ensemble approaches such as bagging-LR and RF-MLP but fails to outperform them in terms of type I and II errors. Moreover, majority voting in the final stage provides more reliable results. Practical implications: The study concludes the approach would be beneficial for banks, credit card companies and other credit provider organisations. Originality/value: A novel four stages hybrid approach inspired by bagging ensemble method proposed. Moreover the two-level majority voting in two different schemes in the last stage provides more accuracy. An integrated evaluation criterion for classification errors provides an enhanced insight for error comparisons.

  • 2.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Prerequisites that support the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development2017In: 24th EurOMA conference EurOMA17, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this paper is to explore the prerequisites that support the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development. An exploratory multiple embedded case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company in the manufacturing industry. By studying four pilot plants’ organisational structure and way of working, this paper contributes with an increased understanding regarding how the fuzzy front end of manufacturing technology development can be supported. This paper describes how a technology roadmap, the usage of master processes and a supportive organisational structure can support the fuzzy front end of new manufacturing technology development.

  • 3.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Eskilstuna.
    Supporting pre-development of new manufacturing technologies2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s tough industrial environment, efficient development of new products and new manufacturing solutions is necessary to stay competitive on a global market. Manufacturing companies use substantial money and development resources to develop new products. However, the resources spent on finding and implementing emerging manufacturing technologies are much more limited. This is often the case even though it is well known that a way of competing on a global market is through the introduction of new manufacturing technologies that can improve product quality as well as contribute to reducing manufacturing time, resulting in reduced product price and in the end increased profit.

    When introducing new manufacturing technologies, different challenges arise such as lack of knowledge, involvement of an external equipment supplier, etc. In addition, time-to-volume is critical when introducing new manufacturing technologies in a manufacturing context. To be able to have a fast ramp-up, manufacturing technology needs to be mature enough and at the same time meet all requirements. Efficient introduction of new manufacturing technologies requires that pre-development activities have been performed in advance.

    Previous research in this area highlights a lack of knowledge and solutions regarding pre-development of new manufacturing technologies. Such pre-development is important in order to have a successful introduction, fast time-to-volume and production system development. Based on these challenges, the objective of the research presented in this thesis is to develop support for pre-development of new manufacturing technologies.

    The research is based on literature reviews and three empirical case studies, carried out over a two-year period of time. The first empirical case study was an exploratory case study in the manufacturing industry. The purpose of that research study was to identify critical factors forcing manufacturing companies to improve the development of manufacturing technologies.

    The second study was a longitudinal embedded case study in the manufacturing industry with the purpose of identifying factors that affect evaluation of new manufacturing technologies during new product development. Particular attention was given to the product development process and how it has affected the evaluation of new manufacturing technologies.

    Finally, the third study was a single case study in the manufacturing industry with the purpose of analysing and discussing the assessment of the maturity level of a manufacturing technology.

  • 4.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Evaluation of Advanced Manufacturing Technology during New Product Development2014In: The 21st EurOMA Conference EurOMA 2014, Palermo, Italy, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that affect evaluation of advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) during new product development (NPD). Particular attention is given to the new product development process and how it has affected the acquisition and evaluation process of AMT. An embedded case study has been conducted at a large Swedish manufacturing company, consisting of semi structured interviews, document analysis, and passive observations. This paper identifies seven factors that affect the evaluation of AMT during NPD and which can be classified into three categories: NPD project, AMT acquisition project and the internal organization.

  • 5.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    FACTORS AFFECTING DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES IN A MACHINING ENVIRONMENT2014In: Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering 2014 TMCE 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify critical factors forcing manufacturing companies to improve the development of production technology in a machining environment. The focus in the paper is on industrial challenges within product design and production system development when introducing new products in a machining environment. Particular attention is given to the product development process and the production equipment acquisition process. A single case study is presented, consisting of interviews, observations, document studies and an analysis of a large Swedish manufacturing company. The case study company is characterized by advanced production technology, high mechanization and high automation level. In parallel with the case study a literature review was conducted in order to identify state-of-the-art methods/models for efficient design and product introduction within a production system. The paper identifies a gap in the current way of working within the case company as well as challenges regarding the development of production technology. Based on the study, the need for future research has been identified including the need of developing an improved working support for efficient production technology development when industrializing new products.

  • 6.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Joint Development of a Manufacturing Technology: A Longitudinal Case Study within the Manufacturing Industry2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compete within the manufacturing industry, there is a need to acquire and develop new manufacturing technologies to differentiate the company from others. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analyse factors affecting development of a manufacturing technology in a joint development project with an equipment supplier. A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company and the collaboration between a manufacturing company and an equipment supplier has been studied. The findings reveal that tacit knowledge and good equipment supplier relationship are highly important factors that facilitate development of a manufacturing technology.

  • 7.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Dept Prod Realizat, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Malardalen Univ, Sch Innovat Design & Engn, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1035-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze knowledge integration in manufacturing technology development projects required to build competitive advantages. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company by following a manufacturing technology development project in real time during a two-year period. Findings - The results show that three different knowledge integration processes exist when developing unique manufacturing technology: processes for capturing, for joint learning, and for absorb learning. The findings of the current research suggest that the three knowledge integration processes are highly interrelated with each knowledge integration process affecting the other two. Research limitations/implications - The major limitation of the research is primarily associated with the single case, which limits generalizability outside the context that was studied. Practical implications - The findings are particularly relevant to manufacturing engineers working with the development of new manufacturing technologies. By using relevant knowledge integration processes and capabilities required to integrate the knowledge in manufacturing technology development projects, companies can improve design and organize the development of manufacturing technology. Originality/value - Previous research has merely noted that knowledge integration is required in the development of unique manufacturing technology, but without explaining how and in what way. This paper's contribution is the identification and analysis of three knowledge integration processes that contribute to the building of competitive advantages by developing unique manufacturing technology and new knowledge.

  • 8.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Managing early manufacturing technology development – phases and key activities2016In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compete within the manufacturing industry, there is a need to acquire and develop new manufacturing technologies to differentiate the company from others. This paper builds on extant operations management and innovation management literature with the focus on how to managing early manufacturing technology development. A multiple case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company in the automotive industry and our paper proposes a conceptual process for early manufacturing technology development and the key activities therein. The findings are relevant for managers working with long-term development and the paper concludes by discussing implications and research limitations.

  • 9.
    Ahlskog, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Manufacturing Technology Readiness Assessment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss how the MRL scale can support the assessment of a manufacturing technology’s maturity level. A single case study within the manufacturing industry has been conducted investigating the use of a MRL scale. An assessment of MRL 4 has been studied.

  • 10.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Multi criteria decision making with Evidential Reasoning under uncertainty2016In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, 2016, p. 1534-1538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many decision problems have more than one objective that need to be dealt with simultaneously. Moreover, because of the qualitative nature of the most of real world problem it is an inevitable activity and very important to interpret and present the uncertain information for making effective decision. The Evidential Reasoning (ER) approach which is one of the latest development within multi criteria decision making (MCDM) seems to be the best fit to synthesize both qualitative and quantitative data under uncertainty. To support this claim, two case studies were tested to illustrate the application of ER for prioritization and ranking of decision alternative to support decision process even with uncertain information. The importance of having a better structured decision process is essential for the success of any organization, so it can be applied widely in most of real world problem dealing with making effective decision.

  • 11.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Ranking of Two Multi Criteria Decision Making Cases with Evidential Reasoning under Uncertainty2017In: Advances in Science, Technology and Engineering Systems Journal V2(3) ASTESJ-V2(3), ISSN 2415-6698, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1059-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many decision problems have more than one objective that need to be dealt with simultaneously. Moreover, because of the qualitative nature of the most of real world problem it is an inevitable activity and very important to interpret and present the uncertain information for making effective decision. The Evidential Reasoning (ER) approach which is one of the latest development within multi criteria decision making (MCDM) seems to be the best fit to synthesize both qualitative and quantitative data under uncertainty. To support this claim, two case studies were tested to illustrate the application of ER for prioritization and ranking of decision alternative to support decision process even with uncertain information. The overall goal of the first case study is to identify and prioritize factors that can be considered maintenance-related waste within the automotive manufacturing industry. The result after applying ER shows “inadequate resources” and “weather /indoor climate,” respectively, are the highest and lowest average scores for creating maintenance-related waste. This prioritization methodology can be used as a tool to create awareness for managers seeking to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste. The aim of the second case study is to look at the possibility of having a new approach for sustainable design. So through a literature review six design strategies were taken into consideration in order to develop a new approach based on all advantages (sustainable factors) of the six approaches. For ranking and finding out about the most important factors the evidential reasoning (ER) approach is used. Based on ER all the important factors, apart from the one collected from interviews are a part of eco-design. So it means among all strategies eco-design is the most dominant strategy in term of environment. However two of the important factors are not found in any strategy but in interviews. These factors can be used as the building blocks for a new approach. The importance of having a better structured decision process is essential for the success of any organization, so it can be applied widely in most of real world problem dealing with making effective decision.

  • 12.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Classification of Maintenance-Related Waste Based on Human Factors2015In: 22nd International Annual EurOMA Conference EurOMA15, Neuchâtel, Switzerland, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this research is to identify and classify factors creating maintenance-related waste. A workshop study has been performed in order to identify root-causes for maintenance-related waste. In total, 16 categories were found in the analysis and it is concluded that these are heavily reliant on human factors as a root- or major contributory cause. These, together with factors based on a literature review have been incorporated into a classification model. The model can be used in creating awareness in, as well as provide a basic framework for decision making of, which waste to target for elimination.

  • 13.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Using evidential reasoning approach for prioritization of maintenance-related waste caused by human factors-a case study2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 90, no 9-12, p. 2761-2775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduction and elimination of maintenance-related waste is receiving increasing attention because of the negative effect of such waste on production costs. The overall goal of this research is to identify and prioritize factors that can be considered maintenance-related waste within the automotive manufacturing industry. Five manufacturing companies participated in a workshop to identify root causes of maintenance-related waste; 16 categories were found. The identified factors were heavily reliant on human factors as a root or major contributory cause at different levels affecting performance and productivity. For prioritization, the evidential reasoning (ER) approach which is one of the latest developments in multi-criteria decision-making is applied. A basic tree structure necessary for ER assessment is developed based on the workshop results as well as literature on human factors. Then, a survey on basic attributes at the lowest level of this tree is designed and performed at one of the companies participating in the workshop. The application of ER shows that, on an overall level, "management condition" is in first order and "maintainer condition" and "working condition" are in second and third order respectively as the worst cases for creating maintenance-related waste. On the most delimited level "inadequate resources" and "weather/indoor climate" have the highest and lowest average scores respectively in ER ranking or prioritization. This methodology with its resulting ranking can be used as a tool to create awareness for managers seeking to reduce or eliminate maintenance-related waste.

  • 14.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jederström, Kathrina
    Mälardalen University.
    Plahn, Maria
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Olsson, Anna
    Mälardalen University.
    Foyer, Isabell
    Mälardalen University.
    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT USING EVIDENTIAL REASONING2017In: Numerical Algebra, Control and Optimization, ISSN 2155-3289, E-ISSN 2155-3297, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 435-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those working in product development need to consider sustain ability, being careful not to compromise the future generations ability to satisfy its needs. Several strategies guide companies towards sustainability. This paper studies six of these strategies: eco-design, green design, cradle-to-cradle, design for environment, zero waste, and life cycle approaches. Based on a literature review and semi-structured interviews, it identifies 22 factors of sustainability from the perspective of manufacturers. The purpose is to determine which are the most important and to use them as a foundation for a new design strategy. A survey based on the 22 factors was given to people working with product development; they graded each factor by importance. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using evidential reasoning. The analysis found the factors minimize use of toxic substances, increase competitiveness, economic benefits, reduce material usage, material selection, reduce emissions, and increase product functionality are more important and should serve as the foundation for a new approach to sustainable product development.

  • 15.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Remaining useful life estimation: Review2014In: International Journal of Systems Assurance Engineering and Management, ISSN 0975-6809, E-ISSN 0976-4348, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 461-474Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the recent modelling developments in estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of industrial systems. The RUL estimation models are categorized into experimental, data driven, physics based and hybrid approaches. The paper reviews some typical approaches and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. According to the literature, the selection of the best model depends on the level of accuracy and availability of data. In cases of quick estimations which are less accurate, the data driven method is preferred, while the physics based approach is applied when the accuracy of estimation is important.

  • 16.
    Ahvenlampi Svensson, Amanda
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring challenges in a verification process - when adapting production processes to new environmental requirements2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The requirements on the products and production processes within the manufacturing industry are continuously increasing according to environmental standards. The new requirements are coming from a growing awareness of what our planet can provide for example by the global challenge of climate change. The industry needs to reduce energy consumption and waste to meet the upcoming requirements.

    One of the processes with high environmental impact in a discrete manufacturing industry is the paint shop. Surface treatment is also of great importance to maintain a high quality product. In scientific literature, technological risk is one of the barriers in implementing environmental conscious manufacturing. Therefore the area of sustainable operations management needs building bridges with other functions and disciplines such as economics, strategies and behavioral sciences in order to manage the transitions. The supply of competence around paint shops today is usually provided by suppliers and other sources within the industry and to make the collaboration to work is essential. In this process of collaboration with external sources, substantial measurements are required to maintain the desirable quality. In order to ensure the competence of testing the quality eventuate when switching technology at a pre-treatment line, this report sets out to explore what the challenges to be taken into consideration are when to assure the product- and- process quality. To respond to this question, a multiple case study is conducted during spring 2016 where the phenomenon to study is the change process and the unit of analysis is the challenges that can be faced during the verification process. The case studied is automotive companies located in Sweden which are producing components for heavy duty vehicles. Data collection is performed by studying documents, participatory observations and semi-structured interviews. The results will give insights to academia on what challenges that are occurring during the verification process of implementing new and cleaner technologies. The conclusions are drawn upon the literature and the empirical results. The managerial implications are to increase the awareness of any potential barriers in the verification process in order to be prepared for managing the technological change process.

  • 17.
    Alayon, Claudia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sannö, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sustainable production adoption by Surface Treatment SMES: challenges and enablers2015In: Global Cleaner Production & Sustainable Consumption Conference 2015 GCPC2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption to sustainable production is a continuous but necessary strive for manufacturing operations, including small and medium enterprises, SMEs. Meeting the future needs of the economic, social and environmental dimensions provides challenges for SMEs. In order to meet these challenges, understanding of internal and external enablers is required. Studies focusing on the enablers for sustainability among SMEs are rare; hence these companies are important players in the supply chain to focal companies. In order to enhance the understanding of the adoption of sustainable production for the sector surface treatment SMEs, an exploratory study has been conducted. In this study, the focus has been placed in the identification and analysis of the challenges and enablers for adoption of sustainable production. Two stages of empirical data collection were undertaken: a focus group session and an online questionnaire. The findings present challenges based on the limitations of the surface treatment process but also where enablers for the social, economic and environmental for meeting those challenges are interrelated. The results showed that these SMEs face challenges in their way towards sustainable production, mainly due to: low economic profitability, need for improvement in old working procedures, lack of fully understanding regarding environmental legislation, difficulty in ensuring workforce, lack of technology development and resistance towards change. These challenges could be faced through internal and external enablers, where the support of large-size customers and other stakeholders is critical for this sector.

  • 18.
    Alayón, C.
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Säfsten, K.
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Conceptual sustainable production principles in practice: Do they reflect what companies do?2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 141, p. 693-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common understanding of sustainable production principles and the identification of sustainable manufacturing practices among practitioners are key starting points in studying how manufacturers are making their operations more sustainable. However, there is a lack of insight in the literature connecting conceptual sustainable production principles, and the practices reflecting these principles. Using semi-structured interviews founded on the sustainable production principles posed by the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, this paper presents an outlook of how companies in different industries carry out manufacturing practices related to the sustainability production principles. Results showed that the majority of sustainable manufacturing practices remain strongly centered on the environmental dimension of sustainability, with the greatest number of practices emanating from principles concerning energy and material conservation, and waste management. Similarly, reactive sustainable manufacturing practices prevailed over proactive sustainable manufacturing practices, as most of the practices aimed to comply with regulatory and market pressures. Quality and environmental management systems were acknowledged as important tools for putting sustainable production principles into practice; while Swedish environmental and social regulations were found to drive sustainable manufacturing practices. This study connects sustainable production principles with sustainable manufacturing practices and opens the way for further studies on a global or sector-specific scale.

  • 19.
    Al-Chalabi, H
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ahmadzadeh, Farzaneh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lundberg, J.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ghodrati, B.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Economic lifetime prediction of a mining drilling machine using an artificial neural network2014In: International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment, ISSN 1748-0930, E-ISSN 1748-0949, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 311-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops models for predicting the economic lifetime of drilling machines used in mining. It uses three cases, each represented by a MATLAB code, to develop an optimisation model. The resulting ORT is fed as input to an artificial neural network (ANN) and the results translated into a relatively simple equation. The study finds that increasing the purchase price and decreasing the operating and maintenance costs will increase a machine's ORT linearly. Decreased maintenance cost has the largest impact on ORT, followed by increased purchase price and decreased operating cost. The ANN method gives a series of basic weight and response functions which can be made available to any engineer without the use of complicated software. It also helps decision-makers determine the best time economically to replace an old machine with a new one; thus, it can be extended to more general applications in the mining industry.

  • 20.
    Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Swerea IVF AB, Sweden.
    Landström, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Rosio, Carin
    Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, Vol. 52, p. 139-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the development of a strategically integrated product and production system portfolio could be enabled by the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing. In previous research, several critical challenges related to developing production system portfolios have been identified, but it has not been investigated how developing a reconfigurable manufacturing concept could aid some of these. Therefore, through a multiple case study, these critical challenges have been investigated in two companies that have recently developed reconfigurable manufacturing concepts for multiple variants and generations of products. The findings reveal that the companies need to deal with several challenges in order to enable a functioning RMS. By running the project separately from the NPD project and to include several product types and production sites the company overcome several challenges. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Andersson, Carin H.
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the complexity of using performance measures: Enhancing sustained production improvement capability by combining OEE and productivity2015In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 35, p. 144-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global speed of change within the manufacturing industry forces companies to constantly improve production performance. In that effort, performance measures are critical for driving and managing production improvements. Two of the most commonly used measures in operations are productivity and overall equipment efficiency (OEE). However, the potential of using these measures as improvement drivers is not fully utilized in industry today due, for example, to ambiguities in definitions and their interpretation. A study of available theory indicates a gap between these implications from a theoretical perspective vs. the industrial perspective. Bridging this theory-practice gap implies great potential for competitiveness and growth in manufacturing, since the latent production capacity that could be utilized is tremendous. Even if a high degree of complexity in definition and calculation when applied in operational conditions might be perceived, this paper will show that a systematically used combined set of OEE and productivity measures can successfully drive production improvements. Also, two new productivity measures for driving improvements at the shop floor level are proposed. The empirical findings are based on a two-year case study within a manufacturing company in the automotive industry using an interactive research approach. 

  • 24.
    Andersson, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Already there?: cultivating emergent places for radical innovation in operations2017In: International Series in Operations Research & Management Science, Volume 255, Springer New York LLC , 2017, p. 131-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter proposes a way of understanding and cultivating places for radical innovation in operations. This chapter describes how, organisations can, instead of letting an innovation laboratory be its single economic and managerial priority, foster a decentralised, varied and emergent palette of places in use where radical innovation can occur. The chapter suggests that this can be done in lean production facilities and radical innovation be balanced with incremental innovation. 

  • 25.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    It Could Just as Well Have Been in Greek:: Experiences from Introducing Code as a Design Material to Exhibition Design Students2016In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction Pages 126-132, EINDHOVEN, Netherlands: ACM , 2016, p. 126-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the experience and learning from introducing programming in a museum exhibition design course. Thirty-seven information design students from Sweden, with no previous experience in programming, participated in the course in 2014 and 2015. The students' tasks were to create interactive exhibition stations at a county museum in five weeks. We introduced Arduino and Processing programming in the course to enlarge the information design students' repertoire and to find ways to develop the interactive aspects of the exhibition medium. We aim to identify and discuss challenges and strengths when introducing code as design material in design education. The education of future exhibition designers is an important matter relevant the TEI community.

  • 26.
    Andersson, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Palmgren, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Visionary Expectations and Novice Designers: Prototyping in Design Education2017In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In information design education, we strive to find methods that provide students with opportunities to explore different ways of learning and designing. We seek to support development of contextual competences that will be helpful in navigating an unknown future of design in society. A challenge in today's design education is to formulate and use methods that support design students in developing competencies in the space between basic form training and context-rich training. The aim of this study was to evaluate prototyping exercises in design education where the focus was in that in-between space. The study is based on 33 prototyping workshops done between 2008 and 2015 and involving 160 students and two design teachers. Four different approaches to prototyping exercises are described, examined and evaluated: "spatial prototyping," "multi-material prototyping," "physical prototyping," and a mix between the latter two, "physical multi-material prototyping." The results show that the prototyping exercises did support the learning of diverse competencies in the in-between space of basic form training and context training. However, the exercises were also counterproductive and met with different kinds of resistance. The results of the study invite to a dialogue on how different prototyping techniques can stimulate learning in relation to future design competences.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Lukas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Produktutveckling av SMS Presence Mobile2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete ingår inom ämnet produktutveckling – industriell design. Arbete har utförts för Smart Media Solutions AB i Nacka Stockholm. Examensarbete är på C nivå och omfattar 15 högskolepoäng. Arbetet har utförts på hel fart under april och maj månad 2015 av undertecknad student från Mälardalens högskola.

    Uppdraget är att vidareutveckla en produkt åt Smart Media Solutions. Produkten heter SMS Presence Mobile och är ett golvstativ för skärmar. Uppdraget innebär att vidareutveckla och sammanställa ett högtalarsystem till produkten.   

    Produktutvecklingsprocessen inleds med att först förstå problemet genom att analysera hur produkten ser ut idag samt dialog med uppdragsgivaren. Med hjälp av olika produktutvecklingsverktyg togs det fram fyra olika koncept vilket slutade med ett slutkoncept. Slutkonceptet koncept är testad och redo för att sättas i produktion.

    Konceptet består av en högtalarlåda som är placerad inuti stativet. Stativet har även täckplåtar som är designanpassade för högtalarlådan. Det har även designat monteringskomponenter för lätt montering av hela produkten.

    Högtalarlådan fungerar och ger ett bra ljud. Högtalarsystemet består av en mini förstärkare och högtalare som är placerade stativet. Det finns även ett grenuttag placerad i stativet för att minska trassel för sladdar. Volymregulator fins placerad på stativ för lätt tillgänglighet till volymreglering. 

    Slutresultat av detta arbete illusteraras i form ar renderade bilder, tillverkningsritningar samt ett tillverkat slutkoncept.

  • 28.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    ‘Company-selfies’ Boundary Negotiating Artefacts in Group Discussions on Innovation2015In: The Proceedings of The XXVI ISPIM Conference 2015 Budapest, Hungary - 14-17 June 2015, Budapest, Hungary, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, one practice-oriented approach to incorporate nonexperts in early stages of innovation work is presented and analysed: the method of photo-based group discussions on innovation. The result is based on studies in 7 different organizations during 2013-2014. The method was developed as a response to a current innovation management problem in manufacturing companies in mid-Sweden, i.e. the problem how to enable all employees to use their talent and potential in relation to innovation initiatives on all levels. The results show how the photographs were used by the participants to negotiate different interpretations of innovation. The photographs were used for self-reflection, borrowing, inclusion and denominating actions. The results contribute to the theoretical understanding in the innovation management community of photographs in innovation processes. It does so by the introduction of the notion 'company-selfie' and the analyse of the photograph as a boundary negotiation artefact in groupdiscussion on innovation.

  • 29.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Spaces for innovation2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Workspace design, as an enabling factor in innovation, is an emerging topic for innovation and design research. However, little research has been done on users’ experience on workspaces for innovation in a manufacturing industrial context. The aim of the dissertation is to develop knowledge and understanding of workspaces for innovation from a user perspective.

    The dissertation is based on studies done in four manufacturing industries and in one design and innovation consultancy, with a focus on the employees' experience of the physical space in relation to innovation. The research method used was the photo elicitation interview. The 31 participants made photographs that served as a basis for verbal interviews to communicate the relationship they experienced between their workspace and innovation. The analysis and the interpretation of the material, supported by information, cultural and phenomenological theoretical perspectives, intend to contribute to the current scientific discourse in innovation and design.

    A pattern was found in the results. In the manufacturing industrial companies, the majority of workspaces that users described as supporting or hindering innovation were motifs showing aculture promoting innovation in small steps. Their examples were found to be in close similarity to what previous research describe as characteristics of exploitative innovation. In the design company, the most photographed motifs were workspaces and objects that supported different variations of what previousresearch defines as characteristics for a culture supporting radical, explorative innovation.

    The dissertation presents results contributing to the research on ambidexterity, with focus on a possible coexistence between different innovation cultures. The results indicate that spatial differentiation creates possibilities for coexistence between the two innovation cultures. Six spatial characteristics were found in the descriptions of the workspaces related to the marginalised explorative culture in the manufacturing companies.

    The dissertation discusses the possibilities of creating spaces for explorative innovation (SEIs) and space as a tool for innovation. An initial version of a support for design is presented.

  • 30.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Carlsson, Anna-Lena
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The method of photo-elicitation from a phenomenological perspective.2014In: Proceedings of 13th International design conference Design 2014, 2014, p. -58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in the relation between workspace design and innovation. On the one hand, is the idea of designing an “innovation lab” that supports innovation. There are substantial financial investments involved when creating an innovation lab and there is evidence that such spaces can have short useful lifespan and some of them fail because they are not used as intended [Lewis and Moultrie 2005; Fayard and Weeks 2011]. On the other hand, workspaces can be altered by the users for short or long terms to support innovation activities. The users hence become spatial designers themselves. A gap exists in research on the underlying mechanisms, architecture, and dynamics by which organisations can create an environment supporting continuous improvements and radical innovation on both individual and organisational levels [Turner, Swart and Maylor 2013, Turner and Lee-Kelly 2013]. From design research we can contribute with a perspective on the underlying mechanisms and the dynamics in play in the area of workspace design and innovation. We can form the design research for the innovation labs, i.e. utopian specifically designed spaces for innovation, or the relationship between innovation, users and daily workspaces. We have chosen to acknowledge and study the complexity in relations between users, daily workspaces and innovation. Our hypothesis was that photo-elicitation could be a method to study that weave of complexity and research underlying dynamics.

    In this article we discuss the method of the photo-elicitated interview (PEI), as a tool in human-centred design research with respect to context and workspace. A phenomenological perspective focus on the human experience, examine and clarify situations, events and experiences as they occurs spontaneously in daily life (Seamon, 2000). This article intend to provide background theories from phenomenology and examples from an empirical study to discuss if and how PEI is instrumental in getting information from interviewees about their relation to their workspaces and innovation. Although the phenomenological theoretical perspective is relevant and therefore used here to describe human relation to workspaces and discuss the method, our use of specific notions from phenomenology aims firstly to support the analyse of the method to inform design research, and is not intended develop the phenomenological concepts themselves.

  • 31.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Spaces for Innovation: A Photo-elicitated Study in Three Companies from Manufacturing Industry and the Design Firm IDEO2014In: The International Journal of Design Education, ISSN 2325-128X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 49-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility that physical space can support or disturb processes for innovation in production systems is overlooked in the manufacturing industry and in research. This article rests on three studies in manufacturing industries and one in a design firm, with a focus on the employees' subjective experience of the physical space in relation to innovation. The employees made photographs and used keywords (followed up with verbal interviews) to communicate the relationship they perceived between physical space and innovation. The study shows that there is a relationship between company culture and the individual’s choices of physical spaces understood to support or hinder innovation. From the results, it can be concluded, that manufacturing companies which were studied form cultures that produce few spaces that support divergent thinking, while such spaces are prioritized in the design firm. This article show clean and orderly spaces for innovation in the manufacturing industry; for the design company, informal, collaborative, and visually simulative environments.

  • 32.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tool complexes of innovation:: Spaces for explorative innovation in four manufacturing industrial companies2014In: DRS 2014, Design´s big debates: Pushing the boundaries of design Research / [ed] Design Research Society, Umeå, 2014, p. 663-676Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing an environment in which both radical innovation and continuous improvement can exist, i.e. an ambidextrous environment, is one of the biggest challenges manage­ment faces. While having an ambidextrous organisation is of central importance to the competitive advantage of a firm, there is limited understanding of how to manage it.

    In this article, we are reporting on our research on the design of workspaces and the relations between design and ambidexterity in innovation. We studied the workspaces as artefacts in innovation cultures. We analysed relations between users and spaces that could enable an explorative innovation culture to emerge, and found spaces related to explorative innovation that coexisted with an exploitative innovation culture in production in the manufacturing industry.

    The results indicate that to develop ambidexterity on an individual level in a culture dominated by exploitative innovation, one strategy is spatial differentiation. The result shows that artefacts relating to a culture for explorative innovation in the studied manufacturing companies are artefacts in a marginalised culture. We present six spatial characteristics for artefacts in the marginalised culture: undercover spaces, grey zone spaces, satellite spaces, chameleon spaces, temporal spaces and accession spaces.

  • 33.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Tool-complexes of innovation.: Spaces for explorative innovation in four manufacturing companies2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design’s Big Debates, Umeå, Sweden, 2014, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 663-676Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing an environment in which both radical innovation and continuous improvement can exist, i.e. an ambidextrous environment, is one of the biggest challenges manage-ment faces. While having an ambidextrous organisation is of central importance to the competitive advantage of a firm, there is limited understanding of how to manage it. In this article, we are reporting on our research on the design of workspaces and the relations between design and ambidexterity in innovation. We studied the workspaces as artefacts in innovation cultures. We analysed relations between users and spaces that could enable an explorative innovation culture to emerge, and found spaces related to explorative innovation that coexisted with an exploitative innovation culture in production in the manufacturing industry. The results indicate that to develop ambidexterity on an individual level in a culture dominated by exploitative innovation, one strategy is spatial differentiation. The result shows that artefacts relating to a culture for explorative innovation in the studied manufacturing companies are artefacts in a marginalised culture. We present six spatial characteristics for artefacts in the marginalised culture: undercover spaces, grey zone spaces, satellite spaces, chameleon spaces, temporal spaces and accession spaces.

  • 34.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Spatial design supporting the management of radical improvements within the manufacturing industry2013In: Proceedings of the 19th international conference on engineering Design, Seoul, Korea, Dem. Republic of: the Design Society , 2013, p. 129-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for the manufacturing industry to become more innovative. Doing what we always have done is not enough. External pressure and the required speed of change, requires industry to improve the management of incremental and radical improvement work. There is thus a need for new methods, tools, and processes to improve the innovative capabilities. In this paper we discuss the use of spatial design to support the management of radical improvement within the manufacturing industry. The designs of the physical spaces are in the paper presented as frames that are cultivating, facilitating and enabling radical improvement without imposing a regime of control and forced change. The spatial design enables the process and contributes to an ecosystem supporting radical improvement. To better manage radical improvement processes, one option suggested in this paper is to create five dedicated places - five enabling frames - for five phases in a radical improvement process, firstly to bring attention to the different phases of the process and secondly to support the actions in each part.

  • 35.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Design to engage?: Embodied information in control rooms2015In: Vision Plus 2015 Conference VisionPlus, Birmingham City , United Kingdom, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and the design of information effect the situation in control rooms for automated industrial processes. The design conveys to the operators the state and changes of state of the process. According to the common view among control room equipment developers, issues for design in highly automated control rooms, include the operators likely ignoring information, being bored and are not noticing variations until the variation triggers an alarm. Such problems can have economic and environmental consequences. In the highly automated control rooms of the future, these risks of can be dealt with from various point of view. The current thinking behind human-computer interaction (HCI) design is engineering the ‘human factor’ instead of understanding the human situation. Visionary areas in computing might convert HCI product development processes to design-driven processes that focus on user experience. The TAIPA research project presented in this paper focuses on the user experience in two control rooms. Based on the results and previous research, we examine how the information might be given a tangible and ambient design to engage operators. This paper presents illustrations of aspects of future design for the control room.

  • 36.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Lindell, Rikard
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems. IS (Embedded Systems).
    Emotions in design: Considering user experience for tangible and ambient interaction in control rooms2016In: Information Design Journal, ISSN 0142-5471, E-ISSN 1569-979X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operators in highly automated control rooms are said to be constantly bored, and boredom is an emotional state that can have economic and environmental consequences. This article presents insights into users’ emotions and their role in the design of control rooms. The study focused on the users’ experience in two control rooms, where operators explored their emotions in relation to a situation, object, place, or action. Based on the results of the study and previous research, this article examines control room’s information design and makes recommendations on how it might be given a tangible and ambient form.

  • 37.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Palmgren, Marianne
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Prototyping in the in-between: A Method for Spatial Design education2016In: 2016 Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference DRS'16, Brighton, United Kingdom, 2016, no 50, p. 653-669Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in today's design education practice is to formulate and use methods that support competences in the in-between-space between basic form training and learning that is relevant for designers in the future society. The aim of the paper is to discuss and to evaluate prototyping exercises in design education placed in that in-between space. Four different approaches to prototyping exercises are described, examined and evaluated in the paper. The prototyping exercises are engaging the students in the learning cycle phases of learning by experimentation and learning by experiencing. The result shows that the prototyping exercises did support learning of diverse competences in that in-between space but were also counterproductive and met different kinds of resistance in the students. This paper invites to a dialogue on how different prototyping techniques in design education might be used when educating designers.

  • 38.
    Asadi, Narges
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Flexibility in assembly systems using product design2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing customer demands for product variety, new and rapid technological developments, and the short life cycle of products characterise the current volatile market. To maintain a competitive edge in the market, manufacturing companies need to accommodate flexibility in their assembly systems that are essential parts of the manufacturing systems with respect to cost, time, and creating product variety. Given the importance of establishing flexible assembly systems, the complexity raised by increasing product variety and the value of appropriate product designs to assembly systems highlight the pivotal role of product design in a flexible assembly system. Despite its significance to theory and practice, however, the characteristics of flexibility in an assembly system and its links to product design are still ambiguous and unexplored.

    The objective of this thesis is to expand the current knowledge of flexibility in assembly systems and using product design to support its achievement. To accomplish the objective and by adopting an interactive research approach, five case studies were conducted in the heavy machinery manufacturing industry. A literature review underpins all the case studies comprising one multiple and four single case studies.

    Through its findings, this research defines flexibility in an assembly system, identifies its dimensions, and pinpoints its enablers. Additionally, three requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design are identified: a common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts. These requirements, if fulfilled in product design across distinct product families, reduce the perceived complexity and support various flexibility dimensions in the assembly system. Moreover, the development of a common assembly sequence and similar assembly interfaces, as the two key requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design, is described.

    Further, based upon developing understanding and knowledge about a flexible assembly system and its requirements for product design, a model and a framework are proposed. The model addresses the role of product design in achieving flexibility in an assembly system. To support the alignment of product design with the key requirements of a flexible assembly system during the product design process, the assembly-oriented framework details the development of these requirements. Through its outcomes, this thesis contributes to the research area of flexible assembly systems and sheds light on its interface with the engineering design field. Moreover, the proposed model and framework aim to assist assembly practitioners and product designers in establishing a flexible assembly system and aligning product design with its key requirements.

  • 39.
    Asadi, Narges
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Supporting flexibility in an assembly system through product design2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing customer demands for product variety in conjunction with the short lifecycle of products has caused manufacturing companies to introduce a wide range of products by accommodating flexibility. An assembly system is an essential part of the manufacturing system from both cost and time perspectives. Hence, the shift towards flexibility in manufacturing companies highlights the significance of establishing flexible assembly systems and designing products that are closely aligned with them. Despite its significance, however, the flexible assembly system concept and its requirements for product design have not been clearly defined in research and from a practical point of view. Most research on flexible assembly systems has mainly approached either the design or the balancing and scheduling issues of these systems, whereas only a few studies have briefly defined the flexible assembly system they focused on, without further specifying the characteristics of a flexible assembly system and its requirements for product design.

    Taking that into account, the objective of this work is to provide a framework to contribute to the understanding of the concept of flexibility in an assembly system and its requirements for product design. In order to fulfil the objective, four empirical studies combined with literature reviews have been conducted. The empirical studies, a multiple case study and three single case studies, investigate the definition of flexibility in an assembly system as well as the requirements that a flexible assembly system imposes on product design.

    Through its findings, this research provides a definition of flexibility in assembly systems that mainly revolves around volume, mix and new product flexibility. In addition, six constituents of a flexible assembly system have been identified: adaptable material supply, versatile workforce, increased commonality, standardised work content, integrated product properties and strategic planning. Furthermore, three requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design are defined, which, if fulfilled, reduce the complexity created by product variety and consequently support flexibility in the assembly system. Accordingly, to increase the understanding of the concept of flexibility in an assembly system and its requirements for product design, a four-staged framework is suggested. The proposed framework deals with the activities related to the concept and the development of a flexible assembly system and is expected to be received by assembly practitioners as a link between assembly and product design teams in the product realisation process. Future research can further validate the framework in practice.

  • 40.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Exploring optimal flexible assembly systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a prominent part of manufacturing system, assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, due to the lack of a unified and clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems, the recognition of optimal flexibility in assembly system without clashing with efficiency still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound basis to discuss the characteristics of flexible assembly and to address the question of reaching optimal flexibility, this paper makes use of a case study performed in five manufacturing plants. The study proposes a clear definition for flexible assembly and identifies six enablers for flexibility in assembly systems. Further in this research the applicability of few different types of manufacturing flexibility in assembly system is investigated. The paper concludes with discussions and suggestions for future research.

  • 41.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry2015In: Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, ISSN 0972-2696, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The major challenge of today’s manufacturing industry in tackling demands for a wider range of products with short life-cycle times and meeting customisation requirements has drawn considerable attention towards flexibility in manufacturing systems. As a prominent part of a manufacturing system, an assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, owing to the dearth of a unified and clear definition of the constituents of flexible assembly systems, in both theory and practice, the recognition of flexibility in assembly systems still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound base for discussing the constituents of flexible assembly systems, this research paper explores the literature concerning flexibility in manufacturing and assembly as well as in flexible systems management domains. To reflect an industrial perspective, a multiple case study of five manufacturing plants in the heavy vehicle industry is performed. By identifying six essential constituents of flexibility in assembly systems, the study proposes a clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems which mainly revolves around mix and volume flexibility. To further enhance the findings, the compatibility of a few previously identified types of manufacturing flexibility in the assembly systems of the case plants is investigated and additional dimensions of flexibility in assembly systems are revealed. Finally, the implications for theory and practice as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

  • 42.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Guaragni, F.
    Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany.
    Johannknecht, F.
    Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.
    Saidani, M.
    CentraleSupélec, Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Scholle, P.
    Paderborn University, Germany.
    Borg, J.
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Panasiuk, D.
    University of Technology of Troyes, France.
    Success factors of an ipd based approach in a remote multidisciplinary team environment - Reflections on a case study2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-9, p. 31-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated Product Development (IPD) is comprehensively discussed in literature. The human-centered approach offers a parallelized set of work activities in interdisciplinary teams. Due to the rapid globalization of IPD activities in the companies, project members are often obliged to work remotely in teams and through virtual means of communication. However, with the recent shift towards working remotely in IPD teams new challenges have emerged that might adversely affect the success of IPD projects. The objective of the paper is to outline the key factors strengthening and weakening the IPD process in a remote multidisciplinary team environment. To fulfill the objective, a case study on an international multidisciplinary team of postgraduate students working on a design project with an IPD approach, was conducted. The results highlight key success factors and their contributions to the project success in a remote multidisciplinary team environment. Additionally, key weaknesses of such approach and their negative impacts are also indicated.

  • 43.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Augustsson, P.
    FlexQube, Sweden.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    An assembly-oriented product design methodology to develop similar assembly operations in a mixed-product assembly line2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-5, p. 131-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing demands for product variety, Mixed-Product Assembly Lines (MPALs) as an effective means of creating product variety are recently increasing in manufacturing companies. However, handling different products from distinct product families creates high complexity in performing assembly operations in an MPAL. The elevated complexity, calls for increased similarity between assembly operations in an MPAL which requires product design changes accordingly. Hence, the objective of this paper is to suggest an assembly-oriented product design methodology to increase similar assembly operations for various products cross-product families. The proposed methodology uses Interface Diagram, a product architecture modelling tool, for comparing assembly operations crossproduct families, suggesting an assembly-oriented design, and communicating it to designers. The methodology has been developed by conducting a case study in heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. The results highlight a visual approach towards establishing a common language between assembly and design teams to consider the requirements of an MAPL in product design.

  • 44.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Volvo Construction Equipment, Eskilstuna.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system- A case study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

  • 45.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, Vol. 4, p. 41-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s fast-changing global market, using mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) and mixed-model assembly lines (MMALs) allows manufacturing companies to be flexible and to maintain their competitive edge through product variety. Balancing and sequencing issues have been recognized as the main challenges of MPALs and MMALs, but other practical needs of MPALs remain unclear. Recognizing the practical needs of MPALs helps in identifying related requirements for product design, leading to products that closely align with the MPAL concept. The objective of this paper is to offer an industrial perspective on the needs of MPALs and to identify its requirements vis-à-vis product design. To achieve this objective, a single real-time case study in a heavy-vehicle-manufacturing company has been performed. The results from this industrial case study suggest that in order to handle product variety in MPALs and to reduce the related complexity, certain dimensions of flexibility need to be created in the assembly system, and requirements related to product design should be considered simultaneously in order to support assembly processes.

  • 46.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Identification of the causes of complexity in mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demands for product variety have directed manufacturing companies towards accommodating flexibility by establishing mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines. However, since greater variety leads to increased complexity, establishing these assembly lines becomes complicated. By conducting a case study, this paper investigates the causes of complexity and the applicability of assembly instructions in one mixed-product and four mixed-model assembly lines in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results indicate a set of causes for complexity and highlight the significance of assembly instructions, as the practical implications for development of flexible assembly systems and design of products closely aligned with them.

  • 47.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Implications of realising mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity - a case studyIn: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Linking product design to flexibility in an assembly system: A case study2017In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 610-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The recent shift towards accommodating flexibility in manufacturing companies and the complexity resulting from product variety highlight the significance of flexible assembly systems and designing products for them. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design from the assembly system's standpoint. Design/methodology/approach - To fulfil the purpose of the paper, a literature review and a case study were performed. The case study was conducted with an interactive research approach in a global market leader company within the heavy vehicle manufacturing industry. Findings - The findings indicate that common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts are the main requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design which reduce complexity and facilitate various flexibility dimensions. Accordingly, a model is proposed to broaden the understanding of these requirements from the assembly system's standpoint. Research limitations/implications - This study contributes to the overlapping research area of flexible assembly systems and product design. Practical implications - The proposed model is largely based on practical data and clarifies the role of product design in facilitating flexibility in an assembly system. It can be used by assembly managers, assembly engineers, and product designers. Originality/value - The key originality of this paper compared to the previous studies lies in presenting a novel assembly-oriented design model. The model enhances understanding of a flexible assembly system's requirements for product design with regard to reducing complexity and managing variation in a flexible assembly system. These requirements can be applied to product design across various product families within a company's product portfolio.

  • 49.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats R.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Towards Establishing Similar Assembly Interfaces for a Mixed-product Assembly System2016In: Procedia CIRP, 2016, p. 635-640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing a mixed-product assembly line (MPAL) is an elaborate task due to the complexity raised by product variety. This paper proposes that securing similar assembly interfaces across distinct product families is an essential requirement of MPALs which facilitates flexibility and reduces complexity. The concept of similar assembly interfaces has been developed and analysed in a case study at a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results suggest that assembly interfaces can be defined according to generic assembly operation steps: pick, place and attach. The paper highlights the need for development of a cross-functional methodology to analyse and establish similar assembly interfaces.

  • 50.
    Asadi, Narges
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Schedin, Joel
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Fundin, Anders
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Considering assembly requirement specifications in product development: identification and approach2014In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation, 2014, p. 969-976Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the major advantages such as reduced time to market and improved quality at lowered cost, the principles of design for assembly capabilities and concurrent engineering are of great significance when developing new products. However, identifying assembly requirement specifications and considering them in New Product Development (NPD) in a timely manner, while securing efficiency and robustness of assembly processes, still remains a challenging task. In presenting a case study of an NPD project in a manufacturing company, this article focuses on the process of capturing and incorporating the requirements related to the assembly system during the early phases of NPD. Further, the results of the research study indicate the different assembly requirements in the case company and pinpoint the challenges in practices involved in handling them. The assembly requirements identified in this research reflect some of the challenges encountered in handling the requirements, through the investigated requirement practice. Based on the results, the issues of when and how to consider the assembly requirements are highlighted in the conclusions and suggestions for future research are made.

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